Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st October 1778.
Reference Number: 17781021
Reference Number: f17781021-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 21st of October, 1778, and the following Days;

Being the EIGHTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir JAMES ESDAILE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VIII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar,

MDCCXXXVIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JAMES ESDAILE , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM BLACKSTONE , Knt. one of the Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas. The Hon. Sir JAMES EYRE , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices, of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

First Middlesex Jury.

James Caney ,

Thomas Bradshaw ,

Thomas Blower ,

John Horsford ,

Thomas Hodgkins ,

Richard Clark ,

Christopher Warcup ,

Edward Hiching ,

William Pain ,

William Stone ,

William Beans ,

Joseph Jolland ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Jones ,

Francis Holman ,

Charles Woodham ,

James Steward ,

Thomas Martyn ,

Peter Taylor ,

William Arnold ,

Samuel Cockran ,

William Brown ,

Robert Williamson ,

George Leverick ,

Thomas Phillips

London Jury.

Willoughby Brewer,

John Lovel

Charles Hougham ,

John Carter ,

John Reeves ,

James Young ,

Benjamin Lewis ,

Stephen Newman

Peter Dunkley

Richard Broxup

John Hook ,

William Renswick .

Reference Number: t17781021-1

727. SUSANNAH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing two hundred yards of tape, value 2 s. and a pound weight of sewing thread, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Stockdale , Sept. 19th .

THOMAS STOCKDALE sworn.

I keep a button-shop in Castle-street ; the prisoner used to work for me. I had some reason to suspect her robbing me, and in order to detect her, I marked some of my goods. I was not at home when the goods mentioned in the indictment were taken.

FRANCIS CHAPMAN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Stockdale; the prisoner was twice at our house on Saturday the 19th of September; I missed something when

she went away the first time; she came again in the evening, and as soon as she was gone out I missed a dozen of stay-tapes; I sent Thomas Marrow after her, who brough; her back, and I found the stay-tapes upon her.

THOMAS MARROW , sworn.

I was sent after the prisoner; I stopped her, and told her to step back, we had some work for her; she had the parcel in her hand; she endeavoured to hide it; the man coming up, told her not to hide it, and she slipped the thread on the counter when she came back.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take the things with an intent to steal them; I was bid to come for work. I took the parcel off the counter, thinking it was the parcel I was to have; they pursued me, and stopped me.

Prosecutor. She never had above an ounce of silk, or an hank or two delivered to her at a time: it never was in the shape or size of this bundle; it was impossible such a mistake should happen.

(The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-2

728, 729. ELIZABETH BARBER and ELIZABETH ROSE were indicted for stealing 5 s. in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Davis , Oct. 9th .

DAVID JONES sworn.

On the 9th of October between twelve and one at noon, as I was coming down Chick-Lane, I was decoyed by Elizabeth Rose into the House of Hannah Doyle , in Black-boy-alley ; as I was going to be concerned with her, I felt her hand in my breeches pocket; we were both on the bed; I immediately got up to prevent her taking my money, upon which Barber came to her assistance, and they held me down, and took 5 s. out of my pocket.

Did you ever see them before? - Never in my life. I am certain to their persons; Rose went out; I was going after her, but was prevented by Barber and one Doyle, who is not yet taken; Barber then threw me on the bed.

Court. You are going to speak of her taking the four guineas and a half, that is the subject of another indictment; you must not speak of that now. Was this your own money? - No: it was the property of my master, Thomas Davis . I had been to receive 5 l. he gave me the 5 s. to give change, in case the person should give me five guineas. I saw Rose in the yard afterwards, but had nobody with me to assist me to take her. I got a constable, and they were secured.

Are you sure you did not give them the 5 s.? - I did not, upon my oath.

Had you made any agreement to give them any money? - None in the least.

Did you intend to give them any? - Yes; I had some due to me, which I meant to call for as I went home.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners, and took them before Justice Girdler. I know nothing of the fact.

BARBER's DEFENCE.

When we were committed the prosecutor charged us with robbing him, and said, if we would not swear to one Doyle, we should be hanged. We told him we knew nothing of her. He then said, if we would raise five guineas he would not hurt us; but if we would not, he would go to the rigour of the law. I never saw the prosecutor before I saw him in the justice's office.

ROSE's DEFENCE.

If he saw me in the alley, and knew I was one that had robbed him, why did he not take me?

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. JUSTICE BLACKSTONE.

ELIZABETH BARBER was indicted for stealing four guineas, a half guinea, and 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Davis , in the dwelling-house of Hannah Doyle , Oct. 9th .

DAVID JONES sworn.

I was decoyed by Hannah Rose into the house of Doyle. After the 5 s. was taken from me (which I gave an account of on the last indictment) I endeavoured to get out, but was prevented by Elizabeth Barber and Hannah Doyle ; Barber threw me down on the bed, and threw herself upon me, with her arm round my neck, and she wrenched my hand out of my waistcoat pocket; where the 5 l. was, and took out the money and gave it to Doyle, who ran out with it; there were four guineas and a half in gold, and 5 s. 6 d. in silver. After Doyle was gone off she kept me about two minutes, and then ran off; I went to pursue Doyle, and found a door at the bottom of the stairs fastened.

How do you know it was Doyle's house? - I heard so afterwards. I did not see Doyle till after I lost the 5 s.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the man in my life till I saw him at the justice's on the Wednesday. He said, if we would return the five guineas, he would not appear against us; if we did not, we must expect the utmost of the law. I opened my cloak, and asked him if he thought I could raise five guineas? He said, no; but I might apply to friends to lend it me.

Guilty of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-3

730. SARAH LYNCH was indicted for stealing a linen bag, value 2 d. two guineas and 3 s. 4 d. in money numbered , the property of William Lovegrove and John Hunt , Sept. 17th .

CHARLES TURNER sworn.

I am an apprentice to Messrs. Lovegrove and Hunter, who are salesmen in Leaden-hall-market. On Wednesday the 16th of September, at noon, I was sent to pay a bill at the Three Tons, Aldgate, and had the money in a linen bag in my breeches pocket. I was coming through an alley that leads into New-street . The prisoner and another woman caught hold of my arm, pulled off my hat, and ran in doors. I went in after my hat; they shut the door, and pulled up their clothes, and wanted me to have to do with them, and the prisoner unbuttoned my breeches, and took the bag of money out of my pocket.

Did you resist her doing that? - No, I did not resist; when she had taken the money she ran away immediately.

When did you see her again? - On the Saturday following; this was on the Wednesday.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the man with my eyes before he took up two other women; he said, he did not know who were the women.

Turner. There were two women taken up by the direction of the prisoner; I said, I knew nothing of them. I was always positive to the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-4

731, 732. WILLIAM HOLLOWAY and WILLIAM SMALLCOMB were indicted, for that they in a certain field and open place near the king's highway, in and upon William Proffitt , did make an assault putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life; and stealing from his person a steel tobacco box, value 1 s. a leather inkholder, value 1 s, a pocket book, value 1 s. and 14 s. in money, the property of the said William , October 17th .

WILLIAM PROFFITT sworn.

I am foreman of the road under one Mr. Wright. I live at Knight's-bridge . On yesterday was fortnight, which was the 7th of October, at pretty near half after seven in the evening, as I was going home from Chelsea on foot, three soldier s met me in a field within a stone's throw of the high road; they bid me stop, and they demanded my money; in a minute; two laid hold of me and picked my pocket of fourteen shillings and sixpence, my tobacco box, inkhorn, and pocket book, and a key; I begged them to give me the

key again, one of them threw it away, and Davis took it up and gave it me; I did not see that they had any weapons, they did not use me ill at all, only put me into a fright when they first came to me. After they had robbed me they went off towards Chelsea. I durst not follow them as I thought I should be knocked on the head if I did. I can swear positively to Holloway; it was dusk, the moon was covered with a bit of a cloud; I had seen Holloway before, but I had no acquaintance with him.

Did you know his name before? - No. I cannot swear to the other. I was sent for to Sir John Fielding 's on the Friday following when Holloway was taken up; I saw him at Sir John's, and knew him then; I am sure he is one of the men; he is the man that picked my pocket; my pocket book was produced at Sir John Fielding 's.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

An information was given at our office; and on the Friday following about two days after the robbery I went into St. James's Park and took Holloway, and brought him to the Brown Bear opposite Sir John Fielding 's; I searched him and found a tobacco box upon him.

(It was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

ROBERT PISS sworn.

As I was going home to my quarters from Chelsea to Brompton I met three soldiers, Holloway and the other two; I did not know the others. Holloway asked me where I was going, I told him I was going home to my quarters; he seemed in a hurry, I said you are in a great hurry, you are going about some robbery I suppose; he said he had got but two sessions to live; I said if he did not look sharp he would have but one; I said you are going to lead these young men away as you have done many a one before; he made a laugh of it, and asked me for a stick I had in my hand and said it would do for the errand he was on, I would not lend it him; I said it would do me more good than him as I had been sick and was very weak; he bid me a good night; I said I supposed we should hear of a robbery in the morning, which accordingly we did.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I was in company with the prisoners the night of the robbery.

How old are you? - Twenty-one if I live till next Christmas. Holloway is a stranger to me, I was in company with the other young man, we were going to Chelsea the night of the robbery to see for one Robert Lee a deserter; Holloway came into our company; going through the field we met this soldier, (the last witness); Holloway stopped him and spoke to him; we went on and did not hear what then they said. The prisoners then went on before and stopped the prosecutor and robbed him; just as I came up they were going off, the prosecutor was making a man for a key, I picked it up and gave it him.

Did you see one of the prisoners throw it out of his hand? - No; I did not, I was twenty or thirty yards off when they robbed him; before I overtook them again they were in the second field from where they robbed the man; the short man gave me a shilling; he said nothing at all were it came from then.

When the prosecutor complained he had lost the key, did he say that he had been robbed? - No; not at all.

To Proffitt. You said three men came up to you? - There were three; this man was a little distance behind.

HOLLOWAY's DEFENCE.

I was at home that night about a quarter after ten; we were all three drinking at the Nag's head in Tothil-street, Westminster, we went to take a deserter; we were all three together; I belong to Colonel Bailey's company; I have been a soldier almost three years; I am almost twenty one years old.

