Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th September 1780.
Reference Number: 17800913
Reference Number: f17800913-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 13th of September, 1780, and the following Days;

Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble. BRACKLEY KENNET , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar.

MDCCLXXX.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable BRACKLEY KENNET , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Hon. Sir HENRY GOULD , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; The Honourable Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; The Honourable FRANCIS BULLER , one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Mr. Serjeant ADAIR, Recorder; THOMAS NUGENT , Esq. Common Serjeant, and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Leonard Lowden

John Allan

Birkhead Hitchcock

James Walton

Theophilus Lake

Lewis Higden

John Browne

John Andrews

Edward Fawcett

Thomas Whitaker

Edmund Dorrell

Francis Deacon

First Middlesex Jury.

John Gregory

Edward Shee

Alexander Palmer

James Neild

John Mettenius

John Crace

James Simons

William Fell

William Lovegrove

Henry Mist

William Parlett

Richard Williams

Second Middlesex Jury

John Fladgate

Thomas Hookham

Mathew Emerson

James Bell

Jonathan Collett

William Clowes

Joseph Green

Francis Dean

John Crostos

James Lee

Francis Henderson

Samuel Hudson

Reference Number: t17800913-1

438. SAMUEL BAKER was indicted for that he in the king's highway, in and upon William Hewett , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 30 s. a steal watch chain, value 6 d. a silver seal, value 1 s. a steal watch key, value 1 d. and 3 s. 6 d. in monies, numbered, the property of the said William Hewett , July the 28th .

WILLIAM HEWETT sworn.

I am second coachman to Mrs. Neville. On the 28th of July, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner

between Coney Hatch and Southgate ; I was walking in the highway; I knew him before by sight; he lived at the Bricklayers-Arms, in John's street, Berkley-square. The prisoner passed me, and then turned back and overtook me again; he had a bill hook in his hand then, but I did not see it when he met me; he demanded my money, which I gave him; then he demanded my watch, which I refused to give him.

What words did he make use of? - He came up to me and said, I demand your money! I gave him three shillings and sixpence; then he said, I demand your watch! I refused to give it to him, upon which he struck at me with the hand bill, but I do not think he tried to hit me, but only to put me in fear; he took the watch out of my pocket and went away, and I saw no more of him till I saw him at Sir John Fielding 's about three weeks after.

Have you ever seen your watch since? - No.

Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - Yes, I am.

PETER SENHOUSE sworn.

I searched the prisoner the day he was taken and found this piece of a watch chain upon him (producing it). The prisoner was taken in Holbourn.

Prosecutor. I believe this is a piece of my watch chain; it is very much like it, but there is no particular mark upon it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

That is a piece of a chain which my fellow-servant made to a pair of scissars; I have had it twelve years. I never saw the prosecutor till I saw him before the justice.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

SAMUEL BAKER was indicted for that he in the king's highway, in and upon William Ivery , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 20 s. a steal chain, value 3 d. two stone seals, set in base metal, value 6 d. and a base metal key, value 1 d. the property of the said William , August the 15th .

WILLIAM IVERY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Bower of Coney Hatch I was robbed by the prisoner on the 15th of August, in a green field near Hornsey , between eleven and twelve o'clock at noon. I walked with him from Bowes farm to the place where he robbed me, which is about a mile and an half. He laid hold of me by my collar, presented a pistol to my breast, and said, Young man, I must have your money, and threatened to blow my brains out. I laid hold of the pistol, and struggled with him, but he overpowered me and got me down; then he pulled my watch out of my pocket. Two gentlemen were coming up on horseback; the prisoner seeing them ran off. I pursued him over two fields and then went to the two gentlemen to get them to pursue him, but he got away; I saw him the next day in Gray's-Inn-lane; I followed him to Holbourn-bars; I then went into the pawnbroker's shop, where I bought the watch and told them, that was the man who had robbed me, and we took him to Sir John Fielding 's; I asked him what he had done with my watch? He said, he had pawned it in Holbourn, but did not know which part of the street. I went with a man from the justice's and found it at Mr. Sowerby's.

DANIEL HILL sworn.

I took a watch in pawn on the 15th of August, of a person who I believe is the prisoner, but I cannot be certain. I took it in about two o'clock I believe.

To the prosecutor. How far is Hornsey from London? - About five or six miles.

(The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. This is not the watch I pawned.

GEORGE NEWTON sworn.

On the 16th of August the prosecutor came to me in the morning and asked me if I could tell the name of the maker of the watch he bought of me on the 7th of August? I looked at my book and told him the name was Charlson. He said he had been robbed of it near Hornsey; I advised him to go to

Sir John Fielding 's and lay an information against, and give a description of the person. He came to me the next day and told me that the man who had robbed him was coming up Holbourn. I jumped over the counter, and as the man, who is the prisoner, was coming by my door I secured him; I put my hands into his pocket and took out this pistol (producing it) it was loaded up to the top and had two stones in it; we took him to Sir John Fielding 's; as we were going along in the coach I asked him what he had done with the watch? He said he had pawned it, but he did not know whether the shop was above or below the bars.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-2

439. ANN the wife of William ROBERTS was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 10 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 10 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 5 s. eight yards of linen cloth, value 6 s. two linen aprons, value 1 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 3 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. two linen towels, value 1 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. a woollen petticoat, value 1 s. a stuff petticoat, value 1 s. a cotton bed-gown, value 2 s. a linen napkin, value 1 s. two linen table cloths. value 3 s. five pair of linen sheets, value 25 s. a pair of woman's stays, value 5 s. two men's linen shirts, value 3 s. eight children's linen shirts, value 4 s. two muslin jams, value 10 s. two cambrick jams, value 5 s. five dimity petticoats, value 5 s. two flannel petticoats, value 1 s. three children's linen bed gowns, value 1 s. eight laced linen caps, value 4 s. a laced linen neckcloth, value 1 s. three pair of dimity stays, value 3 s. two yards of silk ribband, value 6 d. a dimity cloak, value 6 d. and two children's flannel petticoats, value 1 s. the property of John Quarterman , in the dwelling house of the said John , July the 29th .

JOHN QUARTERMAN sworn.

I live in Worship-street, Moorfields . On the 29th of July I lost the goods mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of my house; the prisoner was my servant ; she was left in care of the house; she left the house on the 29th of July; these things were all in the house when we left it on the 30th of May. I went home on the 31st of July, and then I found the drawers all open and these things gone; I found part of them again at Mr. Davidson's, a pawnbroker, at London Wall, and some more at another pawnbroker's, at the corner of Golden-lane. The pawnbrokers gave up the goods, and I delivered them to the constable.

( Thomas Cockran , a constable, produced the goods found at Mr. Davidson's, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

THOMAS HARRIS sworn.

I live with Mr. Davidson, a pawnbroker, I took these things in pawn from the prisoner, I believe it was in the month of June; they were brought at different times.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 10 s.

Imprisoned 6 months in the house of correction .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. BARON HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-3

440. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing a silver watch gilt with gold, value 4 l. and a pinckbeck watch gilt with gold, value 3 l. the property of John Lambert , in the dwelling house of the said John Lambert , July the 25th .

JOHN LAMBERT sworn.

I am a watch-maker . On the 25th of July, about a quarter after seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and another person came together into my shop; the other person cheapened some trinkets, and bought one; the prisoner sat down upon the seat where I generally work; he bought a trinket, which the other paid for; after that he asked the other to cheapen some chains for him; then a third person came in, who had been standing outside the shop at the window; he cheapened a seal but did not buy it; he went out; the prisoner and the other person directly

followed him. I missed the two watches immediately; I followed them, and took the prisoners within ten or fifteen yards of my door. As soon as I collared the prisoner, I perceived the person who came in last began to run; I secured the prisoner, but he had not my watch upon him.

JOSEPH WHITESIDE sworn.

I am a smith. I saw the prisoner take a watch out of the watchmaker's window, and put it into his waistcoat pocket. I was sitting in the window of a publick house opposite. He went out of the shop and gave it to one of his companions in a handkerchief; the man who received the watch ran off immediately; I ran after him, but the pavement being up I fell, and he got out of my sight before I could recover myself.

Where did the prisoner stand at that time? - By the side of the prosecutor. The shop window was open; I saw them through the window.

What sort of watch was it? - A yellow watch.

FRANCIS HORNSBY sworn.

I am a hatter and hosier. I was passing by Mr. Lambert's shop at the same time and saw the prisoner give something in a handkerchief to another man, but what it was I do not know. Then I saw Mr. Lambert come out and catch hold of the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into this shop and bought a trinket. When I got about twenty yards from the shop the prosecutor came after me and desired me to come back; I said I would. He said he had lost two watches. I had not any. He went after the other persons, but could not catch them, so he kept me.

To the prosecutor. What is the value of the watches? - The gilt one I was to have had four guineas for the next morning; I would not have sold the other under two guineas.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-4

441. WILLIAM CHETHAM was indicted for stealing thirty yards of Dutch cord, value 48 s. thirty-five yards of double velveret, value 34 l. 9 s. thirty yards of double velveret, value 30 l. thirty-five yards of double black velveret, value 35 l. 5 s. thirty-one yards and a half of printed velveret, value 6 l. 6 s. and thirty-three yards and half of sattinet , the property of William Hazard , July 8th .

EDWARD BROWN sworn.

On the 8th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, as I was going through Islington to Hornsey , in a chaise, I met several country waggons; I saw a bail fall from the last waggon. I called to the waggoner to stop; by this time I had got to the tail of the waggon. I saw the prisoner drop from the waggon; I got out of the chaise and pursued him; he ran round the houses, and I lost sight of him for a few seconds. There was a gravel pit by the side of the house. A woman who was standing there said he had jumped into that pit. He immediately ran out of the pit again; I halloo'd to a man at a little distance, who stopped him. When he was before Sir John Fielding , he said he was only hanging to the ropes and the bundle fell upon him. The bundle was delivered by the magistrate to the book-keeper, or agent of the waggon.

HENRY WHITE sworn.

I am a silversmith. I was on the road; I heard the cry of stop thief! I ran round the houses, and stopped the prisoner.

JOHN FRITH sworn.

I am agent to the Nottingham waggon. I was sent for on the 8th of July to Islington, where I saw the boy and the truss. I have the bill of lading. I went to the gentleman's house who sent the truss, and he gave me the bill of parcels. The waggoner is at Nottingham; I wrote to him, but he cannot be here before Saturday. There is W B marked on the truss. I know it only from its corresponding with the bill of lading. I was at the unlading of the waggon, and saw there was a rope of the waggon cut.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am thirteen years old. I was riding in the waggon; this parcel jostled out. The

gentleman called out and I ran away for fear the waggoner should horsewhip me.

To Brown. Did you see any suspicious persons near the waggon? - I saw two men leaning over a stile about three hundred yards off, I suspect they were concerned by the information I received from the neighbours.

(The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-5

442. MARY MASON was indicted for stealing a linen jacket and petticoat, value 30 s. a silk gown and coat, value 20 s. two linen aprons, value 10 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. one silk cloak, value 12 s. and a dimity bed-gown, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Fisher , August 22d .

ARABELLA FISHER sworn.

I am the wife of James Fisher . On the 22d of August I locked my door and went out about five o'clock; I returned home at seven in the evening. Then I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). I never saw the prisoner till I saw her at Sir John Fielding 's.

MARY WRIGHT sworn.

I saw the prisoner go into the house where the prosecutor lodges, at about six o'clock. I was in my room, which is just opposite, in Great Wild-street . I saw her in Mrs. Fisher's room. I saw her take something white off a chair, and put it into her apron, then I saw her come out of the house. I did not see her take the things out of the drawers, but I saw her go to the part of the room where the drawers were. She was in the room for about ten minutes.

Wright. Before she came out I called up Mr. Burford, my landlord's brother, to see her stripping the room. When I saw her come out, I shewed her to Mr. Burford. He went after her and secured her.

DANIEL BURFORD sworn.

I came down stairs. Mrs. Wright shewed me the prisoner; she was in the street; she said that was the woman who had robbed the lodging. I stopped her, and found these things in her apron. I took her to the house where Mrs. Fisher lodges and sent for a constable.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

CATHERINE PEARCE sworn.

I live in this house; when the prisoner was taken I saw her drop these false keys from under her petticoats (producing them). One of them opened the room door very easy.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to this house to buy some tea; the woman was not at home; a woman came down stairs and asked me if I would pawn these things for her at Mr. Richardson's, and she would give me a shilling for my trouble. I took the things to carry to pawn. She said she would come after me. This gentleman stopped me. I never was in the room, nor near it.

GUILTY W . and Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-6

443. MARY JACKSON was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel chain, value 6 d. a base-metal key gilt with gold, value 6 d. and a steel seal, value 4 d. the property of Henry Bayle , February 13th .

HENRY BAYLE sworn.

On the 13th of February, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in the Strand. She asked me to give her something to drink, I told her there was nobody up, and gave her a penny to get a glass of gin. She asked me to go and be concerned with her; she said she had not taken a farthing that night. I told her I had but a few half-pence in my pocket; she said she would go with me for those few half-pence. We went upon the Savoy Steps ; as I was going along I took my watch out of my fob and put it into my coat pocket. When I got on the Savoy Steps with her; I felt her hand in my coat pocket, taking my watch. Before I could get ready to pursue her, she got away down the Savoy Steps.

Were you standing up? - Yes. I tried to catch at her, but she had got too far; I ran round the Savoy-square to the sentry-box, she had asked the sentinel to let her in, but he would not. She hid herself among the barracks. I never found her till the Friday fortnight. I have never seen my watch since.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw him before he took me up. He took up two women before, and swore to one of them; and she was cleared before the justice.

To the Prosecutor. How long was you with the woman? - About a minute; we were directly under the lamp. I wrapped some tow about my watch before I put it into my coat pocket. I had not lain down with her at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-7

444. MARY the wife of Samuel THACKER was indicted for stealing two silk gowns, value 10 s. a silk jacket and petticoat, value 10 s. and a silk hat, value 4 d. the property of Louis Desseneau .

(The prosecutor was called but did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-8

445. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for stealing fourteen silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Lowe , Aug. the 5th .

WILLIAM MADAN sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Lowe, who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Baldwin's Gardens . I was in a room adjoining to the shop on the 5th of August. There is a glass frame inside the shop window, in which the goods are kept. I saw the glass frame slide back; I immediately ran out and found the prisoner in the shop. I laid hold of him and found these handkerchiefs in his pocket.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I beg I may be sent to sea.

GUILTY Whipped , and imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-9

446. CATHERINE SHERRARD , was indicted for stealing a silver pint mug, value 41 s. the property of John Street , in the dwelling-house of the said John , July the 24th .

JOHN STREET sworn.

I keep the Golden Lion, a publick-house, at the corner of Great Earl-street . On the 24th of July, in the afternoon I lost a silver pint mug. I had seen it in the parlour at about four o'clock. I missed it at about ten o'clock at night.

What is the value of it? - It was bought by my father fifteen years ago; I heard him say he gave three pound sixteen shillings for it.

Is it worth so much as 40 s.? - I cannot take upon me to swear that it is now worth forty shillings.

RICHARD DAVIS sworn.

I live servant with Mr. Street. The prisoner came into my master's house on the 24th of July, between five and six o'clock for a quartern of gin; I served her in the tap-room; she went away soon after. The mug was missed at night.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

On the 24th of July, while I was standing at my door, between nine and ten o'clock at night the prisoner came and asked me if I knew which was one Mealing's. Seeing something stick out under her cloak, I turned her cloak aside, and saw a silver pint mug under it. I secured it and her. She was next day carried before a magistrate. She said she found the mug. Upon enquiry I found that the mug belonged to Mr. Street.

(The mug was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked the mug up in a passage; I shewed it to a woman; she said it was plate. I asked her what I should do with it? She directed me to Mr. Mealing's.

GUILTY 39 s. Fined 1 s. and Imp. six months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-10

447. THOMAS ROACH was indicted for stealing twelve guineas, an half crown, and five shillings, in monies numbered , the property of Timothy Henley , July 1st .

TIMOTHY HENLEY sworn.

I was frightened with the riots, and hid my money under a flag in my cellar on the 8th of June, twelve guineas and two shillings, and I put a half crown more there on the 30th of June, at night, because the mob had threatened to burn my house. I saw my money there on the 30th of June when I put the half crown in. I went to work the next morning. My wife did not know that the money was there. The plumber came and she gave him the key. I knew nothing of it till the next morning, when my wife told me the plumber s had been at work there. I went down to look for the money, it was gone; the flag was for a step. I put it under it in a rag. The plumber took that flag up to lay the pipe down. I did not hear for a month who the plumber was, till my landlord came to town from Blackheath and informed me. Then the prisoner was taken up on suspicion, but denied the fact.

GEORGE CLAVERING sworn.

I am a master plumber in Red-lion-street, Whitechapel. I went on the 1st of July, to charge the pipe in the cellar, where this man lives. I gave directions to the prisoner to open the ground to change the pipe. There was nobody employed but him and I. I ordered him to take the stone up; I was in the cellar all the time, but a little way from him when he took it up; when he had taken it up, I saw something in his hand; I do not know what it was, it looked like a rag, and I thought I heard something chink. I said, What have you got there? He said nothing, master, and thrust it into his breeches pocket. He said he was made for ever. I asked him what it was he had got once or twice after, he waved it, and would not let me know what it was. I intended to have told his master the circumstance, but it slipped my memory; he is the paviour's man. I thought no more of the affair till a month after, when the prosecutor came, and then he was taken up upon my information.

To the Prosecutor. What did you put the money in? - In a little silk purse, and wrapped a bit of woollen rag about the purse.

Is this cellar a part of the house? - Yes, it is immediately under the dwelling-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I dug up the ground by the direction of the plumber; there was nothing that I saw in the cellar but brick rubbish, so help me God. Four weeks after, this gentleman came to accuse me.

To Clavering. Why did not you mention it to the woman of the house that you had seen the prisoner take something? - I did not know that it was money.

Jury. You said the prisoner said he was made for ever; did not you from that circumstance think it was money? - I spoke to him about it once or twice after.

(The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-11

448. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for that he in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon Robert Pettit , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a base metal watch key, value 2 d. and a

steel seal, value 12 d. the property of the said Robert , Aug. 15th .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

ROBERT PETIT sworn.

I am a farmer , and live near Hoxton. On the 16th of August I had been to fetch Mrs. Gray, and three of my daughters from Sadler's Wells. From the city road turnpike there is a footpath goes across the fields to Hoxton ; when we had got about thirty yards in the field next to the city road, a person came behind me, put an handkerchief round my eyes, and said, d - n your blood, if you stir or speak you are a dead man! I was a little before Mrs. Gray, I had passed three people who were standing at the rails, as we were getting over; I said I have got very little cash about me. The man put his right knee under my left ham, and bent me back, and then I felt my watch pulled out of my pocket very plain.

Was there more than one person attacked you? - I was blind and could not see who did it, but when I got my eye-sight again, by his taking the handkerchief off, I saw there was but one man. He had then got fifteen or perhaps twenty yards off; then he ran and I ran after him. My daughter ran to the city road and cried out thieves and murder ! When I saw my children standing upon their legs, and none seemingly hurt, I ran after him and cried Stop thief too; he was never out of my fight till he was taken. It was a very bright moon-light night. There were people walking about, so that many people came about soon. He ran the same way we had come.

Is that the man? - The prisoner is the man I am sure. I never found my watch again; they were pulling him one way and another, to search for fire-arms, but they found none upon him I believe.

When you first got your eye-sight, was there any other man near you than the man you saw running away? - No other. I saw two men running at two hundred yards distance, I suppose. I had seen three people standing together at the rails as we got over.

Did you take notice enough of him to know whether he was one of them? - No, and if he had ever been out of my sight I should not have known him again.

GRACE GRAY sworn.

I went with Mr. Petit's daughters to Sadler's Wells. Mr. Petit came to us to see us home. We had just got a little below the city turnpike; we went into the field; three men followed us over the stile. Mr. Petit's eldest daughter who had hold of my arm, said she did not like those three men. The next thing I saw was, the prisoner clapped an handkerchief over Mr. Petit's face, and held it behind him.

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - I am positive to him; he said curse and d - n your blood, if you speak or mention another word you are a dead man. I went up and took him by the collar. I said, curse you, you are not going to kill the man. He got from me and ran over the field into the road, there I saw two men get hold of him, but I never lost sight of him. I did not see him take the watch.

How long might this be about? - I do not believe they were together two minutes.

Suppose he had not been taken then had you observed him sufficiently to be sure he was the man? - If I had seen him among forty others afterwards, if he had not been taken at the time, I could have sworn to him. It was very light, and when I laid hold of him I turned him fairly round.

Had he the same clothes on then which he has now? - He had the same coat and waistcoat on, but his hair was more tumbled down, it was not so well put up then as it is now.

Cross Examination.

What time was this? - About ten o'clock.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming from Sadler's Wells, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw many people run; I ran likewise, and being nearly at the head of the mob, the people who ran said, Which way did he go? I said I do not know. I did not see him run; I did not see

the man at all. Some people who were a-head, laid hold of me and said, I suppose this is the man. They held me till these people came up; the woman directly said, that is the man! that is the man! They searched me and took me to the watch-house. I never saw the watch nor the man neither. They searched me again at the watch-house to see if they could find arms or watch about me, but they found none.

For the Prisoner.

- WELCH sworn.

I am a statuary. I have known the prisoner nearly four years; he always behaved himself extremely well towards me. I have employed him many times to receive considerable sums of money for me, and always found him a faithful, diligent servant ; he has had many opportunities to have wronged me but I firmly believe he never wronged me of sixpence.

Have you that good opinion of him that if he was discharged from hence you would take him into your service again? - I would notwithstanding all I have heard; he may have been drawn in by those who have more cunning and less courage than himself.

- RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a statuary and wood-carver. I have known the prisoner near four years; I always thought him an honest diligent man.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-12

449. JOHN WILKINS was indicted for that he in the king's highway, in and upon Joseph Constantine Carpue , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a metal watch covered with tortoiseshell, value 40 s. and seven shillings in monies, numbered, the property of the said Joseph , July 30th .

JOSEPH CONSTANTINE CARPUE sworn.

I am a bookseller at the corner of Russel-street, Covent Garden. I was robbed on Sunday the 30th of July in a street called Sloane-street , leading from Knightsbridge to Chelsea, between a quarter and half after ten at night. I was alone; it was quite dark; I was robbed by one person of my watch and about seven or eight shillings. I saw a man coming out of one of the empty houses in Sloane-street. I had scarce passed by him but he turned round and presented a pistol, and I believe he asked me for my money, but I am not certain; I was exceedingly frightened. I said, if he behaved civil I would give him what I had; I gave him both my watch and money; he behaved exceeding civil. He said, he was very sorry he was forced to take this means to get money, but it was want drove him to it. I asked him for my watch. He said, he wanted money and must have it. He said he would leave money for the watch at the Spring Garden coffee-house. I told him I did not want the money I wanted the watch. He wished me a good night; I wished him the same and he went away.

Could you discern his person at all? - I have some recollection of the person, he seemed to be dressed in a brown coat; it did not seem to be like the prisoner.

Could you see his face? - Yes; but I did not take much notice of it; he seemed to me to be a man between thirty and forty years old; I do not think it was the prisoner; I cannot pretend to say whether it is or not, but I think the prisoner is not the man.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury there was no one present at the time this robbery was committed but the person robbed, and he says he does not believe the prisoner to be the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-13

450. GEORGE DUFFEY was indicted for that he in a certain field and open place near the king's highway, in and upon Thomas Bolton did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a linen shirt, value 10 s. and a linen stock, value 1 s. the property of John Lloyd , July 13th .

JOHN LLOYD sworn.

I am an enameller and have some fortune which I live upon. I live at Ratcliffe Cross, but I have a lodging in t he city. I ordered the boy to tie up my linen and carry it to my washerwoman; I think it was on the 30th of July. On the 14th of July in the morning I was informed my boy had been robbed of the linen, and that the robber was in custody.

THOMAS BOLTON sworn.

How old are you? - Between nine and ten.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes; if I tell lies I shall go to hell.

Was you told to say so? - Yes.

Who told you so? - The constable.

Do you know it is your duty, if sworn, to speak the truth and the whole truth? - Yes, and then I shall go heaven.

He is sworn.

Court. How long have you lived with Mr. Lloyd? - I believe I have lived there eight months.

Did you go in July last with his linen any where? - I have been with it ever since I lived with that gentleman; this was on a Thursday night; I do not know how long ago; there were four of them met me in Gray's Inn-lane; two of them parted with the others in Gray's Inn-lane, and went up towards Holbourn; the other two followed me from Gray's Inn-lane to the Spa-fields; in the Spa-fields they met the other two again; they dodged me.

If they followed you they were behind you? - They came up behind me in the Spa-fields and one laid hold of my neck that I could not speak, while the others took the things from me.

Did he say any thing to you? - Nothing at all.

Did you say any thing to them? - No; when they took the bundle away I ran after them and cried stop thief! they ran towards the turnpike; a gentlewoman at the turnpike stopped the prisoner and asked him if he had taken any thing from that child who was crying thieves and murder? He said no, hang me; and in about five minutes after he said, indeed it was not me. The gentlewoman said it was, and then he threw down the bundle.

You did not see him drop the bundle? - No; he threw down the bundle before I got to him; when I came up the gentlewoman had the bundle, and the turnpike man had stopped him; then Musgrove, the constable came and took him to prison.

Had you any talk with them in Gray's Inn-lane? - They said they would cut my throat if I did not give them the bundle; they had a knife.

What time was this? - Between nine and ten at night.

How came you to go on after they said that? - I went on; I would not give them the bundle; I walked as fast as I could; I did not think they would follow me; I did not see them follow me; I did not see them again till I got into the Spa-fields, but I did not properly see them then for they came behind me.

How came you not to call for assistance in Gray's Inn-lane? - I did not think they would follow me.

Had you taken any notice of their faces in Gray's Inn-lane? - No.

In Spa-fields, it was dark? - Yes.

You could not see them distinctly? - No, I could hardly see them.

How far was it from the turnpike? - Not far.

Did you see him stopped? - No; they told me he was stopped; just as I got to the bottom of the field he was out of my sight.

What makes you think that he is the man? - Because I saw him in the prison and knew him to be the man, and I saw him at the turnpike.

Suppose you had seen him any where else and the bundle had not been found should you have known him? - No; I did not take notice of him; all I know is that that is the man I saw at the turnpike.

Did you see enough of him in Gray's Inn-lane, and when he took the bundle, to know him again? - Yes; he stopped me in Spa-fields.

Did they do you any hurt? - They pinched me.

It was the other man who pinched you, not this? - Yes.

As stout a man as this? - No; he was not so big; he ran the other way; there was a shirt and stock in the bundle.

Prisoner. I was going across the field and heard somebody cry out stop thief; there were two men running across the field; I ran away for fear they should think it was me.

SARAH DEACON sworn.

I live in Tailor's-court, Islington-road, close to the turnpike. On the 13th of July I saw the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock; he was running along out of the Spa-fields towards the turnpike.

Did you see a little boy there? - No, I did not see the child but I heard him cry out murder and stop thief! I went across the road and saw the prisoner. I asked him if he had taken any thing from the child who cried murder and stop thief? He said he had not, indeed. I said he had. Then he dropped the bundle; I picked it up and called stop thief! and the turnpike man stopped him directly.

How long was it before the boy came up? - Not two minutes; I heard him crying, and told him the man was taken; this is the bundle (producing it).

Did you say any thing to the boy when he came up? - I told him I had got the bundle, and the man was stopped; and he went and fetched his mother, who lived just by; the turnpike man asked him if that was the man? He said it was.

To Bolton. What was the shirt and stock in? - A bit of cheque rag; this is it.

Prosecutor. This is my property; it has the initials of my name upon it; it is the same shirt I delivered to the boy that afternoon.

ROBERT PASHALL sworn.

I keep the turnpike at St. John's-street. Between nine and ten o'clock I heard the cry of stop thief! I ran out and saw the prisoner running towards the gate. I unlocked the gate and laid hold of him; in about two minutes after the little boy came up and said, he was the man, he could swear to him. I delivered him to two grenadiers, who came up, till a constable was sent for.

SAMUEL LEE sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for; the soldiers delivered the prisoner to me.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This gentlewoman put it into the boy's head else he could not swear to me; the justice said if she swore to me she would be rewarded for her trouble.

Deacon. He said no such thing.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-14

451, 452. JOHN MOUIT and WILLIAM BRYANT were indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 1 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6 d. a silk waistcoat, value 1 s. thirteen yards of linen cloth, value 13 s. a pair of silk breeches, value 1 s. a pompadour cloth coat, value 1 s. two pair of leather shoes, value 6 d. a pair of leather slippers, value 6 d. a baze cloth cloak with silk hood, value 1 s. and ten yards of cotton, value 20 s. the property of John White , a quarter of a pound of green tea, half a pound of green tea, and a quarter of a pound of coffee , the property of Matthew Jackson , July 5th .

JOHN WHITE sworn.

On the 5th of last July I packed up in paper the goods mentioned as mine in the indictment, to go to Cambridge; I sent them from Kirby-street, Hatton-garden, to the Cambridge carrier's warehouse in Bishopsgate-street. I directed them for Mrs. White, to be left at Mr. - , at Hauxton, near Cambridge.

MATTHEW JACKSON sworn.

I drive the Cambridge waggon; I put this paper parcel into the waggon on the 5th of July, I missed it between Edmonton and Ponder's End , at about five in the evening. Samuel Wackett was following me with a cart; he told me he saw them take the parcel out of the waggon. He described the men to me; I went back again to see if I could find

them. I went down a lane just on this side the sign of the Cock, at Houndsfield. I could not find the men. I came back again and found Mr. White's parcel upon the hedge by the side of the road, with the goods in it. I took it and carried it to the waggon; there was another parcel, a small paper parcel containing tea, sugar, and coffee, likewise taken out of the waggon. I came back to look for that small paper parcel; then I found the two prisoners standing under the hedge, about twenty roods from where I had found Mr. White's parcel. Some people came up to my assistance and we took them to Ponder's end; I took two paper parcels out of Mouit's pocket; one contained half a pound of green tea, the other a quarter of a pound of coffee. They had taken these two little parcels out and thrown the rest away. I charged a constable with them. The other two little parcels were found by some children in the hedge afterwards. Upon the the outside paper was marked Oliver. I found that paper in the hedge. I was carrying that for one Oliver.

SAMUEL WACKET sworn.

I saw Jackson at the beginning of Edmonton, driving the Cambridge waggon; it was about five in the evening; I was driving a cart about thirty yards behind the waggon. I saw Bryant get up at the hind part of the waggon and take out a brown paper parcel, and give it to the other prisoner, then I saw them throw the parcel into the hedge; and then they both ran down the lane which was about five roods off. I went forward and told the waggoner what I had seen. They chucked it over the hedge directly as they got it out of the waggon. The waggon was partly close to the hedge. When I told Jackson of it, he went in pursuit of them and I took care of his horses. Jackson came back in about half an hour, and brought back the parcel I had seen them throw over the hedge; he went back to look for some more things, and I drove the waggon to an house we stop at, and left it there, the Two Brewers in Ponder's End. I live at Theobald's Park. I went home and then came again in the evening to the Two Brewers, there I saw Jackson and the two prisoners.

Where was the place you first saw them? - Before my cart, following the waggon. I did not see them above a minute or two before they got up behind the waggon.

Are you sure these are the two men? - I am.

GEORGE MOULDS sworn.

I am a constable. This tea and coffee was delivered to me by Jackson the waggoner; it has been in my custody ever since; and this other parcel of clothes was delivered to me at the same time (producing them).

WILLIAM SPENCER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Richard Draper , grocer, in Bishopsgate-street. I sold this tea and coffee to Mr. Jackson; here is my hand writing upon the paper.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am book-keeper to Edward Salmon and and Son, Cambridge carriers. I booked this parcel, directed to Mrs. White, on the 5th of July; I delivered it to Jackson the waggoner, and saw him put it into the waggon. The other parcel was not taken up at the warehouse.

Mr. White. This is the parcel I sent; these are the goods I packed up.

MOUIT's DEFENCE.

I went over the hedge to ease myself, I saw two persons there who put the parcels into my pocket. The waggoner seised me as I was going down the road.

BRYANT's DEFENCE.

I am a gardener by trade. I had been to Edmonton to seek after work. I sat down to rest myself by the side of the road, and a man came and took hold of me.

BOTH GUILTY . Imp. 12 months in the house of correction .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-15

452, 453. SAMUEL BLAKEY and SAMUEL HARRINGTON were indicted, the first for stealing a prayer book, value 5 s. another prayer book, value 7 s. and two books entitled, a Collection of Psalms and Hymns

for the use of the Northampton Chapel, value 4 s. the property of the Honourable Selina Countess Dowager of Huntingdon .

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

I am a constable. On the 24th of June I saw Martin and another person go by my door with two bundles; I followed them to a pawnbroker's at the corner of Benjamin-street. They were taken to Justice Blackborough's upon another charge, and Taylor was admitted an evidence. Dinmore went to Harrington's and brought the books; I was not with him when he found them.

Is Dinmore here? - He is not.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-16

454. MARY GARDINER was indicted for that she together with forty other persons and more, did, unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously, assemble, on the 7th of June , to the disturbance of the publick peace, and did begin to demolish and pull down the dwelling house of the Right Honourable William Earl of Mansfield , against the form of the statute , &c.

ELISABETH CRADOCK sworn.

I lived at Lord Mansfield's in June last.

What happened at the house on the 7th of June? - It was pulling down between three and four o'clock in the morning. A vast many people were assembled.

Was there any particular cry among the mob before they began to pull down the house? - No. Just as they began to break the windows they made an huzza. I saw the prisoner in the two-pair-of-stairs room. There were about a dozen people with her; she was slinging the things out of the window, the room was destroyed in which she was, with the furniture and the lady's clothes.

Was any part of the room itself destroyed? - Not till about a quarter of an hour after when the wainscoting was pulled down.

Was it pulled down by the same persons who broke into the house first or by the same set of people? - I cannot tell.

How long was she in the house? - About a quarter of an hour.

Was she there during any part of the time the house was demolishing? - Yes, in the two-pair-of-stairs room; the wainscoting was pulling down while she was there. I did not hear the prisoner in particular say any thing; she was only throwing the things out of the window.

You saw her there about a quarter of an hour? - Yes.

Did you see her at all afterwards? - No.

Was the house itself entirely demolished in the inside? - Yes.

Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - No.

What led you to take particular notice of her? - I took particular notice of her clothes, her face, and her person.

What light had you? - There was plenty of light there.

Was there any other women in the room while you saw the prisoner there? - Yes, there were several more women; there might be about five or six in the whole.

Did you take more particular notice of the prisoner than the other women? - Yes, I knew her perfectly well again when I saw her at Litchfield-street office.

Did you take particular notice of her in the house more than the other women? - Yes.

How came you to do that? - Because she was throwing the things out of the window.

Did not the others throw things out of the window besides her? - Yes, but there was none like her, she had the same cap on she has now, and an old black silk gown.

Should you now know any of the other women? - I do not think I should.

You are very certain that is the woman? - Very certain.

DOROTHY WEBSTER sworn.

I saw the prisoner go up and down the stairs backwards and forwards several times with wearing apparel which belonged to Miss Murray. I saw her no where but upon the stairs.

What light had you upon the stairs? - There was a great deal of light, but what it

was I cannot tell; it was not our putting out, we who belonged to Lord Mansfield's house. I took particular notice of her, for when she had been up and down and dressed herself in the lady's clothes, I received a great many things this young woman (Cradock) brought out of the rooms, and carried them up into our apartments, where she and I used to lay. When she had ransacked all she could get there she ran past me upon the landing place and pushed me down; I told her there was not any more for her there, or any thing that belonged to her because there were many men up and down stairs with them; she made no answer at all but went up stairs into the garrett.

Did you see her do any thing in any part of the house? - No, I was never farther than the landing-place of the stairs; I saw her go down several times with aprons full of things; I cannot tell what she did with them. I was never down stairs till his lordship's house was so much in flames that I could not stay longer. There were a great many women there.

How came you to take such particular notice of the prisoner? - Her pushing me down upon the stairs caused me to take particular notice of her, when she pushed me down; and I took particular notice of her before; that she was so active in carrying the things down.

At the time you saw her in the house was any part of the house demolished, or were the mob demolishing it? - I saw all the furniture on fire in the street, and the apartments were on fire in the butler's pantry.

At the time you saw her? - No, that was after.

Was any part of the house destroyed at the time you saw this woman? - I cannot say it was when I saw her upon the landing place, it was afterwards, when I went to look; it was when the guns were fired.

At the time you saw her upon the landing place was any part of the house destroyed? - All the two-pair-of-stairs floor was demolished, the house was entirely pulled to pieces and burning; there was no front to the house at all on that side when I looked.

Was the wainscoting or bannisters of the stairs, or windows, or any part of the house demolished before you saw her the last time? - That I cannot tell.

Did the same mob continue together or was it a different mob which destroyed the house from that which came first? - I cannot tell.

Was there any time when the mob ceased? - When the soldiers came, some went down and some continued; and others came up afterwards.

Was it before or after the soldiers came that you saw the prisoner? - Before I heard say that they were come; I never saw the soldiers at all till after the house was destroyed.

Was you before the justices in Litchfield-street? - Yes.

What day was that? - I cannot tell.

How long after Lord's Mansfield's house was destroyed? - I cannot tell.

To Cradock. When was it? - After the last Old Bailey session.

Then you had not made charge against the prisoner till since last Old Bailey session? - No. She was taken up because she had bragged that she had been at Lord Mansfield's house several times, and was never molested till the last time, and then she was stripped of the things she had got on, which were a petticoat and apron of Miss Murray's.

You had been before the justices in Litchfield-street before this time had not you? - No never before.

Then you only went to charge this woman? - Yes.

THOMAS WILKINSON sworn.

At about four in the morning I was below stairs in the servants' apartments; the prisoner came down; I imagine she had missed her way; just by the servants' hall she asked me the way out. I said if you will go along with me, my dear, I will show you the way out; I took her up the laundry stairs and went out into the stable yard; there is a longish passage there, then I ordered her to strip, seeing through her pocket-hole that she had got something better than became her dress. She said she had nothing but what was her own. I had got the porter's staff in my hand, I knock ed her down; she cried out murder ! I said if you will not be quiet I will give you some more. I struck her again. She begged for mercy. I said there

had been none shewn that night, and none I would show for I would have her stripped before I parted with her. She begged me to give her time. I took her by her heels or somewhere thereabouts, and set her upon her shoulders; I then turned her up and found a white petticoat and apron upon her; I tore them off. I struck her several times with a stick I had, and would have put her in the cistern, but the butler told me I had better let her go as the mob was about. I took the petticoat and apron; I have not them here; they belong to Lord Stormont's daughter.

Had any part of the house been demolished at that time? - A great part of it had.

What light had you when she came? - It was quite day-light.

Were you any time with her? - I might be ten minutes with her.

Are you very certain that is the woman? - I am very certain of it. I made no observation of it till she happened to be discovered by her own bragging of what she had done; I was sent for to the office. She was taken up in consequence of what she had boasted herself.

JAMES HYDE sworn.

I attend at Litchfield-street office. I had an information of a woman who had been in Lord Mansfield's house. There were some people taken up for examination. I did not take the people till the day the servants were to come to London, as I could not charge them with any thing myself. The day the servants came to London, I went up the street where I saw this woman frequently about; and fetched the prisoner. She staid in the round-house till the servants were sent for. She was taken up on a publican's information.

Have you yourself heard the prisoner say any thing? - No. I was myself at Lord Mansfield's, but I never saw the prisoner there

FRANCIS COLLINS sworn.

She came into my house with some things which I suspected to be Lady Mansfield's, the next day after Lord Mansfield's house was destroyed, whether they were or not I cannot tell.

Did you hear her say any thing? - Yes, I believe she said they were Lady Mansfield's, and she thought she had a right to wear them as she had got them.

Did she say so? - She did.

Did she say how she got them? - No, I cannot say she did.

How long was it before you mentioned what she had said? - It might be next day, I cannot say.

Who did you mention it to? - I mentioned it to several of the officers belonging to Litchfield-street office.

When you heard the prisoner say that the things she had on were Lady Mansfield's, and she had a right to wear them, having got them why did not you lay a charge before the magistrates against her? - I believe at that time there was no business done at the office whatever, not that night; no charges were taken or any thing done.

Was it the day after Lord Mansfield's house was destroyed that you heard this woman say this? - I believe it was the day after.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is all very false what they have sworn against me. There are a great many women in St. Giles's who are like me. I was a-bed and asleep when Lord Mansfield's house was destroyed. Hyde bid me go out of the way several times, I said I knew myself innocent and would not go out of the way at all.

To Hyde. Did you ever advise her to go out of the way? - No; I have taken a great many of the rioters, and have been struck and used very cruel for it.

Prisoner. I had several in the jail yesterday who would have been witnesses that I was in my lodgings, one Mr. Crofts who lives in Tottenham-court road knows I was at home, but he is not here. I did not know my trial would come on to-day.

Dixon. I had her in custody and told her yesterday morning she would be tried this morning.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-17

455. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing a leather pocket-book, value 6 d. the property of the Rev . Thomas Price , clerk; and a bank note for 50 l. one other bank note for 10 l. one other bank note for 10 l. the said bank notes at the time of committing the felony , being the property of the said Thomas Price , and the sums secured thereby being due and unsatisfied to him the proprietor thereof, August 5th .

Rev. Mr. PRICE sworn.

Upon the 5th of August, about four in the afternoon, I lost my pocket-book, with three notes, out of my coat pocket. I missed it about twenty yards on this side Temple-bar . The prisoner was detected by Mr. Wilson, who was in company with me, and brought back with the book. I had never seen him before he was taken. Mr. Wilson has the book.

THOMAS WILSON sworn.

Mr. Price dined with me on the 5th of August, I was going with him into the city; when we got a few yards within Temple-bar, he put his hand into his pocket and missed his pocket-book. A woman came up and said she had seen a man take something out of Mr. Price's pocket. Upon that we went back again to my mother's, near the New Church in the Strand, and there we got into a coach to go to the Banker's for the numbers of the notes, and to stop the payment at the Bank. When we got to Temple-bar, a gentleman, who was in the coach, said he would get out and ask the woman if she recollected any thing of the man she saw take something out of Mr. Price's pocket. While he was talking with the woman, as I sat backwards in the coach, I observed a man stand at the corner of Shire-lane, with a surtout coat on; his pocket hung loose from it in which I saw the print of a book. I jumped out of the coach, with an intention of asking him what he had got in his pocket; upon my jumping out of the coach the man went through the Bar. I pulled my friend, who was talking to the woman, by the shoulder, and told him I believed that was the thief; we ran after him; the man upon seeing us run after him, ran up Ship-yard. I cried stop thief! and he was stopped at the top of the yard. I ran up to him, laid hold of his pocket, and took the book out of it; from thence we came back again, got into a coach, and went to Sir John Fielding's.

Who is that man? - The prisoner at the bar. This is the book, I took it out of his pocket.

Mr. Price. This is my book; here are the notes; I cannot swear to the identity of them, because I had not taken their numbers. I had three notes in it, one of 50 l. and two of 10 l. each.

Mr. FORD sworn.

I was along with Mr. Price that afternoon, and Mr. Wilson. We were going into the city to send a packet to Birmingham. About twenty yards from Temple-bar Mr. Price said he had lost his pocketbook. A woman who delivers bills out came and said she saw a man at the gentleman's pocket, who had run up Shire-lane. Mr. Price was exceedingly frightened, and ran home directly to see whether he had put the pocket-book in his pocket or not. When we came back the prisoner was standing by that woman; he looked suspicious. Mr. Wilson got out of the coach, and said that man looks suspicious, we had better examine him; the man turned round and ran directly through Ship-yard. At the top of Ship-yard Mr. Wilson took hold of him and took the pocket-book out of his pocket. He first said that no pocket-book had been taken out of his pocket; but when he was before Justice Wright he said, he found the pocket-book.

ELISABETH CLARKE sworn.

I deliver bills out. I was standing at Temple-bar; I saw the prisoner take something out of Mr. Price's pocket, and then run up Ship-yard. There was a boy and he close together so that I could not perceive what it was.

Prisoner. Before the justice she said that she saw the boy pick the gentleman's pocket and give it to me.

Clarke. I never said so.

THOMAS FREDERICK DAWSON sworn.

I am a mast-maker. I heard the cry of stop thief! I saw the prisoner running up Ship-yard;

I and a butcher laid hold of him, and I saw Mr. Wilson take the book out of his pocket.

- CLARK sworn.

I am clerk to Sir William Lemon . Mr. Price was paid seventy pounds on the 5th of August in Bank notes, a fifty and two tens. I made the entry of the numbers at the time I paid the notes to Mr. Price. (The marks of the notes were compared with Mr. Clark's entry, and they corresponded.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going from my mother's in Black-friars up Fleet-street; near Temple-bar there was a fruit-basket; I stopped there and picked up this pocket book. I asked the woman if she knew any body who had lost any thing? She said, she did not. I asked several people; I thought to keep it till it was advertised and then that the owner might have his property again. I staid upon the spot near a quarter of an hour.

GUILTY . Navigation 2 years .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-18

456, 457. GEORGE LLOYD otherwise GEORGE COOK and WILLIAM FRENCH were indicted for stealing a trunk, value 5 s. a thickset jacket, value 5 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. and a glass bottle covered with leather, value 1 s. the property of John Harding ; a fustian jacket, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and a printed drab waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of James Hodgkins , August 31st .

JOHN HARDING sworn.

I keep a coffee-house in Honey-lane Market. On the 31st of August last I had occasion to send these things to Barnet; I ordered my servant to carry them to Smithfield.

RICHARD WOODHOUSE sworn.

I am servant to William Dalton , who lives at Barnet; he ordered me to take up a trunk which I should find at the Lock and Key in Smithfield; on the 31st of August I called for it, and put it into my cart to carry it to Barnet. I carried it as far as Back-lane, Islington; I then saw the trunk in my cart; I did not miss it till a quarter of an hour after which might be between five and six o'clock, when I got to Islington work-house ; I stepped behind my cart; in about five minutes after I missed it I saw the prisoner by the work-house wall; somebody told me I had been robbed, and that the men were gone that way; upon which I went to look and saw these two prisoners getting up from the trunk; they were then fighting with Mr. Brown's man. I went to assist; they ran away and left the truck behind them; I pursued them, and they were taken about ten minutes after; I never lost sight of them. The trunk lay on the left side of the fore-part of the cart; I think it could not drop out.

A Witness sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brown of Hornsey. I was told the first cart was robbed; several of us were going out of town; I was following behind; it was half past five; upon which I got over the gate and found the two men lying down by the trunk against the wall by the work-house; upon my coming over they both jumped up; when I came within twenty yards of them they left the trunk. French, upon my coming up, drew his knife and said If I came nearer he would run it into me. However I kept to them, and then they ran away; I ran a field after them, then I could run no farther, and Woodhouse continued the pursuit till they were taken. I am positive they are the men; I had not seen them on the road before.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

I was playing at cricket on the 31st of August in a field just by; I heard a cry of

"Stop thief!" I saw French upon turning round jump over an hedge; he tore his breeches in getting over; I caught Lloyd; I searched him upon the spot, I found nothing but a knife about him.

THOMAS PRICE sworn.

I was in a field by Steward's-lane, facing Islington work-house, that afternoon; at about six o'clock I saw the two prisoners sitting on a rail where they might continue about a quarter of an hour; some carts came by; I saw French run to the first cart; he whistled through his fist, upon which the

other followed him up to the cart and helped him out with an hair box, and they carried it over the stile behind the work-house; I afterwards heard Lloyd say, I will rip up any body who comes nigh me. There was nobody in sight when they went to the cart; the carts which were following them had not turned the wall, and therefore they were not in sight; it was just round the work-house; I was catching sparrows in a field, where, I believe, they did not see me; upon seeing this I went and told that man who was then just come in sight; by that time hey had just got it over the gate; they did not stop the cart but took it out as the cart went along; the people ran after them, and I saw no more of them (the trunk is produced.) I believe this to be the very trunk I saw them take out of the cart.

Harding. It is my property, and the things in it are mine.

FRENCH's DEFENCE.

I was sent on an errand to Islington; I came along the back road. I went to the corner of the work-house to ease myself; I saw this trunk lie there; I afterwards saw three men jump over the field; I jumped up and ran away. I thought it had been a press gang ran across the field. There were some gentlemen playing at cricket who ran after me and took me; I never saw this man who is here in my life, before he was taken with me.

LLOYD's DEFENCE.

I belong to the Adamant. I went to take leave of my friends; coming along the road they ran after me, and called stop thief! I did not run away.

(French called three witnesses who gave him a good character.)

For Lloyd.

JOHN JACKSON sworn.

I am a watch wheel finisher. I cannot say any thing about the prisoners, but I can say something which perhaps may be of use to them. I was drinking yesterday morning at a publick-house in the Old-Bailey; when I came out I saw that Thomas Isaacs in company with another man discoursing concerning some of the prisoners who were to be tried; I heard him express these words, I have got two to swear to, and d - n my blood I will do them over; or to that effect.

Who did he say this to? - Some person he was talking to in the street, near the Pitt's Head; I just came out of the house, went past him, and heard him repeat the words.

Do you know what Isaacs is? - A sheep's-head man and a constable.

He did not name any of the prisoners? - No.

This was in the open street? - Yes.

What was you doing there? - I drank two glasses of ale there; I went to Mr. Topping to speak to him concerning some money he was to be paid for writing out a brief and two or three petitions concerning my unfortunate brother, who was executed for the affair at Newgate.

At what time of day was this conversation? - I believe between nine and ten yesterday forenoon.

Isaacs. Upon my oath I was not there between nine and ten.

Jackson. No I mistake, it was Monday.

On Monday was it? - It was the first day of the session.

Isaacs. I deny the charge. As I hope to be saved I was in these gentleman's company the chief part of the time. Upon my oath I never mentioned any such words.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-19

458. JOSEPH FREEMAN was indicted for stealing fifty-five yards of printed callico, value 13 l. thirty-three yards of Marseilles quilting, value 9 l. 18 s. seventy-four yards of printed bordering, value 3 l. 14 s. and four yards of printed cotton, value 4 s. the property of Bartholomew Gibson , in the dwelling-house

of the said Bartholomew , July 8th .

WILLIAM HOLLY sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Gibson, a linen-draper in Castle-street . On the 8th of July the prisoner came into the shop between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, and took the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) off the counter and ran out of the shop immediately. I was behind another counter. I pursued him directely; when he found he was pursued he threw them from off his shoulder.

Did you see him throw them from his shoulder? - Yes; I continued to pursue him and at last I secured him. When I took him he told me he was not the person I took him to be. I brought him back into the shop and left the things lying in the street. The other witness took them up, I never lost sight of him at all. I am sure the prisoner is the man who came out of the shop and threw the things off his shoulder.

What did he say when you brought him back to the shop? - Nothing at all.

GODFREY HILLS sworn.

I was at that time fellow-servant with the last witness. On the evening of the 8th of July I was standing at the back counter.

Did you see this man come in? - No, but I heard the last witness run out of the shop in a violent hurry. I followed him and found these goods lying in the middle of the street. I brought them in again; they have been in my custody every since.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am as innocent as the child unborn. I was going by and heard the cry of stop thief! That gentleman catched hold of me. As to having the things or knowing any thing of them. I was never in the place, and I know nothing of them.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-20

459. JOHN BANBURY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 50 s. a steal watch chain, value 12 d. a silver seal, value 2 s. a gold ring, value 5 s. and a base metal watch key, value 1 d. the property of Isaac Sowter , July the 5th .

ISAAC SOWTER sworn.

I am a gentleman's servant . I live in Dean-street. Upon the 5th of July I had been spending the evening at the Lion and Goat in Grosvenor-street; at a little after one going away I desired a coach to be called for me; the waiter could not find a coach; he offered to walk with me to the end of the street where I should probably get one; we walked together to the end of Lower Grosvenor-street ; he desired me to sit down at the door of an alehouse there while he went back for his hat and told his master he was going to see his wife, and then he would walk with me and see me home, I sat upon the bench before the door for about five or six minutes then the prisoner came up to me; he was a stranger to me; he sat down by me; we entered into conversation. He asked me which way I was going and said he would go with me. I told him I was waiting there for a man; when the waiter came back to me we set off together; we walked arm in arm; the prisoner had hold of my left arm and the waiter, Nichols, of my right. I had, in the Lion and Goat alehouse, put my watch into my left-hand coat pocket; having a good many seals to it I thought it would be safest there; when we had walked about thirty yards from the alehouse bench I heard the chain jingle; I put my hand immediately to my pocket, missed it, and told the waiter that my watch was gone, and that the prisoner had robbed me; the prisoner still had hold of my arm. He said what did I mean by accusing him; that he was a gentleman and incapable of such a thing? I said if he would not give it up I would charge the watch with him, which I did. He said he would go to an alehouse to be searched, but as we were going along to the watch-house, going through Grosvenor square, he pretended

to be siek; he leaned against the pallisades; he stooped down and unbuttoned the knee of his breeches; when he had gone a few yards after that the watch-chain struck against one of the people's legs who had hold of him, and the watchman took up the watch; I saw it drop from him at the time; it was a darkish night.

Was you sober? - I had been drinking but was not so much in liquor but I knew every thing which passed, and the prisoner had I believe been drinking too.

Cross Examination.

You are a gentleman's servant? - Yes, out of service.

Did not you spend an evening with the prisoner at the Sunderland-Arms? - No, nor any where else.

Do you know one Smith? - Yes.

What is he? - A weaver I believe.

Did not you say he was your attorney? - No.

You never was at the Sunderland-Arms, nor saw the prisoner there; you never sung songs with him and offered to make it up for twenty guineas, nor say that Smith was your attorney? - I was at that gentleman's house and saw Banbury there.

Did you sing songs there or not? - Not in his company I am certain I never did.

Did you sing songs in the house? - I might; when the prisoner was in the house I never did.

You did not offer to make it up and appoint him to meet you at that house the next day? - I never offered to make it up at all.

You did not desire him to meet you at your attorney's, Mr. Smith, in Web-square, Shoreditch? - I did not desire him to meet me there at all.

Did you send Smith to make it up for you to Mr. Gillam, a gentleman you found out, who is attorney for this man? - I said if it could be done before a magistrate.

Did you send Smith to Mr. Gillam in Clifford's Inn? - I did not.

Then all this I am speaking of never existed? - No.

I will tell you fairly the people are all here who heard this, will you say you did not sing songs with this man, shake hands with him, and offer to make it up for twenty guineas? - I never did.

You did not say Smith was your attorney and appoint him to meet you there? - No, I did not say any such thing.

- NICHOLS sworn.

I am waiter at the Lion and Goat. On the 4th of July last the prosecutor came to our house with a friend, staid and supped there; about one he desired me to call him a coach. I said I believed there was one at the corner of Bond street. He said he would walk to the corner of the street with me; when he came there there was not one. I said I was going to Whitechapel and if he would stay till I went and got my hat I would go home with him, for he was a little in liquor; the prisoner sat down by him.

Was he very drunk? - No; he was I believe sober enough to know what he did.

Sober enough to walk alone? - Yes. I was absent about ten or twelve minutes; when I returned the prisoner was setting upon the bench by him. He said is this the gentleman you was waiting for? Mr. Sowter said yes. He said he was going our way and he would go with him; he took hold of his left arm, I took hold of his right arm; when we had walked twenty or thirty yards Mr. Sowter said my watch is gone; this man has picked my pocket of my watch. I looked round and saw the prisoner's hand go into his left-hand inside pocket, and I heard something like the rattling of a chain; I let go the prosecutor's right arm and took hold of the prisoner's, and desired him to give the gentleman his watch and go about his business. I thought he only took it out of a joke. He said he had not got the watch; he would go to a publick-house and be searched. I told him it was not a time in the morning for publick-houses to be open; that if he went to any house he must go to the watch-house. I asked him several times to give up the watch; he would not. I said I would charge the watch with him; the watchman was coming by the Haunch of Venison; I called to him and gave him charge of him; going up Brook-street we met two patrols; I desired them to aid and assist; they did;

before we came to the corner of Grosvenor-square I observed him put his left-hand into his left-hand pocket and take something out and put it into his breeches; I mentioned it to the watchmen at the same time as we were going by the Marquis of Rockingham's house; after that, he said he was sick, he begged leave to cast his stomach; he went to the rails, put his left foot upon the kirb-stones and made as if he was going to vomit into the area; he unbuttoned his breeches knee and shook his leg as if he was going to shake the watch out into the area; I desired the watchmen to take him away, which they did; I then desired one of the watchmen to walk behind him, as we had him on each side; in less than ten or a dozen yards the watch fell out of the knee of his breeches upon the flat stones. The man said the chain touched his leg; I saw him stoop and take something up. He said, here is the watch; and I saw it in his hand.

Did you know the prisoner before? - I have seen him before once or twice; I have been at his shop; he was a tobacconist.

Was you perfectly sober? - I was not at all in liquor; the prisoner appeared to be a little in liquor.

Cross Examination.

How came you not to take the watch away from him instantly? - I did not know whether I had a right to do it.

It never occurred to you to examine his pocket or breeches or any part of his person for this watch? - I did not know that I had a right to do it.

Did you feel afterwards in his side pocket? - I did not.

Was there any thing there? - A snuff box.

How can you distinguish the rattling of a chain from the rattling of a snuff box? - I do not know that he had snuff boxes in that pocket; he had five about him; I took it to be the rattling of a chain; he was dressed very well, and said he was a gentleman.

RICHARD WEBB sworn.

I am a watchman in Lower Brook-street; after I had called half after one I heard a noise in the street; I got out of the box and locked the box door; these people were coming up together; they said they had got a man for stealing a watch. I walked behind them till they got into the square; there he seemed rather resolute; I got hold of the back of his coat and said he must go to the watch-house; when we came to the Marquis of Rockingham's he said he was sick; he went and laid hold of the rails and strained but brought nothing up; he lifted his foot up to the kirb-stone and seemed very busy with his hand at his breeches knee; we took him from the rails, and as we were going a little further the watch struck against my leg as it fell out from the knee of his breeches. I said to the watchmen here is the watch; I stooped and picked it up; his breeches knee was unbuttoned.

(The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

SAMUEL YARRALL sworn.

I am one of the patrols; at about half after two on the 25th of July my partner and I were together; we heard a disturbance and went to see what it was. Mr. Sowter said he had been robbed of his watch; we took the prisoner as far as Grosvenor-square; he seemed to be sick about the centre of the square. He said he wanted to vomit; he put his foot up against the rails and unbuttoned the knee of his breeches on his left side and endeavoured to shake out the watch, which Mr. Sowter said he had robbed him of; he could not vomit; we took him from the rails, and in about ten or twelve yards afterwards the watch dropped from the knees of his breeches. I actually saw it drop.

Where was you when it dropped from him? - Behind him.

Cross Examination.

Was you nearer than Webb? - I was close to Webb; I saw it drop from him; it hit against Webb's leg and fell upon the ground; I was rather on one side of Webb.

THOMAS UNDERHILL sworn.

I am one of the patrols of St. George, Hanover-square; my partner and I were coming down the street; we heard an outcry in Lower Brook-street; we walked forwards and saw the prisoner; he was very loth to go to the watch-house; he pulled backwards, we pulled him along; when he got to Grosvenor square he stopped and said he was very sick; we let him go up to the rails; he got his knee into the rails and wanted to shake the watch out. I observed

that his breeches knee was open. I said you shall not stay here any longer; we pulled him from the rails, and he had not gone above ten yards before the watch dropped from him; one of the watchmen picked it up; we took him to the watch-house and left him there. I did not see the watch drop from him; I was on the contrary side; it fell from his left side, I was upon the right. I heard the man, who had hold of him on the left side, say,

"I see the watch coming out at his knee now." I saw the watch immediately as the man picked it up.

ROBERT ANSLOW sworn.

I am a watchman. While I was calling half after one, I heard a voice call watchman. I went to the people; Mr. Sowter said I have lost my watch, this gentleman has got it, therefore you shall take him in charge to the watch-house. The patrol came up; we hauled the prisoner up to Grosvenor-square; he pretended to be very sick; he leaned his head towards the iron pallisadoes and strained much, but nothing came up. He put his left foot down upon the kirb-stones, and was unbuttoning his breeches knee. When I perceived his hand busy I said let us take him away, he is about no good. We gave him a shove away, and before we had got a dozen yards, I perceived the watch drop from his breeches knee. Before it touched the ground, I said there is the watch. Webb stooped and picked it up and said the watch knocked against his foot before it touched the ground.

Cross Examination.

Where was you when the watch fell? - I had him by the left-hand collar; I happened to look down and perceived the watch dropping out of his knee.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. Sowter the next day before the justice, acknowledged he called me to him, threw his money down upon the bench and his pocket-book. I know nothing of the watch.

For the Prisoner.

JOSEPH FERRABY sworn.

I am a tobacconist, my brother keeps the Sunderland-Arms. The prosecutor came to my brother's house and brought a person with him, who he said was his attorney, his name was Smith. He wanted to know if there was any of Mr. Banbury's friends there to make it up; he wished to have it settled. Banbury came to my house; I said go to my brother's, for there are the attorney and the prosecutor. I went there afterwards.

Was you present before the magistrate when the prisoner was first examined? - I was at a publick-house before he went to the magistrate. He said he wished he could have it settled. He said he was in liquor.

Did he say any thing about pulling out his money upon the bench, or bank notes? - No. I heard Banbury say so. The prosecutor seemed to wave saying any thing left something should come out against the prisoner; he would leave it to his attorney, one Smith; he said if he had the value of his watch, he would never trouble his head more about it. I have known Mr. Banbury seven or eight years; I have been his security as a marshalsea-court officer; he never brought me into any loss. He sells snuff and tobacco.

What is his general character? - He never wronged me.

But what is his general character? - I can say nothing but relative to myself.

BENJAMIN FERRABY sworn.

I keep the Sunderland Arms. Mr. Sowter came to my house and staid about an hour; Banbury came in about five minutes after him.

What passed between them? - I cannot say; Mr. Sowter wanted to make it up with Banbury, but said he would not do it, but his attorney should.

Did they spend the evening together? - Not then. A week or a fortnight afterwards he came to my house; he sung two or three songs along with Banbury in the parlour; they shook hands together as soon as they came in. They were near three hours together. A chairman held his horse at the time.

Do you remember what his offer was about making it up? - No, it was to be done by his attorney; I heard the attorney say he would not do it for nothing, he must have something for doing it.

(The prisoner called four other witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY N. 2 years .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-21

460. STEWARD MONTAGUE was indicted for stealing a pair of pistols mounted with silver and brass, value 4 l. the property of Daniel Giles , Esq. and a black silk cloak, value 21 s. the property of Jane Messman , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said Daniel Giles , Esq . August 30th .

DANIEL GILES , Esq. sworn.

On this day fortnight, the 30th of August, being at dinner, between the hours of three and four, with my sister, in the parlour, the man was in the other parlour, I heard one of my maids cry out thieves! and another murder! I got up and opened the parlour door; the street door was open. Somebody had ran out. My man had jumped out of the parlour window after the man who was found in the house; and I went after him. My man cried stop thief! all the way he went, and there was an uproar in the street. I did not see the prisoner as he had turned the corner before I got out. I saw him afterwards at a publick-house. The window at which he came in was almost eight feet from the ground; it is my dressing-room; I had been robbed at that window before.