SMALLCOMB's DEFENCE.

My serjeant is not come yet.

HOLLOWAY GUILTY Death .

SMALLCOMB Not GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-5

733. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 2 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of stays, value 2 s. and 4 s. in monies numbered , the property of George Scott , September 19th

ELIZABETH SCOTT sworn.

I am the wife of George Scott . Last Saturday was four weeks my husband went out at about six in the morning; I heard a noise; I thought it was somebody come to me to buy something; I was not well; I did not attend to it; I did not get up at that time. About seven in the morning I heard the same noise repeated, turning round in my bed (the curtains being drawn I suppose the prisoner did not think there was any body in the bed,) I drew back the curtains and saw the prisoner sitting with a gown, a pair of stays and petticoat of mine in her lap; I left them in a chair by the window; there were 4 s. in money likewise laid in the chair at the time; I had asked my husband for some money before he went out, and he had laid four shillings down in the chair; I jumped out of bed and seised the prisoner; I did not immediately think of my money, but laid hold of the gown, the handkerchief, and the stays, which she dropped and extricated herself from me; she ran down stairs, but was pursued and taken; when she was brought back again I had by that time recollected my money; I charged her with taking that; she denied that she knew any thing of it; at last Timnall said he saw her drop two shillings on the stairs; then she desired to be searched; she afterwards produced the other two shillings.

WILLIAM TIMNALL sworn.

I lodge at Mrs. Scott's. I heard a screaming early in the morning; I ran down stairs; I saw the prisoner at the door without any cap on; I laid hold of her; she denied having done any thing amiss and insisted upon being searched; there was an accomplice that stood below in the street that I apprehend she was going to give the money to; I saw her take two shillings of the money and put it on the corner of the stairs, which I secured for Mrs. Scott; the other two shillings she delivered to the constable; upon being told it would be better for her to declare what was become of them, she pulled off her shoe and stocking and delivered the other two shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met with a girl that had some rags to sell, I was going to Spitalfields market, I never was in the woman's bed-chamber.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-6

734. MARY FORRESTER was indicted for stealing a pair of treble muslin ruffles worked, value 50 s. a pair of double muslin ruffles worked, value 20 s. four pair of silk stockings, value 30 s. a muslin cap, value 2 s. a lawn apron worked, value 10 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. and a lawn handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Francis Scott , July 21st

- SCOTT sworn.

I am the wife of Francis Scott ; there was a trunk which had been left at our house for four years which was to be sent for; I received a note that the prisoner at the bar was to fetch it; the trunk was emptied, and the things that had been in it which are the things mentioned in the indictment were tied up in a bundle and laid on a chair near the trunk. On the twenty first of July when I was up stairs, my mother who was below stairs called to me and said the woman who had fetched the trunk had ran away with the bundle; I immediately looked out at the window, and saw the prisoner running along with the trunk under her arm; I pursued her, but could not overtake her, and I did not meet with her till three weeks after; then I took her up; she insisted then that it was not she that had fetched the trunk, but that it was her sister, and she endeavoured to throw the theft upon her sister; her sister was taken up; nothing appeared against her sister, and she was discharged. The prisoner fell upon her knees before the justice, and owned she had done it, and begged forgiveness. I found this cap upon the head of Mrs. Reynolds, at a publick house in Broad St. Giles's; I knew it to be mine as soon as I saw it.

JAMES ALDERS sworn.

I live with Mr. Cordy, a pawnbroker in Berwick-street. I took in pawn of the prisoner this pair of silk stockings and this pair of ruffles (producing them) upon the 21st of July. She said, they belonged to a Miss Berry, who lived in Well-street, with whom I knew the prisoner's sister had lived servant.

CHARLES RICHARDS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane, at the corner of Newtoner's-lane. The two pair of silk stockings (producing them) I took in pawn on the 21st of July. I believe of the prisoner; they are pawned in the name of Mary Forrester . The prisoner's sister and her mother did likewise occasionally pawn goods with me; the mother's name is Sarah; the sister's name is not Mary; upon the whole, I believe they were pawned by the prisoner.

- REYNOLDS sworn.

I keep a publick house, the sign of the King's Head, in Broad St. Giles's. I bought this cap and other things (pointing them out) of a woman, whose name I do not know, but it was the same woman that was by the justice committed for stealing these things, she came with another woman to the bar and drank a glass of gin; she drew out these things and said that she had them to sell as she was in great distress; she asked fourteen shillings for them; she went away; she came back again by herself and I gave her half a guinea for them.

Did you see the sister before the justice? - I did she was not the woman.

(The several articles that were produced in court, were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was my sister that fetched the trunk away; she gave me these things to sell and pawn for the said Miss Berry; I told the pawnbroker that they were Miss Berry's.

( James Hopwood deposed that he was present when the prisoner was before the justice; and that he did not hear her confess the fact, nor see her go down upon her knees to beg forgiveness.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-7

735. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 6 d. and twenty pieces of silk ribbands, containing three hundred yards, value 6 l. the property of John Hollier , October 3d .

JOHN HELLIER sworn.

I am a haberdasher on Holborn Bridge . On Saturday the third of October my servant called me down stairs, and told me that the box containing the ribbands mentioned in the indictment was lost; I have not recovered it again.

ROBERT BROUGHTON sworn.

I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's back door on the third of October between three and four in the afternoon with a box under his arm.

Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - No; I am sure he is the person; I observed his limbs and his walk; he was taken up, I saw him again in the evening, and knew him directly.

Prosecutor. It was a wainscott box with a deal front, painted mahogany colour; it was about twelve inches square in the inside.

JAMES IVEY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. HELLIER. I saw the prisoner come into Mr. Hellier's shop; there was a box of ribbands in the middle of the shop, he took up a piece; I asked what he wanted, he made no answer, but went further back into the shop; in about three or four minutes after I missed the box of ribbands; I had seen the prisoner in the shop twice before.

SARAH BASKERVILL sworn.

On the third of October between three and four in the afternoon the prisoner came into my shop to have his hair cut; there was a bundle left in the passage, I felt the handkerchief, it was rolls of things in it; he went out again in a hurry without having his hair cut, and said he would come again presently; one Roach came and took the bundle away. I don't know what it contained.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it; that woman did not see me bring it in.

Baskerville. I don't know who brought the bundle in; Peg Roach took it out.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-8

736. ELIZABETH PRINGLE was indicted for stealing one hundred yards of silk ribband, value 3 l. 10 s. and one hundred thirty yards of gauze, value 10 l. the property of Joseph Harris , Sept. 26th .

THOMAS TREHERN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Harris, who keeps the Worcester stage waggon , which comes to the Bull and Mouth Inn. On the 26th of September while I was going from London to Worcester the prisoner got into the waggon at about six miles from High Wycombe to go there; she afterwards got out, and said waggoner, I am going to do what nobody can do for me, and she went through the gap of an hedge into a field; she staid longer than I expected; when I had got some distance from the place I went to the tail of my waggon and saw a deal box broke open, and the things taken out; I went back in search of the prisoner, and took her with the things upon her; I charged a constable with her.

(The things were produced in court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner in her defence called several witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-9

737. ANNE CORKE was indicted for stealing a pewter pint pot, value 8 d. the property of Richard Botheroyd , October 16th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-10

738. SARAH BRIGGS was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot, value 10 d. the property of Richard Botheroyd , Sept. 24th .

RICHARD BOTHEROYD sworn.

On the 24th of September as I was getting my pots in Beach-lane , I went into a house; I put some pots on the bottom of the stairs, and went up to a lodger; when I came down I missed one of my pots; I saw the prisoner going out, I followed her and found the pot under her cloak; she said she took it to get some water.

( John Towers the constable produced in court the pot, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took the pot to get some water.

GUILTY W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-11

739. WILLIAM BEANS was indicted for stealing two loaves of sugar, 28 lb. wt. value 10 s. the property of Richard Skinner , October 19th .

RICHARD SKINNER sworn.

I am a carman . On last monday evening at about half after six o'clock as I was going down Poor Jury Lane with two baskets of sugar in a cart, which I had received from Mr. Goble in Church Lane, I saw the prisoner in my cart; he took out two loaves of sugar and I saw him give them to his partner, who ran away with them; he had another in his hand; I laid hold of his coat and secured him immediately; I have not since seen the other man, I dragged the prisoner by the collar, and drove my horse till I came to the constable's house.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am master of the cart. Skinner came home and told me he had lost two loaves of the sugar; he had one hundred and sixty loaves of sugar in the cart.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty, I was not in the cart.

For the Prisoner.

ROBERT GUARD sworn.

The prisoner is my apprentice; I have known him ever since he was five years old; he always behaved very honest and just, as a servant should do; he has been trusted with a great deal of property; he never wronged man, woman, nor child; he is a chimney-sweeper .

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-12

740. TIMOTHY LYNCH was indicted for that he in and upon Mary Halsey spinster, an infant of eight years of age , did make an assault, and her the said Mary did wickedly know and abuse , September 21st

(The witnesses were called, but did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17781021-13

741. ANNE HAGGER was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot, value 10 d. the property of Anne Green , widow , October 5th .

THOMAS TOWERS sworn.

My aunt, Anne Green, keeps a publick house . On Monday the 5th of this month the prisoner came into the house, and called for a pint and pennyworth of beer; it was our club-night. I came down stairs, and seeing the prisoner in a part of the room I thought she had no business in, I watched and saw her take a quart pot off the upper shelf, and put it under her apron; I told my aunt of it, but I bid her not take any notice till the prisoner went away; when she went out I sent the girl after her to bid her come back, but left she should not, I went after her myself; she came back; I asked her what she had in her apron, she said some bread and cheese, which I found she had; I asked her what she had underneath; she said nothing; I felt under her apron and took the pot out of her hand; she said good lord, I did not know what I was about when I took it.

(The pot was produced in court by the constable, and deposed to by Towers.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I asked his aunt to let me take the pot to get some small beer.

GUILTY W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-14

742. JOHN LESTRUCCI was indicted for stealing three silver table spoons, value 20 s. and three silver tea spoons, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Ryves , Sept. 19th

Mr. THOMAS RYVES sworn.