Did you see the prisoner at the publick-house? - Yes, he went down on his knees and begged my pardon. They said he had snapped a pistol; I looked at it, and said it was mine; it was taken out of my drawer. I saw one pistol taken from him.

WILLIAM VAUGHAN sworn.

On the 30th of August between three and four o'clock, the maid servant coming up stairs past my master's dressing-room, she called out here is a man! My master was then at dinner; the dressing-room door was open; I went into that room; I saw the flap of a brown coat hanging across the bottom part of the window-frame; I got on the table which stood near the window; I went to the window and saw a man about four or five yards from it on the opposite side, running, in the same coloured coat I had seen in the window. I jumped out and called stop thief! several times; he ran up Wormwood-street, where I saw Mr. West stop him. When I came up to him his arm was extended, with a pistol of my master's in his hand; Mr. West took it from him. I picked up a cloak off the ground, near the prisoner, which belonged to Miss Messman, who was at dinner with my master. The prisoner was taken to a publick-house; he begged he might not be prosecuted, for the sake of his mother.

WILLIAM WEST sworn.

I was going along Wormwood-street, rather before four in the afternoon; there was a cry of stop thief! I turned round and saw the prisoner running with a pistol in his hand, as he turned the corner of Broad-street, about an hundred yards up Wormwood-street, I knocked him down and wrenched the pistol out of his hand; I held him down till another gentleman came up, and found the other pistol in his pocket. The cloak was found under his coat. One of the pistols has a ball in it, the other has none.

(The pistols were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Miss JANE MESSMAN sworn.

This is my cloak; I had hung it on the back of a chair in Mr. Giles's dressing room.

MARY GLOVER sworn.

I saw the prisoner in my master's dressing-room; I am certain he is the man; he was between the drawers and the table; I was not more than four yards from him. I saw him again the day after he was taken, and knew him immediately.

What was he doing when you saw him? - Putting something into his pocket; I do not know what. I alarmed the house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going through Broad-street I saw these things lie on the ground; I picked them up; I saw a man running before me; I ran after him. When I got into Wormwood-street I was knocked down.

To West. Was he in liquor or sober? - I believe he was sober.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-22

461. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing thirty yards of linen handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the property of John Hemans , September 18th, 1779 .

JOHN WHITE sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Hemans. The prisoner Williams came into our warehouse and stole these handkerchiefs, on the 18th of September, 1779.

(It appeared the prisoner had been committed in September 1779, but had made his escape before the October session.)

White. He came in and took a couple of pieces of handkerchief off the counter and went out of the warehouse, and I followed him; there were other persons in the warehouse, but I believe there was not any body else saw him. It was about four in the afternoon; they were at the farther end of the warehouse; I was in a desk above him; I believe he could not see me; he did not speak a word; he walked till he got out and then he ran. I followed him and overtook him about thirty yards from the door. He dropped the handkerchiefs just as I laid hold of him; here is a young man here who picked them up when I took hold of the prisoner.

WILLIAM CARN sworn.

I saw the prisoner come from Mr. Heman's house with the two pieces of handkerchief under his left arm; when he got out he ran very fast; the last witness pursued him, and he then took the two pieces with his right-hand from under his arm and threw them on the causeway; I picked them up and took them to Mr. Heman's warehouse.

WILLIAM SPAWTON sworn.

I am a constable. These pieces of handkerchief (producing them) were delivered to me by young Mr. Hemans, in September, 1779, but I did not take particular account of the time; young Mr. Hemans is not here, the porter was present when they were delivered to me.

White. I was present when the handkerchiefs were delivered to the constable; it was the same day the prisoner was taken; they are the same pieces; they were never out of my sight from the time they were picked up till they were delivered to the constable; they are Mr. Hemans's property.

PRISONER'S DEFENCE.

I was going along Watling-street; they cried out stop thief, and I was secured.

GUILTY Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-23

462. HENRY BARNETT was indicted for stealing a canvas bag, value 12 d. fifteen yards of woolled cloth, value 3 l. 18 s. two yards of woollen scarlet cloth, value 29 s. seven yards of double linen, value 6 s. two yards of double canvas, value 2 s. two gross of coat buttons, value 14 s. nine pair of woollen trowsers, value 4 l. the property of Evan Evans , and John Passman , July 16th .

JOHN PASSMAN sworn.

I am in partnership with Evan Evans . I packed up the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) on the 16th of July, and sent them by our porter, Henry Carefield , to the Red Lion, in Cockspur-street, Charing-cross , to go to Gosport.

- GOVAN sworn.

I am a constable. I found these things ( producing the goods mentioned in the indictment) under a bed in the house of Mary Spencer , on the 17th of July.

(They were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

HENRY CAREFIELD sworn.

I am porter to Messrs. Passman and Evans; I saw this parcel packed up; I took it to the inn; it was late; a man there said he would take me to the book-keeper of the inn; he took me to a publick-house; the prisoner was there. He said he was the book-keeper; he took me to a publick-house a little above the inn. I delivered the parcel to him and he delivered it to the other man who went away. I gave him sixpence and he gave me change, taking two pence for booking.

I insisted upon seeing it booked; he took me to the publick-house and asked me to sit down. I said it was not customary for the book-keeper to ask one to sit down. He said he would book them in Grace-church-street; for, he said, the same coach which went from the Red Lion went from thence, and the books were there. He then said the goods were gone to Tower-street to his house; the prisoner wanted to go to Tower-street. Finding him shuffling I charged the watch with him; the goods were afterwards found at his companion's in Tower-street by the prisoner's directions.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-24

463. WILLIAM GROVES was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 2 s. 56 lb. of starch, value 28 s. and 16 lb. of stone blue, value 20 s. the property of Gabriel Health , September the 1st .

HENRY DAWSON sworn.

I live with Messrs. Bayes and Warwick, No. 48, Snow-hill . While I was standing at Mr. Warwick's door, between seven and eight o'clock on the 1st of September, I saw the prisoner jump up and take this box out of Mr. Health's cart while it was passing by. He took the box upon his shoulder and ran away with it. I informed the carter that a man had taken a box out of his cart; he went with me, and we found him in Fleet-market. I never lost sight of him but for about two minutes, when I went to tell the carman what had happened. I will swear the prisoner is the man. (The box was produced in court and deposed to by the witness.) When he was taken I observed this mark Spencer of Hempstead.

RICHARD GRAY sworn.

I was driving the cart. I had two boxes in it, this was one of them. Dawson told me of it. I pursued him a little way; having nobody with the cart I returned back and did not see him taken.

GUY WARWICK sworn.

I was standing behind the counter; Dawson told me the man had taken the box; Dawson and I followed the prisoner and took him.

(The box and its contents were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man gave me the box.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-25

464. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing a gold watch, value 14 l. and another watch with a gold case, value 6 l. the property of Jane Hatch , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said Jane , August the 1st .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

JANE HATCH sworn.

I live in St. James's-street . I lost two watches; I know nothing more of it; my maid saw the man and can give an account of it.

What were the watches? - Both gold; one was in an enamelled case. I keep a toyshop; they were in the glass case.

HANNAH CLAYTON sworn.

I live with Miss Hatch. On the 1st of August, at about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, as I was on my knees lighting the fire in the parlour adjoining to the shop, I heard a glass case in the shop shut down; I lifted up my head and saw the prisoner in the shop; I kept my eyes upon him, but before I could get upon my legs he got out of the shop and ran towards the Palace. I immediately pursued him, and never lost sight of him; when I came to the Stable-yard, St. James's; he passed a soldier; I called to the soldier to stop that man, that he was a thief; that soldier and another pursued him; he was taken about twenty yards on the other side Penny's gate; I came up immediately; he had thrown the watches over the wall into the garden; there was a man in the Park appeared to be a friend to him.

WILLIAM CARELESS sworn.

On the 1st of August, between eight and nine in the morning, I was coming up St. James's Park from Buckingham-gate; in one of the walks by the side of the mall, just as I came opposite the stable-yard gate I heard somebody call out stop that man! I turned my head and saw the prisoner run; he came out of the stable-yard into the Park, ran a little way down, made a stop, and drew something out of his right-hand breeches knee, and threw it over the wall into Lord Godolphin's garden; I could not distinguish at that distance what it was, but it appeared to be round, and something was hanging to it. I was in the farthest walk but one from the stable yard gate; he was in the coach-way; I saw several people, particularly some soldiers, run towards him; when I came up to them I saw Miss Hatche's servant a good deal confused; I asked what was the matter and what she had lost? She said she did not know justly, but she believed watches. He said I have no watches but one of my own, and pulled one out. Knowing he had thrown something over the wall, I desired the people to take care of him while I got the key to see what he had thrown over.

Jury. Did you see distinctly two round things? - No, only one at that time. Some of the people said the garden belonged to Lord Godolphin; I went to Lord Godolphin's, and one of the servants and I went into the garden to look, and almost opposite the bottom of the garden, where I thought he threw them, we looked about, and his lordship's servant found two watches; I saw him pick them up. The people brought the prisoner round to his lordship's door.

ROBERT ROACH sworn.

I live with Lord Godolphin. I picked up the watches on the border of the garden, just by the garden wall; Mr. Careless was with me.

(The watches were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel. I know no more of the watches than the child unborn. As I was going into the park between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of stop thief! I ran as well as many others. When I was in the park they cried stop that man with the apron! I having an apron on stopped to see who they meant, and they laid hold of me, and searched me, and took my watch out of my pocket.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am a soldier belonging to the Cold-stream regiment. I was in the park when this happened. I heard a woman call stop him! stop him! I made a stop and saw the prisoner coming into the park, and saw two soldiers lay hold of him, and heard some contest. I was not nigh enough to hear what they said; I did not see him attempt to throw any thing over; my eyes were upon him all the time.

Did you see him stop to take any thing out of his breeches? - No, I was almost opposite Penny's gate, just upon the hill; I had a good prospect of him.

THOMAS PRITCHARD sworn.

I am rider to a gentleman in the brandy way. I have known the prisoner three or four years; he is a wax-chandler; I never heard any harm of him in my life.

To Miss Hatch. What is the value of the watches? - About twenty pounds.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. BARON HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-26

565. DONKEY FILLEYSON was indicted for stealing two large silver table spoons, value 30 s. the property of John Sowerby , August 4th .

JOHN SOWERBY sworn.

I live in Butcher-row, Temple bar . I lost two silver table spoons, on the 4th of August, out of a drawer in the bar. I put them there about a quarter of an hour before I missed them. The prisoner came to live with me the day before; I had him from an office; he gave me a direction to go to Westminster to enquire his character, but I had not had time to go. I missed him before I missed the spoons; upon missing the spoons I went to Westminster where he had directed me, but could not find that he had lived there. I took him the Tuesday following in Westminster.

WILLIAM GARDNER sworn.

I took a spoon in pawn of the prisoner on the 4th of August. He used to bring things for his mother; I always found her to be a very honest woman till this affair happened; she lodges at a chandler's shop in Windmill-street.

(The spoon was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM WHISGRAVE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in a silver table-spoon on the 4th of August of the prisoner. I have known him and his mother five or six years; he used to come to our shop very often on his mother's account; I lent him five shillings upon it.

(That spoon was likewise produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went out with some beer; there was another boy who said if I did not get some spoons from my master he would do me a mischief.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBSON sworn.

The prisoner was my servant twelve months; he was in my house all that time as my other servants were; I never missed any thing; his mother is a poor but very honest woman.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-27

466. THOMAS COX , labourer , was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 6 l. a silver salt-cellar, value 8 s. a silver salt-spoon, value 12 d. a silver table spoon, value 14 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. and two silver crewet tops, value 1 s. the property of William Cox , in the dwelling-house of the said William , July 17th .

WILLIAM COX sworn.

I live at Colnbrooke . On the 17th of July, about one o'clock at noon I lost the things mentioned in the indictment ( repeating them); I had seen them all in the bar, except the tankard, about ten minutes before I missed them. This gentleman (the prisoner) came and had a dinner at my house.

In company or alone? - By himself; the waiter came out of the room, and when he returned the gentleman was gone. The waiter came and asked me if I had seen him, or he had paid his reckoning? I told him I had not seen him. He said the tops of the castors were gone; he went back and then missed the spoons. I have a letter (producing it) which came from the prisoner on Sunday last.

How do you know it came from him? - I suppose so, it has his name to it.

Prisoner. When you sent your servant after me I had not left your house for good, I had not paid for what I had had.

Cox. You had got two or three hundred yards, almost to the turnpike.

Prisoner. I had not paid you? - No, and I suppose you never intended it.

THOMAS AVERLIN sworn.

I live with Mr. Cox. The prisoner came to dine at my master's house; I attended upon him; my master carried in part of the dinner, and I followed him; there was on the table a silver table spoon, a silver salt and salt spoon, and two crewets with silver tops. I brought him a pint of beer in a china pint mug; I set it down on the table by him, and went out of the room; I staid out some time, and then went back to see if he had done dinner; when I went into the room he was gone, and I missed the things off the table; I am sure they were there when I went out. I went into the next room and missed a silver tankard off the side-board. I saw it in that room when I shewed the prisoner into the room where he dined. He went through the room where the tankard was. I went and told my master, and five or six of us went in pursuit of him; my fellow servant overtook him, and I saw him brought back.

JOSEPH STURMON sworn.

When the plate was missed I took a horse and went after the prisoner immediately; I overtook him in the London road, about three hundred yards from our house; I rode up to him and asked him what he had got in his pocket? He asked me what business it was of mine? and said what he had got was

his own. I told him I did not know whether it was or not, and insisted upon seeing. He said I should not, I might take it out of his pocket if I dared. I brought him back and we sent for a constable. The prisoner was searched in my presence; I saw the silver tankard taken out of his side pocket, and a silver spoon. I did not stand to see all the things particularly taken out. He said they were his own.

Cross Examination.

Was he perfectly sober then? - He was very sober as far as I saw.

It was not the conduct of a sober man before you and your master to say the tankard was his own? - He insisted upon it that it was his own.

Was he out of his mind? - Not that I know of.

WILLIAM LLOYD sworn.

I am a constable. The plate we took from the prisoner has been in my possession ever since the 17th of July. It was all taken out of his pockets (producing the several articles).

(They were deposed to by the prosecutor, they were marked W. M. C.)

To Lloyd. What did he say for himself when the things were found upon him? - Nothing at all.

Counsel for the prisoner to the prosecutor. W C are the initials of your name? - Yes.

You did not put them on yourself? - No.

You know his name is Cox? - Thomas Cox .

Counsel. But his father's name was William Cox .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I submit to your lordship that this indictment cannot be maintained against me; I have heard it read, I find I am described as a labourer. I am an attorney of the King's Bench, and should have been described as a gentleman. I submit to your lordship this indictment cannot be supported against me. I have not my admission about me, I can send for it.

Court. You pleaded to the indictment as a labourer.

Prisoner. I was under a necessity of doing that.

Court. No, you was not; you might have pleaded in abatement.

Prisoner. I presume I am not too late before judgement.

To the prosecutor. You have known this man a long time? - I believe he was at my house the night before, and ran away without paying me.

Court. What is the value of that tankard? - Six pounds; it cost me seven.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

THOMAS COX , labourer, was indicted for stealing four silver table-spoons, value 42 s. the property of William Vaughan , in the dwelling house of the said William , July 15th .

WILLIAM VAUGHAN sworn.

I keep a publick-house in New Palace-yard, Westminster . On Sunday morning the 16th of July I missed four silver tablespoons out of the cupboard of the bar. I had had them in my hand on Saturday at about four in the afternoon; the prisoner was lurking about the house three or four times on the Saturday. He asked me to dine with him the next day on a goose. I have known him some years.

What is he? - I do not know; he calls himself an attorney; on missing the spoons, I went round to the pawnbrokers in the neighbourhood and found them at Mr. Joseph Wassels , a pawnbroker in the Broad Sanctuary; the prisoner was taken up, and I was sent for to the justice's.

JOSEPH WASSELS sworn.

These spoons (producing them) were pawned with me between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday night by the prisoner.

Did you know his person before? - Yes, perfectly well. He said they were left him by some relation; I think he said his father. He asked me two guineas on them; I lent

him twenty-six shillings; they have been in my possession ever since.

What is the value of them? - About forty-five or forty-six shillings.

What are they worth as old silver? - About five or six and forty shillings; they weigh nine ounces at least.

Prosecutor. They are my property; my name is upon them.

Prisoner. My lord I have the same objection to this indictment that I am not rightly described. I have no witnesses.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-28

467. MARY HURST widow , was indicted for stealing six linen towels, value 3 s. a dimity bed-gown, value 2 s. a child's dimity cloak, value 2 s. three linen table-cloths, value 10 s. and three linen napkins, value 3 s. the property of Matthew Smith , July 30th .

ANN SMITH sworn.

My husband's name is Matthew Smith . On the 13th of July, at about twelve o'clock, I was informed a person had come out of my house with a bundle. I got several people to go after her; the prisoner was taken and brought back with the things mentioned in the indictment upon her; some of them belong to a Mrs. Vallans, the rest belong to Mrs. Blewett; I had them to wash.

THOMAS KENNEDY sworn.

As I was going along to my work I happened to meet a woman with these things; I am partly sure it is the prisoner, but I cannot swear it is her; I met her just above Harrow Stock-hill, Hempstead. The girl, who belonged to the house the linen was taken from, desired me to stop her. I did, and took her to Mr. Edwards, the constable; there I saw her searched, and the things mentioned in the indictment were found upon her; they were loose in her apron.

SIMON EDWARDS sworn.

I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me by the last witness with a bundle of linen in her apron; it has been in my possession ever since.

(The linen was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Edwards. I asked her how she came to rob a labouring woman? She said, The Devil led her into the house. I asked her if she lifted up the latch? She said no, the door was open.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found them on the road.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-29

468. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a pair of silver sauce-boats, value 7 l. 7 s. the property of William Marchant , April 24th .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

WILLIAM MARCHANT sworn.

I am a silversmith , and live in Holbourn . The prisoner came to me on Saturday the 22d of April and bought two pair of buckles and a gold watch-key. He asked me if I could give him change for a large note? I told him I could not. He said it was of no consequence he would give me an order upon the Bar of Gray's-Inn Coffee-house for the money, which was thirty shillings; he wrote upon a piece of paper

"Please to pay to the

"bearer thirty shillings; the Bar of Gray's Inn Coffee-house. J. Williams." I went and delivered the parcel and receipt at the Bar, and they paid me the money; that was on the 22d. On Monday the 24th he came to me again; he then agreed with me for a pair of silver sauce-boats; he desired I would pack them up and carry them to Gray's-Inn Coffee-house and he would pay me for them. I took them there; the prisoner was sitting at one of the tables going to breakfast. I went up to him and presented my boats. He took his purse out of his pocket and threw out about five guineas and a few shillings upon the table, and said; I have not quite money enough. I shall be glad of another pair of buckles, such as those I had of you on Saturday; can you let me have a pair? I said, I

believed I had not a pair of the same pattern by me but I would see at my maker's whether there was a pair in hand. He desired to have them by twelve o'clock. I was going to take away the boats with me and to return at twelve to have brought them with the buckles. He said, Perhaps you may not be back here at the time; leave the boats at the bar and I will pay for them there, if you should not return. I had no objection to that. I went up with him to the bar and left them with the bar-maid. I said to her, You are to receive seven guineas of this gentleman for this parcel; then I went to see after the buckles. As I was going out the prisoner said, You will be back again by twelve o'clock? I said yes, I shall. I returned exactly at twelve, then I found he was gone and had got the boats but had not paid for them. They said he had left word he should be there at twelve or half after, but he did not come back at all.

When did you get your boats again? - I have never got them again; he offered to give them up before the Lord Mayor if I would not prosecute him, but I rather chose to prosecute; he was taken up on the 11th of May, at the London Coffee-house; he was there upon the same sort of business; as I had given information he was stopped upon that business.

Cross Examination.

Do you know him? - I never knew him before that Saturday.

Then perhaps you do not know what business he is? - No other than what I have heard.

He offered to return your boats before my lord mayor? - He did, or to pay for them, but the lord mayor would not consent to it.

I believe you first went before Justice Addington upon this business, and obtained a warrant from him against the prisoner? - I did.

Have you got that warrant now? - I have not; the warrant was for obtaining goods under false pretences. Justice Addington would not grant it otherwise, the first warrant was drawn out for felony, but Justice Addington would not sign that warrant.

That warrant was executed upon the prisoner? - It was backed in the city; the warrant was granted after he was committed for an affair in the county.

Was that warrant of Justice Addington's lodged against him? - I believe it was.

Then after that how came you to apply for a warrant for a felony? - From the advice of gentlemen whom I thought much better judges of the affair than myself.

Prisoner. The day I bought these buckles of you did not I say to you I want a pair of silver sauce boats; I was going to let out a first floor, furnished; you shewed me a pair of nine guineas; now if I had-had a mind to rob you might not I as well have taken those of nine guineas as these? - That was your policy to deceive me.

Prisoner. Instead of leaving his bill and receipt with the people at the coffee-house for this money, he took the bill and receipt away again? - I left the bill and receipt.

You left the bill and receipt with the bar-maid? - Yes, to receive the money for me; it was made for seven pounds, eight shillings. I said to the young woman, you observe the gentleman is to pay you only seven guineas, as we had agreed for that sum.

SARAH PASTOR sworn.

I am bar-keeper at the Gray's-Inn Coffee-house. On a Monday, I do not know the day of the month, Mr. Marchant brought a pair of silver sauce-boats between eleven and twelve o'clock, and told me when I delivered that parcel to Mr. Williams I was to receive seven pounds, seven shillings; it was left with me in the bar. Mr. Marchant went away. I was called out of the bar, and then the waiter delivered the parcel to Mr. Williams.

Was there any bill and receipt left with you? - Yes, there was.

Was you to deliver the parcel and that bill and receipt when Williams paid the money? - I was.

THOMAS PARKES sworn.

I am a waiter at this coffee-house; the first time I ever saw the prisoner, to my knowledge, was Saturday the 22d of April; he came to the coffee-house and dined there; he bought a parcel at that time of Mr. Marchant, which he ordered to be left at the

bar with a bill and receipt. He took the parcel from the bar and paid the money and went away. On the Monday following he came in the morning to breakfast at the coffee-house; after he had had his breakfast he paid me for it, and told me to give him a parcel which was left for him in the bar; at that time there was nobody in the bar. I went into the bar and seeing only one parcel lying there I brought it out and gave it to him, which parcel I saw him carry off; when the young woman came into the bar I told her I had delivered the parcel. She said, Good God! there is a bill and receipt, and the money was to have been paid, which I know nothing of.

Did you see the bill and receipt there? - Yes, I did then, but not before; I saw no more of Mr. Williams from that time till he was taken up at the London Coffee-house.

How long did he stay in the coffee-room after you delivered him the parcel? - He went away immediately.

Do you recollect how long the woman had been out of the bar before he spoke to you to deliver him this parcel? - As near as I can recollect not more than two minutes.

Was she not in the room at that time? - No, she was gone out of the room.

How long was it before she returned again? - Not more than ten minutes.

(The counsel for the prisoner submitted to the court, that the case proved against the prisoner did not amount to felony. The learned judges were unanimously of opinion that under the circumstances of the case it clearly amounted to felony.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I acknowledge going on the day the prosecutor says, and agreeing for this parcel. I had taken an house and was going to lett the first floor, furnished, at a guinea and an half a week. I made use of no false pretence to the waiter; I do not recollect that the maid ever went out; I went up to the bar; I saw the waiter; I asked for it, and he gave it me; neither did I go with the prosecutor up to the bar as has been mentioned. I offered to return those very boats five weeks after, as I had not sold them.

GUILTY . N. 3 years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-30

469. OWEN SULIVAN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 15 s. the property of John Turner , July 16th .

JOHN TURNER sworn.

On the 16th of July my watch was taken out of a little kind of counting-house between three and four in the afternoon.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought me this watch; there were three or four other persons with him; it was on the 26th of July; I believe it was delivered to me by one of the others; it was offered to sale. I had seen it advertised in the Hue and Cry. I asked to whom it belonged? The prisoner said it is mine. I immediately took him into custody.

(The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a countryman; I came to town one day; a man told me he had got a watch, we were at work at Paddington; I saw him talking to a man a little way off; he said he bought this watch for fifteen shillings; I gave him seven shillings and sixpence for half of it; when the other man went away then I went up to a gentleman's at Paddington and gave him seven shillings and sixpence more for it, and bought it all. I met a bricklayer near St. Giles's, he said if I would give him a gallon of beer he would help me to work. I said I had no money, I had only got a watch. We went to a publick-house, he called for a gallon of beer to drink; the bricklayer made me leave the watch there for it; he was to call next morning to carry me to work; he did not call. I never released the watch from the publick house, but the

lieutenant did. I told them the watch was mine; the lieutenant would not let me have it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM,

Reference Number: t17800913-31

470. GRACE MADDOCKS was indicted for stealing a piece of linen cloth containing twenty-five yards, value 30 s. the property of Jacob Worthy , privately and secretly, in the shop of the said Jacob , August 2d .

ISAAC HAWLEY sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Worthy, a silk mercer, linen-draper, and hosier , what is call a warehouseman, in Hanway-street, Oxford-road . The prisoner has several times come to our shop. On the 2d of August she came in between six and seven in the evening. I believed she had several times used our shop before. When she came in I was showing a customer some Irish cloth; I opened several pieces. The prisoner did not speak at all. I laid a piece on the counter; while I was showing the customer another piece I missed this piece of Irish from the counter. The prisoner was still in the shop; I was on the same side of the counter she was; I went close to her and asked her what she wanted, for I suspected her. She asked if I had any gymp or fringe? I said No. She turned round directly and walked out of the shop; I followed her into the street, between the two doors of the shop, I took her round the shoulders and asked her for a piece of Irish; she immediately said take it. I put my hand under her cloak and took it out. She had got it concealed under her cloak. She said do with me what you please, I do not care. A constable was sent for, and she was committed to his charge.

What is the value of this piece of linen? - Thirty shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I went to the shop I asked the gentleman for some trimming. He asked me what sort? I said Pink. He said he had none. When I went to buy the trimming, I wanted to buy a bit of cloth for a pair of shift sleeves; seeing him show this cloth, it was a dark shop, I took it to the door to look at it; the gentleman followed me out and said I wanted to take it away.

Court. Did you see her look at it? - No, she had it concealed under her cloak.

(The prisoner called two witnesses who said she was a civil well behaved honest girl; who, when out of service, was employed in making stop work and soldier's clothes ; and they said she was about twenty years of age.

GUILTY ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy on account of her youth .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-32

471. WILLIAM LONG was indicted for stealing one thousand prince's metal nails, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Shrimpton , John Russell , and William Ewster , July 13th .

WILLIAM JONATHAN EADE sworn.

I am apprentice to Messrs. Thomas Shrimpton , John Russell , and William Ewster , who are ironmonger s. On the 13th of July, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the warehouse at a time when there was only a boy serving two customers, finding the boy had more to do than he could manage, I went into the shop. I found the prisoner at the counter; he said he wanted a halfpenny worth of tacks; the article being so trifling, and having seen him pass the door twice before, I suspected him. I served him with the tacks, and as he went out of the warehouse I saw a parcel in his pocket; I desired Mr. Lynam to follow him. He and Samuel Fowler both went out after him, and brought him back; the nails were found in the church-yard.

GEORGE LYNAM sworn.

I am shopman to Messrs. Shrimpton and Co. I went after the prisoner; he was stopped by Fowler between thirty and forty yards from our shop. We brought him back.

Fowler said he had thrown the parcel over into the church-yard. I got over the wall and found the parcel.

SAMUEL FOWLER sworn.

I overtook the prisoner; he had the parcel in his right-hand pocket. I took hold of his collar; he put his hand in his pocket and took it out, and chucked it over the wall. When we brought him back he said he had done it through distress.

(The nails were produced in court by the constable and deposed to by William Eade .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw the parcel lying on the ground as I came out of the shop; I thought somebody else might drop it; I took it up and put it in my pocket.

GUILTY W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-33

472. MARY STRICKLAND was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a cornelian seal set in silver, value 12 d. and a steel watch key, value 1 d. the property of James Miles , August 26th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-34

473. DAVID HART was indicted for stealing a pair of leather saddle-bags, value 10 s. three l inen shirts, value 12 s. two linen stocks, value 2 s. a cambrick handkerchief, value 6 d. a pair of leather breeches, value 5 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 2 s. a pair of metal shoe-buckles, value 3 d. a cotton waistcoat, value 7 s. three printed linen handkerchiefs, value 12 d. a pair of thread hose, value 1 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 12 d. a cotton night-cap, value 3 d. and a metal stock-buckle , the property of John Watson , John Ward , and John Parson , July 1st .

(The Witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

JACOB SAMUEL MISTREZATT sworn.

I am book-keeper to the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane . On the first of July, between two and three o'clock, I received a pair of saddle-bags of a boy to go by the Norwich coach, directed to George Hubbard , of Wacton-Hall, Norfolk. I booked them, and put them in a place under the counter, where we deposite all the goods which go by that coach. Between nine and ten o'clock, when we were getting the parcels ready to go by the coach, they were called over by the coachman, and the bags were there then, I saw them myself; they were placed on one end of the counter, near the door; I was copying the bill from the book; I heard a scuffle on the outside, I went out and saw the prisoner and the coachman struggling; they had each of them hold of the bags; the coachman was pulling them into the office. William Wilson came to the assistance of the coachman, and they brought the prisoner in, and I fetched Mr. Heley, who keeps the tap, and he secured him.

JAMES BROWN sworn.

I am coachman to the Norwich coach, at the Swan with Two Necks. On the 1st of July I was going to load my coach; I went to take up some parcels on my left-hand, and as I turned about I missed the bags; I had had them in my hand not above a minute before; somebody called out the Norwich! the Norwich! I went out and saw the prisoner with the bags in his hand; I seised him by the collar, and took them from him, and brought him back into the warehouse.

WILLIAM WILSON sworn.

I am book-keeper at the Swan with Two Necks, but am not in the same office; I stood at my own office door, looking at this coach, which was going off; I saw the prisoner come out of the office with the pair of saddle-bags on his right-arm; the coachman called out to him and asked him where he was going with the bags? He said to Norwich. The coachman came out and laid hold of the prisoner, and took the bags from him.

What did the prisoner say? - All he said was, you do not take me to be a thief do you?

Was he dressed smart then? - Yes. He said nothing about the bags in my hearing.

JOSEPH GATES sworn.

These bags (producing them) were delivered to me at Guildhall, by the coachman Brown, this direction was upon them.

Brown. These are the bags, and that is the direction I called the numbers over by; they are the same, I took them from the prisoner.

What are the persons' names who keep the coach? - John Ward , John Pearson , the other person's name is Watson, but I do not know his christian name.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The gentleman came in and said he did not think I was the man; Heley, one of Sir John Fielding 's men, came and said I was a very bad man, and they used me very ill.

For the prisoner.

LUCY GRAY sworn.

I am a servant at Rotherhithe. I have known the prisoner four or five years; he is a dealer, and buys clothes and watches . On the 1st of July I met Mr. Hart in Cheapside and asked him to go with me to the Swan-with-two-necks. I said I had some money to receive from an aunt of mine from Norwich; he went with me; we were going up the yard; there lay several bags on the ground; I had like to have tumbled over them. I said to Hart there is something lies here; I picked it up immediately and gave it him into his hand. He said it belonged to one of the coaches he supposed; he would go and carry them to the book-house; the coachman laid hold of him as he was going up the yard.

Did he call any body? - No; he went straight up, and the coachman laid hold of him.

When you went into the yard did you call out to any body or any coach? - No; I was going to the book-house.

Court. How long were you in the yard before you saw the bags? - We saw them directly.

You had business there, why did not you call out for any body? - I asked for the coachman; they said I could not see him that night, I must call the next day, that was after the prisoner was laid hold of.

To Brown. Can you be certain whether in carrying out a number of things to the coach you might not have carried out these bags and dropped them in the yard? - I had not carried any thing out of the warehouse at that time.

To Gray. You went to receive money, how much? - Two guineas; my cousin came the next week and brought it.

How happened you to go to the Swan-with-two-Necks? - Because I had a letter.

Have you it here? - No.

(The book-keeper's book was produced in which there was an entry corresponding with the direction on the bags.)

THOMAS BALLARD sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Kirby. The prisoner was confined in Wood-street Compter; there was a man escaped out of the same room; he might have escaped if he would.

(The prisoner called two other witness who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . Impr. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-35

474. SIMON SAMUEL was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Plummer , September 1st .

ELISABETH PLUMMER sworn.

I am cook at the Bull-Inn, Bishopgate-street . On Friday night, the 1st of September, between eleven and twelve at night, the prisoner came in for a bed; I went to call the chamber-maid, and when I returned I missed my handkerchief off the kitchen-dresser; the prisoner was gone out again, and got half-way up the gateway. I followed him, and called out, Stop him! and he was brought back into the kitchen; my handkerchief was found on the second step of the stairs, in the yard, where he was to go up to bed; he was brought back by those stairs my young mistress was in the kitchen, and saw him take it.

ELISABETH SIMPSON sworn.

I was in the kitchen, the prisoner came in and asked for a bed; the cook-maid went to

call the chambermaid; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief off the dresser, and go out; I called after him; the cook came immediately, and followed him, and he was brought back; he acknowledged taking the handkerchief, and said he was in liquor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the Bull-Inn for a bed; I did not go into the kitchen, only within the gates; the young woman went to call the chambermaid; then they called after me, and said I had stolen something; they searched me; I had nothing upon me.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY , imprisoned 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-36

475. JANE JOHNSON and ELISABETH JONES were indicted for stealing seventeen guineas; a piece of foreign gold coin, value 9 s. a piece of foreign silver coin, value 3 s. one shilling and a silk purse, value 1 s. the property of Andree Gothard , August 4th .

ANDREE GOTHARD sworn.

I am a tailor , in St. Martin's-lane. On the 4th of August I was going to the Tower, between three and four o'clock in the morning, to see some friends who were going to Holland.

Was you in liquor, or sober? - I was very sober; there was a woman near Temple-bar catched hold of my arm, and told me she had something to say to me; I would not speak to her; she took hold of me, and walked to the next street.

Do you know who that woman was? - I did not know her before; I know her perfectly well now, it was Jane Johnson ; we walked to the corner, and then I felt her hand about my pocket; she looked about, and said, Stop, there is somebody coming; she ran away, and then I missed my purse; there were in it seventeen guineas, a gold ducat, a Queen Anne's shilling, a dollar, and eight little pieces of foreign money; I am sure I had it in my pocket before I met her.

Was it light enough to distinguish her? - Yes, I pursued her immediately, and came up with her on the other side Temple-bar.

Did you ever lose sight of her? - Yes, in turning the corner of that street, but I soon had her in sight again.

Was any person with her? - No, not at that time; when I came up with her, I said she had taken my purse; she said it was no such a thing; then I called out for the watch; the watch came, and some people came and asked what was the matter? I said the woman had taken my purse out of my pocket with so much money in it; the watchman came, and the other prisoner came too, and made herself very busy, and said they should let that woman alone; as she was so busy, the people said I should search both; they were both secured, and taken to the watch-house.

Before you met with Johnson, are you sure you had the money? - Yes, I felt it just when I was with her, walking in the street.

SAMUEL PLANT sworn.

I am houseman at St. Dunstan's watch-house. On the 4th of August, a little after three in the morning, I was in Fleet-street, waiting for the watchman coming up; I heard a person cry out two or three times, You have robbed me! I sent two or three watchman to where I heard the call; in a few minutes after they brought these two young women up to the watch-house; the prosecutor said Jane Johnson had robbed him of his watch and seventeen guineas; Jones said, I am innocent, and you shall search me; Jones was searched, and the money in the purse was found hid up in a corner of her gown; I opened the purse, and found the money in it that the prosecutor had mentioned; there were twelve guineas in a piece of leather, and five loose.

(The purse and money were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To the prosecutor. At the time you was with Johnson, are you sure there was no other woman near you but her? - No, I saw no other in that street.

JOHNSON's DEFENCE.

I was coming by Temple-bar at half after three o'clock, at the corner of Bell-yard there was a young man and woman together; the woman ran across the way; he called watch, watch! and laid hold of me directly and I was taken to the watch-house. About ten minutes after that this young woman was brought to the watch-house, she said she had kicked something before her.

(Jones was not put on her defence.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-37

476. MARY OSBORN , spinster , was indicted for stealing three linen handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a laced tucker, value 1 s. and three linen napkins, value 9 s. the property of Ann Palmer , spinster ; three linen shifts, value 12 s. a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. a quilted petticoat, value 18 s. and a pair of laced robbins, value 4 s. the property of Elisabeth Caton , spinster ; a pair of linen sheets, value 8 s. two linen petticoats, value 3 s. six cotton handkerchiefs, value 10 s. three linen handkerchiefs, value 6 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. a linen napkin, value 3 s. three linen table-cloths, value 8 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. a silk gown, value 5 s. four yards of linen bordering, value 4 s. a pair of laced robbins, value 8 s. and two muslin aprons, value 5 s. the property of Frances Caton , in the dwelling-house of the said Frances Caton , and Elisabeth Caton , September 9th .

Miss FRANCES CATON sworn.

I live in Pall Mall . On the 9th of September, I discharged Mary Osborne as servant , because she did not suit me; she had lived with me about four months; she was cook. On the day before she went she willingly unlocked her boxes and I found several things of mine in them; there has lately been only herself in the house as a servant.

You was in town yourself? - I was.

Where did you leave these things before you found them in her box? - In different rooms in the house.

Had she any thing to do with them? - Yes, to wash and to put them by. When I found them in her box I took them out; I asked her what she had to say for herself? She told me nothing. That was Saturday night. I let her go. I took her up on Monday morning, upon finding many other things missing.

Look at these.

(The several articles mentioned in the indictment were produced in court and deposed to by Miss Caton.)

Whose house do you live in? - My sister Elisabeth Caton 's house.

Prisoner. Miss Caton gave me a great many of these things when my old mistress died. - I did not give her one of them; I told her she might either go or stay till I was settled, but I gave her nothing; the things belonged to another lady which was at our house.

What is the value of the whole of these things? - I would not charge them at more than twenty shillings.

THOMAS CARTWRIGHT sworn.

I had a warrant against the prisoner; I found out her lodgings in John-street, Tottenham-court-road; I found her on Monday the 11th; the lady said she missed a great many more things she had not found; I asked the prisoner if she had got any thing in her boxes belonging to the lady? She said she had not. I desired her to open her boxes; there were four, I think; in them I found these things which the lady has sworn to.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My mistress did not give me warning, I gave her warning; her mama was taken with fits, and was very ill, I used to attend her; I sat up with her when she died; I laid her out, my mistress desired me to do it; it is a customary thing to have all that was about a corpse when it is laid out; there were three sheets about her; when they were moving the linen there were but two old servants sheets laid upon the bed; I left them there, and took one off my own bed instead of

the three that she died in; my mistress promised me mourning, but she never gave me any thing but an old gown; she ordered me to take it to the mantua-maker's to fit me, and then she took it again, and would not return me the money the mantua-maker charged for it; I did two servants work, because she would keep but one, to oblige her; we had words, and she took me up out of spite.

Court. Upon the melancholy event of your mother's death, did you give her any thing, or was she to have any thing? - A few trifling things; I gave her none of these things.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-38

477. FRANCES PARKE otherwise SPARKES , spinster , was indicted for stealing a Bank note, value 10 l. and a bill of exchange, value 20 l. the property of William Thomas , privately and secretly from the person of the said William , June 6th .

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn.

I am a copper-roller to the Gnoll copper-company. Upon the 4th of August, another clerk belonging to the company and myself came to London. I went to Piccadilly, and there met the prisoner and another woman; I went with these two women to a tavern; from thence, after having sat and drank three or four hours or more, I do not know how long, I was drunk, and I suppose the rest were so too, I went with the prisoner to Hedge-lane . I sat on the bed and dropped asleep; at six next morning I waked and found my pocket had been picked of a note and bill; my watch was gone, but I found it on the bed. The prisoner did not live in that house; I went back to Piccadilly and enquiring of the woman who was with my friend, I found out where the prisoner lodged; I went to her lodgings and took her up. I am sure I had the note and bill in my pocket when I went to Hedge lane; I felt it in my pocket a few minutes before I went there. Upon my telling the prisoner it would be better for her, she confessed taking the bills. I found the door open when I waked in the morning.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I do not know whether I went upon my head or my heels, I was so intoxicated; as I was going along the room I stooped to buckle my shoe, and kicked something before me; I looked down, and under the corner of the table, where the negus was, I saw a piece of paper; I thought it was a piece of a letter I had pulled out with my pocket handkerchief; I put it in my pocket. I was much intoxicated; I had been with him from seven in the evening; I gave him a direction to my lodgings, expecting him to call again. I never removed from my lodgings. He gave me 2 s. before he went with me.

To the Prosecutor. Did you give her two shillings? - Yes, I told her my wife was

in the country, I would have nothing to do with her.

How came you to go with her? - To oblige my neighbour.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-39

478. MARY the wife of Henry WELLS was indicted for stealing twenty guineas, a linen shirt, value 3 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. and four pieces of silk, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Perry , in the dwelling house of the said Joseph , August 2d .

JOSEPH PERRY sworn.

I keep an house in Brewer's-yard, Rosemary-lane, in the parish of Aldgate . On the 2d of August I went into the country at about three o'clock in the morning; I left twenty guineas in the drawer. I cannot be positive whether it was locked; I found it open; I thought I had locked it. I likewise lost a shirt and a shift, and three or four pieces of silk. The constable has what money was left unspent. The other things were found in the prisoner's apartment. I had hired the prisoner on the Sunday to look after my children, because my wife was dead. The little children she took home every night. I came home on the 5th of August, then I heard she had had 200 l. left her; not hearing of that before I suspected it was mine. I looked and missed my money; I took her in the morning in bed. The constable charged her with taking the money out of my drawer. She owned she had taken the money out of the drawer, and laid out nineteen guineas of it. I was with the constable when he took her out of bed. She said her husband was innocent, that she alone was guilty of the fact.

Did you say it would be better for her to to confess? - No. She owned what she had bought, and gave us two guineas, two half crowns, and a Holland's doit back out of the money. The next day we went and searched her apartment, and found the shirt, shift, and silk.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Who did you leave in the house when you went away? - She had the whole care of the house, I left nobody in it but her and five infants; I saw the money the night before, between eleven and twelve o'clock, when I went to bed.

Prisoner. I never was in trouble before. I leave it to the mercy of the Jury to do what they will with me.

JOHN HERBERT sworn.

I am an officer in Whitechapel parish. The prosecutor came to the watch-house and desired me to go with him to the prisoner's lodgings. When I came to the room she got up and opened the door; I told her she was my prisoner. I told her if she had done any thing amiss to own it; upon that she said she had robbed him of twenty guineas.

Did you tell her it would be better for her? - I looked upon it in that light that it would be better for her.

She said nothing before you told her that? - I cannot say; he was in the room as soon as I; I did not hear him say any thing.

Perry. I said nothing to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-40

479. MARY COLLINS was indicted for stealing two linen sheets, value 4 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 1 s. a looking-glass in a mahogany frame, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. a brass candlestick, value 6 d. and a bolster, value 6 d. the property of John Davis , the said goods being in a lodging room, let by contract by the said John Davis , to the said Mary Collins , July 22d .

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. In June last, I let a room in our house, in Little St. Andrew's-street, Seven Dials , to the prisoner, by the week, and with it the goods mentioned in the indictment. I went up into the prisoner's room, and missed all the goods I had let to her with the room. She said they were at an acquaintance's in Long-acre. I

told her if she would let me know where they were I would contribute something towards getting them out of pawn; she refused to inform me. I sent for a constable and gave him charge of her.

ROBERT DIBBLE sworn.

The prisoner pledged these things with me.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My husband went away and left me with two small children. I was greatly distressed; I meant to get them out of pawn on Tuesday and restore them, but they took me up on the Monday.

(The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. three months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-41

480. CHRISTOPHER TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing a linen bag, value 1 s. a cloth coat, value 5 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 1 s. a linen frock, value 2 s. a cloth great coat. value 1 s. seven linen shirts, value 20 s. a linen handkerchief, value 16 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 1 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 6 d. and two horse nets, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Jessup , June 24th .

THOMAS JESSUP sworn.

I live at Peterborough. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment. I sent them from Bedford to London by the Bedford waggon. They were to be left at the Bear and Ragged Staff in Smithfield. I saw them afterwards in the possession of Isaacs.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

Upon the 24th of June, I saw one Martin Taylor , and the prisoner go along with bundles; I followed them to a pawnbroker's, there I took the things, mentioned in the indictment, from them. Martin Taylor was admitted king's evidence. I found the bag, the shoes, the stockings, great coat and the net, by the direction of the evidence, in Townsend's lodgings, on Saffron-hill.

(The goods were all produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

MARTIN TAYLOR sworn.

On the 24th of June last, Townsend and I were out together between three and four o'clock in the morning; we met this waggon on the other side of Islington Workhouse ; I got up into it, and took this bag out, and we went to Townsend's; there we separated the things; he took one bundle and I carried two to the pawnbroker's. Isaacs and another constable came and took us there with the things upon us.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was not with him, I only met him; he said they were his wife's things. I was not out with him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-42

481. SARAH KING was indicted for stealing eight guineas and half a crown in monies, numbered , the property of James M'Donald , August 2d .

JAMES M'DONALD sworn.

I am an Irishman. I was a stranger in this place; I had just come from sea, and wanted a lodging. I was sick and sore; I belonged to the Minerva. I was paid off. The prisoner picked me up, and took me into her lodgings in Church-lane , and shewed me the bed. She went out directly.

Was you sober? - Yes. I was very sick and lame. She came into the room again in about a quarter of an hour; I had not been asleep. She went to the tester of the bed, where I had laid my clothes. She took down the clothes and the breeches, and as she was laying the breeches on a chair eight guineas fell out of them on the floor; it was in a brown paper, and there were about ten or fourteen shillings dropped on the ground; she stooped down and took the gold up, and an half crown, and made off. I was not able

to follow her, as I was sick and in bed at the time. The people told me she was a lodger there; there was nobody else in the room at the time she took down my clothes. I had no money left to bear my expences home to my native country. I have never got any of the money again.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He was leaning over a post; I was coming out with small beer in my hand; he said can't you afford more than small beer? I said no, if you will give me strong do. So I went up stairs; there were two young women there. He followed me. He was in the room three hours, and he got himself in that time much in liquor. I know nothing of his money.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-43

482, 483. THOMAS otherwise WILLIAM KIRVIN and GEORGE MALONE were indicted for stealing a silk cloak, value 14 s. the property of Sarah Temple , spinster , July 15th .

SARAH TEMPLE sworn.

On a Saturday, about the 17th of July, at about nine o'clock in the evening as I was going from Cheapside to Westminster a man followed me from St. Clement's church to the New Church in the Strand ; he asked me how far I was going; I said to Westminster. He asked me if he should see me safe there? I said I was going with a gown and he could not go with me. Going by the New Church he picked up an old woman's pocket, he said what there was in the pocket I should have part of. The first street we came to he was to see what was in the pocket. He opened the pocket; there was a green purse, and in the purse a ring, it was valued at six guineas by Malone, who was called to read a note that was found in the pocket. I was to have part of it, because I saw him pick it up; he said he had not the cash about him to give me the part, but he would go to a person's house and borrow it; he left me and came back and said the people were out at supper and would not be home till twelve o'clock; he asked me if I had any money about me or any thing I could leave in his hands for him to trust me with the ring. I told him I had not any thing about me but a lady's gown I was going home with to Westminster, which I did not choose to part with. He said he did not want the gown he only wanted the ring.

Had you the ring at that time? - No, he had it; he said he wanted it to send to a person in the country he lay under great obligations to, and had nothing to leave in my hands, while he took it. I said I did not want the ring. He told me he had not the money about him; that he would take the gown and be with me in half an hour. He said the gown was not the value of the ring, and he took the cloak off my back. I gave him the gown but not the cloak.

Did he give you the ring? - Yes, on taking the cloak, and went away, and promised to be with me in half an hour.

He never came? - No. I went home, and the people of the house looked at it and said it was worth nothing. This is the ring (producing it).

Which of the prisoners took the cloak? - Malone. The other took the gown; Kirvin spoke to me first, and Malone came up to value the ring.

Did both go away together? - No, Kirvin went first; he put the cloak up in the napkin with the gown, and took both away and left me with the other man. They were taken by Sir John Fielding 's men. I have recovered the gown, but not the cloak. When he put the cloak up with the gown, I told him I could not part with the cloak, I could not go through the streets without it.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I met Kirvin and Malone in company in Hatton-garden; Malone had this gown tied up in an handkerchief. I knowing them asked him what he had got there? He said it was a gown Kirvin had just taken out of pawn and made him a present of to give to his sister. I thought it was a gown not come honestly by; I took them to the office, and it was advertised, and this girl came and shewed a piece of the same pattern before she saw the gown. She told the same story then

which she has now. Her mistress came with her. She is apprentice to a mantua-maker. About a week before this happened, I had Kirvin in custody; I searched him then, and he had a ring in his pocket wrapped up in a piece of cotton, and a receipt for six pounds or six guineas. I opened it before the justice and shewed it, but I cannot say whether this is the same ring, though it is very much like it.

(The gown was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Recollect as near as you can what day of the month this Saturday evening was? - I think it was the 15th of July.

Mrs. ALDAY sworn.

I am mistress to Sarah Temple . I sent her out with this gown on Saturday July the 15th about nine o'clock.

For Kirvin.

ANN READING sworn.

Kirvin lives in Little Wild-street; I live in Gravel-lane, in the Borough. I went up to his lodgings on the 15th of July at about twelve or one o'clock in the day, he was sick in bed; his wife was not within, he entreated me to stay till she came in. His wife came in about five o'clock. I staid all that night. I never left his apartment till between eight and nine o'clock next morning. All that time he was not able to get up.

Do any other people lodge in the same house? - It is a lodging house; different families lodge in it; but I am not acquainted with them.

How long was he confined to his bed? - I do not know, I did not see him for a week or a fortnight.

Did any body come backwards and forwards that afternoon while you was there? - Nobody at all.

What day of the week was it? - Saturday.

How came you to take particular notice of the day of the week and month? - It was my son's birth-day, who is seven years of age.

What part of Wild-street does Kirvin lodge in? - At my Lady Gunston's, Little Wild-street, No. 21, on the right-hand side.

(Malone called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.)

BOTH GUILTY .

MALONE Imp. 12 months .

KIRVIN Imp. 15 months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-44

484, 485. ALICE PARKER , spinster , and ANN WALKER , spinster , were indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 1 s. a callimanco petticoat, value 5 s. and a linen bed-gown, value 2 s. the property of Ann Reynolds , spinster , May 13th .

ANN REYNOLDS sworn.

I am servant at the Golden Fish in Old Palace-street Westminster . On the 13th of May I lost the things mentioned in the indictment. I had seen them the day before. Both the prisoners used our house.

ROBERT MIMMS sworn.

I received the petticoat from Alice Parker on the 13th of May. I pawned it for her for seven shillings, and the bed-gown at the same time. They were taken out of pawn by the prisoner, and sold to Hawkins.

LYDIA HAWKINS sworn.

Parker and another girl, not Walker, offered to sell some things which were in pawn. I went with Parker to the pawnbroker's and took them out of pawn.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PARKER's DEFENCE.

I had them of Walker.

(There being no evidence against Walker she was not called upon for her defence.)

PARKER GUILTY .

WALKER ACQUITTED .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

ALICE PARKER , spinster, and ANN WALKER , spinster, were indicted for stealing a stuff quilted petticoat, value 10 s. the property of Mary Wicker , spinster , July 31st .

MARY WICKER sworn.

On the 31st of July, when I returned from my work, at four o'clock, I missed a petticoat out of my room; Ann Walker 's mother lodged in the house, and Ann Walker came backwards and forwards to her mother; Ann Walker was taken up and she confessed she had taken it, and said Parker was concerned with her; she said it was sold to Mr. Taylor. I went there the next morning and found it.

- TAYLOR sworn.

I bought this petticoat of Parker (producing it). She said it was not her's; she went out, and she and Walker came in together; I bought it of her.

PARKER's DEFENCE.

Nan Walker sent me first with a petticoat; she told me it was her own; we were not together; she was at home; another girl went with me and took the money.

WALKER's DEFENCE.

I have no witnesses.

PARKER NOT GUILTY .

WALKER GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-45

486. CATHERINE WALKER otherwise BUTLER was indicted for stealing seven cloth waistcoats, value 7 s. a nankeen waistcoat, value 4 d. and two pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. the property of George Cornfoot , July 31st .

JAMES HELEY sworn.

On the 31st of July I saw the prisoner come out of my master's shop, who is a salesman in Rosemary-lane , between one and two o'clock. I followed her; I stopped her and found she had the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) in her apron; when I stopped her I asked her if she had any thing to sell? She pulled out a silver mug, and then a silver milk pot; I stopped the plate, and took her to Justice Sherwood's office. He took the plate and said he would advertise it. I am sure these things are my master's property. She said she bought the plate of a Jew; she did not deny taking these things.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the witness.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been tried three years ago, and was ordered to be confined in Bridewell for three years, but was released by the rioters. A person gave me these things to sell.

Heley. When she was before the justice she was asked where she got these things? She said, I might find it out, and she was committed at first by the name of find it out.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Impr. 12 months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-46

487. ANNE HEMP was indicted for stealing an iron weight, called a quarter of an hundred weight, value 21 s. the property of our sovereign lord the king , August 8th .

JOHN KNOWLES sworn.

I am door-keeper to the Rotation office in the Borough. On the 28th of August, while I was standing talking to a young woman in Rosemary-lane, at her father's door, who keeps an iron shop; the prisoner came into the shop, and said, Young man, I wish you would withdraw, for this young woman and I want to change smocks; I said I shall not disturb you; the prisoner put something down; the young woman said I won't buy it; I looked round, and perceived it was a weight; she took it up again under her cloak, and went out; I followed her, and said I insisted upon seeing what she had got under her cloak, and saw it was an iron weight, with a broad arrow upon it; she said a man gave it her on Tower-hill to sell for him; I took her to Justice Clarke; at last she voluntarily confessed she was in liquor, and took it off the quays.

JOHN CHURCH sworn.

I am one of the warehousemen on the quays. The weight is his majesty's property, it is kept for the use of the custom-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I do not know what to say, I have no witnesses.

GUILTY . W . and Impr. 1 month .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-47

488. JOHN MILLS was indicted for stealing nineteen pounds of white wax, value 39 s. the property of Charles Ellis and James Scott , August 24th .

DANIEL WHELAN sworn.

I carry on business for Charles Ellis and James Scott , wax-chandler s at Hampstead . On the 29th of August, nineteen pounds of white wax were stopped; I did not miss it till it was stopped.

LEWIS DUCUE sworn.

I am a wax-chandler, and live at the corner of Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury. On the 24th of August, I stopped nineteen pounds of white wax; it was brought to me by the prisoner; I had seen him once before, but I did not know where he lived; I put it into my scale, and weighed it; I said, My friend, here is nineteen pounds weight of it, look at the weights; he said, master, I will trust to you; I said, I suppose these goods are stolen, if you can prove they are your property, or you are sent to sell them, I will pay you for it; he was on the outside of the counter; he said, O master, that I can soon do! In the interval, a coach with some people stopped at the door, I thought they might belong to the prisoner; he went out; I went round the counter to the door, the prisoner was then gone, there were some women at the door; one said, Who is that dare stop my property? I went round to the trade, and likewise to Sir John Fielding , to inform them I had stopped some wax; I went at last to Messrs. Ellis and Scott's, in Bond-street; Mr. Ellis came and looked at the wax; I described the man to him, and on the 29th of August he brought the prisoner to my shop; he confessed the fact to me, Mr. Ellis, and Mr. Scott; he said necessity drove him to take it, and begged to be let off.

(The wax was produced in court.)

Whelan. This wax is my manufacturing, part was taken out of the bleaching-ground, and part out of the melting-room.

Are you certain it is your manufacturing? - I am.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found this in a bag, I expected some owner would come for it; none coming for it, I went to sell it.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . Fined 5 s. and Impr. 6 months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-48

489. MARGARET, the wife of William FOSTER , was indicted for stealing two guineas and sixteen shillings and sixpence, the property of John Gray , in the dwelling-house of Anne Williams , spinster, July 30th .

JOHN GRAY sworn.

I am a seafaring man . I was taking a walk in Stepney-fields on the 30th of July, at about four o'clock in the afternoon; I was a little in liquor, I met the prisoner; she asked me what countryman I was; I said north; she said she was the same; I said you may as well go with me for company; we went together, and had two or three pints of beer; then she took me to an house in Elbow-lane ; I do not know whose house it is, I never enquired, I was never there before; I got there about seven o'clock; there was only one woman within; she brought up a pot of beer; she went away after that; the prisoner and I went to bed together.

Had you your money when you went in there? - Yes, for I paid for a pot of beer, and a shilling for a bed after I got into the house; the money was in my pocket when I put my clothes off; I lay there till between eleven and twelve at night; she was gone away; the people waked me, and said I had lost my money, and called in the street five or six times, Sailor, you have lost your money! I looked at my pockets, and missed my money; I told them I had lost my money; I

was locked in; the people of the house opened the door, and let me out; I found the prisoner in custody in a neighbour's house; they asked me if I should know the woman? I said I believed I should; they shewed me the prisoner, and asked me if that was her? I said yes; so they took us both to the watch-house; I did not get any of my money again.

You say you was in liquor that afternoon, was you so much in liquor as to make it doubtful whether that might be the same person or not? - I am certain she is the same person.

Prisoner. He declared before the justice of peace and this man, that he knew nothing of the purse; he does not know the nature of an oath; he does not know good from evil; he came to me in the prison to make it up with me; I would not make it up with him, as we were all before the presence of the Lord, as he is omnipresent in every place, as I was not guilty of the crime. I have not had time to send to my landlady in Virginia-street; if he was to advertise me for a whole year in the news-paper, nobody could prove any thing against me.

ROBERT BLADES sworn.

I keep a green-stall, and go about with greens with an horse and cart; I live in Gravel-lane; my cart-house is in Elbow-lane. Between eleven and twelve o'clock I was alarmed by a woman, who said somebody had broke into my back-yard; I ran there to see, the dog was barking much; the prisoner had run into the necessary, and locked herself in; when she heard me speaking to the dog to be quiet, she came out and begged to be let out. I asked her how she came there? She said she had got into a bawdy-house and was obliged to make her escape; she must have come over two pallisades. I took her to the watch-house; I found a purse in my back yard the next morning.

(The purse was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

- ELLEY sworn.

I was present when she was searched; we found two guineas upon her head behind her bonnet; Thomas Cole searched her and found sixteen shillings and sixpence upon her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of it.

GUILTY of stealing the money, but Not Guilty of stealing in the dwelling house .

W . and Impr. 12 months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM,

Reference Number: t17800913-49

490, 491. FIDELY MILLARD and ELEANOR SANDERSON were indicted, the first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Lewis Berger , on the 24th of August , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing 34 lb. weight of Prussian blue, value 12 l. the property of the said Lewis Berger in his dwelling house ; and the other for receiving the above goods, knowing them to be stolen , against the statute, &c.

(The counsel for the prosecution informed the court that he had not any evidence to affect Sanderson, so she was immediately acquitted and discharged.)

JOHN BERGER sworn.

I am a colour-maker, and am foreman to my brother, Lewis Berger , at Shadwell.

There is an house and warehouse? - Yes; they join together. On the 24th of August I locked the doors at nine at night; some people lay over it but a good way off; after I had locked the door, I went home to my own house; when I went out I gave the key to one of the servants. At eleven o'clock I was alarmed by a watchman that the fore door was open. I went into the yard of the counting house; I could discover nobody there, I went out again; on Sunday in the morning I found the nail of the shutters forced out; they had drove it; at eleven the night before I found some blue split upon the floor; there was twelve or fifteen pounds gone from one place; in the whole there was blue taken away to the amount of forty or fifty pounds weight.

CHRISTOPHER APPLE sworn.

At nine at night on Thursday my master gave me the key; I went in to go to bed; I locked and bolted the door on the inside.

CHARLES FAWKES sworn.

I am a watchman; at ten o'clock the door was fast, I tried it myself! at ten minutes after eleven it was broke open; there was no mark of violence upon the door; it must be broken by somebody in the inside of the house.

PHILIP THOMAS HOGGINS sworn.

The workmen seldom go into the ware-house from Thursday night till Sunday night; there was no occasion for their employment during that interval; the prisoner was a labourer before in this business, however he discharged himself on the Saturday before this fact was committed; one Hodfield lay in the warehouse at this time.

SOPHIA ENGELLA sworn.

I live with my uncle; I saw the prisoner at eleven o'clock on Thursday night; he brought nineteen pounds and three-quarters of blue; I took it to Adams, the next morning after I received it from the prisoner; I do not know whether it was a Wednesday or a Thursday, or how long ago; I believe not a month.

JOSEPH ADAMS sworn.

I received three parcels from Engella, at different times; on the 31st of July ten pounds and an half, on the 25th of August I received two parcels by the hands of some women, nineteen pounds and three-quarters; she brought it to me, she said, by order of Harman, of whom I bought it and paid for it.

Hoggins. I examined the window on Monday; it was forced back; the nail was wrenched out; I am certain this blue produced is Mr. Berger's; it was ill manufactured; it had been laid aside for a particular person; the whole was worth seven pounds, ten shillings.

How far is the house where he sold it from Mr. Berger's? - About half a mile.

LEWIS BERGER sworn.

On Thursday night I was alarmed by a watchman; when I went into the house I went to the two men, they were both fast asleep; I never looked at the window before the Sunday after; I left it on the Thursday night.

To John Berger . Did you examine the window on Thursday night? - I saw my windows, door, and every thing was fast. Thursday night I went up to the window and looked at it.

Did you see on Thursday night whether the nail was fast or not? - No; there was the appearance of a dirty foot half way up the bricks, which I think was occasioned by a man's getting up to the window.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all of it.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-50

492, 493, 494. SARAH WHITE , HARRIET WILSON , and ANN BURTON were indicted for stealing eleven guineas and sixpence halfpenny, in monies, numbered, and an hat, value 5 s. the property of George M'Gill , privately from the person of the said George , July 12th .

GEORGE M'GILL sworn.

I am a tailor by trade, and live in Wood-street. On the 12th of July, between eleven and twelve at night, I met Sarah White in a publick-house, the corner of Charles-street, Soho-square. She asked me to treat her with a pint of ale, which I did; she asked me to go with her to her apartment, which I unfortunately did, in Dyot-street ; she asked me to give her some gin; I agreed to give her some. She said she had got but one halfpenny in the world if I would give her two-pence she would have a quartern of gin. I gave her the two-pence; after that we agreed to go to bed; while I was in bed with her she robbed me of eleven guineas and sixpence halfpenny.

Did you see your money before you went

to bed? - Before I went to sleep, after I was in the room.