I am an officer ; I live at No. 17 in great Titchfield-street , the prisoner was my servant ; on the 18th of September last, as I was going into the country the next day, I thought proper to look over my place as I was going to take some with me; on looking over, it I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I had reason to suspect the prisoner; I was informed he frequented an alehouse in Hedge-lane; I went thither; I was there directed to one Lewis Rossi 's, No. 1. Maid-Court, Wardour-street, I found there that he was in possession of some duplicates of table spoons which he had pledged at a pawnbroker's; Rossi very honestly delivered them up to me again.

LEWIS ROSSI sworn.

I get my bread by translating from foreign languages into English; I know the prisoner by his frequenting Italian houses; he said to me one time that he wanted to raise some money; he had some duplicates to dispose of, and wanted to raise a guinea upon them; I was commissioned to sell these duplicates as his property; the person paying me a guinea was to go to the pawnbroker and redeem these goods; upon the prosecutor's coming to my lodgings, and finding that these were not honestly come by, I delivered them over to the hands of the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. I delivered them back to the pawnbroker.

ROBERT WILSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of September the prisoner pawned a silver tea spoon with me and two more on the 19th.

(They were produced in court and deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned three table spoons with me, on the 11th, 12th, and 15th of September. I lent him eight shillings on each; I gave him duplicates for them.

(They were produced in court, and desposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A sister-in-law of Mr. Ryves gave them to me in the absence of Mr. Ryves; perhaps two or three days after he was gone out of town, because I wanted my wages, and I was to raise this money upon them for my wages.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-15

743, 744. SUSANNAH GREENSLADE and ELIZABETH AGAN were indicted; the first for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a steal watch chain, value 6 d. and a stone seal set in silver, value 1 s. the property of William Wainyates privately from his person , October 13th ; the other for receiving the abovementioned goods well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM WAINYATES sworn.

I am a publican ; I live at the Antigallican and Prize in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the eleventh of this month at about nine at night, when I was going from the Swan and Two Necks in Lad-lane to my house in Mary-le-Bonne; as I was passing through George-alley , which goes out of Field-lane, Greenslade crossed upon me; she followed me some way up the alley to a rather light place; there she stopped me; I had drank a little liquor; she got rather fumbling about me; I chose not to stay with her; I was going to leave her; as I was turning away, I cast my eye round, and saw her give something that glittered out of her hand to the other person that was hinder-most; I laid hold of her, clapped my hand to the fob of my breeches, and missed my watch. I laid hold of Greenslade, and kept her in custody till a constable came; Mr. Hall took her to Clerkenwell Bridewell. I know nothing about the other woman; the constable has my watch in his possession; I could not see what it was she gave to the other woman, but it was something glittering.

You was in liquor? - Rather in liquor, not so much so, but I could tell what I was about very well.

Had you been accosted by any body else in the way from the Swan? - No.

Had you any liquor there? - Yes.

JOHN HALL sworn.

I was the constable of the night. Some people came to me, and said, that a man was robbed in George-alley; I went, and the prosecutor gave me charge of Greenslade; I sent her to New Prison. After that, the man said he should be glad to get his watch again. I went to some bad houses in the liberty, and got some intelligence where Agan had pawned or sold the watch; at last I got intelligence where the watch was; I went to the house that was Burkett's; I charged him with it, and it proved to be his man's house.

- BURKETT sworn.

I am a boat-builder, and live on the Surry side of Black-Friar's Bridge. I lent Elizabeth Agan seventeen shillings upon this watch, on Sunday the eleventh instant between nine and ten o'clock.

How happened she to come to you with the watch? - I was at the house of a friend of a woman that was with her.

What friend's house? - In Chick-lane: another woman called me out, and asked me to lend her seventeen shillings upon it; it being Sunday night she said she could not pawn it, and she wanted to go to market in the morning. I lent her seventeen shillings upon it, not knowing it was stolen.

Court. Nor not caring about it? - I was never guilty of such a thing in my born days. I had known the woman before.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To the Prosecutor. You did not see Agan that night? - I might see her, but I cannot swear to her.

GREENSLADE's DEFENCE.

I was just coming out of my own house,

from our place, for a pennyworth of beer to my supper; this gentleman catched hold of me, and bid me give him his watch that I had robbed him of; I told him I had never seen him nor his watch; he said I was the person, and he would give a constable charge of me; I told him I would stay till he fetched a constable, if he pleased; I staid while he fetched one; I desired he would not drive me down; I went down to Mr. Hall's house; Mr. Hall asked for the watch; I said I had never seen it. The prosecutor said, if you have got it, for God's sake give it me! I will go home to my wife. I never had the the watch, nor know nothing about it.

AGAN's DEFENCE.

As I was coming down George-alley about ten o'clock, I trod upon something; it rattled; a woman came after me, and said she would have halves; we went to that gentleman's house, and he lent us 17 s. upon it; she had half of it; I have never seen her since; I was carried to Mr. Hall's house, and know no further of it.

To the prosecutor. Can you recollect your having looked at your watch any time that evening? - Yes; going over Smithfield I did, and it then wanted about three minutes to nine; that was not five minutes before I lost it.

GREENSLADE Guilty of stealing the watch, but not privately from the person .

AGAN GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Greenslade, Agan: Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Greenslade: Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-16

745, 746, 747. PATRICK BURN , JOHN JONQUE , and WILLIAM ELLIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Dennis , on the 14th of September , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing four yards of gold lace, value 12 s. and 22 l. 17 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said James .

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-17

748. EDWARD POWLETT, otherwise DAVIS , was indicted, for that he on the king's highway, in and upon George Strahan , clerk , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a metal watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. and four guineas and 4 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said George , May 17th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-18

749, 750, 751. MARTHA FISHER , MARY THOMPSON , and MARY HARRIS were indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 23 s. the property of Edward Kirkman , Oct. 9th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17781021-19

752. ELIZABETH GARDNER was indicted for stealing seven pair of womens linen gloves, value 3 s. 6 d. and a pair of womens worsted stockings, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Lingham , Sept. 23d .

ANNE LINGHAM sworn.

I am the daughter of the prosecutor. On Wednesday last was three weeks the prisoner came into our shop and enquired for some stockings; she did not buy, but went out again. I missed a 'pair of stockings; Harding, the apprentice, was sent after her.

- HARDING sworn.

I went after the prisoner; I found her at some distance from the shop; she was sitting down, and pretended to have the stomach-ache. I made her get up, and behind her I found a pair of woman's stockings; as I was bringing her up the lane, a pair of white linen gloves dropped from her; after that another pair dropped from her; one of the pair of gloves has Mr. Lingham's marks upon them; I cannot swear to the other, nor to the stockings. I had the day before put fifteen pair of black stockings upon the counter, when we came to tell them there were only

fourteen pair; it was impossible to miss the gloves, there were so many pair there.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been to Westminster; coming along I found a black stocking, and these gloves were pushed into it; I did not know what it was, but I pushed all the heap in together; I picked them up, and sat down on the first step I came to; I dare say the young man knows I sat down looking at them, and had nine cock's heads in my apron; the things were in my lap; I do not know that I was in the shop; I do not know where the gentleman lives. I am a pin-maker .

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-20

753. MARY MOLLINEAUX was indicted for stealing a piece of linen cloth containing twenty-five yards, value 30 s. the property of Emanuel Thorley , privately, in the shop of the said Emanuel , Oct. 8th .

EMANUEL THORLEY sworn.

I am a linen-draper in Red-Lion-street, Holborn ; the prisoner, and another who is not taken, came into my shop with a pretence to buy gauze; it was on the ninth of the present month, about four in the afternoon; I showed her some of the common sort; she said that was not the kind she wanted, for she wanted silk gauze. I told her, I did not keep silk gauze, that was milliners and haberdashers goods; there was a piece of Irish lying upon the counter at the time; the women said they were sorry to give me the trouble, and turned out of the shop. I missed this piece of Irish immediately; I followed them, and stopped them within forty or fifty yards of the shop. The prisoner had a long cloak on, the other had none; therefore I knew she must be the person that had the goods. I went before them; I put my arm round her, and said, you have got something of mine under your cloak. What is it? said she; I said, a piece of Irish. I felt it slide down with my hand, and she dropped it at her heel. I kept her there, and desired a boy that was near to call a constable. I took the cloth up in my hand, and the constable came directly and took charge of her; the cloth has my own private mark upon it. (It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.) I had only this one piece of cloth upon the counter when they came into our shop, for I had sold the fellow to it not five minutes before.

Was there any other person in the shop? - Only the prisoner, and the woman that came with her; the prisoner had a large red cloak on.

Prisoner. Did not three women come into the shop? - No.

Prisoner. I never was near his counter; I had been on an errand; as I was coming along I met a young woman that lived near me, when I lived in service in Lincolns-inn-fields. I told her I was going home towards Westminster; she said, she was going that way, but must buy some gauze to make up a cap; she said, if I would stop, she would go home with me; she went into the shop; she had got a cloak on, I had none; when we had got a vast way from the shop, she turned her head round, and said, the man of the shop is coming; that rather startled me; I stood still; she dropped something; this gentleman laid hold of a piece of cloth, and then took hold of me; he bid her go about her business. I never was guilty of any thing bad in my life.

Court to the prosecutor. You said the other had no cloak? - I believe she had no cloak at all; this prisoner had a large red cloak on. I was persuaded before I stopped her that the prisoner must have the cloth; I felt it sliding down under her cloak.

Jury. Did you bid the other woman go about her business? - I did not say any thing to her.

Court. Whether she had a cloak on or no, must be a circumstance that you must know. - She had a cloak on when she was before the justice.

Prisoner. He wanted a woman to swear she saw me drop it.

Prosecutor. A neighbour came in and told my wife the circumstance that she saw the prisoner drop the cloth. When that woman came before the justice she would not swear this; she wished to avoid the trouble

of coming to the Old-Bailey, and therefore evaded the justice's questions in such a manner, that they could not bind her over.

Guilty of stealing the cloth, but not guilty of stealing it privately in the shop .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-21

754. JOHN WILKS was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 12 s. and a man's hat, value 4 s. the property of William Edwards , Sept. 19th .

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn.

I am a gentleman's coachman . I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; they were taken off some pegs in the stable. I saw them on Friday morning, and missed them on the Saturday morning. The prisoner had been my fellow-servant . I heard he was taken up on another account. I went to see him; he had my stockings on, and my buckles in his shoes; he owned he had taken my things, and had sold the coat and frock in Rosemary-lane. I went to Rosemary-lane, and found the coat and frock; he had also sold the breeches and hat there, but they had been sold again, and I never found them.

WILLIAM HARPER sworn.

On the 19th of last month I bought a pair of velveret breeches of the prisoner; I sold them again afterwards, before this affair transpired.

- CORNFORTH sworn.

I am a salesman. I bought a frock of the prisoner in the morning; he came afterwards in the afternoon and changed a coat for the one he has on.

(The frock and coat were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOHN HYDE sworn.

When the prisoner was before the justice, the prosecutor suspected he had his stockings and buckles on; he said there was a mark in the stockings, I pulled them down and found the mark.

(The stockings and buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor said before the justice they were his stockings and buckles, and said if I could tell where the other things were he would not hurt me; I did not know they were his, I bought them in Oxford-road.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-22

755. LETITIA GARDINER was indicted for stealing 7 l. 8 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of William Riley , in the dwelling house of John Butler , Sept. 21st

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17781021-23

756. MARY BUTLER was indicted for stealing a woman's crape gown, value 10 s. a woman's cotton gown, value 10 s. a linen quilted petticoat, value 1 s. a linen shirt, value 1 s. 2 laced handkerchiefs, value 6 d. a woman's black silk cloak, value 20 s. two linen aprons, value 6 d. two yards of black ribband, value 6 d. a pair of silk stockings, value 1 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 2 s. a woman's silk bonnet, value 3 s. and a man's linen stock, value 6 d. the property of Robert Mildred .

ELIZABETH MILDRED sworn.

I am the wife of Robert Mildred ; I take in washing. On the 10th of October I asked the prisoner to come and wash for me, which she did; I counted out the linen to her; I went out between nine and ten in the morning and returned about six in the evening, she was then gone and had locked my door and taken the key with her; I went to her lodging and found the door on the latch, but she was not at home; I got a candle of the landlady and went in and found my key on her table; I went and opened my door, and found she had put the linen in the tub and some water on it, but no soap; I did not miss any thing then; being tired I went to bed. The next morning I found my drawers open; and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them). She was taken on the Friday following, and some of my things were found upon her.

JOHN SADLER sworn.

I heard that Mrs. Mildred had been robbed; the prisoner came to the Brown Bear in East-Smithfield to surrender herself; she said the cloak and black crape she had on were Mrs. Mildred's; I asked her how she came to take the things, she said she was in liquor

that she took a knife out of her pocket and wrenched open the drawers. She had a white petticoat, a pair of white silk stockings, and a white laced cap of the prosecutor's on; she said there was a flowered linen gown at one Davidson's, a pawnbroker's over the water; and that she had pawned a gown in the Minories, and another petticoat in Rosemary-lane, but they were returned to the prosecutor again; Davidson was sent for, he would not come.

(The clothes found on the prisoner were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I washed for this woman eight months; I never took a thing from her before in my life.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-24

757. ROBERT COCKED was indicted for stealing a diaper table cloth, value 4 s. a huckerback napkin, value 8 d. a linen pillow case, value 1 s. 6 d. two diaper night caps, value 1 s. thirteen table knives, value 3 s. fourteen table forks, value 2 s. a carving knife and fork, value 1 s. 8 d. a desert knife and fork, value 1 s. a China bason, value 3 s. three pints of rum, value 3 s. 6 d. two glass bottles, value 4 d. and a paper account book, value 6 d. the proper of Thomas Wilson , Elizabeth Clapham , widow , and Francis Lee , and a man's hat, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Wilson , September 18th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-25

758. THOMAS CARPENTER was indicted for stealing 100 lb. of moist sugar, value 20 s. the property of persons unknown , October 14th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-26

759. FRANCIS BURKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Marsh , on the 20th of October , about the hour of seven in the night, with intent the goods of the said William, in his dwelling-house, to steal .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-27

760. ELIZABETH WELCH was indicted for stealing a silk hat, value 5 s. a sattin cloak, value 20 s. two muslin aprons, value 10 s. three muslin caps, value 2 s. a yard and a half of silk ribband, value 3 d. a linen pillow case, value 3 d. and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Michael Disman , October 17th

MARY DISMAN sworn.

I am the wife of Michael Disman , who lives in the Minories . I sent the prisoner in to clean our room on the 7th of October, in the morning about twelve o'clock, and she stole the things mentioned in the indictment. I was near the door selling fruit. I sent her in to clean the place; she was in the room about two hours. I had given her the key to go in; when she brought me the key again I went in and missed the things from out of my chest, which was left unlocked. I found her afterwards at a public house near Stepney; she had a cloak and silk hat of mine in a bushel basket covered with straw; she had pawned the rest; she would not tell me where she had pawned them; I am sure the cloak and hat were mine.

JOHN SADLER sworn.

The prosecutrix came to me, and said she was robbed; and that the woman was at the Sun and Sword in Rosemary-lane, and had the prosecutor's things upon her; I went directly and brought her up to the office, the justice bid me search her; and in her pocket I found an old cap and a blue ribband which the prosecutrix said were her's.

Court. Produce them? - I came out in a hurry to swear against Mary Butler , and forgot to bring them.

Court to the Prosecutrix. Did you see the cap and ribband? - Yes.

Did you then swear to them? - Yes. I made them myself, and can swear to my own work.

The other things (repeating them,) you did not meet with? - No. but she pawned them.

How do you know that? - She herself said she did, but that she was drunk at the time, and did not know where she pawned them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I worked for this woman; she bought a great quantity of things unknown to her husband, and did not know how to pay for them; she got this hat and cloak and the things she has sworn to now, and bid me go to pawn them; I went out with them, and met with a ship-mate's wife of my husband; we went in to have a pint of beer; she came into the alehouse; they were in my apron; she asked me for them, and I delivered them to her directly. I worked for her three days before, I found a gold ring of her's upon the floor, and gave it to her.

Court to the prosecutrix. Upon your oath, did you send her to pawn any of these things? - Upon my oath I did not.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W . and Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-28

761. BENJAMIN SPONG , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Hornsby , on the 11th of October , about the hour of eight in the night, with intent the goods of the said Robert, in his dwelling house, to steal .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-29

762. THOMAS COX , was indicted for stealing sixteen women's cloth cloaks, value 20 s. a stuff petticoat, value 9 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 7 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of William Watkins , September 13th .

WILLIAM WATKINS , sworn.

I keep a house in Westminster, and go to fairs; my wife makes hats and bonnets, and sells them; we keep the fairs and statutes ; my wife hired the prisoner's coach in Bond-street, on Sunday the 13th of September. I know nothing of the loss of the things, but by my wife's information.

ANNE WATKINS , sworn.

I employed the prisoner, who is a coachman , to carry me and the goods down to Edmonton, that I had to sell at the fair; he was to carry me for five shillings; but I was to give him the privilege to take up any other passenger he might meet with on the road; he put one of the parcels into his boot, he put the petticoats into the coach, and the bonnets, ribbands, and hats, that I had in two parcels more, he put likewise into the coach; he put three parcels into the coach, a hat-box, bonnet-box, and a bundle of petticoats, the cloaks were all in a pack; I got to Edmonton , and went out of the coach to seek a lodging which my husband had taken the day before; I staid about a quarter of an hour. I met him coming towards me, he d - d and sunk me, and raved in an outrageous manner; I told him I would give him sixpence for the little time I had kept him; I went into the Bell to change half a guinea to pay him; he threw what was in the coach down into the street, and drove off with this other parcel; I called out to him, and other people called out to him for it, but he would hear nothing; Mr. Rose made a man strip in his shirt, who ran after him two miles and searched his boot and coach but none of these things were in it; Mr. Locke took the number of the coach. When I came to town I went to his master, the master told us the first day we went after him that he was not within, but if we came next morning before the coachmen went out we should see the man and coach; we went next morning, the first person we saw was the prisoner; I said that is the man; when we came up to him he changed countenance at the sight of me,

and said he knew nothing of my bundle; he did not regard me. My husband said if he did not make known the things he had taken from me, he should hear further from him. My husband went to Sir John Fielding 's, and got a warrant, and took him up next day; the first day he said he had them not; but in a little time after we took him, he confessed taking them; my husband knows the rest. I was not there.

WILLIAM WATKINS , sworn.

You took this man under Sir John Fielding 's warrant?

Yes: Halliburton and I took him. I said to him before his master, who was then in the yard, if you will let me have my property, which I am convinced you have got, no more shall come of it; he said he knew nothing of the matter, I might be d - d for what he cared, he said, don't drag me along, don't let me appear like a blackguard before the justice, let me go home and clean myself. I said he might do that; we went home with him; he said to his wife, or some woman that officiated as such, that he was a prisoner, and mentioned upon what account, I there mentioned that he knew of the goods, and if he would give them to me no more would come of it; she said, Thomas, let the gentleman have his property; she put her tongue out, signifying to me that he had got them; I gave her a shilling for some gin, she went for some, in the mean time he owned he had my property; he sent his mother for the goods, she brought thirteen cloaks, a black petticoat, a shift, a handkerchief, and a pair of sheets all together. My pack that was round these goods lay in the room cut to pieces.

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

THOMAS ROFE , sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner's mother-in-law, I believe it was, brought me a cloak on the 15th of September last.

(It was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

SAMUEL MILSON , sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; a cloak was pledged with me on the 17th of September by Dinah West .

Who is she? - I don't know.

Do you know the woman? - Yes; she said it was her own property.

To the prosecutor. Do you know Dinah West ? - Yes she was one of the women that was there.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

CHARLES PAXTON , sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a cloak of Dinah West on the 14th of September.