Did any body else come into the room besides her? - A person brought the gin; they drank it between them; after that woman was gone I locked the door.

Was it after that that you saw your money? - No, before; I waked, I believe, between four and five o'clock, my money was gone out of my breeches pocket; I had put my breeches under my head. I went out and found a constable; I desired the constable to examine the person who brought the gin to see if I could learn who the prisoner was; there was a woman in company with the prisoner found that morning in a publick-house, near St. Giles's church; there were two guineas of the money found upon her, which she owned before the justice were mine.

Had you advised her to own it? - I had not said a word to her, nor nobody else, that I know of. She said, of the money which her and Ann Burton took out of my pocket they had given two guineas to the other prisoner to conceal the robbery; she spoke of taking the whole; that she took the eleven guineas.

Was you drunk or sober? - I was not drunk.

Are you certain that is the woman? - I am.

- ATWOOD sworn.

We took a great deal of pains, I did in particular, to make her confess; I told her it would be to her advantage to do it.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-51

495. GEORGE SHARP was indicted for stealing three guineas, the monies of Richard Whitford , privately and secretly from his person , August 18th .

RICHARD WHITFORD sworn.

I lost three guineas on board the ship I am master of , which was lying off Union-stairs on this side the river; I apprehend it was stolen from me on the evening of the 17th while I was asleep; it was in a purse in my breeches pocket; I missed it the next morning; I suspected the prisoner, and had him taken up.

THOMAS COLE sworn.

The prosecutor came to the justice and got a warrant; I went on board the ship and took the prisoner; after I had taken him the steward and I went into the cabbin together. He told me he took the money out of his master's breeches pocket while he was asleep in the cabbin.

What did you say to him to induce him to confess? - I only said, what have you done boy with your master's money.

Did you tell him it would be better to confess? - No, I did not; I asked him what he had done with it? He said, he went ashore that same night, between eleven and twelve o'clock; that he met with two girls in the street; he said he talked to them some considerable time up an alley, and that he gave them two guineas. I asked him whether he went to any house to sleep with them? He said no, he did not; he came on board again at five in the morning; after that he said he went on shore on Saturday and spent a guinea, He made confession before the justice, which I saw him sign. (The confession was read in court.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They coaxed me very much.

GUILTY of stealing the money, but not privately from the person .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-52

496. JOHN DUNBAR was indicted for stealing an hair trunk, value 2 s. an hair muff, value 5 s. two silk gowns, value 10 l. two silk petticoats, value 5 l. a striped sattin waistcoat, value 4 l. a striped sattin waistcoat, value 20 s. a linen tablecloth, value 12 and a small piece of silk ribbon, value 3 d. the property of Samuel Hawley and William Downes , September 6th .

WILLIAM DOWNES sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. Hawley. On

the 6th of this month I saw a trunk, directed to the care of Mr. Foot, lying upon our wharf. Soon after I went to Change, and on my return I was informed that the trunk had been stolen off the wharf.

JOHN NEWHALL sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Hawley and Downes. On the 6th of this month about three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was returning from dinner, I met the prisoner at the bar in the street with the trunk upon his back. I had seen it landed at eight o'clock in the morning; it came from Perth, and was landed upon my master's wharf. I stopped him and got it from his shoulders; he seemed as if he would have made off, but I secured him and took him and the trunk back to the wharf.

SIMEON NICHOLSON sworn.

On the 6th of September a trunk was landed at my master's wharf, directed to Thomas Graham , Esq. to the care of Henry Foot . I saw it upon the wharf between one and two o'clock.

Has the prisoner any thing to do with your wharf? - Nothing at all. This is the trunk which was landed at our wharf.

Newhall. This is the trunk I found upon the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came out of Scotland in a sloop. I came down to Wapping to seek a ship which was going farther on. I came to two or three wharfs to seek for a ship. A man came dressed in a blue coat, with a small ribbon about his hat; he asked me where I came from? I said from Scotland. I had come only that day. He said he would give me sixpence if I would carry this trunk about forty yards because he did not choose to carry it; as I was carrying it one of these gentlemen stopped me and said it did not belong to me. I said it belonged to that gentleman.

To Newhall, When you stopped him what did he say to you? - I asked him who gave him the trunk; he said a man with a laced hat. I said you shall go back with this trunk and see if you can find the man.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-53

497. JOHN M'DANIEL was indicted for stealing a piece of rope called a coil, value 5 s. and another piece of rope called a pudding, value 5 s. the property of Robert Waters , Esq . August 3d .

JOHN WEATHERALL sworn.

I am master of the ship; I lost a rope called a pudding; I saw the coil and the pudding in the ship on the 2d of August; I believe this to be the same rope from the size of it; there is no particular mark upon it. I am sure this is the pudding.

JOHN STAMFORD sworn.

On Thursday the 3d of July I was told by a gentleman that a man was gone out of the ship with a pudding on his back; I followed him immediately to an old stuff shop, and saw the pudding. They turned him out of the house. I said if they would not buy it I would take him to a place where he might dispose of it; I took him to the yard and sent for an officer.

- WELSH sworn.

I saw the prisoner between five and six in the morning coming over the side of the ship, with such a coil as this on his back; I went on board the ship, and told Stamford of it.

Stamford. I found the coil at the old stuff shop, where he had left it.

WILLIAM MELVIN sworn.

I took charge of the prisoner with this pudding, and took him before the justice. This is the pudding.

What is the worth of the ropes? - Ten shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The captain gave it to us.

JAMES WEATHERALL sworn.

I never gave it to him. The ship is since sold. I was then captain of her. I had some labourers at work the day before; I told them to be sharp, and I would give them some short pieces which lay upon the deck. This was in the hold; that on the deck was of no use.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-54

498. ELISABETH SAVORY , spinster , was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value

1 s. a linen cap, value 3 d. a linen apron, value 1 s. three pair of worsted stockings, value 18 d. three flannel petticoats, value 18 d. a flannel blanket, value 6 d. a linen shirt, value 6 d. and a pair of leather shoes, value 1 d the property of Thomas Brown , August 23d .

THOMAS BROWN sworn.

I am a labourer , I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel . My wife takes in washing. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment on the 23d of August, from an out-place, a little distance from the house, in the garden.

JOHN SCOTCHER sworn.

I am a wheel-wright. I work in Church-lane. The prosecutor's house faces my garden; I got up and went to the window to see what weather it was; I saw the prisoner and another woman coming down the walk; the other woman had this bag under her right-arm; it was empty. As they walked past my house they seemed to go a-tip-toe; when they got round the house I saw them again at the back window. They went to Mr. Brown's door, and I saw the other lift up the latch of the street door; they went to the next door and tried the latch of that. They went to Mr. Batty's; there they tried the latch; it was bolted. They came back to Mr. Brown's, and the other went in at the garden door; they got into the wash-house, where these things were. The prisoner stood on the outside while the other was packing up these things; the prisoner went into the wash-house to her; I saw them both come out. I came out of the door and called out Mr. Brown, you are robbed. He did not hear me for some time; I then came out to stop them, upon which they carried the things to the place they took them from, and came back empty-handed; I stopped them and asked them if they had got any thing? They said no. They went away. A person went after them and stopped them, and they were put into Whitechapel watch-house.

(The goods were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about the things more than the child unborn. This girl took me to this house and said it was her acquaintances.

To Scotcher. Was it light at this time? - Yes, I am sure the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-55

499, 500, 501. CHARLES WEST , WILLIAM NASH , and SAMUEL WILSON were indicted for that they one piece of copper money of this realm, called a halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make, coin and counterfeit , against the statute.

Another Count. For that they one piece of false, feigned, copper money to the likeness and similitude of the copper money of this realm, called a halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make and coin, against the statute, March 29th .

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

On the 29th of March, I went with Mr. Clark and other officers, to Wilson's house, having received an information that they were coming halfpence there; there were officers fixed all round the house. I entered the street-door, and went through the parlour into the kitchen, I met Mrs. Wilson in the parlour; she asked for God's sake what is the matter? I told her I had an information that there was coining there. I looked in the kitchen, but could see nobody. I opened the cupboards under the dresser, and looked all round; there was nothing to be seen concerning coining. I returned from thence into the parlour again. One of the officers, Labar, came into the kitchen and said one had jumped out of the window, but he had catched him. I stood there about two minutes talking to him; I turned round and saw Mrs. Wilson smoothing down the cape of West's great coat. I had examined the kitchen thoroughly before. I said to West, Good God! where are you come from, out of the ground? He said he had been sitting upon a chair by the fire in the kitchen. I said, Good God! would you persuade me I am blind? I have examined every place in the kitchen. I then examined every place about to see where he could have come

from, but I could find none for some time. We had searched for the space of two hours I believe, and could not find any implements for coining. I said to the rest of the officers we may as well give it up, they certainly cannot be at work here. I went up stairs into the one-pair-of-stairs room; there were some empty hampers and lumber. There I saw in the crevice between two of the boards a place that looked as if a board had been taken up with a knife; I drew my cutlass, ran it between the boards, and lifted the board up and there was a place made with steps and two ropes to go from thence to the side of the kitchen. I called Mr. Clarke and said I had found the nest at last; Mr. Clarke went down, and I followed him. When we came to the bottom there was a small press for cutting out blanks, &c. and a large one for striking the impression upon the halfpence. I told them I would go up stairs, and desired them to knock hard that I might see if there was any other way of getting there. They knocked with an hammer, and by that I saw where West had come up; it was under the sink in the kitchen. There was I suppose half a bushel of coals and a pail of water stood, and there was a little door to open to come out of the hole under the sink. I then took down all the wainscoting on that side of the room. The hole they had made to go down was through a cupboard; they had made a partition. It was not a cellar, but an hole dug in the ground, I suppose longer than half as big as this table; there was room enough for the flies to work, but it was a very confined place. Here are a quantity of halfpence finished; a quantity of blanks which are not struck. Here are the dye, the cecil, and the other things used in coining.

Cross Examination.

Mr. Wilson was not there? - No.

He was in the country at this time I believe? - It is impossible for me to tell that, they said he was just gone out.

Was your back towards this sink at the time you was talking with the officer? - It was.

Court. Could West have got into the kitchen by any other means than out of this hole at the sink without your seeing him? - No, it was impossible, unless he had been let out at the top of the house; there was an opening at the side; it was a great height, as high as the top of this court; I stood in the doorway, talking to Labar. When I turned round he was behind my back. I am very certain he came out of that hole.

Court. What was his dress? - He had a sort of lightish great coat with a red cape. I believe he had no apron, he had corderoy breeches very dirty and a brown waistcoat.

West. There was a door opened from the sink, which was between Prothero and me; I was behind it, he might look several times, if he did not come behind that door to see; there are several doors out of that kitchen which I know of; but I know of no such thing as a trap door.

Court. Could he be by the sink and you not see him when you went into the room? - No, it was impossible, for I examined every place; there was a bell fixed just by the great press below in the hole, and a wire came up to the parlour from it.

JOHN LABAR sworn.

I went with Mr. Prothero and Mr. Clarke to this house; I went to the back part; they made a noise getting in forwards, upon which Nash opened the back window on the first floor which leads into the yard, and jumped out, I secured him, and went and told Mr. Prothero of it. While I was talking to Mr. Prothero, I saw the cupboard door move a little, I looked very steadily at it, and saw West come out of it, in a great coat, his hands and breeches were quite green. When we came to examine the door we saw it was to go down into the hole below.

Where was Prothero at the time you saw West come out of the cupboard door? - Talking with me at the kitchen door, standing with his face to me. When Mr. Prothero found the place out, I went down and saw the dies and things there.

West. Whether there was any other door he could see me come out of? - There was no other door to that room but that we were standing talking at.

Court. You say Nash came out at the window, was there any communication from

the place where that window was to this hole? - He might come up the hole and go through the kitchen, but if he had done that the people in the house must have seen him.

Was Prothero in the house before you saw Nash? - I imagine so, because of his jumping out at window.

How was he dressed? - In a working dress with a white jacket.

Was any thing green about him? - I did not observe any thing.

Cross Examination.

Did his hands appear dirty as if he had been at bricklayer's work? - His hands appeared brown and coppery.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn.

I went with Prothero and Labar, to the house of Wilson.

Did you see any body in this house? - Yes, I saw West; when I saw him he had on a pair of breeches which smelt very strong of copper, and his hands appeared as if he had been at work in this way; the next morning when he was brought before the justice I challenged him with having changed his breeches in the prison.

Describe what you found in this hole? - I was the first who went into the hole; it was fifteen feet deep from the boards to the ground where the presses were fixed; when I got down I saw a large press fixed, with a pair of dies, and a large quantity of halfpence round it.

What was the large press for? - For stamping the impression; and upon the left side of the large press there was a small one with a large quantity of cecils and blanks, and some sheet-copper; these dies were set in the press; these halfpence were struck off from this die, which was then in the press.

The whole apparatus was complete for the making of halfpence? - As complete as it possibly could be.

Do you know whose house this is? - I know it to be Wilson's house.

NASH's DEFENCE.

I was at work, setting the kitchen-range in the back-kitchen; when they knocked at the door I went to open the door; there was a hole in the door, they ran the cutlass through the hole of the door; then I ran out backwards, for I did not know what they were about.

Court to Prothero. Was there a back-kitchen? - Yes, and a private still at work in it without paying the duty; we sent for an officer to seise it.

Was there any range? - I am not sure, I did not observe.

Was there any mortar? - I did see mortar in the back-kitchen, but I did not see any tools.

To Clarke. Did his hands appear as if he had been at work at the bricklayer's trade? - I did not observe his hands; there was mortar in the room, the window of which he jumped out at.

To Labar. How did his hands appear? - As if he had been at work with copper.

Was there any mortar upon his hands? - No.

Jury. Had he any apron on? - He had no apron on.

Would the tiling and bricks give his hands that colour? - No.

Court. Were there any bricks in the back-kitchen? - None loose that I saw.

For Nash.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn.

I have known Nash twenty years; he used to do labouring work for my husband; he was out of business and wanted a job; Mr. Skynner asked my husband if he knew of a man? He told him yes; this young fellow went there and Skynner employed him to set up a grate, that was about a fortnight before Easter Wednesday.

Where was he setting up a grate? - At Mr. Wilson's, at the back of the Fleece.

How do you know that? - I saw the grate, and saw him setting it up there.

Jury. What is he a bricklayer ? - Yes.

You said just now he was a labourer? - Yes; but when he was out of employment he worked at that.

Court. How did you know the grate was to be put up for Wilson? - My husband took an apartment backwards of Wilson, and this grate was to be put up for our use. Mr. Pratt was the man who employed him.

I thought you said Skynner just now? - Skynner was the landlord.

You said Skynner employed him to set up the grate? - No Pratt.

How came you to say Skynner? - I made a blunder; Pratt is at the door now.

How long was he about that? - I cannot tell.

Notwithstanding it was put up for your use? - I believe five or six days, but I do not know.

What became of him afterwards? - Indeed I don't know no further than there was somebody coming in after the coiners, and he was getting out at the window, because he thought it was a press-gang, as he told me.

Jury. Had any of the officers a drawn cutlass when he opened the door.

Prothero. I had a cutlass under my coat, but I did not draw it, nor never do till I find there is occasion for it; as to Nash he was on a different side of the house to where I was.

HENRY LOVEJOY sworn.

I was there in the fore part of the day and saw him setting up a grate in the back-kitchen.

What time of day? - Eleven and twelve o'clock.

When was this? - I did not make any remark about the time, I think it was about April; I did not take any account.

Was it before or after Easter? - I think it was after; it was the day he was taken up I think.

Are you certain of that? - I am.

How long were you there? - Not any time; I went through there to the shed to Mr. Pratt; there is a way through the house.

Through the back-kitchen? - Through a part of the passage. He is an acquaintance of mine. I stopped, as I went through, to see him.

Did you know he worked there before? - No.

How happened you to find him out then? - He used to use the Fleece; I knew he worked about the neighbourhood; I did not know he was in that house till I saw him there; I met him in the passage; he came out for mortar or bricks, or something of that sort.

Court to Prothero. What time was it when you went to the house? - It was after dinner; it might be three o'clock.

Cross Examination of Lovejoy.

Where do you live? - At No. 59, Wood's Close.

So you was going through this passage, is it through the house? - There is a passage through the house.

Then you must go through the window? - There is a door-way and passage leads into the yard.

A common passage? - No; Mr. Pratt's gate was shut up, and so I went through there.

What, is it a thoroughfare? - No; there is a bricklayer's shed in the farther part of the yard; you go through the hall of the house, and then through a long passage.

How came you to go through Mr. Wilson's house? - Because Mr. Pratt had a shed there, and the gate was shut.

What business are you? - A carpenter.

How long have you been acquainted with this man? - I have known him on and off some time.

He is a bricklayer? - Yes.

You wanted to speak with the master bricklayer? - Yes.

Is he here? - No.

The master Bricklayer is the man who employed him? - I do not know; his name is Pratt.

WEST's DEFENCE.

I worked for Mr. Wilson, cutting of fire wood; he had bought two load; I cut a good part of it up; he sold it in penny-bundles; when I went in I did not see any body in the kitchen, because the kitchen-door was shut, and Mrs. Wilson was gone with the key to let me in. I went into the kitchen; when I got in I did but just turn myself about and people came in at the door; I did not know what they wanted; I stood by the sink-door where there were coals lying; I went to see for an ax I had to cut wood with; I went into the kitchen for it.

(There being no evidence to affect Wilson he was not put upon his defence.)

West. I desire to call some witnesses to prove there is no such cupboard by the sink.

JOHN PINCKNEY sworn.

Do you know Wilson's house? - Yes.

Do you know the kitchen? - Yes.

Is there any sink in it? - Yes.

Is there any cupboard or door by that sink? - There is a door shuts in the sink that parts the kitchen and the sink; it is a sort of a closet.

Have you ever been down in the hole below the kitchen? - I never saw any thing of the like kind; the boards were nailed down.

When did you see it? - Three or four months ago.

In May or June? - I cannot say; it was before last term.

Have you any thing to do with the terms? - No, only I was here attending last term.

Last session you mean? - Yes.

Did you know this house in the month of March? - Yes, before that; I knew the house before Mr. Wilson was in it; a relation of mine lived in the house.

Was there any communication from the sink to this hole? - I never saw any thing like it.

Have you examined it enough to say there is no communication from this place to the kitchen? - I have.

There is no communication? - No.

You swear there was no communication in the month of March? - Yes; and I stand to it.

I asked you if you had been acquainted with the house before? - Yes; three years.

Have you examined the house sufficiently to swear to the situation of it in the month of March? - I have, and there was no communication from the sink to the hole that you speak of; I can speak within these three years, there has been no communication.

Was there any communication from any other part of the kitchen to this place? - I never saw any; I examined it thoroughly; I can say positively there was not.

Have you been in the hole since? - Yes.

Which way did you go in? - From the top of the house.

Jury. Do you call the sink the closet? - Yes.

There is a communication from this closet to the hole? - No, Mr. Wilson asked me to go down and examine the place, that was about a fortnight before last session; I have lain in the house several nights.

Cross Examination.

Where do you live? - At No. 7, Aldersgate-buildings.

When you went to this house you found it in the same situation as it was when you saw it before? - I did not see any difference.

The wainscoting was not pulled down, nor the cupboards altered at all? - I did not see any difference.

How came you to examine if there was any communication between the hole and the kitchen? - Mr. Wilson desired me, for he said there was a fellow would swear his life away, and he must be guarded against him, if possible; I know there was an affair happened in that house and I was surprised at it.

How did you get down into the hole? - From the top of the house, the top story.

Three pair of stairs? - I believe there is two-pair-of-stairs besides the garrets, because I plaistered the garrets I went through.

This passage was from the garrets down to the hole? - Yes.

How deep was it? - About twenty-seven, or between twenty and thirty foot.

This hole did not exist then, nor upon your oath, never did exist? - I do not know that it ever did exist; there never was a hole made in the sink to appearance.

Nor under the sink? - No.

Jury. Whether you saw that hole in the month of March? - I did not.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS sworn.

Do you know Wilson's house? - Yes. I have lived in it about a year and an half.

Is there any communication, or was there during any part of that time, from the sink to the hole under ground? - There was not; I have been to the sink and got coals, I never saw any thing of the kind.

Were you ever down in the hole? - Never.

Have you examined the kitchen sufficiently to take upon yourself to swear there is no communication, either from the kitchen or the sink to the hole? - I have.

Will you say there was none? - I will during the year and an half I was there, there was none; I have seen Wilson chopping wood, I never saw him do any thing else.

Cross Examination.

What are you? - I live in Mr. Wilson's house now, and have for a year and an half.

Have you ever seen this passage from the garret to the work-shop? - No, I never saw it.

You never heard of it? - Never till now.

You never heard Wilson talk of it? - Never.

You never heard him talk of the hole under the sink? - Never.

How came you to examine this so minutely if you never heard any thing about it? - Mr. Wilson gave me leave to go there for coals; I never saw any thing of the kind.

You swear there is no such thing? - I never saw it; I must have seen it if it had been there.

How many floors are there in this house? - I do not know, I have never been over all the rooms; I lived in the one-pair-of-stairs; it goes to the next house to go up into the other rooms.

You have heard talk of this hole? - Yes.

Which was the way to it? - I never saw it; I do not know; I live forwards.

Who lodged in the house besides you, did not one Mrs. Dickins? - No; one Browne lodged there.

Lovejoy did not live there? - No.

You never saw this way to the place? - I never did.

When the man was taken in the house was you there? - No, I was not at home; I work out; there were some people there when I came home.

They had pulled something down I believe? - Yes, the wainscot by the sink.

Did not you look under the sink to see the way to the hole? - I was not in the room five minutes.

Did your curiosity never lead you to examine it? - No.

Where do you dress your victuals as you have the use of the kitchen? - I do not use it now; my sister was very much frightened.

Who is she? - Mary Saunders , she lives in the house with me.

Court. When you came home and saw the wainscot pulled down did not you look at it? - Yes.

Upon your oath was there then any communication door to the hole? - No.

Was you subpoenaed to come here? - No; I was desired to come here to speak the truth that there was no hole there.

How came you to tell that gentleman that you never heard it said whether there was or not till you' came into the court? - I must hear of it being in the house.

Prothero. I took all the presses out of that hole, one of which was seven hundred weight; there was a sink for washing of dishes; under the sink there was a hole with coals in it, and behind the hole there was a hatch which was loose, which opens to the hole. I took every bit of the wainscot down from the top to the bottom with a pick-axe. Mr. Vernon saw me do it; this man says he came in from the top of the house, the house is but one story high.

To Labar. Did you look at this hole? - Yes; it was a place by the sink, a little touch would open it.

Was it such as any person might come out of or go in at? - Yes, without any trouble at all.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

Where you present at the time the prisoners were taken up? - I was.

Did you look at the hole by the sink? - I was in the kitchen when he went down and knocked for me to see where the hole came to; he knocked, I answered, and we found it came into the sink; the cupboard was wainscoted.

I am asking you about the hole, or communication, from the kitchen to the place where the people were at work? - It was beside the sink.

Was there a communication besides the sink? - Yes.

Such that a man might go down? - I went down myself; we took up the heavy press through the same hole.

To Clarke. Did you observe this sink? - I did.

Is there any communication from thence to the hole? - Prothero was desired to knock to see where West came out from, that was under the sink; the closet was made up perfect with the wainscot, which closet was planked up that we could not see there had been any closet till we got up to the one-pair-of-stairs; there was an hole clear down the closet to the place where the press was, and there was another hole by the side of the sink, where West was supposed to come out at.

Is the hole big enough for a man to go through? - Yes; we got all the things up there.

West. I desire one favour more, that the carpenter who mended the place may speak.

Henry Lovejoy . Did you examine this house? - I put the partition up after it was broke down, by the sink.

Did you see whether there was any other door? - I did not go down, I did not examine it much.

You did not examine it enough to say whether there was or not? - No.

WEST GUILTY .

NASH NOT GUILTY .

WILSON NOT GUILTY.

( John Pinckney and Elisabeth Saunders were committed by the court for wilful and corrupt perjury.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17800913-56

502. ANN HOLLETT was indicted for stealing a pair of linen pockets, value 12 d. a green silk purse, value 12 d. a pair of women's cambrick robbins, value 6 d. a glass smelling bottle, value 1 d. and two yards of thread lace, value 12 d. the property of Thomas Hilliard ; a pair of linen pockets, value 12 d. a leather pocket-case, value 2 d. a steal curtain screw, value 1 d. a small looking-glass in a shagreen case, value 6 d. a garnet stone belonging to an ear-ring set in silver, value 6 d. a silk purse, value 1 d. and sixpence in monies, numbered , the property of Mary Elliot , spinster , May 19th .

JOHN BOWDLE sworn.

I am a constable. On the 19th of May I went down to Battlebridge to take an account of nuisances. About six o'clock in the morning the prisoner and a man was at the Maidenhead at Battlebridge, drinking tea; I went in and they were talking about a fire in Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury. I saw them examine some things they took out of a bundle; there was a ring which is here.

Did they do that in your company? - No, I sat, and had a pint of beer at another table; they were saying that they had been at the play over night, and as they were coming back in the morning they saw a terrible fire in Bloomsbury. The man pulled out a book with an ear-ring in it, and said my dear, is not this a diamond. She said I think it is. When they had had their tea, they had no money to pay for their breakfast. The man pulled out a medal and sold it to the landlord for their breakfast; the landlord allowed them eighteen pence for it. I staid till they had got their breakfast; and then stopped them on suspicion of a robbery. On searching the prisoner and the man I found some letters on each of them; they were directed to No. 5, Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury. I took them to New Prison, and by the direction I went to No. 5, Bloomsbury, I saw the house had been on fire, the next door was No. 5. I took the prisoner to Sir John Fielding 's; the prosecutors came and swore to their property. I found all these things, some upon the prisoner, and some on the man (producing them).

What did you find on the prisoner? - Here are two purses, one is a green one, the other a crimson coloured one; there was another purse with a crooked halfpenny in it, a pair of round robbins, as they call them; I do not know one from the other; she said before Mr. Addington, at Sir John Fielding 's, that the man went up into the house with an intent to assist the people on account of the fire. She said she stood down stairs;

that she never was up stairs at all; that just after he came away and across the street; she saw something under his arm, and asked what he had got there? He said I will show you by and by, my dear. That then they went to Copenhagen-house; that the people were not up there; then they came down to Battle-bridge.

Did she say who the man was? - She said she did not know him before that night; she said they had not examined the things till they came to the Maidenhead at Battlebridge, where they breakfasted; I did not hear them say anything about the things; when they pulled them out at Battlebridge they were looking at them. When he took the letters out they looked at one of them; she snatched it out of his hand and said, This letter came from my friends in the country.

Who had the bundle? - It lay on the table.

Prisoner. Did he ever see me touch any property, or have any of it, or take it from me? - She took the pockets and this book.

MARY HILLIARD sworn.

I lost these things on the night of the fire. I did not miss them till the constable brought them, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. On the Thursday night I put them by the side of the bed, there was a fire next door to us.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was walking early in the morning, the man overtook me; when we got to Battlebridge he said he had been ill of a fever and asked me to go in and drink; I went in and drank with him; he had a bundle; I did not know but it was his own property. As we were drinking the constable came in, he was shewing me a ring, and asked me if it was a diamond one; but how he came by the property I know not. I never was near the fire nor knew nothing of it till he mentioned it at the publick-house.

Bowdle. She said she was at the bottom of the stairs while he was up stairs assisting the people in their distress; that he was pulling down the bed and things.

Prisoner. I have no friends; the woman I live with expects every minute to lie-in or she would be here.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-57

504. ABRAHAM DANFORD and WILLIAM NEWTON were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Watts , on the 1st of August , in a certain dwelling-house belonging to Mary Brown , spinster, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a leather bill-case, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Smith , John Wright , and Henry Gray , against the statute.

2d Count. For the like robbery in a certain house near about the king's highway.

3d Count. For the like rubbery in a certain house belonging to the said Mary Brown , spinster, near about the king's highway.

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

THOMAS SOULBY sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Smith, Wright and Gray, who are banker s in Lombard-street. James Watts is likewise clerk to them; he is a quaker by profession. On the 1st of August the prisoner Danford came to me in Smith, Wright, and Gray's compting-house; he said he had a bill which was nearly due, and he wished to pay it into our house, to the account of Hodges, Carr, and Company, at Leicester, that he himself was going out of town, and therefore could not receive it. I told him he might receive the money of Hodges, Carr, and Company, as soon as the bill was paid. He brought a bill for thirty-seven pounds five shillings, drawn upon Lancaster by Atkins; he was to pay it to us for their account, and he was to receive the money of them on his return from his journey, which he said would be in about a month. It is common to pay money in on account of country customers, and to take the money on their return. He said he would step to the inn and fetch it. He went away; he came back in a little time and paid it to another of the clerks, as I since understand, but I was not present; the clerk brought the bill to me in the compting house.

Did any of your clerks go out on the 5th of August? - James Watts went out with bills to the amount of four thousand pounds and upwards. I saw him go out with the pocket-book.

Whose property is that pocket-book? - Smith, Wright, and Gray's. He went out about nine o'clock.

Cross Examination.

How long have you lived with Smith, Wright, and Gray? - About three years and an half.

Is there any other partner in that house? - Smith, Wright, and Gray only.

No sleeping partners? - No, none.

How do you know that Watts went out with that pocket-book? - I was standing at the counter and saw him put some bills into that very book.

Court. Did you see him put this very bill into that book? - No.

How long did he stay after he put them in before he went out? - A very few minutes; I was in the front shop when he went out.

Where was he between the time of his putting the bills he received into the book, and going out of the shop? - We were both in the shop; after he was gone out I went into the counting house.

Did not you go out of the shop till he went out? - I did not.

ANN BOUCHER sworn.

Where do you live? - In Water-lane, Black Friars .

Near the house Number 21? - Opposite.

Did you observe any thing particular on the 5th of August? - On Saturday morning the 5th of August at about nine o'clock I saw the two prisoners go into the empty house No. 21.

Did you observe whether any body let them in or they let themselves in? - They let themselves in with a key; then they opened one of the parlour window shutters next the door; I was sitting at breakfast when they went into the house. In about three quarters of an hour after I saw a young man knock at the door; he was let in by somebody; when he had been in the house about a minute I heard a very dismal cry, and I heard the cry of murder! two or three times. I ran over and looked through the key-hole of the door and perceived three men struggling in the passage. I looked through some time. I asked some dustmen to break the door open; they would not. I went to the window and found the sash was fast; I gave it a sudden jerk, and some thing that it was fastened with on the inside broke, and it went up. Then they were opposite the parlour door, in the passage almost opposite the window.

In what situation were the three men? - Danford had got. Watts by the collar with his right-hand, the other prisoner was behind him, and was pulling him into the house. I saw Newton have hold of the end of a letter-case, and pull it from under the banker's clerk's arm, from out of a pocket on the inside of his coat, he had got his left arm under Mr. Watts's left arm; I asked them what they were doing, if they were going to kill the man? I asked if nobody would get in at the window? I said, if no one would get in; I would. I got my knee upon the edge of the window, to get up; when Newton perceived that, he dropped the book out of his left hand into the passage, and made to the door; I heard the door unbolt; I got from the window. Newton rushed out, and as he rushed out I catched at him, but he ran under my arm. I called out stop thief! A carman was coming up with a load of coals; he stopped him, and brought him back.

Did you see him stopped? - I did, he never was out of my sight. Then Danford rushed out; I catched him by the collar; Watts had hold of a part of his coat. When I catched hold of him he begged of me to let him go. The carman brought Newton back and gave him to me, and I then had hold of them both. The prisoners are the two men.

Where was the pocket-book found? - As soon as the pocket-book was dropped the young man (Watts) made a scuffle to get the book again. When he came out with Danford I asked him who he was? He could not tell me; he could not speak. Then I saw he was almost choaked.

Where was the pocket-book found afterwards? - In the passage; I saw it lying there, and saw Watts take it up.

When the pocket book was taken up from the ground had you it in your hand? - Watts could not tell me who he belonged to, but I read the name in gold letters on the pocket-book, it was JAMES WATTS - SMITH , WRIGHT, and GRAY, LOMBARD STREET. I believe this to be the very book.

I suppose you did not examine the contents? - No, he had a great many bills in it. I desired him to keep his book shut left he should drop any of them.

Counsel for the Prisoner to Soulby. I have this moment learned what I did not know before, that Watts's name is upon this pocket-book. Now when you come into the service of the bankers don't they make you a present

the pocket-books which you are to use in the business? - No, we always leave them behind us when we go away.

Then how comes the name of the clerk to be upon the book? - That each clerk may know his book that he is to take out.

Then the book is not given you? - No, we leave the books when we leave them.

( James Watts was called into court.)

To Mrs. Boucher. Is that the young man of whom you have been speaking? - It is.

To Soulby. That is the James Watts you have been speaking of? - Yes, it is. There is no other James Watts in our house; nor no other book marked in that manner.

( James Watts said he was one of the people called quakers, and as such was willing to make a solemn affirmation; he was informed by the court that his evidence could not be received on a criminal charge but upon oath. He could not be prevailed on to take the oath, consequently his testimony was rejected.)

Cross Examination of Ann Boucher .

Where is this house situated? - In Water-lane, Black Friars.

Is it a single or double house? - Two rooms on a floor, one in front and one backwards.

Does not this passage run the depth of the house? - It does; the street is very narrow and the houses are three stories high.

What you have been speaking of is as to what you discerned through the key-hole? - I observed most when I had the w indow open.

With respect to the time when you said Newton took the book? - Yes.

You did not know the reason of taking the book I take for granted? - I did not.

At the time of taking the book where were the persons who were struggling? - Danford was next the street door, I suppose not half a yard from it, and he had Watts by the collar. The parlour door and the street door partly join together.

Whether the passage was not very dark at the moment when you saw Newton take the book? - It was not very dark; there is a window over the back door that throws a light into the passage, and there was likewise a light over the street door, the passage was not so dark but I could perceive every thing in it.

You are sure upon your oath you could distinguish what passed in the passage? - Yes.

Have not you said the passage was very dark? - Not so dark but I could perceive every body there, and could perceive what they were doing. I had the best part of my body in at the window when I saw them take the book.

Did you give no signal that you was at the door at the time you was there? - I knocked very loud several times.

And was the book taken after the knocking? - It was.

Counsel for the Crown. Then you not only had the light of the windows over the back and the fore door, but the light of the window you was at? - The parlour door was wide open and the window was wide open which I was at.

Danford. As she is upon her oath I beg to ask her whether she has not had a promise of being rewarded in case we were convicted? - No, I have never seen the gentlemen belonging to either of the bankers except Mr. Smith and another gentleman at the banking house; I have never seen them since.

Danford. But any other person? - No, from no person.

Court to Soulby. Do you know whether Watts is or not a quaker by profession? - He professes to be a quaker.

WILLIAM HERRING sworn.

I am servant to Constantine and Jarvis, coal-merchants; as I was driving along my cart, by the bottom of Water-lane, I heard the cry of stop thief! The first man who appeared was Newton running as hard as he could; I held up the but-end of my whip to him and told him if he did not stop I would knock him down. I seised him with my right hand by the left wrist. He said for God's sake don't stop me, it is only the bailiffs after me. I said bailiffs or devils I will have you back again. I put my left hand round his neck and took him back to Mrs. Boucher's; there the other prisoner was and there I left him; she said that was the same man who ran out of the house before Danford.

RICHARD PRYCE sworn.

You are rent gatherer, I believe, to Mrs. Brown whose house is No. 2 Water-lane, Black-Friars? - The house is her property.

Did any body apply to you for the key of it? - A man applied to me on the 28th of July, he went by the name of Coats.

Was it either of the prisoners? - I cannot take upon me to say that it was either of them; I am not positive to them. He asked what kind of an house we had to let? I told him. He asked to look at it? I said the key was at Mr. Lardner's, the next door; that he might have it to look at the premisses.

You have seen the house since? - I have.

Did you find it in the same situation as when he had the key? - He came on the 28th; he was to give me an answer; he did not come till the Monday following, which was the 31st of July; then he had the key; he was desired to leave the key at Mr. Lardner's again, where he had it from; what he had the key for was, as he said, to have a woman in the house to clean it down.

Had he taken the house? - No, not positively, but he had left half-a-guinea as earnest for taking it; between that and Monday he was to give a positive answer whether he would absolutely take it or not. I told him the rent was twenty pounds a year and all taxes; he agreed to give the rent.

Then what remained unsettled? - He said the house was for a friend in Sheffield, to make a hardware warehouse of, who did business for a person on Ludgate-hill, and he thought it would be convenient for him.

If the agreement was not settled how came he to leave half-a-guinea? - He said, that the woman who cleaned the house was to leave the key at Mr. Lardner's again; this was the Monday; on the Thursday following I went down and found the key was not left with Mr. Lardner. I went to the door and found he had taken the bill off the window. I knocked at the door, not knowing but there might be somebody in the house; there was nobody there; I have been down the cellar stairs several times since.

Was there a free passage to the cellar at the latter end of July? - Yes; when the person had the key, it was quite clear. I went there upon the 5th of August; then I found there was a door barricadoed on the cellar stairs, to prevent a person going down into the cellar, there had not been any such thing before. I went down to the bottom of the stairs.

Could you go into the cellar on the 5th of August? - Yes, but that was after the prisoners were taken; the door was then broke open which had been put upon the cellar stairs.

Did you see whether there had been a fastening at the bottom of the cellar stairs different from any which were there when you let the house? - Yes; at the top of the cellar stairs the door was made much more secure than ever it had been before, and there was a large door on the stairs, it might be two or three steps down; there was a sort of a little landing place under another stairs which went up, and this was about two stairs below that.

So that when you passed the first door you could not get down stairs? - No, because of the other door.

Cross Examination.

You are speaking of alterations which have been made after you had taken the half-guinea? - Yes.

It was made whilst they had the key? - Yes.

How was the passage from the street door, was it dark when the door was shut? - It was a long passage, not very light; but there is a light over the street door, and from the back yard directly across, so that you might see from one window to the other.

Counsel for the crown. Then it is light enough to see into it? - Yes.

Court. Have you ever had the key again? - Yes.

How did you get it? - I had the key from Mrs. Lardner on the Saturday after these men were taken.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I am a carpenter. I went to examine the cellar stair-case of this house, No. 21, in Water-lane.

Describe it? - The door opens into a passage, which leads straight through into the yard; there is a light over the yard door and

a light over the front door. The stair-case is about the middle of the building on the left hand, there was an open stair-case, and there is a door which opens to the cellar stairs which is under the stairs which lead up to the dining-room, and about half way down the cellar stairs, it was enclosed with a strong door fixed up about five steps or half way down, and the door opening to the cellar stairs was strengthened by a batten nailed up the inside of the door; a whole staple was driven into the left-hand post, and an half staple into the right-hand post, and a wooden bar of the parlour window shutters was cut in two in order to make a bar to fix into these staples; one end to go into the whole staple, and the other into the half staple, the top door was weak, and so they had strengthened it with a piece of wood.

If any person was enclosed between these two doors could they be heard by any person? - It must be some time first, for it is just in the centre of the building. It is a dismal place if they had shut him in there, for there was no light at all when the door was shut.

Cross Examination.

Where does this house stand? - In Water-lane Black Friars.

That is a high street? - A publick street towards Black Friars Bridge.

DANFORD's DEFENCE.

All that gentleman swears is false as I am a living man.

(Danford called Thomas Hutchinson , who had known him eleven years; Robert Farren , about thirteen years; William Cannon near eight years; George Robinson , upwards of ten years; Henry How , ten or eleven years; John Skinner , ever since he was seven years old; James Sheene , ten years; Samuel German , ever since he was five years old; John Parkinson , seven years; John Roberts , fifteen years; John Massington , upwards of ten years; Samuel Pitt , ten years; Thomas Nicholson ten years; John Bacon four years, Joseph Fox , twenty years; and Ann Ashley , twenty years, who all gave him an exceeding good character.)

Newton called John Coustall , who had known him sixteen years; Joseph Mittin , fourteen years; William Fuller , seven years; and Francis Gewley , about six years, who all gave him a very good character.)

BOTH GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17800913-58

504. WALTER RAYNER was indicted for that he in the king's highway, in and upon John Cornwell feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a metal watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 20 s. and three shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said John Cornwell , September 11th .

JOHN CORNWELL sworn.

I live with Mr. Alderman Sawbridge. On the 11th of September, at past twelve o'clock at night, I went to Guildhall Coffee-house to fetch a suit of clothes for my master; I took a coach at Charing-cross, it carried me there, and I got the clothes, and ordered the coachman to drive to New Burlington-street. The man said his horses were very tired, he had been out all day, and begged I would discharge him. I said I would not discharge him without he got me another coach; in Cheapside I got another coach. I paid him his fair and ordered the coachman to drive me to New Burlington-street. I had been riding post for several days; I lay down on the seat and went to sleep. Near St. Giles's church the coach stopped, and the man who drove me I detected unbuckling my shoe. I awoke with it, and was going to jump out of the coach; I saw him go from the coach door and get upon the box; then he drove on as fast as he could before I could get out; the door was open and the step was down. I put the step up and shut the door. I called to him to stop all the way; when he got into Oxford-road he stopped the coach and said, Master, did you call to me? I said, yes, certainly you have robbed me of my watch and my money. He said no, master, I have not robbed you, indeed I have not; and

I will drive you safe home. Upon recollection, I thought if he would drive me home to where I was known, it would be better to detect him than where I was; accordingly he drove me to New Burlington-street. I got out of the coach, laid hold of his collar, and called the watch; one watchman came up to me; I desired him to ring his rattle, to get some more watchmen. I got three or four watchmen about him. I desired them to keep him till I went up to Mr. Sawbridge, who was in bed, to know what to do with him. We took him to the watch-house, and the next morning I went with him before the justice. I never found any of my things again.

What did you loose? - My watch, a pair of buckles, and three shillings in money.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took this gentleman out of another coach in Cheapside; he bid me stop in Newgate-street to take a girl up, and bid me set her down in St. Giles's. He said I need not put the step up he would put it up himself. I had not gone far before he said he was robbed. I said he could not be robbed without it was by the person in the coach with him, that I would drive him safe home.

To the Prosecutor. Did you stop to take any person up into the coach? - No, upon my oath.

DAVID MILES sworn.

Did this man, when he was taken up, say any thing about stopping to take up a girl into the coach? - No. I sent the coach home. The proprietor of the coach said he knew nothing of the prisoner.

To the Prosecutor. You are sure the prisoner is the man? - I am.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not guilty of the robbery . N. 3 years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-59

505. SARAH GROVES otherwise M'CARDELotherwise CLARK , spinster , was indicted for stealing five stocks, value 2 s. two muslin aprons, value 2 s. and three linen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of John Moore , July 5th .

JOHN MOORE sworn.

On the 5th of July I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) between five and six o'clock. I had seen them in the parlour about twelve o'clock the same day. My wife came down stairs and found the parlour and street door open. My wife called up to me; I came down. There were a number of things missing. The things mentioned in the indictment were stopped at a pawnbroker's. I was informed that a woman came out of the house; I went round to the pawnbrokers and gave them information of it, and about a fortnight after she was stopped and I was sent for by Mr. Leighton, a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street; there I found the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was sent to Litchfield-street office; I saw her there; she was examined, and said she knew nothing of it.

WILLIAM WARREN sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Leighton, a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street, Soho. The prisoner brought these things (producing them) on the 5th of July, in the evening, about eight or nine o'clock, and pawned them. I was present but did not hear what she said. They were pawned in the name of Sarah Clarke .

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it; I am innocent of it, I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-60

506. SARAH SMITH , spinster , was indicted for stealing a cloth great coat, value 2 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6 d. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Evans , and a cloth jacket, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Burton , August 23d .

THOMAS EVANS sworn.

I am a sawyer , and work with Thomas Burton . We went out of the yard where we were working in Bow-street, Covent-garden , on the 23d of last month, about

three o'clock, to get a pint of beer; we returned in about four minutes, then we found the gate open. Just as I came up to the door the prisoner came out; I asked her what she wanted, or whether she knew any body there; I pulled down her apron and out tumbled Burton's jacket and waistcoat, my great coat and waistcoat she let fall out of her apron. She went down on her knees and asked me to forgive her.

THOMAS BURTON sworn.

I was present when the things were found upon the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My three children had the small pox, one has been cut for the stone, and this has lost its sight since it has been in prison. I owed fourteen shillings for rent; I was going to my master's to borrow a few shillings to save my goods, this man met me in the street and knocked me down two or three times; he said he believed I was the person who stole his coat. I know nothing of the coat.

(The prisoner called her mother and Benjamin Smith , who both gave her a good character.)

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-61

507. MARY HUNT was indicted for stealing five yards of Irish linen cloth, value 5 s. the property of Henry Thwaites , August 1st .

HENRY THWAITES sworn.

I keep a linen-draper's shop . I saw the prisoner go out of my shop, on the 1st of August. My servant followed her and brought her in again, and I saw him pull about six yards of Irish cloth out of her apron; it had my mark upon it, she had another parcel in her apron wrapped in paper which she had bought.

JAMES GIBSON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Thwaites. The prisoner came into my master's shop, on the first of August, under a pretence of buying a bit of cloth. She took hold of this and asked the price of it? I told her it was fourteen pence a yard. I suspected her. She took hold of another piece, and laid it over this, and then pulled this from under it, and let it fall on the floor; she desired me to cut her off two yards and an half of the other piece, which she paid me for, I put it in paper and delivered it to her; as soon as she received it, she let it drop on the floor where the other lay, and then took them both up together and put them into her apron and went out; I followed her outside of the door, brought her back, and took it out of her apron; it was loose in her apron.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop to buy two yards and an half of cloth. I changed an half guinea and paid for it; when I came out the gentleman stopped me and said I had got more than I had paid for. I did not know of it.

Prosecutor. There were some people attended, who said she had a good character, and they believed it was the first offence. I believe she was in liquor at the time.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. 3 months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-62

508, 509. MARGARET ODEER and ANN RICHARDS were indicted for stealing six guineas, a half crown, and three shillings, in monies, numbered, the property of Joseph Sumner , privily from the person of the said Joseph , September 9th .

JOSEPH SUMNER sworn.

I am a farmer in Essex. On the 9th of this month, about ten minutes before twelve at night; I went from the Clifford's-Inn coffee-house, where I spent my evening, with an intent to go, to Newgate market, where I generally lie when I come to town. As I was going down Fleet-street, at the end of Fetter-lane I met the two prisoners; they were strangers to me. Whether they asked me to treat them with a glass of wine, or I asked them, I cannot charge my memory; it was soon agreed between us to drink something

together; they said if I would step back just as far as Temple-bar, they knew of a very good house. I very imprudently went back with them to that house, it is up a passage by Temple-bar; the people were gone to bed. They said they knew of another very good house, the One Bell in the Strand. We went there; there were a great many people at the door, so I would not go in; they brought me at last to the London Hotel, in Bridges-street, Covent-Garden ; we went into that house, and had three bottles of wine and some cakes, to the amount of seven shillings and ninepence; I pulled out my money to pay the reckoning; I gave the waiter a guinea, and he brought an half-guinea and a half crown. It was about three in the morning, and as the morning was short we all three lay together, which was imprudent in me.

And unreasonable I think? - It was. I waked about seven o'clock, as near as I can guess, and then the prisoners were gone, and my purse and all my money was gone. When I took the purse out to pay the waiter I had six guineas left in it.

How long before you went to bed did you take out the purse? - I do not think it was above a quarter of an hour at most. I heard some people talking below, and I went down; there were the two prisoners. Nairn said good morning to you, you was bravely drunk last night. I said it may be so, pray what have you done with the money you took out of my pocket? Money, says she, with some opprobrious oaths, I know nothing of your money; you do remember, I suppose giving this Ann Richards half a guinea because she was injured? I said I never gave her a farthing, nor had they asked me for any, but what is become of the six guineas and three shillings and sixpence? She said d - n your money, I know nothing of it. The waiter said, I thought some such thing as this for they two have been up two hours and wanted to go away, but I would not let them go till you got up. I sent to Sir John Fielding 's, and Halliburton came, and I gave him charge of them. Halliburton said to Odeer, I shall search you. She said, so you may, I have only six guineas, which he gave me because he saw me at Chelmsford.

Did she come from the country? - do not know.

They do not do such things in the country? - They do things bad enough in the country; I do not know any body does such foolish things as me. She asked me if I came from the country? I said from Essex; she said the knew Braintree; that she had been taken there in a phaeton and pair by a gentleman by whom she was with child. Halliburton took from her six guineas and three shillings and sixpence. The other prisoner gave him the half guinea out of a handkerchief which she had in her bosom.

Prisoner. Was not you exceedingly drunk over night? - I was in liquor.

Court. Can you swear positively to the recollection of what you did over night, that you did not give any thing to that girl? - I did not.

Richards. I know this girl had three guineas and five shillings in her purse before she met this gentleman.

Jury. Before you retired to bed with the prisoners, did not you promise her a gift? - I did not.

Did not these girls say make us a present? They did not, as I remember.

WILLIAM HALLIBURTON sworn.

I was desired to search Odeer. She said here is what money I have got, and pulled three guineas out of her right-hand pocket, and three shillings and sixpence. I said, you have more than that. I searched the other pocket, and found a purse with three guineas in it; the purse was not the prosecutor's.

Prosecutor. My purse was found afterwards in the chamber. I called at the house and the waiter gave it me.

Halliburton. She said she had all the six guineas, and the other said she had the half guinea from him as a present.

To Sumner. You did not lie in your breeches that night? - No, I took them off and put them under my pillow.

ODEER's DEFENCE.

The waiter gave him a night-cap. I said I was not in a condition to be concerned with any man. He said he had only a few guineas in his pocket, which were at my service, and he gave me three guineas, and gave the half

guinea to the other girl. I had three guineas in my purse before.

RICHARD's DEFENCE.

He gave me half a guinea as a present.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-63

510, 511. ROBERT DOWNING and WILLIAM WOOD were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place near the king's highway, in and upon James Anderson feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a pair of metal buckles plated with silver, value 6 d. a muslin neck-cloth, value 1 s. and one shilling in monies, numbered, the property of the said James Anderson , September 10th .

JAMES ANDERSON sworn.

I am a shoe-maker , and live in Vine-street . I was robbed on Sunday the 10th of this month, about half after seven, in the Long Fields, leading from King-street, Bloomsbury-square to the turnpike ; Elisabeth Bailey was in company with me. I was going from Little Queen-street, to her master's country lodging, which is near the turnpike, Tottenham-court Road. As I was going through the first field I heard some people coming behind me; I looked back, and saw two men coming up; the young woman was rather afraid. I walked a little faster till we got into the second field; then I heard the men walking faster. I thought we could not escape them, so I fell into our usual pace again. The prisoner Downing came up to me, put one hand to my back and the other to my breast and tripped up my heels, and I fell down upon my back; then he demanded my money. The other prisoner was with the young woman demanding her money; she was about two yards from me. Downing said, your money, d - n you. I told him I had got none. He said what was I doing here without money. I had a shilling in my breeches pocket; I took it out and put it into my waistcoat pocket as I lay on my back between his feet; then he pulled the watch out of my fob, and asked me if my buckles were money, silver he meant, at the same time he was turning my breeches pockets out, then the other prisoner left the young woman and came up to me. I felt one of their hands (I do not know which) at my waistcoat pocket and missed the shilling.

Did you lose any thing else? - Then Downing took the plated buckles out of my shoes; after I rose up he took my muslin neckcloth from my neck; I desired they would not injure the girl; they promised they would not; then they went back the same way they came, and I went on with the young woman to her master's lodgings; it was a wet darkish night, but not to dark but I could see. I am positive to Downing; as to Wood I am not positive, though I firmly believe it was him. I told what had happened to me to a man at the turnpike, who directed me to go to the first publick-house. I did, and told the landlord and two men what I had been robbed of, and described the men; there were several people went out to look after them, and I was informed they were taken at the Compasses, a publick-house, in Tottenham Court Road. I went thither and saw the prisoners there. I said those were the men, that I was positive as to Downing; they were searched but nothing material was found upon them; Downing offered no violence to me, but the tall man struck me on the eye. I did not see any weapons.

(Upon his cross examination he said he never saw the prisoners before; he was a little frightened but not greatly, as there were no weapons; that they were dressed in sailor's habits, and one of them had striped trowsers on, but as to Downing he knew him by his countenance.)

ELIZABETH BAILEY sworn.

I was going to my master, who has a lodging by this turnpike; at half past seven, in company with Mr. Anderson, in the first field, I saw two men coming on behind Anderson; we mended our pace; the men came running up; the short man ( Downing) put

his hand upon Anderson's shoulder, asked for his money, and tripped him up; then the other came up to me, and asked for my money; but I could not observe what the other did to Anderson; Wood took my buckles and pockets, and then he went to Anderson. I stood still; I was about two yards off; Wood struck Anderson on the eye and pulled the neckcloth from his neck; then they went away from us, and Mr. Anderson and I went together to the turnpike; it was light enough to see the face of a man, and I am certain to the face of Wood, though I am not so certain as to the other; Wood was dressed as he is now, and they both appeared like sailors; when we came to the turnpike Anderson told what had happened. The next morning I saw the two prisoners at the round-house, and was sure then that Wood was one of the men.

(Upon her cross examination she said that Wood had striped trowsers on; that she had never seen the prisoners before she believes; the time taken up by this robbery was about six or seven minutes; and that they seemed to be as much frightened as she was.)

A Witness sworn.

I keep the turnpike leading from Tottenham-court to Islington. On Sunday the 10th, the two last witnesses came to the gate and said they had been robbed. I asked where, and whether they should know the people? They said, yes; one was a tall man in a waistcoat, long striped trowsers, a jacket, and round hat; the other had a jacket and trowsers and was rather taller and thicker than the little one, and had curled hair and a cocked hat. I directed Anderson to the first publick-house to get a pistol, and he came back in five minutes with two or three men. I called upon two men who lived just by; I had intelligence that two men answering such description lodged at the Three Compasses, in Tottenham-court Road; I went for Grubb, the constable. Anderson being come back I went to the Three Compasses, and the two prisoners and several other people were there, but no others dressed like sailors. Anderson said, he would swear Downing was the man who robbed him, and believed the other prisoner was the other. The next morning Elizabeth Bailey saw them. She said, the ta- man robbed her; that the robbery was committed about two or three hundred yards from the turnpike gate, and it was light enough to know a person, if close to him; it had rained pretty hard that evening, but I do not recollect that it did at all when they came to me.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I am a constable. I was called on at my house in St. Giles's by Anderson and others. Anderson said he had been robbed by two sailors, one a tall man, the other a short punchy man, dressed in jackets and trowsers. I went up Tottenham-court Road; then round the fields to the place where the robbery was committed, but found nobody there; then a person came with Anderson to me and gave information that two such men had been at his house and he knew they lodged at the Three Compasses; this led me to go thither, but they were not there then; after ten o'clock Dixon and I went to the Three Compasses again; we saw the prisoners there; we seised them. I sent for the prosecutor; he came and said, they were the two men who had robbed him; they were searched; three shillings were found upon one, and two shillings upon the other.

( John Dixon confirmed the testimony of Charles Grubb .)

DOWNING's DEFENCE.

I have witnesses to prove I was at this time at a different place.

WOOD's DEFENCE.

I was along with Downing.

For the Prisoners.

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn.

I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Tottenham-court Road, facing Mr. Whitfield's Tabernacle. I have known Downing six years. I have not known Wood long; he is just come from sea, I believe. Last Sunday was se'nnight they came together to our house at eleven o'clock in the forenoon and dined with me; at three o'clock, or rather after, I went out with them to the Duke of Grafton's head, near the turnpike in Tottenham-court

Road; we staid there till about ten minutes past seven o'clock; there was a dial in the tap-room; I looked at it; then we all together went back to my house; they staid and supped with me; we went to supper at about half past seven o'clock; my wife and I, and they two.

What distance is your house from the Grafton's Head? - A quarter of a mile, and they staid with me till half after eight by the clock at Whitfield's Tabernacle, for the dial just faces my lodging; they told me they were going to the Doctor's in Great Queen Anne-street.

Jury. What had you for supper; - Cold beef.

One of the Prisoners. And apple pudding.

What day was it? - Yesterday was se'nnight.

When did you see them before? - On the Friday before in the morning; I saw them go out; they lodged at the new inn, just by.

When was the time you saw them before that Friday? - They called in upon me almost every night.

JANE EDWARDS sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Edwards . The two prisoners came together, as near as I can guess, at five minutes after seven o'clock; the chapel clock had struck seven when I was putting my children into bed; they staid till about half after eight, as near as I can guess.

Had they any thing to eat and drink? - Yes; some boiled beef and pye and pudding; they went from us to Dr. Medcalf's, at the corner of York-street, to see two young women.

Court. Had not you seen them before? - Yes; they were with us all day; my husband and they went out together to have a pot of beer.

What time did they first come to your house that day? - Pretty soon in the morning; they were at our house all day, except when they went out with my husband; they dined with us.

What time did they go out in the afternoon? - About four o'clock, as near as I can guess, with my husband; they came in with my husband all together.

ANN ATTMORE sworn.

I am servant to Dr. Medcalfe, in York-street. The two prisoners came to our house to see my fellow servant and I, being acquaintance; they came at half past eight o'clock, and staid till just after the watch went ten.

Did they come in sailor 's dresses? - Yes; they were very dry and very clean when they came to us; at the time the robbery was committed it rained very hard.

AMEY MERCER sworn.

I am likewise servant to Dr. Medcalfe.

Do you recollect these two men coming to your house on Sunday se'nnight? - Yes; they came, as nigh as I can tell, at half after seven o'clock.

Attmore. It was half after eight? - It was half after eight, it was my mistake; they went away some time after ten.

Was you an acquaintance of these men before? - It is about a fortnight since I saw them. Robert Downing was a very particular acquaintance of my fellow-servant, who is at home.

What a sweet-heart I suppose? - I do not know as to that; I did not know Wood, no more than I have often heard an exceeding good character of him from my fellow-servant, while he was at sea.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn.

I am master of the Venus brig; they have belonged to that ship four months.

Did they belong to her at the time they were taken up? - Yes; they are honest sober men, and very attentive to their business. They asked my leave to go on shore on the Saturday night before; I gave them leave; I could safely trust them I believe with untold gold; they have been two voyages with me to Ireland. I shipped them both at Portsmouth I think in May; they asked for money on Saturday night before they went on shore. I gave Robert Downing half a guinea, the other five shillings; but the other had received his full wages, though I gave him that money.

(They called nine other witnesses who gave them all a good character.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

WILLIAM WOOD and ROBERT DOWNING were indicted for that they, in a certain open place and field, near the king's highway, in and upon Elizabeth Bailey feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person two linen pockets, value 6 d. a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. two farthings, and a pair of metal shoe buckles plated with silver, value 6 d. the property of the said Elizabeth , September 10th .

(There was not any evidence given upon this indictment.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-64

512. GEORGE WATSON was indicted for stealing a leather pocket-book, value 10 d. and five guineas in monies, numbered, the property of Lawrence Anderson , in the dwelling house of the said Lawrence , August 14th .

LAWRENCE ANDERSON sworn.

I am a publican in Old Gravel-lane . On the 14th of August, between four and five in the afternoon I was alone in my bar; I had seen this money and the pocket-book two or three hours before in the desk in my parlour, into which you go through the tap-room; the prisoner Watson and another man came into my house, after four o'clock, and called for sixpenny worth of something to drink; they went into the parlour where the desk was. I saw them shut the door. I was angry at that, and asked why they shut the door, and sent to have it opened; the boy went and opened it; they shut it again. I sent the girl to open it, one of them was standing with his back against the door; they soon after paid for the liquor and went away. I had carried them some pens, ink, and paper, into the room. In two or three minutes after they went away I was told I had been robbed. I went directly to the desk and missed the pocket-book and five guineas; I always locked the desk; and it appeared to be locked when I missed my money; I suppose it must have been unlocked; they might stay in the room half an hour. I am sure no one else was in the room after the time I saw my pocket-book and the five guineas. I was in the house all the time myself, it is not usual for company to go into that room, but they got in, I hardly know how.

JONAS SHAKER sworn.

I was sitting in the tap-room when the prisoner and another came in; they called for liquor and went into the parlour and shut the door; upon Anderson's saying he was robbed I pursued them. I saw them about five minutes afterwards in a court. I saw one of them holding up a piece of paper; after that I saw one of them with a pocket-book in his hand, which had it I cannot tell, but they were both looking at the pocket-book. One said to the other, while they were examining the pocket-book, there is nothing in this pocketbook of any consequence. I applied to several people to assist me; just as I seised them one threw down the pocket-book, but which of them I cannot tell.

ANN PAYNE sworn.

I saw the last witness come up. He said they had robbed his landlord; they put their back against the doctor's rails, and that moment I saw the pocket-book drop between them; the Doctor picked up the book and I picked up a letter, which fell out of it, and gave it to him to put into it.

WILLIAM WHITWAY sworn.

I am an headborough. The prisoner was brought to me; the other man had made his escape. I searched the prisoner and found nine guineas in his breeches pocket, and in his waistcoat pocket I found this bunch of picklock keys (producing them.)

Anderson. It is my pocket-book.

Shaker. The pocket-book the two men held up and were looking at was a black pocket-book.

Ann Payne . I believe this to be the same pocket-book the Doctor picked up.

Anderson. Among the nine guineas there is one I can swear to; there are two black marks upon the reverse side.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am intirely innocent of it.

(The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-65

513. ANN GRAY was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 8 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 12 d. a cloth waistcoat, value 3 s. and a pair of shoes, value 4 s. the property of William Morris ; and a pair of mens shoes, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Jones ; and three linen shirts, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Williams , August 8th .

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn.

I live in Goodman's-yard . On the 8th of August, I lost three shirts, which I had left in my room when I went out to work at six in the morning. When I came back between four and five in the afternoon I missed them; I saw the prisoner in the street when I came back, and found the things upon the ground near Mr. Russell's passage gate.

THOMAS JONES sworn.

I lodged in the same room with the last witness. I lost a pair of shoes and buckles from the same room at the same time. I found them under the gate between three and four o'clock.

WILLIAM MORRIS sworn.

I lodged in the same room; I lost my property, which I found under the gate.

JULIANA KIRK sworn.

I keep this house. The three men lodge with me. On the 8th of August in the afternoon, while I was in the kitchen I heard a noise; I stepped forward and saw the prisoner go out of my house; I followed her to Russel's gate-way, which is not many yards off; just at the moment I came up to her she threw the things down.

JAMES BARKER sworn.

I am a constable. I found these things under the gateway.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the several Prosecutors.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming past the place; that woman said I had the things; I never saw her before.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-66

514. ELISABETH MACDONALD was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. four linen caps, value 10 d. a piece of silk ribband, and a pair of linen sleeves, value 4 d. the property of John Taylor , August 6th .

MARY TAYLOR sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 6th of August I went out to buy something, when I came back I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, they were taken out of the kitchen.

JANE THOMAS sworn.

Between ten and eleven in the morning I saw the prisoner and another woman come to the house; the prisoner went in, the other staid at the door. I saw the prisoner come out with the linen folded up in her apron. They both immediately ran away; when they came into East Smithfield they parted. I followed the prisoner and saw her go into a publick-house, the Three Jolly Sailors. I came back and informed Mary Taylor of this; when we went back to the house she had left it and had left the linen behind her; she was taken an hour after.