(The cloak was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I set this woman down at the Bell at Edmonton; she kept me at the door above an hour; she then made me go along with her to find out the place where her husband had taken a lodging for her; when I came back again a man had drove my coach away and brought it back; he said he took it to give my horseswater; they treated me with two pots of beer, in the house. I took a fare up at the door, for they said they had got every thing out of the coach; when I had got two or three miles off, I had six people in the coach and two or three outside, a man followed me up and said, are you the coachman? I said yes; he said, there is a box in your coach. I bid him look into the coach and see; he looked in, the gentlemen said there was nothing there, he bid me go on, I came on to London. I set these people down at Bishopsgate Church, and one gentleman at Temple-bar; I carried four or five fares after that, I put my hand under the seat of the coach to feel for my hammer to knock the pole of my coach up, then I found this bundle in the coach; I took it to my own home, my mother-in law took care of this bundle in case it should be enquired after or advertised, as it must then be given back to the people; I kept it a whole week, it was never advertised, I did not know where to carry these things; I thought I had them safe when the people came for them, I asked my mother where they were, she said she had pawned them; I did not know that she had; I did not deny them, I told them they should have them again; I have lived twenty-six years in Whitechapel; I never did a misbehaviour thing in the world; I never did any fault in the days of my breath. I am a poor man, and worked hard for my bread all my life time, and I have no friend but God and

your lordship. I had a box left in my coach a year before that, and I carried it home and the footman came to me and I gave it to him; and I hope your lordship and the jury will have mercy upon me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-30

763. MARY BOW , was indicted for stealing a linen sheet, valued 5 s. the property of Matthew Kenny , September 24th .

(The prosecutor was called but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17781021-31

764. SAMUEL WOOD , was indicted for stealing a pair of leather breeches, value 6 s. the property of Matthew Caney , Sept. 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-32

765. RICHARD BALE , was indicted for stealing Hume's History of England, in 8 vols. octavo, value 30 s. and Hume's Essays, in 2 vols. octavo, value 8 s. the property of Peter Johnson , Esq . August 8th .

SAMUEL JOHNSON , Esq. sworn.

I am the brother of Peter Johnson , who is a barrister , and is now in Scotland; the prisoner's wife came to me, and said that her husband was detected in pawning Hume's History of England and his Essays, and begged I would not appear against him; some time after I heard that he was taken by some of Sir John Fielding 's party; I received an order to attend at Sir John Fielding 's. I can swear to the name Peter Johnson in the books being my brother's hand writing; the prisoner was porter of Lincoln's Inn.

HUGH DAVIDSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Fleet-street; upon the 8th of August last the prisoner brought ten books to me, the History of England by Hume and Hume's Essays; when he came first he said that he came from Mr. Peter Johnson , that he wanted a guinea upon them; the porters of Lincoln's Inn came about an hour after, and asked if the prisoner had been to pledge such books, I particularized them when I received them. I saw the name Peter Johnson in them.

Mr. Johnson. I believe them to be my brother's. I cannot swear particularly that I saw them in his library.

JAMES PULLAM sworn.

I am a porter at Lincoln's Inn; on the 8th of August, between seven and eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner come down Mr. Johnson's stair-case with some books upon his shoulder tied up in an handkerchief. Mr. Johnson was out of town.

To Mr. Johnson. Where was your brother at this time? - Gone the Northern circuit.

Who had the care of these books? - The prisoner's wife.

What time did your brother go out of town?

The same time that the judges went the Northern circuit.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My wife has been laundress to Mr. Johnson this year or two; nothing ever went out of the chambers but what was meant to be returned again; there was no imputation of any thing in the world. I beg mercy of the court.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-33

766. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of Anne Cowley , widow , October 17th .

(The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing the court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17781021-34

767, 768, 769. FRANCES PEARCE , ANNE ARROGONY , and CATHERINE DAVIS, otherwise SIMPSON , were indicted for stealing a bank note, value 15 l. the property of Henry Kitchen , William Kitchen , and Henry Peter Kitchen , a bill of Exchange for 350 l. a bill of Exchange for 150 l. another for 25 l. another for 30 l. another for 75 l. and another for 40 l. the property of Henry Kitchen , William Kitchen , and Henry Peter Kitchen , the same being due and unsatisfied to the said Henry, William, and Henry Peter; and a leather pocket book, value 2 s. the property of the said Henry , September 15th .

HENRY KITCHEN , Esq . sworn.

On Tuesday the 15th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock at night as I was coming through the Strand; I was attacked near the New Church by three women; they surrounded me and took my pocket book from me; I turned round and saw it go from me, or I should not have known I had been robbed; I saw four hands held up; I suppose it was delivered from one to another; I cried watch, and stop thief! and secured Pearce directly.

Had she the pocket book in her hand? - I cannot say she had.

What did you see her do? - I cannot say I saw her do any thing; she was one that surrounded me, she seemed very much frightened when I laid hold of her.

Did she seem before to be in the company of the other two? - She was one that surrounded me.

Do you recollect whether the other two prisoners were two of the persons that surrounded you? - I do not know; they ran away immediately as they took the pocket book; there were notes in the pocket book to the value of 14 or 1500 l. and many memorandums.

Cross Examination.

You say this was at night about eleven o'clock? - Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Were there any more than three women near you? - I did not see any other.

Are you sure there was no more than three? - I think there was no more, I could see no more.

You say you saw four hands held up, then one must have held two hands up I suppose? I suppose so; as soon as the book was taken four hands were held up to receive it.

Did they say any thing? - I do not recollect a word, it was all done in a minute.

As to the persons of Arrogony and Davis, you know nothing of them? - No. They are perfect strangers to me.

You saw the pocket book in the hands of a person when the hands were held up, did she seem to have received it from the hands of another? - She might have received it from the hands of another; I do not know which.

Did you lay hold of any other woman besides Pearce? - No other.

ELIZABETH MILLS sworn.

What do you know of Mr. Kitchen's being robbed? - On the 15th of September as I was coming down St. Clement's church yard , I saw Simpson and Arrogony about Mr. Kitchen; they were one on each side of Mr. Kitchen. I saw no more at that time, but those two women; when he came down by St. Clement's Church, I was at the Talbot Gate; this was done on the other side of the way, they stopped by the church a few minutes; then the fat one (Davis) ran away first, the other ran in a minute or two after, the other running fell down. Mr. Kitchen cried out, stop thief! I am robbed. There was no other woman near him when he cried stop thief. There were five or six women standing at the corner of the church, he ran up to them, and laid hold of one, and said, I have got you; I have got you.

Cross Examination.

What are you? - I am an unhappy woman.

How long have you taken the name of Mills upon you? - Fifteen years.

Did you ever go by the name of Griffiths? - No.

Or Price? - No.

Or Frisket? - No. I once lived with one Peter Frisket ; while I was with him they might call me Bet Frisket .

But you never went by the name of Frisket nor Price? - No.

Do you know one Price? - Price the bailiff?

The same. - Yes.

Was you never called Price? - I never had any connexion with him.

How long had you seen these women with Mr. Sheriff Kitchen? - They walked with him.

Were they talking? - They seemed to

be talking; I did not hear them talking; they had hold of him, they came down by St. Clement's Church-yard with him, arm in arm.

I believe it is about two hundred yards from the Church-yard to the Talbot-Inn.

Were they walking arm in arm all that way? - Yes.

Was it light enough to distinguish these two women with him? - Yes.

Did you know the women before? - I have known Simpson some years.

Were did they first salute the gentleman? - I do not know.

You did not see that? - No.

The first time you saw them was in St. Clement's Church-yard? - Yes.

You are sure there was no other woman near him? - I am sure there was not at that time; there were some at the White Horse door, about one hundred yards off.

Did Mr. Kitchen go so far before he laid hold of any body? - He went almost to the Church-yard before he laid hold of any of them; he said, I have got you all. There were five or six women standing together, they all ran away but this woman he laid hold of.

Counsel for the Prosecution.

Do you recollect how many Mr. Kitchen laid hold of before he laid hold of Pearce? - There were five or six together.

AARON AARONS sworn.

I know nothing of the prisoners. I know the man that had some of the bills of exchange.

Do you know for what sums? - No.

Do you know whether they were the bills that Mr. Kitchen lost? - No.

PEARCE's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of what I am charged with.

SIMPSON's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of what I am charged with.

ARROGONY's DEFENCE.

I am innocent; and have nothing in the world to say.

For Arrogony.

SAMUEL PRICE sworn.

Do you know any thing of that woman. Elizabeth Mills ? - Yes; she went by the name of Griffiths when I knew her.

Has she taken the liberty to be called by your name? - I do not know whether the women of the town have not called her so. I have known her ten years.

Do you think she is such a woman as deserves credit upon her oath? - I should think not.

MARY HAYES sworn.

Do you know Elizabeth Mills ? - I know her very well; I have heard she went by several names, but when I knew her, she went by the name of Griffiths; I lodged in the same house with her; she is a very abandoned woman.

Do you think she is such a woman as ought to be believed on her oath? - Upon my honour I do not believe she ought.

For Pearce.

AMELIA BURCHEL sworn.

Did you happen to be in the Strand the night of this robbery? - Yes. I came from the corner of the New Church; as I came round the corner, I saw one woman running.

Was Pearce on the spot when the robbery was committed? - I cannot say; I was not on the spot at the time; I saw one woman run, and a gentleman staggered across the way; I saw another run, and she fell down; neither of them were Pearce; the gentleman came with his arms open, and said I will have you all, I will have you all, and laid hold of me and another woman. I escaped from the gentleman, and he laid hold of Pearce, and said he was robbed.

Court to Mr. Sheriff Kitchen. You said you laid hold of Pearce immediately? - Immediately.

Did you lay hold of any other? - No.

SUSANNAH THOMPSON sworn.

I was in the Strand that night, coming down a little below Holywell-passage.

Was you on the spot when the gentleman cried out that he was robbed? - No; I was not.

How far was Pearce off at this time? -

I did not see her at this time; I saw Arrogony and that lusty woman ( Davis) had hold of the gentleman's arm, and the little one, said you b - b, what are you snitching at? the lusty one had hold of his arm.

Where was Arrogony? - About four yards behind him.

Was that before the cry of stop thief? - Yes.

Cross Examination.

You are a woman of the town? - Yes.

Pearce was not there at all? - No.

You know Bet Griffiths and Bet Erisket ? - Yes; I know her to be sure.

PEARCE GUILTY Imp. three years .