ELISABETH JACOBS sworn.

I keep the publick-house, the prisoner left these things in my yard.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

(The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-67

515. BENJAMIN ELLIOT was indicted for stealing a sow pig, value 15 s. the property of Adrian Hedley , July 9th .

(The prosecutor was called but not appearing the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-68

516, 517, 518, 519. JOSEPH CARTER , MARY the wife of Joseph CARTER , ELISABETH CARTER , and JANE CARTER , were indicted for traiteroulsy

coining a piece of false, feigned, and counterfeited coin, to the likeness and similitude of the good legal money and coin of this realm, called an half crown , against the statute, &c. August 3d .

2d Count. For coining a shilling.

3d Count. For coining a sixpence.

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of Joseph Carter .)

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

On the 29th of July, in the morning, an information came to the office, that some coiners were at work, at No. 23, in Water-lane, Black Friars . I went there between the hours of eleven and twelve with Messrs. Clarke, Prothero, Carpmeal, Jennings, Macmanus, and Phillips. We knocked at the door; an old woman let us in. When she saw a good many of us, she ran to the stairs and squalled and made a great noise. Jennings clapped his hand before her mouth to prevent her making a noise. Macmanus and I ran up to the three-pair-of-stairs back room; in a little room on the left-hand side, I saw Joseph Carter , Mary Carter , and Elisabeth Carter , rise from separate stools; before them lay on a bench, three separate parcels of money. The three stools were in a line. The mother was next the window, Elisabeth Carter was in the middle, and Joseph Carter on the left-hand side. When they arose Elisabeth Carter in the middle dropped something, but what I could not tell. Joseph Carter himself was without his coat, his shirt sleeves were tucked up; he had a white night-cap on, a leather apron before him, and was without his stockings; he had a leather thumb-stall upon his left thumb, which, if it is examined now, I believe some silver will be found upon it (producing it); in the other room, there were several pair of flasks, a furnace, and a crucible upon the fire.

PATRICK M'MANUS sworn.

I was employed on this business. When we came to the house we knocked at the door, in a little time an old woman opened it, we rushed in. She attempted to shout out; one of our people clapped his hand before her mouth, and stopped her. Jealous and I went up stairs, and went on till we got to the garret. I saw a place made like a stove, I put my hand on it and said it was hot; it was in the front garret on the right-hand side; I spoke low, I thought he was near enough to hear me. I turned round and saw Jealous open the door at the left hand side of me; he went in and I followed him. Mr. Carter was then standing upon his feet; I looked over and saw the mother standing next the window. The daughter was getting up, and I heard some money fall down; I said Charles, the girl is throwing down money. He said never mind any thing, let us keep them where they are.

The mother was next to Joseph? - No, the daughter was in the middle between the two; she was next the window on the farther side. I heard a noise; there were three different parcels of money on the bench, and three stools upon which I suppose they had been sitting. Clarke and Carpmeal came up immediately, and they were taken to Sir John Fielding 's just as they were; the man had his shirt sleeves turned up; he had his shoes on but no stockings; and his hands were black. The woman's hands were black; she was dressed in a working dress. The young woman's hands were much the same.

PERCIVAL PHILLIPS sworn.

I went to Carter's house in Water-lane, and when the door was opened we all went in together. I saw that young girl (Jane) in the kitchen, at a carpenter's chest. I thought it was a bench; she went from thence into the yard, and put her hand into the water; I was close to her; I asked her what she had thrown into the water tub? She said nothing. I looked into the water tub, but there was not any thing there; I brought her back into the kitchen. I looked on the chest where she came from, and there was a pan of aqua fortis and water, and a pan with water and white sand in it (producing them) in that pan; with the white sand in it there were these half crowns and shillings (producing a large parcel); in the aqua fortis and water there were some half crowns and sixpences (producing them. The witness likewise produced a bottle of aqua fortis and a pipkin.) This pipkin was on the corner close to the fire; there was some fire in a pan under it. I called Prothero to look at her hands; they were all over sand

and aqua fortis; for she had but just touched the water with one hand when I catched hold of her.

Cross Examination.

Do you know what trade Carter is? - I believe he is a carpenter; there is a carpenter's chest in the house.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

When we entered the house the old woman went to the foot of the stair and begun to halloo. One of the officers put his hand before her mouth to prevent her. Phillips went down into the kitchen; I followed him. Jane Carter was by the carpenter's chest in the kitchen. She ran out into the yard; Phillips laid hold of her and brought her back. I found this shilling (producing it) in a pot in the pickle. Phillips had taken some money out before I found out the shilling. All the prisoners appeared in the situation of having just been at work.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I went to this house in Water-lane with the rest of the officers; I took care of the back part of the house for fear of an escape. When all the prisoners were in custody Prothero came and called me; when I came into the house I saw the youngest daughter in the custody of Phillips and Prothero. I then went up stairs through a room where some body had been casting, and in a room adjoining to that were the father, mother, and the eldest daughter. To the best of my knowledge the father was on the left-hand side, in the centre the daughter, and on the farther side the mother. The father was without his coat, his shirt sleeves tucked up; and I think he had a white cap on and a pair of slippers; he had no stockings. The daughter and the mother were in bed-gowns. There were three pair of handvises, three stools, which three people had been sitting upon, and some money lay all over the bench where they had been at work. I took them before the magistrate in the same situation they were in; and I am sorry to say there was not a doubt that each of the persons had been doing some part of the work.

That is your opinion? - Clearly so.

Upon what do you found that opinion? - By examining their hands, which were discoloured with working silver. There was a thumb-stall with silver on it found on the thumb of the father. There was a quantity of filings and a pair of knippers they cut it off with. There were the filings which had been filed, and some pieces cut off the rough edges. They are all here. I then went to examine the work shop; they had been casting there that day, for the furnace was warm. There was a melting pot in the furnace. There was a get which they lay in the sand, for a gutter for the metal. There was casting sand, facing moulds, and every thing complete for casting. I went down stairs; I found the pickle and other things there, and a quantity of half crowns which had been taken out of the wet sand; she had certainly been at work; her hands were in a terrible situation by working with the aqua fortis. I asked her what her name was, which she refused to tell me. She begged me not to ask her any questions. I put her into another room, and then found by the grandmother, that she was a daughter to the man. (All the implements were produced in court). This is the melting-pot which was on the fire; this is part of the money which lay before them; here are some rough cast as they came from the sand, the others are filed round the edges to take the roughness off.

Then the persons so employed were filing these? - No doubt of it; here are files, and here are parts of the get; here are three hand vises, scowering paper, and cork, which they make use of; and another finger stall, which was found in the shop; here are flasks; here are the patterns with which the impressions were made in the moulds in which this counterfeit money was cast.

What is the use of the pickle? - By putting them in the pickle it forces the silver to the surface.

These halfcrowns which were found in the pickle do they correspond with the pattern you have produced? - They do; there is one which has been cast and made use of as a pattern; and these two are counterfeits; here is another made from that pattern.

Are the shillings and sixpences the same? - All the same; here is a shilling which is a rough cast, a filed one, and a complete

one, and a pattern; there is a hole in the woman side, and that corresponds with all of them.

( Reuben Fletcher , a moneyer at the Mint, deposed that the pieces produced were counterfeit.)

(The prisoners being called upon to make their defence said, they left their defence to their counsel, who called eight witnesses who had known them many years, and gave them all a very good character.)

JOSEPH CARTER GUILTY ( Death )

MARY NOT GUILTY .

ELISABETH NOT GUILTY.

JANE NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17800913-69

519. GEORGE WEAVER was indicted for buying six hundred and forty-eight false and counterfeit halfpence from Cicely Browne for a guinea .

2d Count. For buying them at the rate of six hundred and forty-eight halfpence for a guinea.

3d Count. For buying seven hundred and twenty false and counterfeit halfpence for a guinea.

4th Count. For buying them at the rate of seven hundred and twenty halfpence for a guinea, August 31st .

SAMUEL COLLINS sworn.

I am a joiner. On last Wednesday was three weeks, I think it was the 23d of August, I was in Mrs. Browne's house; the prisoner came and asked if her name was Browne? She said yes, He said, have you any thirtys? She said she had not, but she would get him some; she took out two or three halfpence of the sort she was to get at thirtys for a guineas to show him the pattern. He asked at what time he was to come? She said about one o'clock. I went away and told Prothero what had passed. He came with me about one o'clock to apprehend him. He came between two and three, and the two pieces were done up in an handkerchief for him. I did not see the halfpence, I heard them rattle, and he gave Mrs. Browne one guinea in gold, and some silver; I do no know how much, I did not see him tell the silver for the halfpence; he then went away.

What did you understand by thirtys? - Thirty shillings' worth of halfpence for a guinea in gold.

Did you hear the agreement? - Yes, there was to be thirty shillings for a guinea. I do not know how much there was given him.

When you said he asked if she had any thirtys, did the parties explain what it was? - The woman when she shewed him the pattern, said, these are thirty shillings for a guinea.

CICELY BROWNE sworn.

Weaver came to my house for two pieces of halfpence when Collings was there.

What do you mean by two pieces of half-pence? - Thirty shillings for a guinea; he agreed to give me two guineas for three pounds' worth of halfpence. He came between two and three o'clock. I gave him two parcels, but by mistake gave him seven and twentys; he gave me a guinea in gold and a guinea in silver. I never had any dealings with him before; he was recommended to me. When they are sent into the country they have but twenty-seven, but when they come for them in town they have thirtys. He took them and put them in his handkerchief. He only had two papers to see if they were the kind he wanted. I did not find the mistake till night. I expected him to come in the morning; instead of that I was taken to Sir John Fielding 's; there I told the truth to save myself.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

Collings came and told me he was at an house near Holbourn, where a man had bargained for two pieces of halfpence. I went to the publick-house and waited for him, and when he came out I took him with the money, which was done up in papers.

REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I have examined them; there is not a mint halfpenny amongst them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A person gave me a direction to Mrs. Browne in Field-lane, and desired me to call for a parcel she was to have; there she gave

me a guinea in gold and another in silver. Mrs. Brown asked for my handkerchief and did them up, nothing more passed between us. I did not know what the parcel contained.

(The prisoner called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-70

520, 521. WILLIAM STEPHENS otherwise GOFF and SAMUEL FORD , were indicted for that they in the king's highway in and upon Marian De Rollo , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, a Cotton handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of the said Marian , August 4th .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

(The prosecutor being a foreigner and not understanding the English language, an interpreter was sworn.)

MARTIN DE ROLLO sworn.

I am a sailor belonging to a Neapolitan polacre; the ship is gone to sea since this affair happened. On a Thursday six or seven weeks ago I was going along Saltpetre-bank ; the prisoners came up and faced me; they spoke to me, but I could not understand what they said. They were handling some nuts I had in a basket. There were some women and children about the place; Stevens took a handful from my nut-basket and ran away with it. I wanted to pursue him to get my handkerchief; the other held me by the skirts of my jacket and stopped me, and collared me by the handkerchief of my neck; then he attempted to take my watch from me, but could not because the chain was fastened to my breeches; he held his fist to my face and made a sign that he would lick me. Stevens came back and threatened me. They said a good deal, I did not understand what, and shewed motions of beating me.

Did they beat you? - No.

Ford. In what way did we stop you first? - They were handling the nuts.

WILLIAM WHITWAY sworn.

I am a labourer in the East India Company's warehouse. I went and apprehended the prisoners.

What are these young fellows? - I apprehend they are common thieves. I took them up, I believe it was on the 3d of August; they were commited on the 4th.

STEVENS's DEFENCE.

I was coming down with a bushel of coals; I saw this young man; he asked me to drink part of a pint of beer with him. This man came to the door; we asked him how he sold his nuts? He said twenty-two for a halfpenny. This man said he would have twenty-eight for an halfpenny, and went to strike him.

FORD's DEFENCE.

The other prisoner and I went to drink a pint of beer. This man came with his nuts to the door; I asked the price of them; I cracked two or three and found they were good for nothing and threw the shells in the basket; he began to make a noise and knocked down my pint of beer.

(The prisoners called two witnesses who gave them a good character.)

BOTH GUILTY of the felony, but not of the robbery .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-71

522. CATHERINE PRICE was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. and six shillings in monies, numbered, the property of John Farris , privily from the person of the said John , July 28th .

JOHN FARRIS sworn.

On the 28th of July, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, coming by the French Horn tavern, near Red Lion-street, Holbourn , I saw the prisoner standing at the door; she asked me to give her something to drink at this tavern. We went into a room,

we sat down together, she in one chair and I in another. As I sat in the chair I fell asleep. Nothing passed between us. When the waiter came in and waked me, and asked me if I had lost any thing, I had been there about half an hour; the prisoner was gone. I immediately found I had lost my watch and money. I have not got either watch or money again. The prisoner was taken up about three weeks after. I had looked at my watch just before I went in, so I am sure I had it. I had been drinking a little, but was not disguised so much as not to know what I did.

Had you any talk with the prisoner about a present? - No, nothing at all.

WILLIAM BICKNELL sworn.

I was waiter at that time at the French Horn in Holbourn. I remember the prisoner coming in with Mr. Farris, it was very late in the evening, near the morning. They went into a room and ordered a negus. I saw seven or eight shillings; he gave me two shillings, and put the rest into his pocket and buttoned it up. I did not observe whether he had any watch; in about ten minutes after the prisoner went out; I went in to him and he was asleep. I then waked him and asked him if he had lost any thing, because his breeches were wide open, as well as his pockets; he searched his pockets, and said he had lost his watch and money. I took the prisoner up about six weeks after. I am sure she is the woman, I knew her before.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor was in liquor, and he took me into the French Horn. I was at the house every night, but they did not take me up for three weeks.

To the Prosecutor. Did you give her any money? - I did not.

Was you with any other woman that night? - No.

Did you treat any other? - No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-72

523. MARY LANGRAM was indicted for stealing a black silk cloak, value 20 s. a silk apron, value 2 s. a silk hat, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 d. and a thread laced cap, value 6 d. the property of Ann Pedder , July 17th .

ANN PEDDER sworn.

I keep a green shop in White Cross-street . On the 17th of July, I went to Newgate-market at a quarter after five in the morning, I came back at six and found my door broke open. The staple was drawn; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). I found a hat, cloak, and apron at the pawnbroker's.

( Thomas Wood , a pawnbroker, produced a cloak, which he took in pawn from the prisoner; it were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought these things in Rag-fair.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-73

524. MICHAEL WHITE was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Christopher Kempster , August 1st .

CHRISTOPHER KEMPSTER sworn.

My pocket was picked of my handkerchief, on the 1st of August, in Fleet-street , near the Bolt and Tun. I suspected the prisoner, he was very near me; I believe he had made an attempt before. I felt something at my pocket, and I immediately missed my handkerchief; he crossed the way, and went up a court; I took him by the collar, and carried him to Bow-street, where I saw my handkerchief, and some others taken out from under his apron, by Halliburton; it has the initials of my name and a figure of 3 upon it.

(It was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM HALLIBURTON sworn.

Mr. Kempster brought the prisoner to Bow street. I searched him, and found this

handkerchief between his shirt and his skin.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the handkerchief in Fleet-street, at the corner of a glass shop, by Water-lane.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17800913-74

525. JOHN RINKLE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Adam Harris , the 18th of August , about the hour of five in the afternoon (no person being in the same dwelling-house) and stealing three linen gowns, value 30 s. a linen curtain, value 5 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 20 s. a stuff petticoat, value 4 s. two linen aprons, value 3 s. a silk cloak, value 10 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value, 10 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 3 s. a silver stock buckle, value 3 s. and two silver tea-spoons, value 2 s. the property of the said Adam Harris , in his dwelling-house .

ELISABETH HARRIS sworn.

I am the wife of Adam Harris ; we live in Little Charlotte-street . The 18th of August, I went out about four o'clock into the next street; I locked my door; I returned in about half an hour; I had not left any person in the house.

Prisoner. She said before the justice she left a lodger in the one-pair-of-stairs? - I am not certain whether any body was in the house; when I returned I opened the street-door; I attempted to unlock my own room door, upon which the prisoner, who was inside the room, opened it; this bundle lay tied up upon the table, and another handkerchief was spread open; he came up to me, and said, O you eternal bitch! and put both his thumbs to my throat, and threw me down in the passage; I hallooed out, and called out thieves! A little boy who lives in the house ran out, and then the prisoner ran out; a gentleman seeing him run out, and me lying in the passage, stopped him, and brought him back. He had in his pocket a black cardinal of mine, my husband's silver shoe-buckes, and two silver tea-spoons.

(The bundle found on the table was produced in court, and the contents of it were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Harris. When I went out, the things were in my drawers; I saw the prisoner's face, and can swear to him.

JOHN EVANS sworn.

This silk cardinal, a pair of silver shoe-buckles, a pair of silver knee-buckles, a silver stock buckle, and two silver tea-spoons (producing them) I found upon the prisoner in the back room; we took him to Litchfield-street; he was examined, and the woman swore to the property.

(They were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM BUNN sworn.

I was coming through Little Charlotte-street on the 8th of August; I heard a violent screaming; at that instant the prisoner rushed out of the house of Mrs. Harris; I heard a woman's voice call out, Stop him, he has robbed me! I looked in, and saw Mrs. Harris lying in the passage; I pursued the prisoner, and gave the alarm.

Had you a perfect sight of him when he came out, as to know him again? - Yes, I saw him perfectly; the prisoner is the person.

Can you tell who took him? - I cannot tell; there was one coming the contrary way met him, and one pursuing him, came up to him together; I do not know which took hold of him first.

RICHARD SIMMONDS sworn.

I am a fishmonger at No. 2, Little Charlotte-street. On the 18th of August, at about four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a call of Stop thief! I ran out, and ran the way the people ran, to Windmill-street; there Mr. Bunn shewed me the prisoner; he was running; I pursued him, and a young man stopped him; I did not loose sight of him before he was taken.

RICHARD MARRIOTT sworn.

I stopped the prisoner in the fields; there were a number of people running.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am totally innocent of the fact; the goods found upon me I bought for 18 s. the rest of

my defence I leave to my counsel, and the mercy of the court; the man I bought them of was a stranger to me; I do not know where to find him.

(The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.)

To the prosecutor. What lodgers have you in the house? - A man and his wife in the dining room, and two young men lay in our back parlour.

Are you sure whether any person was in the house or not? - In a lodging house one cannot be certain; there might be some body in the rooms.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-75

526. JOHN RINKLE was indicted for stealing six silver table-spoons, value 60 s. and forty guineas, and thirty halfcrowns, in monies, numbered, and a Bank-note of ten pounds; the said note at the time of committing the felony being then due and unsatisfied, the property of John Frost , in the dwelling house of William Frost , July 15th .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

JOHN FROST sworn.

I live at the Hoxton-Town Coffee-house, at Hoxton ; my brother keeps the coffee-house. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) on Saturday the 15th of July. Between four and five o'clock, the prisoner called at our house with a friend; my brother asked them to walk into the coffee-room below; they replied no, they would go up stairs; they went up stairs into a long room; my brother followed them; there was an empty room between the room they were in, and the bed-room where the things were kept; the bed-room door was fast; they ordered tea; they waited about a quarter of an hour before the tea was ready; we suppose in that time they took the things; there was nobody up these stairs besides all that day.

One of the Jury. I was at Sir John Fielding 's when the prisoner was examined, and the witness could not swear to him then? - There were two persons taken up in Cheapside, I could not swear that they were the men.

Whether you did not say at Sir John Fielding 's you had taken up a man in Cheapside and carried him to the Compter? - Yes; he was taken before the Lord Mayor; there was nothing found upon him, he was acquitted. He was there and dined there by himself, but never was up stairs.

Court. Did you swear he was one of the persons who drank the tea? - No, he only dined there. I took him up because I thought he might know this gentleman, because they would not go into the room where he was.

Counsel. Though that gentleman was never up stairs, yet you took him up and lodged him in jail? - Yes. I thought he might know them.

How long after the 15th of July was it before he was taken up? - He was taken up on Friday the 18th of August, on Mr. Harris's account; we went on the Tuesday after.

ELIZABETH FROST sworn.

I am the wife of William Frost ; my husband keeps the Hoxton-Town Coffee-house. I never saw the prisoner before the 15th of July; then he came to our house with a companion about four o'clock.

Did you lose any money? - Yes; forty guineas, about three pounds, and a Banknote. I saw it about twelve o'clock; it was in a box under the bed. I counted it; I took it from under the bed and put it in the drawer of a chest of drawers in the bed-room; the gold was in a little box, the silver was in a bag; we missed it in about two hours after the prisoner was gone, his companion went with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-76

527. ANNE the wife of William ELBY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a silver watch-chain, value 2 s. a stone sealset in base metal, value 2 d. a piece of

silver seal, value 6 d. a base metal key, value 3 d. two guineas and three shillings in monies, numbered, the property of Stewart Fabram , privily from the person of the said Stewart , August 9th .

STEWART FABRAM sworn.

I am a milk-man . I was drinking in company with the gentlewoman at the bar some time last month. I was coming by her house, at Bluefields, she was sitting at the window. She asked me to come in. I staid there, I believe, about half an hour; then we went to the King's Arms in Sun Tavern-fields; we staid there about an hour; from thence we went to the halfway-house; we staid there about half an hour; from thence we went to the Three Cranes at Mile-end ; we did not stay there above half an hour.

I suppose at all these places you drank pretty freely? - Yes.

Then I may fairly suppose that you was very drunk? - Yes, I was very much so.

When had you the watch last? - At the Three Cranes; I am clear of that.

You are clear, why you was so drunk you could not know any thing that passed? - I am certain I had it there, because I took it out to look at at that place.

Drunk as you were can you positively swear that? - Yes, I will swear, that when I had looked at it I put it into my pocket.

Was any body else in the room? - It was in a publick tap-room; there were several other people there but not in my company.

Did you sit near any body? - No.

When did you part with the prisoner? - Between ten and eleven o'clock; they took charge of her there; the watch was found upon her person.

How came you to miss it? - I did not miss it, the people in the room saw her take it.

Cross Examination.

How long have you known this young woman? - By sight eight or nine years.

You used often to drink tea with her? - No. I used to go and see her, but not very often.

You knew where she lived and you and she where in habits of intimacy? - No.

But you used to pay her a civil visit now and then? - Yes.

You used often to see her? - No.

Have you been there a dozen times in your life? - Yes, I may have been.

Finding you could not put the watch into your pocket yourself did not you desire her to take care of it? - I did not.

Was you sober enough to recollect that circumstance? - Yes.

Did not she say immediately here is the watch which this man, who knows me well, has given me to take care of? - It is no such thing.

Did she say so? - She did not.

Whether she did not when the constable came say that? - She said she had a right to it.

What did she say her right was? - They questioned her to know whether I was her husband? She said, no; but she had a right to take care of it.

Did not she say that right was because you had given it her to take care of? - No; she did not say so.

Will you take upon you to swear you did not give it her? - Yes.

You was very drunk? - Yes, but I am clear in it I did not do it.

You knew her, and had been above a dozen times at her house? - I do not know that I have.

Perhaps only eleven times, but you have been there often? - Perhaps too often.

You knew her husband too? - Yes.

We should not have heard any thing of this prosecution, I believe, if the husband had not threatened you for taking his wife from him? - I did not take his wife from him.

Did not the husband threaten to bring an action against you for seducing his wife? - Yes.

And is not that the reason for your bringing this prosecution? - Yes, it is.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury you will acquit the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-77

528. MARY SPEAKE was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 10 s. a linen jam, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. a linen shirt, value 5 s. a callico bed-gown, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. and a flat-iron, value 6 d. the property of Gitter Humphreys , August 18th .

MARY HUMPHREYS sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. The prisoner slept with me; when I went to bed I left the gown upon the horse; the prisoner blew out the candle. which caused me to suspect all was not right. I asked her where the gown was? She said, upon the horse. I put out my hand and found it was not there. I jumped out of bed, upon which she ran off.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I beg the mercy of the court, I have no friends here.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM,

Reference Number: t17800913-78

529. ANN DOE was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 20 s. a linen shirt, value 18 d. a yard of linen cloth, value 12 d. and a child's linen clout, value 6 d. the property of John Abbott , August 19th .

(There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, but the testimony of a little boy, who not knowing the nature of an oath could not be examined.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-79

530. ARNOLD GOLDENARMS was indicted for stealing a woollen coat, value 8 s. the property of John Cole , August 14th .

(The prosecutor was called but did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-80

531. ANN the wife of George MILLER was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 7 s. the property of Ann Couch , spinster , August 12th .

ANN COUCH sworn.

I live in Gravel-lane . I missed a gown, which was lying upon my bed. I found it afterwards in Bell-yard, Whitechapel.

- FLETCHER sworn.

I bought this gown (producing it) of the prisoner for 7 s. She said it was her own.

(The gown was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PARKER's DEFENCE.

I picked up the gown done up in a bundle; there was a woman going to pick it up before me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-81

532. GILES MURRAY was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon Sarah the wife of James Wood , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person one shilling, in money, the property of the said Thomas, from the person of the said Sarah , August 28th .

(The prosecutor was called but did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-82

533, 534. CHARLOTTE WARE and MARY WRIGHT were indicted for stealing sixty yards of silk ribband, value 30 s. the property of Mary Iggulden and Jane Sowden , privily, in their shop , July 12th .

MARY IGGULDEN sworn.

I am in partnership with Jane Sowden ; we keep a Milliner's shop , No: 8, Gerrard-street . On the 12th of July we lost about sixty yards of silk ribband out of the shop; I was not in the shop at the time.

MARIA INNES sworn.

On the 12th of July, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop, and asked to look at some ribband; they took out a piece of pink

ribband, and asked the price of it? I said sixpence a yard; they wanted to have it for a groat; I said I could not afford it for that, and I desired they would go out of the shop, for I suspected they were shop-lifters; they then went out; I missed the ribband the next day out of the box.

WILLIAM NORMAN sworn.

John Windes had stopped Ware for robbing him; one of these pieces dropped from her; this was on the 11th of July; I searched her, and found these three pieces of ribband upon her; one piece was under her right arm, another under her left, between her shift and her skin, another piece she put down while I was searching of her.

(The ribband was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Is that part of the ribband that was in the box? - Yes.

JOHN HINDE sworn.

On the 12th of July, I met Charlotte Ware ; the other prisoner was with her; I challenged her with stealing two shirts from me; she ran away, I ran after her; this piece of ribband dropped from her, and the rest were found upon her.

(The ribband was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WARE's DEFENCE.

Mary Wright is as innocent as the child unborn.

WARE GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 4 s. W .

WRIGHT NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-83

535. EDWARD HUSSEY was indicted for stealing a pair of steel barrel pistols, inlaid, and mounted with gold and silver, value 5 l. a pair of brass barrel pistols, mounted with silver, value 40 s. and a pair of steel barrel pistols, mounted with silver, value 20 s. the property of James Squibb , in the dwelling-house of the said James , July 13th .

JOHN HUGHES sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Squibb the auctioneer in Savile-row . Some pistols were stollen from the auction-room; I saw the prisoner there, tying up something in a handkerchief; I mentioned that there was a strange man tying something up; he was secured, and the pistols were found upon him.

THOMAS PARTRIDE sworn.

I took the pistols from the Prussian ambassadors to Mr. Squibb's to be sold; I saw the prisoner come out of the room with the pistols under his arm; he had a piece of cloth tied round them; I pursued him into Old Burlington-street, and took them from him; I asked him whose pistols he had got there? he said his own; I said I believed they belonged to Mr. Squibb; he said if they were mine, I was exceedingly welcome to them; I said he should go with me, and I took him back.

How soon was this after Hughes said there was a strange man packing things up? - About ten minutes; a quarter of an hour at farthest.

(The pistols were produced in court, and deposed to by the witness.)

RICHARD DENEW sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Squibb; these are the pistols that were at our house, they came from the Prussian ambassador's, they had been there about ten minutes before the prisoner came in, the tickets on them are my hand-writing; the prisoner was very much in liquor when he was taken.

What is the value of these pistols? - Eight guineas; they were not to be disposed of under twelve guineas.

The place they were taken from was part of Mr. Squibb's dwelling-house? - It is the warehouse, it adjoins; but I believe it is not under the same roof, there are two roofs.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was so much in liquor, I did not know any thing of it till I was taken to prison, and in the morning I asked what it was for?

Denew. He was very much in liquor; they were taken from him in Burlington-street.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

Denew. When I proffered the indictment,

I was told it made no difference whether it was forty shillings or eight pounds; it was never meant to take his life.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. N. 1 year .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-84

536. GEORGE PEPOTT was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 10 s. five linen aprons, value 5 s. a laced cap, value 1 s. a linen cap, value 1 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. two dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a pocket apron, value 1 s. and a pair of shift sleeves, value 1 s. the property of Mary Champion , widow , September 9th .

MARY CHAMPION sworn.

I live at Shadwell-market . On the 9th of this month, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I was sent for to Denmark-street to look after a gentlewoman's house; I put up these things in a bundle, and laid them on a table; the prisoner and two other soldier s came in, and called for a pint of beer; I left the bundle on the top of a settee bed, and went up stairs for a handkerchief; when I returned, the bundle and the soldiers were gone; this was about half after eleven o'clock; I went home, and going up King David-lane, I saw them in a publick-house; I went and got assistance, and took them up, and about an hour after the prisoner brought the things to me from the Bee-hive in Penitent-street; I asked him where the things were? He said, would I hurt him, if he told me where the things were? I said no, I did not want to hurt him, and he went with the man from the justice's, and brought the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-85

537. GEORGE ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing eleven live pigeons, value 11 s. a live goose, value 5 s. and two linen bed-curtains, value 4 s. the property of Joshua Brooks , August 13th .

JOSHUA BROOKS sworn.

I live at Tottenham-court , and deal in live poultry . On the 13th of August I lost eleven pigeons, some of them were taken out of the shop, others from out-houses on my premises; the goose came from the Cape of Good-Hope; they were lost on Sunday morning; I went round the next day to people who deal in those things; I found five or six pigeons in the possession of Mrs. Martin, in Holbourn, near St. Giles's; I could swear they were mine.

Did you find the goose? - Nothing but the head of it. I took up the prisoner on the Tuesday following, by the information of Mr. Martin.

(The pigeons were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

- MARTIN sworn.

I keep a poulterer's shop in High Holbourn. On Sunday the 13th of August, I purchased these six pigeons of the prisoner for four shillings; on the Monday morning Mr. Brooks came and claimed them as his property; the next day I saw the prisoner go by, and had him secured. At Wilmot's Office Mr. Brooks said he would shew him mercy, if he would impeach any others who were concerned with him.

Prosecutor. I told him if he would discover any accomplices, that they might be brought to justice, he should have mercy shewn him; we went in quest of another person, but could not find him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-86

538. GRACE DAVERELL was indicted for stealing a woman's cloth cloak, value 3 s. three linen caps, value 6 d. a pair of worsted stockings, value 12 d. a linen stock, value 6 d. a silk bonnet, value 6 d. and two yards of silk ribband, value 1 d. the property of William Hill , August 18th .

MARGARET HILL sworn.

I am the wife of William Hill , who is abroad; I live in a lodging-house in Church-lane,

St. Giles's . The prisoner came on a Friday about five weeks ago, and slept a few hours in a bed in the same room I sleep in; while I went down stairs, she went away with the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). About fourteen days ago I met her in Dyot-street; she had my bonnet and ribband on her head; I never found any of the rest of my things.

ROBERT HINXMAN sworn.

I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; the bonnet and ribband were found upon her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the bonnet in Covent-garden.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-87

539. MATTHIAS NICHOLAS DE CRUS, otherwise DE CRUZE , was indicted for stealing a violin, value 20 s. and a violin-bow, value 2 s. the property of John Hardy , August 31st .

JOHN HARDY sworn.

I keep a publick-house in New-street, St. James's . On the 31st of August the prisoner came to my house, between seven and eight o'clock at night; he went backwards; the fiddle and bow were in the parlour, the door of which opens into the passage that leads into the yard; I saw them there not a minute before the prisoner came in; I missed them as soon as he was gone; I pursued him, but could not find him; I took him about an hour after at a publick-house, and charged a constable with him. I was informed by a person that the prisoner went into the Coach and Horses, a publick-house in Shug-lane; I went there, and the woman of the house delivered to me the violin and bow.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

MARY MOULD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Hardy; the prisoner came into our house; he called for no liquor; he went backwards to the yard; I saw the fiddle and bow lie on the table in the parlour, not half a minute before; he came back in less than two minutes, and went away, and he did not call for any thing; I saw him have the fiddle and bow under his right arm.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This gentleman came to another publick-house where I was, and asked for his fiddle; I told him I knew nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-88

540. ROBERT M'KAY was indicted for stealing a cheque shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. and a piece of canvass, value 10 d. the property of James Mitchell , August 28th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-89

541, 542. MARY BRITTLE and GEORGE PARSONS were indicted for stealing forty quarts of wine, value 40 s. forty quart bottles, value 3 s. and a quart of brandy, value 1 s. the property of John Ramsden , September 4th .

Mr. JOHN RAMSDEN sworn.

I live in Tavistock-street, Bedford-square . On Monday the 11th of this instant, I went at dinner to fetch a bottle of wine out of a cellar even with my kitchen; I brought up a bottle; I found I had made a mistake, the cork was wrote on, red wine. Parsons perceiving I had made a mistake, asked if he should go and change it; I said no, I would go myself. I went and brought up another; then I went to Slough on the Thursday following; when I returned, I missed a considerable quantity of wine; I took Parsons into the cellar, and observed that I had not used above five bottles, and there was a decrease of above two dozen. We looked over the wine, and found five bottles of Sherry deficient, and fifteen bottles of Madeira; there was a deficiency

of claret, but I cannot tell the quantity; there was a large quantity of port deficient; I said, George, you cannot have drank this wine since Monday evening; I said I was sure he or Molly had taken it, and I would find it out. He said he knew nothing of it. I examined their boxes, but found none there; I then went down into a vault under the street, and found a bottle of port, with the mouth downwards, and another half full; I said I was clear he knew something of it. He said, no, indeed, he did not; I said I would go and search the hampers in the other vault. He then said if I would go up stairs, he would tell me something; he did not say what. I said, could not he tell me in the vault. He said no, he had rather go up stairs. Going up stairs, I said I supposed there was some in the cock-loft. He said, no, there was none there. I opened the door of my one-pair-of-stairs room, and went in. He then said, Sir, should not you be sorry to hang me? and I should be very sorry to hang Molly. I said, yes, I should be very sorry to hang him, or for him to hang Molly. Then he said that as he was rubbing the table he found a sort of a pick lock key; that he told Molly, and she said she had got a smith to pick the lock of the Pembroke table, where I keep all my keys, and had a key made to it; I went and fetched Mr. Bond, and he examined them both; he then told the same story. She then said, George, how can you be such a villain, did not you hide yourself in the area while the smith attempted to pick the cellar lock? He said, no, he knew nothing about it. Then she said, he told her that he could not pick it, nor all the people in the kingdom. She said, that then she got the smith to pick the lock of the Pembroke table, and to make a key to it, which they always used, and all my other keys. I had a dozen of keys lay there; I always carried the key of that drawer in my pocket; by means of this key they could get at the key of the cellar, and open it at their pleasure. She told me they had given two bottles of wine to the milk-woman; the milk-woman was sent to, and she brought the two bottles of wine to my house; she said she had given three bottles to a Mary Miller in Queen-street, Great Russel-street; I sent my man for her; she denied knowing any thing of it; I went and searched her room, and found seven or eight bottles, one with a cork marked, wine bottoms, that I can swear to; when I came back, she said, George, you have given your brother a great deal of wine, there is wine there. He said he had done no such thing, that she had given it to his brother. She said, you know, George, two of your brothers were here on Monday, and a friend of mine, and we drank about six bottles of wine made into negus, that was while I was out of town. He said they had not drank so much wine as six bottles; she said one of his brothers had a bottle of white, and a bottle of red wine home with him, and she gave her own friend another bottle. He went with me to his brothers. I said, you have got a key of George's box, I insist on having the key; I got the key, and examined the box, and found a pint bottle and a phial full of brandy.

Did you make her any promises, or threaten her to induce her to make this confession? - No; I always had an high opinion of the boy, Parsons; the smith said he never saw him when he was there.

( - Beckford produced a cork found in one of the bottles in Miller's apartments, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PARSON's DEFENCE.

I received the wine of her, I did not know where it came from.

For Parsons.

SAMUEL PRINCE sworn.

I am a lock-smith. I made this key (looking at it) for Mr. Ramsden's maid servant.

Had you any conversation about that key with Parsons? - Never. I delivered it to the maid. I took the lock off in order to make it. She wanted first of all to have the lock of the wine cellar opened, she said she had lost the key.

BRITTLE's DEFENCE.

My master was out. A lady who lives with him was very ill; my master left the

key of the wine vault, and said, Molly, there is the key.

BRITTLE GUILTY . Imp. 3 months .

PARSONS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-90

543. WILLIAM THIRSTON was indicted for stealing a chintz pattern gown, value 30 s. a stuff petticoat, value 7 s. two linen aprons, value 1 s, a cotton gown, value 5 s. two linen shifts, value 2 s. six linen caps, value 1 s. four half handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two linen aprons, value 1 s. the property of Margaret Chance , in the dwelling house of John Chivers , August 17th .

MARGARET CHANCE sworn.

I live at Stepney. On Thursday five weeks ago I set my box down on a bench by the London Infirmary, being tired. The prisoner sat drinking a pint of beer at the door. He asked me if I was going to a place? I said yes, to a publick-house in the Borough. He said he could help me to a place in a private house, which would be better than a publick-house, and if I would go over to the Red Lion he would tell me more about it. I went over with him; I put my box down on the table, and he called for a pint of beer, then he began talking about the place. We sat there about three quarters of an hour; he then went with the box to the woman at the bar, and desired her to take care of it while he went to enquire about the place. I asked if the box would be safe; the woman said yes. We then went to the Horse and Groom, in Church-row, Whitechapel; he called for a pint of beer; then he went out. He said he was going for an answer, and would be back in three minutes. I staid about a quarter of an hour. I began to be be uneasy. I went down to the Red Lion and asked for my box; the woman said the man had been and got the box. I was sitting at a house at Bethnal-green, on this day month, I saw the prisoner go by, and I had him secured. The box contained the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). I have never found any of them.

What is the value of these things? - They are put at the value of fifty-three shillings, they are worth that.

ELISABETH CHIVERS sworn.

My husband was in possession of the Red Lion, Whitechapel , for the sheriff. The prisoner and the prosecutrix came into our house between four and five o'clock and called for a pint of beer; they sat about an hour talking together, then they left this box in my care. They went out together, and in about a quarter of an hour he came back and said, Now, madam this box. I said there it is, and he took the box on his shoulder and went away.

PRISONER'S DEFENCE.

I never saw the woman before.

(The prisoner called six witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the things to the value of 39 s. Imp. 3 months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-91

544. MARY LUCAS was indicted for stealing a silver shoe-buckle, value 5 s. a stuff shoe, value 1 s. a linen shirt, value 5 s. a linen sheet, value 3 s. and a pair of cotton stockings , the property of David Bagshaw , June 10th .

DAVID BAGSHAW sworn.

I live in Tothil-street . The prisoner was my servant . The things mentioned in the indictment were stolen out of my box; I had opened my box while she was present. I went down stairs and left her in the room; she brought me the key of the door down. I missed the things; in an hour after she went out and never came back again. We took her up about a week after. She confessed the fact. She had the buckle then upon her.

WILLIAM GARNER sworn.

The prisoner pawned this sheet with me on the 10th of July, for three shillings in the name of Mary Brown . She said it was her property.

(The sheet was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is nothing but spite and malice, I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . To be confined in the house of correction and kept to hard labour for 6 months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-92

545. ANN CARNAN was indicted for stealing a cloth cloak, value 10 s, a silk and cotton gown, value 20 s. two linen aprons, value 2 s. a pair of linen sleeves, value 6 d. and a yard of thread lace, value 1 s. the property of John Neale , September 9th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-93

546, 547, 548, 549, 550. ARCHIBALD PATTERSON , THOMAS SOUTHALL , JAMES GRAY , WILLIAM HODGE , and JAMES LEPPINGWELL , were indicted for a conspiracy .

(There was not any evidence given in support of this indictment.)

ALL NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-94

551, RICHARD DORRINGTON was indicted for that he with divers other persons, unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously did meet together on the 7th of June , to the disturbance of the publick peace, and did enter a certain building called Justice-Hall, situate in the Old Bailey , and did break, demolish, and destroy divers glass windows, chandeliers, against the peace .

Counsel for the Crown. On account of the youth of the prisoner the crown does not wish to prosecute, I shall not therefore call witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-95

552. THOMAS FOLLOWELL was indicted for that he being a wicked and ill disposed person, on the 8th of June , unlawfully did enter a certain part of the jail of Newgate , with an intent to set fire to and burn certain ruts and places in the cells, &c. against the peace .

Counsel for the Crown. There are some favourable circumstances in this man's case, and therefore the crown does not wish to give any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17800913-96

553. SAMUEL THOMAS CHARLES was indicted for riotously assembling on the 7th of June , and committing divers outrages and a riot, and making an assault upon Andrew Williamson against the peace .

ANDREW WILLIAMSON sworn.

I am a soldier of the third regiment of guards. I was on duty in the Poultry on the 7th of June. There was I suppose a mob of three hundred people came up making a noise. The prisoner and two men offered to come into the Poultry. The prisoner had an iron bar in his hand. The mob desired me and the other soldiers to unfix our bayonets; we refused to do so; upon which they throwed dirt and stones at us; this might be at about a quarter after three o'clock in the morning. Charles the prisoner lifted up the iron bar to strike at me; in order to save myself I knocked him down with the but end of my firelock, and took him to the Poultry Compter. They would not receive him there; he was brought back again; then he was brought back a second time. I was exceedingly hurt. They were all very riotous; most of them were drunk. He was a little in liquor; he was very much hurt by being knocked down; I saw him in the hospital eight or nine days after. I did not see him in any other act of outrage, but striking at me.

JOHN BRUCE sworn.

I am a soldier. I remember this prisoner coming with the mob; they came down crying No Popery! and swore they would come into the jail; they said they would be d - d if they would not be in, and have their fellow

prisoners out; I heard the prisoner say he had an iron bar in his hand. Then they threw brickbats and dirt at the soldiers. I saw him strike at Williamson with the iron bar, but we struck him on the arm and disabled him, and Williamson knocked him down; he was immediately carried to the Poultry Compter. He was damaged so much in the head that he could not possibly get away. He was carried to the hospital for fear he should die, which we supposed he would.

(The prisoner called Peter O'Donnell , William Eyre , John Bolfe , John Heath , and Edward Horne , who all gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-97

554. BENJAMIN KINDER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Aberdeen , Esq . on the 19th of June , about the hour of two in the afternoon (no person being in the said dwelling house) and stealing a bedstead with blue Manchester furniture curtains, value 3 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 10 s. three blankets, value 15 s. a cotton counterpane, value 20 s. a tent bedstead, value 3 l. two cotton curtains, value 3 s. a feather-bed, value 2 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 10 s. three blankets, value 15 s. a linen counterpane, value 5 s. two bolsters, value 10 s. four pillows, value 10 s. a bolster, value 5 s. three linen pillow-cases, value 2 s. three window curtains, value 20 s. another window curtain, value 2 s. two blankets, value 10 s. five chairs covered with leather, value 6 l. two card tables lined with green cloth, value 40 s. a mahogany dressing table, value 10 s. a dressing glass with three drawers, value 5 s. a japan tea-board, value 3 s. a Bath stove, value 10 s. two cut fenders, value 8 s. three sets of fire arms, value 5 s. a pair of bellows, value 1 s. a hair broom, value 6 d. a brown tea urn, value 5 s. three copper stew-pans, value 10 s. three saucepans with covers, value 6 s. a copper pot and cover, value 10 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. a brass candlestick, value 6 d. a japan spice-box, value 2 s. three japan waiters, value 2 s. a pewter cullendar, value 6 d. three skimmers, value 1 s. an iron cleaver, value 6 d. six pieces of carpeting, value 10 s. seventeen clock pins, value 6 d. a glased print, value 10 s. and two cord bags, the property of the said Robert Aberdeen , Esq. in his dwelling house .

JAMES CROSBY sworn.

The property which is specified in that indictment has been taken out of an house belonging to Robert Aberdeen , Esq. who is now in the West Indies, in the service of his country; the house is in Dean-street, near South Audley-square, in the Parish of St. George . Upon his going abroad he requested that I would either deliver the lease to the landlord, or lett the house furnished; the house was surrendered to me on the 15th of June last. My son, and I, and another person took an inventory of every thing in and upon the premisses; I examined every thing very minutely; a person I intended to put in charge of the house had been at that time engaged, I shut up the house; there was no person left in it. A gentleman made application to me on the 27th to see the house; when I went to it I found that the lock of the street door had been forced, and the key hole was filled with horse dung. I sent a person down the area. I saw the door which leads to the kitchen below was open; he came up and let me in at the street door of the house. I found the principal part of the bolt of the lock was in the staple; the box of the lock was on the door; then I went up stairs and found that every thing specified in the indictment was carried off; we found a good many articles left packed up, ready for carrying away; we found the back part of the house open, and the detached stables were open; and through that part the goods were carried away.

Did they appear to be forced? - They did not. I advertised five guineas reward for a discovery of the parties; and some time in the beginning of July I received a letter from the office in Litchfield-street, desiring that I would be there at twelve o'clock. I went accordingly and saw these goods.

GEORGE CROSBY sworn.

I was with my father, on the 15th of June in the evening, to shut up the house. On the 27th I was sent to open the house to a person who was desirous of viewing it. I found I could not gain admittance, the street door lock had been forced back from its place, the key would not go in, and the key hole was filled with dirt and dung. When I informed my father of the circumstance, he immediately concluded the house had been robbed.

ELISABETH HOLLAND sworn.

On the 19th, 20th, and 21st of June I saw the prisoner carrying out the goods. I live with Miss Clayton, in Tinley-street, which adjoins this street. The first day I saw him carry out, to the best of my knowledge, a bed; he had it upon his back. The next day I saw him carry out a carpet. He had a parcel the 3d day, but what it was I cannot say.

What time of day did you see him? - To the best of my knowledge between one and two in the day.

Did he come out at the street-door? - No, the back-door, which answers to the kitchen; it is joining to the stables.

Did you know the prisoner before? - No.

Are you sure he is the person? - I am very confident; I looked particularly at him, and was amazed to see such a kind of man come to carry away the things. He had on a light green suit of clothes, very much faded.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I am a constable. On the 13th of July the prisoner was brought to the office in Litchfield-street, on a charge of stealing some lead from Portman-square. He was asked where he lived? He hesitated, at last he said he lived at Lambeth, and gave us a direction where. Mr. Bacchus and I went to his lodgings to see if we could find any locks or lead. When we came there I wondered to see the house so grandly furnished. I found there all the goods specified in the indictment; and we found this chissell (producing it.) Mr. Crosby and I tried it to some of the marks on Mr. Aberdeen's door, and it answered.

(Some of the goods were produced in court and deposed to by Mr. Crosby.)

JOHN DIXON sworn.

I was present with Grubb when he found these things in the prisoner's possession, and I was present when the chissell was tried to the door.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a broker by trade, I bought these things at different times, and paid for them.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS SMITH sworn.

I am a carver. I have known the prisoner two years. He has worked for me. I never had any reason to suspect his honesty, he is a carpenter and joiner.

WILLIAM BATTERSBY sworn.

I have known him near two years; I always took him to be a very honest industrious man. I understand him to be a cabinet maker.

Is he a broker? - No.

THOMAS YORKE sworn.

I am a clock-maker. I have known him three years and an half; he is a very honest, sober, good man.

ABIGAIL THOMPSON sworn.

I have known him between four and five years; he is a just, honest man. He is a carpenter and cabinet-maker, and such like.

A journeyman carpenter? - I cannot say that indeed.

To Mr. Crosby. What is the value of these goods? - They have been valued at forty pounds, and upwards.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods in the dwelling-house . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-98

555. HANNAH BAKER was indicted for stealing eight linen napkins, value 20 s. four linen towels, value 4 s. a linen tablecloth, value 4 s. a linen bed-gown, value 4 s. a green woollen tablecloth, value 4 s. a linen shift, value 5 s. two yards of black silk lace, value 8 s. a pair of leather clogs, value 2 s.

three linen shirts, value 5 s. and three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. the property of John Emmett , August 21st .

DOROTHY EMMETT sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; she was in my service till August. The things mentioned in the indictment were all in a spare bed-room, except one gown; no person went into that room but the prisoner, except the family.

JOHN EMMETT sworn.

She lived servant with me eleven months. The things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) were missed, and some of them were found in her boxes. I had a good opinion of her, and gave her a good character when she left my service.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

I am a constable. These things (producing a box) I found in the prisoner's lodging on the 21st of August. She said her master the prosecutor gave them to her.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor and prosecutrix.)

Redgrave. We found the box at her lodgings, in Charterhouse-lane. I found a bundle at a gentleman's house in Marlborough-street, where she used to visit the servants. The maid servant produced them to us. The prisoner said the bundle was her property, and that her master and mistress gave them to her.

( James Prior confirmed the evidence of Redgrave as to the finding of the things.)

MARY PHILLIPS sworn.

These are some of the things which were at my house; my little grandaughter brought them to me; she is about eleven years old; my own daughter's child.

Do you know that the prisoner at the bar had them? - No. Ann Aldridge sent these things to me by her daughter; the prisoner knows nothing at all about them.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-99

556. ANN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 20 s. a woollen cloth waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 6 s. and a pair of stuff shoes, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Griffiths ; a cotton gown, value 10 s. a stuff petticoat, value 5 s. twenty linen aprons, value 2 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. a silk bonnet, value 1 s. and nine shillings in monies, numbered , the property of Elisabeth Smithers , July 8th .

THOMAS GRIFFITH sworn.

I live upon Fishstreet-hill . On the 8th of July, at about six in the morning, I went to open my street door, and found it open. I had shut the door over night; the prisoner was my servant ; I sent her for a pint of beer at night; she fetched it, and brought the keys. On finding the door open, I went up to the garret to call the prisoner; she was not there. The apprentice was in the bed, she lay in. I awoke the apprentice; all the things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of the children's room except my own clothes. I traced her to Fetter-lane, there I took her up; she confessed taking the things as soon as we went into the room, and that she had sold my clothes to a Jew. There was nothing said to her to induce her to make that confession. The other things were found in her apartment and in the next room.

ELISABETH SMITHERS sworn.

I lost the thing mentioned in the indictment as my property; they were found upon the prisoner; I had seven shillings and sixpence in my pocket, and eighteen-pence in a trunk; it was all gone.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by Smithers.)

JOHN SCANDRAT sworn.

I am a constable. I was present when the things were found.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. six weeks .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-100

557. ELISABETH GOOTREE was indicted for stealing a a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 12 s. the property of William Cordy , September 12th .

ELISABETH ANNE BASSEY sworn.

I live at Mr. Cordy's on Snow-hill . On Tuesday last the prisoner and another woman came into our shop; they asked to see a child's cloak; they did not buy the clock; as soon as they were gone out, I missed the buckles; the apprentice went out and brought them both in; I took them both up stairs, and found the buckles on the prisoner, concealed under her breast.

SAMUEL DURAND sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Cordy. Elisabeth Bassey told me she missed a pair of buckles; I went after the woman, and brought her back; she was taken up stairs, and the buckles were found in the prisoner's stays.

(The buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by Bassey.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went in with the woman to buy a clock, and she gave me the buckles.

GUILTY . Imp. 2 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-101

558. SAMUEL NEWTON was indicted for stealing two front plate glasses of a chaise, value 18 s. and two plate door glasses of a chaise, value 18 s. the property of Charles Vincent , September 5th .

Mr. CHARLES VINCENT sworn.

I live at No. 5, Margaret-street, Westminster. On Tuesday the glasses mentioned in the indictment were stolen out of my chaise which stood at the Red Lion, Marsh-gate , on the other side of Westminster-bridge.

BARNARD BARNARD sworn.

I am a clothes-man. On this day fortnight I went to Hedge-lane with my clothes-bag over my shoulder about one or two o'clock; I went to a publick-house, and called for a pint of beer; the prisoner asked me if I would buy any glasses, for he had some that belonged to a carriage; I thought he was making game of me; I said I would buy them. I told him where I lived, and he came in the evening at nine o'cl ock with the carriage and the lady in it; I bought two hind glasses, and two fore glasses of him; he said the lady had made him a present of them, and the carriage too; I knew by his speech they were stolen.

Did he offer to sell you the carriage too? - No.

(The glasses were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

RICHARD EVANS sworn.

I keep the Red Lion at Lambeth-marsh. Mr. Vincent's carriage used to stand at my house. The prisoner drove it. On the 5th of this month the prisoner came, and said Mr. Vincent wanted the chaise to go to Hammersmith; he took the chaise out in the afternoon; about nine or ten o'clock in the evening, he sent it back again, by a man who cries clothes; the blinds were up, I did not see whether the glasses were in it or not, it was locked up, and the door was never opened afterwards, till I broke it open.

Were the glasses in when the carriage went away; - Yes; for they were all washed, and the carriage was cleaned the morning before.

MOSES MORANT sworn.

On the 5th of this instant, at about nine or ten o'clock, Barnard Barnard came to the Office in Bow-street, and gave information that he had bought some chaise glasses, which he thought were stolen, and that he was to pay for them the next day at the Mitre in Chancery-lane; I went with him the next day to the Mitre; the prisoner was waiting at the door; I took him into custody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is well known here that this Barnard has been the means of taking many a man's life away; I am very innocent of the matter.

Mr. Vincent. The prisoner has a very worthy father; who is a man of property; his father has given him a good education, but he was wild, and chose to be a post-chaise boy.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON-SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17800913-102

559. THOMAS HUMPHREYS was indicted, for that he in the king's highway, in, and upon Richard Collins , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear, and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 20 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a white metal watch key, value 1 d. a steel seal, value 6 d. a steel watch hook, value 1 d. a white metal coat button, value, 1 d. an half-guinea, and one penny in monies, numbered, the property of the said Richard Collins , September 12th .

RICHARD COLLINS sworn.

I am a gardener , and live with Mr. Tattersall, at Hyde-park-corner. I was robbed on the 12th of this month, about eight o'clock in the evening, by Hyde-park-corner , in the king's road; I met the prisoner and another man; they passed by me a little way; then they turned back; one of them had a pistol in his hand, which he clapped to my breast, and demanded my money; one pulled out my watch. I took out half a guinea, meaning to slip it into my coat pocket but they snatched it out of my hand. They searched all my pockets, and took all I had.

How long did they stay with you? - I suppose about a minute and an half.

Was it a light or dark night? - It was a moonlight night, or I should not have gone across the fields. As soon as they had robbed me, they ran across the field; I ran after them, and called out, stop thief! Thomas Gradey , who is here, saw them, and the prisoner was taken in about a quarter of an hour; I have a piece of his waistcoat, which he tore in getting over the pales; one of the people picked it up, and gave it me, and it matched the place from which it had been torn off; he owned it was his, and he said he hurt himself, and it was a wonder he had not killed himself in getting over.

Prisoner. When he came up to me, when I was taken, he said he thought it was me, but he was not certain.

Collins. I could have sworn to his face; I remember the size of his person very well, and the colour of his cloaths.

You don't mean now to swear to his face? - No, only to the colour of his cloaths, and his size.

THOMAS GRADEY sworn.

I was at Chelsea on the 12th of this month; coming home, I heard some man, towards the King's road, cry out Stop thief! which proved afterwards to be Collins. I saw three men running down the field, and heard Collins cry out Stop thief! Stop thief! Stop thief! The prisoner jumped over the hedge, five or six feet behind me; as soon as he jumped over the hedge, he cried out Stop thief! then he jumped over the hedge into the other field; I pursued him, and cried out Stop thief! he jumped over two hedges; I hallooed out to the patroles to stop him; the prisoner went to the hedge by the road, seeing them all in arms, he saw he could not go that way, but must be taken; he turned on his left hand in the field where I was; I turned immediately, and kept him to my right; I hallooed to the first sentry-box for them to stop him; he jumped over a paling about four feet high, which brought him into a field of plowed ground; he made a push towards the farther part of the field, then he made towards Mr. Shakespear's timber-yard; I was not ten yards behind him when he jumped over that paling; then I said, you are as safe as a bird in a cage; for I knew he could not get from thence. I stopped to see that he should not come out of that place again; I never lost fight of him till he got over that paling. When he was taken, my master, the constable, searched him in my presence; there was nothing as I saw found upon him.

THOMAS STONE sworn.

I belong to the timber yard. I heard there was a footpad there; I got a light, and searched, and the prisoner was found under the shed amongst the timber; he was searched, but there was nothing found upon him; I then went and searched the place from whence he was taken, and found a white metal button and an halfpenny.

(The button was produced in Court.)

Prosecutor. This button was coming off my coat a few days before that, and I put it into my waistcoat pocket, where the halfpence were taken from.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This man might put the button there himself; he was at the place; I know nothing of it.

To Collins. Was you perfectly sober that night? - Yes, I had not drank any thing strong all that day.

Are you sure the prisoner was one of the three persons? - I am.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17800913-103

560. MICHAEL MARTIN was indicted for that he, with twenty other persons and more, did make a great and terrible riot, rout, and disturbance, and did continue together for an hour, and during that time did commit great noises, against the King's peace , &c. June the 5th .

WILLIAM RUSSELL sworn.

I am a shoe-maker. On the 5th of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I went into White's-alley, Rope-maker's-alley, Moorfields , in order to see the depredations which were then committing by a number of people. Soon after I had got to the place, I saw the prisoner pass by me, at the head of a number of people, who appeared to me to be very riotous. He had a long flat iron bar in his hand; it appeared to me to be the bar to an inside window. Upon his going by me, I said to several people round me, That young man, who is going at the head of that mob, was my foreman ; he is a Roman Catholick. The rest of the men had some of them sticks, or bludgeons, and things of that kind. I should suppose there were more than thirty of them. I did not follow them up the alley. Soon after (I suppose between five and six o'clock) he returned, in the same situation that I saw him go up.

Do you mean still as a leader? - Yes, in the same situation as before, he returned. I said to a gentleman, who will be called, If you will go with me down to the Romish priest's house, I will shew you a Roman Catholick AT WORK. I will call him by name, and challenge him with being one. The gentleman refused to go with me. Soon after the prisoner returned, upon his going by me, I said, Martin, have you turned your coat to pull down your own house? He said, No, he had not; or, No. He went away; I saw him no more till the Wednesday following.

In what condition was he then? - Very much burnt. I asked him how he came to be burnt? He said, He had been to Palace-Yard, and that from thence he went to Newgate, where he was burnt.

In what situation were his cloths and person, when he came down the alley again? - I did not take particular notice what situation his cloths were in.

You are certain as to his person, and that he was in the situation you have described? - I am sorry I cannot have a doubt. I think it my duty to mention to the Court, that the prisoner was a servant to me two years, and upwards; during that time, I can take upon me to say, that he was as faithful and honest a servant as any man ever had. I have trusted him with large sums. When I have been in the country, he has carried on an extensive business for me, and has always rendered me a fair and honest account. It is a great grief to me, that I have been obliged to give this account.

DAVID FERNIE sworn.

Between five and six o'clock on Monday afternoon, the 5th of June, I was near the end of White's-alley, Little Moorfields, where I saw the prisoner. I should not have paid particular attention to him, but from a conversation with Mr. Russell. I request to be informed, whether it is necessary to state the circumstance of that conversation, or only such parts of the prisoner's behaviour as I observed.

Court. It is not necessary to state the conversation.

Mr. Fernie. In consequence of the conversation between Mr. Russell and me, I observed the prisoner coming from White's-alley, as it were from the Popish chapel, which was then demolishing by the mob. Mr. Russell, alluding to him, said,

"That is the person I spoke to you about; to satisfy you, I will call him by name." Mr.

Russell called him twice by name; the second time the prisoner turned round, and looked at Mr. Russell. Mr. Russell said,

"Martin, have you turned your coat to pull your own house down?" He said,

"No." He appeared confused, and went away at the head of the mob, who followed him. I observed at passing us, he had a weapon in his hand, but of what materials it was formed I cannot pretend to say; his hat and coat were covered with a whitish dust.

What kind of dust do you mean? - If I must mention the idea that struck me at the time, I took it to be the dust of a demolished building.

Were the mob making a great noise and a riot at that time? - They made a considerable noise; it was enough to make me conceive it a riotous one.

JOHN BOULTON sworn.

On Monday the 5th of June, between the hours of five and six in the afternoon, I was in White's-alley, Moorfields; I saw the prisoner pass by at the head of a mob; he seemed full of spirits; he had an iron bar in his hand like the bar of a window. His hat and clothes were covered with dust like that of mortar. What made me take particular notice of him was, Mr. Russell called to him, Martin, what have you turned your coat, to pull your own house down.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

On the Monday I went out with a few friends; in the afternoon I was informed they had pulled down the chapel and house in Rope-maker's-alley, Moorfields. I got into Little Moorfields; when I had got there there was a young man who had something of a bar in his right-hand; he threw down the bar, and went into the house. I afterwards took the bar up and walked with it in my hand up to the ruins only to look on; I afterwards returned. Mr. Russel halloo'd out to me, Halloo, Martin, have you turned your coat, to pull your own house down? He delivered me up to the mercy of the mob; the mob took the bar away and were going to destroy me. I boarded at the same table with Mr. Russell; went to the same place of worship for three years during the time I served Mr. Russell. I have sufficient witnesses to my character.

(The prisoner called John Smith , Robert Moggeridge , George Wood , Jane Field , David Christer , John Ford , and Thomas Pullen , who had known him many years, and gave him an exceeding good character.)

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. 3 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: s17800913-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as followeth:

Received sentence of death, fourteen.

Steward Montague , Abraham Danford , William Newton , Samuel Baker , John Harris , Thomas Cox , Thomas Freeman , Grace Maddox , George Duffee , Mary Gardener , George Watson , Benjamin Kinder , Thomas Humphreys , and Joseph Carter . [Carter to be drawn upon a hurdle to the place of execution].

Fined 1 s. and sent for soldiers, two

William Groves , and John M'Daniel .

Fined 1 s. one.

Donkey Filleyson .

Navigation 3 years, two.

George Lloyd otherwise Cook, and Fidely Millard .

Navigation 2 years, three

William French , Christopher Townsend , and George Sharp .

Twice publickly whipped, and imprisoned 12 months, one.

Charles West .

Kept to hard labour in the house of correction 6 months, one.

Sarah King .

Imprisoned 12 months, one.

John Dunbar .

Reference Number: a17800913-1

BRACHYGRAPHY; Or, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, (DEDICATED with Permission to the KING,) The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS)

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are taken in Short-Hand, by J. GURNEY.

Reference Number: a17800913-2

BRACHYGRAPHY; Or, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, (DEDICATED with Permission to the KING,) The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS)

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are taken in Short-Hand, by J. GURNEY.

Reference Number: a17800913-3

BRACHYGRAPHY; Or, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, (DEDICATED with Permission to the KING,) The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method By JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS)

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are taken in Short-Hand, by J. GURNEY.


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