ARROGONY and DAVIS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

N. B. This Jury were returned by the Coroner.

Reference Number: t17781021-35

770. ESTHER MOSES was indicted for receiving a trunk, value 5 s. four dimitty petticoats, value 10 s. fifteen linen shifts, value 40 s. five pair of cotton stockings, value 30 s. five pair of pockets, value 5 s. five linen night caps, value 5 s. a flannel petticoat, value 2 s. six linen towels, value 6 d. a black silk cloak, with broad lace, value 20 s. thirteen linen handkerchiefs, value 10 s. twelve muslin hoods, value 12 s. twelve fine muslin handkerchiefs, value 20 s. six muslin tippets, value 4 s. three linen aprons, with pockets and bibs, value 3 s. three muslin sprigged aprons, value 4 s. three yards of green ribband, value 1 s. and two volumes of Johnson's Dictionary, value 8 s. the property of Mary Jones (for the stealing of which Thomas Burleigh had been convicted in September Sessions) the said Esther Moses well knowing the same to have been stolen against the statute.

(The record of the conviction of Thomas Burleigh was produced and read.)

JOHN KINGHAM sworn.

I am a carrier. I took a trunk on the 7th of September, from Mrs. Jones at Esher, to bring to Mansel-street; it was stole as the cart was going along Bond-street; the cords were cut, and the tilt undone, and it was taken out behind.

You charged one Burleigh with it? - Yes; he confessed that he and Munro had taken it.

RICHARD MARDELL sworn.

In September an information came to Sir John Fielding's office that a trunk had been stolen. Soon after that, Burleigh and another were pressed; Burleigh was rather afraid to go for a soldier; he said, if he could be taken before Sir John Fielding he would discover a robbery. Two or three officers were despatched to Mrs. Moses's upon the information Burleigh had given. In the one-pair-of-stairs-room. I took from a closet a small basket, and in the basket I found these two books (Johnson's Dictionary) Mrs. Moses then was present. I asked her if they were her's; she said. Yes. I said, what do you do with such books as these? She said they were for her children to read. I told her that the

books and she must be taken before Sir John Fielding .

Did you find any thing else upon her? - No.

How long after the trunk was stolen was it that the books were found at her house? - That was stolen on the 7th, this was the 11th. I found this piece of paper in the books when I found them.

Mrs. JONES sworn.

These are my books, which I prosecuted Burleigh for stealing; here is a piece of paper in one of them, upon which there is my own hand writing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was not at home when these books were brought into my house. My daughter was sitting at her door; a man came by, and asked her if she had not a room to let, because there was a bill up at the door; she took him up stairs, and showed him a room; he had these two books tied up in a handkerchief; she said to him, what have you got there? He said, two books. She asked if he was agreeable to have the room; he said he was, and would bring his girl there by and by to see if she liked it; he said I will leave you these books till I come back again, and he never came back again. She gave them to her little boy, and because he lives with me he brought them to my house.

For the Prisoner.

REBBECCA JOSEPHS sworn.

I know Mrs. Moses. I remember a little boy that is here bringing two books to her house; he said his mother gave them to him to read; he put them into a basket, and carried them up stairs; he said he must keep them clean, that his mammy lent them him to read.

Whose little boy is that? - My sister's little boy; the prisoner's grandchild.

What day was that? - The Tuesday before Mrs. Moses was taken up; she was taken up on a Friday.

JUDITH MOSES sworn.

Have you a little child? - No; it is Mrs. Lyons's child. I saw that child bring two books to Mrs. Moses's house; she is his grand-mother; he brought them, and put them in a little basket, and took them into the closet; they remained there till she was taken; it was the Tuesday before she was taken.

Did you look into these books? - No. I cannot read nor write, but should know the books if I was to see them. These are the books to the best of my knowledge.

- NATHAN sworn.

You know Mrs. Moses? - I know Mrs. Lyons.

Do you know her child? - Yes.

Did you see that child borrow any thing? - I had been in the house with Mrs. Lyons; a young man came up to the door, and asked for a furnished lodging; Mrs. Lyons said she had one, and asked him to go up, and look at the lodging; he had two books under his arm; she asked him what they were, whether history or play books; he said no, they were dictionaries; she asked him if he would lend them to her child to read. She gave them to the child.

Do you know the books when you see them? - Yes. These are the books.

- LYONS * sworn.

* This witness is the daughter of the prisoner, and the widow of Lyons who was executed on the 19th instant at Tyburn.

I borrowed two Johnson's Dictionaries for my child; I gave them to him; he took them to Mrs. Moses's house, because he was brought up there.

How do you know they are dictionaries? - I saw them before I gave them to my child.

Can you read them? - I can read and write too.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-36

771. ELIZABETH KELLY was indicted for stealing a plain gold ring, value 4 s. the property of John Beck Heather , October 19th .

JOHN HILL sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Heather, who is a pawnbroker . The prisoner came on Monday last to buy a ring; she came at near five in the afternoon, and said there was a ring in the window. she should be glad to look at; she had a companion with her whom she bid show me the ring as it hung in the window; her companion went out, and pointed to the ring. It had a couple of tickets to it; the prisoner plucked the tickets off, and put the ring on her marriage finger; she asked the price; I said six shillings and six-pence; she bid me four shillings and six-pence, then five shillings; I would not take that; she then returned me this metal ring in lieu of the gold one; I said that was not the ring I had given her; she swore it was; I insisted upon her returning the ring; she said that she was married at St. Martin's Church with that ring. This is a metal ring; she said would you sell me base metal for gold; I said no, but that was my ring which she had put upon her finger. I insisted upon her returning that ring; she held out her hand, and bid me touch it at my peril; she would not return it; I threatened her with a constable; she said I might do as I liked; she flung a shilling upon the compter, and said, if I would take my oath that the ring she had on her finger was my master's; she would pay for the oath. I called a fellow apprentice, and sent him for a constable; he went to Sir John Fielding 's, and brought up Halliburton, but before he came into the shop, a gentleman came in to sell a pair of silver buckles; in the mean time, the prisoner took off the ring, and somehow concealed it.

Were the rings alike? - Very much alike; you would, not know the difference apart, but I knew the difference being a judge of the weight of gold; and besides I saw this ring concealed in her left-hand. When I gave her the other ring she had it between her thumb and fore-finger. This is the ring (producing it) that she gave me; it has been tried, and it is base metal.

Are you certain the ring you missed was gold? - Yes; I had tried it myself, and here is the ticket that was upon it; we found upon her no more than a half crown and two shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

If he would have taken my money, I would have had the ring of him; he has all my fish in his shop, twenty-eight cod, besides haddocks. I put the ring on my finger; I bid him five shillings; it was rather tightish, if he would have taken my money, I should have taken it of him. I knew no better.

Hill. She denied having any ring at all when she came into our house; the ring she gave me I saw in her hand. When she came before Sir John Fielding , she said she had no ring.

Prisoner. I never was in such an affair in my life; nobody knows where I am; I am ashamed to let any body know where I am.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17781021-37

772. GEORGE GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain order for the payment of money, purporting to be an order under the hand and seal of Thomas Miller , Esq. one of his majesty's justices of the peace, and to bear date the 9th of July, 1778; whereby the said Thomas Miller , Esq. did order the high constable of Kensington division, or John Benson , Esq. treasurer of the county of Middlesex, to pay unto the said George Graham as a reward, the sum of 10 s. within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering such order, and giving a receipt for the said sum ; which said false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money is as followeth (that is to say);

Middlesex, to wit, No. 67.

To Mr. Calcutt, the high constable of Kensington division, or John Benson , Esq. treasurer of the county.

T. Miller. (L. S.)

WHEREAS it duely appeareth unto me, Thomas Miller , Esq. one of his majesty's justices of the peace, in and for the said county, that Joseph and Sophia Adams , a rogue

and vagabond, was wandering and begging in the parish of Fulham in the said county, which said Joseph and Sophia Adams was this day brought before me, by George Graham , one of the officers of the said parish, in order to be dealt with according to law. I do hereby order you to pay unto the said George Graham as a reward, for apprehending and bringing before me the said rogue and vagabond, the sum of ten shillings within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering to you this order, and giving unto you a receipt for the said sum. Given under my hand and seal the 9th day of July, in the year of our Lord 1778.

With intention to defraud the said John Benson , Esq . against the statute, &c. October 1st .

2d Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, the said order for payment of money, knowing the same to be forged, with the like intention, against the statute.

3d Count. For feloniously forging the said order for payment of money, with intention to defraud Thomas Calcutt , against the statute, &c.

4th Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, the said order for payment of money, knowing the same to be forged, with the like intention, against the statute, &c.

5th Count. For feloniously forging the said order for the payment of money, with intention to defraud the inhabitants of the county of Middlesex, against the statute, &c.

6th Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, the said order for the payment of money, knowing it to be forged, against the statute.

JOHN BENSON , Esq. sworn.

I am treasurer of the county of Middlesex .

Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Did he at any time, and when apply to you for any money? - Upon the first of this month he brought me this order, together with several others, for the payment of money as a reward for apprehending of vagrants.

Has that order been in your custody ever since? - I delivered it to the clerk of indictments for the purpose of drawing the indictments, but I put my initials at the back of the seal.

When he delivered it, had you any suspicion that it was not a genuine order? - None. I paid him ten shillings.

What are the names of the persons in that warrant? - Joseph and Sophia Adams .

I observe that they are two vagrants, yet are treated as one throughout the warrant? - The magistrates vary in their warrants, sometimes there are four in a warrant, forty shillings; sometimes ten shillings a vagrant.

I see it is for apprehending a vagabond? - It is very incorrect.

That incorrectness did not lead you to suspect it? - No.

How came you to suspect afterwards that it was not a true order? - In passing my accounts as treasurer, the magistrates have frequently remarked upon the many sums ordered by this gentleman; I had it mentioned to Mr. Miller by an acquaintance of his that it was thought much of; and that it was thought he had acted very imprudent. He wrote me a letter that he had not signed such an order for two years. I went to Mr. Miller's, and showed him the order and he denied it.

You are positive to the person of the prisoner? - Yes; very positive, because he has been repeatedly with me upon the same occasions.

You take no receipts do you? - Yes, ready wrote to every one.

THOMAS MILLER , Esq; sworn. (looks at the order.)

Is that T. Miller in the margin your hand writing? - It is not.

Does it bear any resemblance to your hand writing? - A little striking at first; but when I looked over it, I found it was not; but I know I have not signed any for these two years.

You are positive that it is not your hand? - I am. From some hints given me formerly, I have not thought proper to sign any such

warrant for these two years back. (The order read.)

"found wandering." The word found was omitted in the indictment in the count for forging.

Court. There is an inaccuracy in this indictment; the prisoner must be acquitted.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

GEORGE GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for payment of money, purporting to be an order under the hand and seal of Thomas Miller , Esq; one of his majesty's justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex, and to bear date the 15th of July, 1778; whereby the said Thomas Miller did order the high constable of Kensington division, or John Benson , Esq, treasurer of the county, to pay unto the said George Graham , as a reward; the sum of ten shillings, within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering such order, and giving a receipt for the said sum ; which said false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money is as followeth (that is to say):

Middlesex to wit.

To Mr. Calcutt, the high constable of Kensington division, or John Benson , Esq; Treasurer of the County.

T. Miller. (L. S.)

WHEREAS it duely appeareth unto me, Thomas Miller , Esq; one of his majesty's justices of the peace in and for the said county; that Joseph and Mary Langston , a rogue and vagabond, was found wandering and begging in the parish of Fulham, in the said county; which said Joseph and Mary Langston was this day brought before me, by George Graham , one of the officers in the said parish, in order to be dealt withall according to law; I do hereby order you to pay unto the said George Graham , as a reward for apprehending and bringing before me the said rogue and vagabond, the sum of ten shillingd within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering unto you this order, and giving unto y ou a receipt for the said sum. Given under my hand and seal the 22d day of June, in the year of our Lord, 1778.

With intention to defraud the said John Benson , against the statute, &c.

2d Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true the said order for payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention, against the statute, &c. October 1st

JOHN BENSON , Esq; sworn.

(produces the order mentioned in the Indictment.)

This was offered me on the 1st of October by the prisoner. I paid it.

If that is not a true order, who is to stand to the loss of it? - I apprehend I must. I cannot charge the county with it; the loss must fall upon me.

You are sure that order was brought you at the same time, and by the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Cross Examination.

How long has that been out of your hand? - I went to Mr. Miller last week, it was all the intervening time by myself locked up in my desk.

You are sure it is the same warrant without any alteration whatever? - Yes.

Court. Did you mark that? - I did.

Was there any person by when you marked that order? - No.

THOMAS MILLER , Esq; sworn.

I think you said before, you had not signed an order of that sort these two years? - Yes.

Then it is hardly necessary to ask you whether that is your hand or not? - I am sure it is not. (It is read.)

The word dealt was spelt dealth in the first count; and T. Miller in the second count was omitted.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

GEORGE GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for payment of money; purporting to be an order under the hand and seal of Thomas Miller , Esq; one of his majesty's justices of the peace for the County of Middlesex; and to bear date the 22d of July, 1778; whereby the said Thomas Miller did order the high constable of Kensington Division, or John Benson , Esq; treasurer of the County, to pay unto she said George Graham , as a reward; the sum of ten shillings within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering such order; and giving a receipt for the said sum ; which said false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money is as followeth (that is to say):

Middlesex to wit.

To Mr. Calcutt, the high constable of Kensington Division, or John Benson , Esq; Treasurer of the County.

T. Miller. (L. S.)

WHEREAS it duely appeareth unto me, Thomas Miller , Esq; one of his majesty's justices of the peace, in and for the said county; that Maria, and Jane Leaver , a rogue and vagabond, was found wandering and begging in the parish of Fulham, in the said County; which said Maria and Jane Leaver was brought before me by George Graham , one of the officers in the said parish, in order to be dealt withal according to law; I do hereby order you to pay to the said George Graham , as a reward for apprehending, and bringing before me the said rogue and vagabond, the sum of ten shillings, within one week after demand thereof made, upon his producing and delivering to you this order, and giving unto you a receipt for the said sum. Given under my hand and seal, the 15th day of July, in the year of our Lord, 1778,

With intention to defraud the said John Benson , against the statute, &c.

2d Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true the said order for payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention against the statute, &c. October 1st.

JOHN BENSON , Esq. sworn.

(Produces the order mentioned in the indictment.)

That was brought to me; the same day with the other order by the prisoner. I paid him the money. I marked that when I gave it to the clerk of the indictment at Hickes's-hall.

Cross Examination.

That was locked up the same as the other? - It was.

Are you certain to the prisoner? - I know him perfectly well.

JOHN MILLER , Esq; sworn.

Is that your hand writing? - It is not.

(It was read and exactly corresponded with the setting forth of it in the indictment.)

Cross Examination.

To Mr. Miller. I believe you know the prisoner is an officer of the parish? - He is a beadle of the parish.

For the Prisoner.

To Mr. Miller. What has been this man's character? - He behaved very well; I had a good opinion of him.

PAUL MERCER , sworn.

I have known the prisoner twelve years; he always behaved as an honest man.

JAMES KEENE , sworn.

I am an overseer of the parish; the prisoner has a very good character. I have known him between seven and eight years; I have trusted him with money, and always found him very just in his accounts.

STEPHEN BLAND , sworn.

I have known the prisoner from a child; I have known him attend auctions many times, and been intrusted to receive large sums of money; he is an industrious fellow; and bears a fair character.

WILLIAM JENKINS , sworn.

I have known the prisoner between six and seven years, he is a very hard working man; I never heard any harm of him; he bears a fair character for whatever I have heard of him.

GEORGE HALL , sworn.

I have known him 22 or 23 years, I have trusted him with many hundred pounds at different times, he never offered to defraud me, and bears the character of a very honest man.

JOHN GROOME , sworn.

I have known him seven years; he always bore the best of characters.

JOSEPH RICH , sworn.

I have known him upwards of ten years; he always bore a very good character.

- BEDHAM, sworn.

I have known the prisoner four years; he is a very honest hard working industrious man.

JOHN BEDHAM , sworn.

I have known him from a child; I have employed him as a servant, and always found him a very honest fellow.

He bears that character? - Always till this affair happened.

JOHN DAY sworn.

I have known him fourteen or fifteen years; he has dealt with me for many pounds, and always behaved very honest.

Does he bear the character of an honest man? - I never heard the contrary till this affair.

JOHN LEWES sworn.

I have known the prisoner from a child; he was always a very honest industrious man.

JOHN GOMM sworn.

I have known him I believe twenty years; he bears the character of an honest person; I have trusted him with 50 l. at a time in auctions, and always found a true account of all monies he has been entrusted to pay for me.

RICHARD ATWOOD sworn.

I have known the prisoner between ten and seven years; he has an undeniable character; he is an honest and good officer, and a very good servant. I never heard a word miss of him from any body.

ISAAC HOARE sworn.

I have known him thirty years. He is a very industrious hard working fellow.

JOHN HUNT sworn.

I have known him a great many years; he always bore a good character; I never heard to the contrary in my life.

JOSEPH NEWMAN sworn.

I have known the prisoner a great many years; I always took him to be a very honest industrious man; he always bore that character.

JOHN SHARPE sworn.

I have known him from his childhood. I never heard any thing dishonest of him in my life; he always bore a fair character.

There were a great number more witnesses ready to be examined as to the prisoner's character.

One of the witnesses. My lord, almost the whole parish would appear for him.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[He was humbly recommended by the Jury to his majesty's mercy .]

Reference Number: t17781021-38

774, 775. MARY LIGHTBURN , and MARIA GROVES, otherwise PENTECROSS , were indicted, for that they in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon Anne Rawlinson , spinster , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person ten bobbins of silk, value 30 s. eight ounces of silk coloured warp, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Cluen ; and a silk cloak, value 20 s. the property of Elizabeth Rawlinson , Sept. 19th .

ANNE RAWLINSON sworn.

How old are you? - Going in my nine.

Do you know what you came here for? - To swear to the women.

Do you know what swearing is? - Yes.

What is it? - To take my oath.

If you take a false oath, what is the consequence of that? - To go to the place of torment.

If you tell a lie, is that a good thing or a bad one? - A bad one.

If you tell a lie upon your oath, is that worse or better? - Worse.

(She is sworn.)

I am sister to Elizabeth Rawlinson . My sister winds silk; I live with her; she sent me to a silk-man in Wood-street, in order to bring some silk for her to weave ribbands with; this was on a Saturday about a month ago. I was to bring them from Wood-street to my sister's house, which is in Cock-lane, Shoreditch; this happened about eleven o'clock in the forenoon. I was bringing it, and walking by myself along Aldersgate-street, which is my way from Wood-street to Cock-lane, Shoreditch; the two prisoners and another woman followed me there; they began to talk to me, by asking how my sister and my mammy did. After talking some time with me, they asked whether I would go with them to a place called the Bull-in-the-pound, near Bagnigge-wells ,

for they wanted to call upon a woman next door to that House, that owed them a crown. I agreed to go with them; they took me across the fields. When they were in the fields they asked me for my bundle; I told them I had rather carry it myself; they said I was not able to carry it; that I could not, and should not carry it. It was about fifteen ounces of silk wound upon bobbins; upon my refusing to give it to them they took it away by force and ran away; I was left alone; I did not know my way home; I fell a crying; a gentleman came up and asked me what was the matter; I told him some women had taken away my things and left me there; I told him where I belonged to, he carried me home to my sister's house. I saw the prisoners afterwards in Charterhouse-street, near Charterhouse-square; I was along with my sister; the moment I saw them I knew them again; I said then that I was positive these two were the two women, and I challenged them, and I am very positive the two prisoners were the persons that robbed me in the fields. It was white silk wound upon bobbins, and a long end row with all sorts of colours upon it.

JOHN PRINCE sworn.

I am a sawyer. I was at dinner at the Black Horse in Barbican; the two prisoners came by while I was at dinner there; it was on a Saturday about three or four weeks ago; it was about a quarter after two, they seemed a little in liquor. We had a few words; during the time of the quarrel they dropped some bobbins of white silk.

JOHN UNDERHILL sworn.

I was with Prince at the Black Horse in Barbican at the time. It is about a month ago; it was on a Saturday. I was standing at the door; the prisoners had some words with Prince; they had taken an apple as they went by from Prince's child, upon which there were some words passed between them; and during that time they dropped these bobbins; they had white silk wound upon them; upon their dropping, one of the women picked them up, and said, come away do not let us stay here, and they went away.

SAMUEL CLUEN , sworn.

I am a weaver ; I am master of these two sisters; the girl was sent, by my orders, to fetch this silk from Wood-street. It is a month ago last Saturday; I met the girl coming home crying; she then said the same that she has said now; that some women had taken it from her, and a silk cloak.

To Anne Rawlinson ? Did you lose a cloak? - Yes; a black sattin cloak out of my lap which belonged to my sister. My sister told me to call upon a gentlewoman to whom she had lent it, and bring it home; I did call and put it in my lap.

ELIZABETH RAWLINSON sworn.

I am sister to Anne Rawlinson ; I was in St. John's-street, very near Charterhouse-lane, with my sister Anne Rawlinson when we met the two prisoners; my sister said those were the two women that robbed her; she was as positive at that time as she is at present; upon that they were taken hold of. The cloak that was lost was my own property. I sent her the morning she was robbed, by Mr. Cluen's direction, to fetch this silk, and to bring home this cloak.

LIGHTBURN's DEFENCE.

Coming along Charterhouse-square I met this young woman. I have known her many years. Walking along and talking with her this gentlewoman, and a little girl coming along, she cried out stop thief! she stopped us, and sent for a constable directly; that is all that I know of it.

GROVES's DEFENCE.

I can say no other but the same; they met us, and laid hold of us, and said we were the two women that were concerned in the robbery.

BOTH GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17781021-39

776. MICHAEL SWIFT was indicted for that he in the King's highway, with a certain blunderbuss (loaded with gun-powder and divers balls) which he held in both his hands, did wilfully and maliciously shoot at Charles West , against the statute, September 25th .

CHARLES WEST sworn.

I am boatswain of the Censor Frigate, a convict ship; I went down into one of the

guard boats; they had hove one of the sets over board that we steady the lighters with to heave the ballast up. Michael Swift jumped into the boat; he stabbed me with a knife, and then took up a blunderbuss, and said, You bloody bugger! if you don't go out of the boat I will blow your brains out! there were others in the boat. Knowing if I went into the river I should be drowned, I asked him where he would have me go to; he said draw along the lighter, which I did; and he bid us all get out of the boat; before we could get out he fired the blunderbuss; it was charged; I had seen the captain charge it, and a brace of pistols; it was in the stern of the boat. If a man, who was in the boat, had not that instant tossed the mouth of it up I believe it would have shot me, and all that were in the boat. When he fired it he gave it to another man to load again.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn.

On Wednesday, September the 30th, going along by Wellclose-square I heard a disturbance; I was informed that Michael Swift had escaped from some of the officers. I went after him, he said, If you come after me, you bugger, I will blow your brains out! and he snapped a knife at me, which he had in his hand; I pursued him still, and knocked him down, and secured him; when I took him, he said he was afraid he was a dead man, for he had jumped into the boat, and taken a blunderbuss, and fired it at the boatswain; and had likewise stabbed him in his thigh; he begged we would let him go, for he said he was a dead man if he was taken!

JOHN FARRELL sworn.

Elby and I took the prisoner; I have no more to say than what Elby has said.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not fire the blunderbuss at him, nor stab him. The usage of the place is enough to make any man try to escape; they not only starve them, but murther them. I have no witnesses.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-40

777. THOMAS PRICE was indicted for feloniously receiving twenty-three pair of shoe buckles, plated with silver, value 50 s. (being a parcel of the goods, for the stealing of which Thomas Elburne and George Goodburn had been convicted) by the said Thomas Price , well knowing the said goods to have been stolen , against the statute, August 16th .

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn.

I was the prosecutor of Elburne and Goodburn, for stealing thirty-three pair of plated buckles from my boy, Thomas Hart .

WILLIAM SIMMONS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Price; Flint brought these buckles to Mr. Price. I do not know any thing of Edwards losing the buckles.

Where are the things that were brought to you to sell? - They were taken away from us.

What did Flint say when he brought them? - He wanted to sell them. I did not buy them, but lent him three guineas upon them; my master was out of town at the time, and had been out of town a week.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, upon this evidence you must acquit the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17781021-41

778. ELIZABETH DEMPSEY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 4 l. a silver watch chain, value 5 s. a glass seal, set in silver, value 1 s. a cornelian stone seal, set in base metal, value 6 d. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. and two silk handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of William Clarke , October 13th .

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn.

I am a weaver , and live in the parish of Bethnal Green. On Tuesday was se'night, which was the 13th of October, I was pretty forward in liquor, having been out all day. I met the prisoner in Whitechapel; we went into an ale-house together, then I agreed to go home to her room, near Wellclose-square. I went to bed and fell asleep,

which I am apt to do when fuddled. I apprehend nobody came to bed with me. In about two hours John Chivers came into the room; he cursed and swore, and asked what I did there, and said that it was his room, and bid me get up and dress myself, and go out. I was so much in liquor, I thought I was at home; I began calling for my wife; but not finding her I got up; when I came to look about me, I missed my watch, my silver buckles out of my shoes, and two silk handkerchiefs, one of which I had in my pocket, the other about my neck. I said I would not go out of the room till I had my things; Chivers still kept bullying me, and sent for the watchman to turn me out. Chivers and I charged one another with the watch; we were taken to the watch-house; the watchman discharged us both upon our promising to come back the next morning. The next morning Chivers delivered the watch to the watchman; he said he had found it; the buckles were pawned with Mrs. Smith for 6 s.

THOMAS SPENCER sworn.

I am a constable; I was charged with both Clarke and Chivers by each other; Chivers afterwards brought the prisoner to the watch-house; he left the watch with me. Chivers said in the woman's presence, that he had it of her; afterwards he said, that upon letting down the bed, the watch was found upon the bed.

[The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by Clarke.]

JOHN CHIVERS sworn.

I live in a place called North East Passage, by Wellclose-square ; I am a shoemaker; I have two rooms; I let the lower room to the prisoner. I came home about ten in the evening, and found in the lower room the prosecutor, Clarke, in bed. I asked him what business he had there. I had been drinking rather free, and there might be some rough words pass between us. Clarke said he had been robbed; hearing that, I went to see after my wife, who was at the Blue Anchor, and was sitting up for me. I told her what Clarke said; she came back with the child at her breast; the prosecutor immediately said that my wife was the woman that had robbed him. I knew the prisoner very well, but did not suspect her at that time; and finding Clarke resolved to stay there, I went to call the watch, in order to clear the house of him. Spencer then came, and we both went to the watch-house. At about eleven o'clock the next day the prisoner came home to my lower room; I went to her directly; I said, what have you been doing here? you have let a man in to the room, and have brought a scandal upon the house, and the man says you have robbed him; she denied it; she said a man had been with her that had given her the buckles to pawn for six shillings, in order to be concerned with her; and had spent the evening with her; but denied that she knew any thing of the watch: the bed was let down, and the watch was found between the quilt and the blankets. Immediately after this I went and told Clarke that I had found his watch; he said he would make me find the buckles too: we went before Justice Sherwood, and there, notwithstanding the prisoner was there, he charged my wife with being the person that robbed him. I was much surprised at that; I bid him look round the room and see if there was nobody he knew; he said, no; at last I brought the prisoner to him, and asked him if he was not acquainted with her; he then said she was the person.

ELIZABETH SMITH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned these buckles at half past nine o'clock on the 13th of October; I lent her six shillings upon them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This man went with me to my lodging with a view of spending the evening with me; he gave me these buckles to pawn for six shillings, merely for lying with me.

To the prosecutor. Had you any money? - No.

Then are you sure you did not give her the buckles? - I am sure I did not; I did not lie with her; I do not know whether she is a man or a woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17781021-42

779, 780. SIMON EMANUEL MOSES and SAMUEL ISAACS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Israel Abrahams , on the 28th of September , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing a wooden box, value 8 s. another wooden box, covered with shagreen, value 20 s. nine silver watches, value 20 l. a metal watch, with the outside case covered with tortoiseshell, value 50 s. forty-six pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 20 l. four pair of silver knee buckles, value 20 s. seven silver table spoons, value 5 l. forty-two silver tea spoons, value 5 l. three pair of silver salts, value 3 l. three silver milk pots, value 3 l. two silver pepper castors, value 40 s. four pair of silver tea tongs, value 40 s. five silver punch ladles, value 50 s. forty gold rings, set with stones, value 20 l. twelve cornelian seals set in metal, value 12 s. twelve cornelian seals, set in silver, value 12 s. seven pair of silver shoe-buckles, set with stones, value 7 l. and twelve silver hair pins, value 12 s. the property of the said Israel in his dwelling house .

[The witnesses were examined a part at the request of the prisoners.]

ISRAEL ABRAHAMS sworn.

I live in Ebenezer-square, Houndsditch . I travel with a box . On Monday last was three weeks I went out in the morning, towards Hackney, with my two boxes, and returned about seven in the evening. I went through Petticoat-lane in order to get to my own house; Moses, I observed, dogged me to Ebenezer-square, where I live; I did not take much notice of him at that time. I went home and eat my supper; afterwards I took my boxes up stairs, and then went to a publick house, the Gentleman and Porter. At about eight o'clock my wife went out, during my absence, so that I cannot say exactly what was the situation of the house when it was left empty. My wife and I met together, and returned about ten in the evening, which was about two hours after I left her; the door was locked in the same manner as when we go out. When I came up stairs I found one of the windows of the chamber, with the shutter broken, the bar broken, and the sash thrown up; it is a very suspicious window, for it is near a wall, to which any person could get, and might have thrown up the sash, and therefore it is the custom of my house never to open that window, for fear somebody should get in at it. When I came up stairs I missed the two boxes of things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) the box had certainly been opened in the room, for there were two watch chains found upon the wall; the box must have been broke open, for I locked them up when I left them.

[On his cross-examination be said that he kept no servants at all.]

ELIAS ISAACS sworn.

I live five or six houses from Ebenezer-square. On Monday was three weeks, while I was standing at my door in Gravel-lane, some time after nine at night, I saw three men come by; the first of them, which was Isaacs, had a jewellery box under his arm; the second was the prisoner, Moses; he had a large wooden travelling box upon his head; the third had nothing at all. I did not take much notice of them, only observed these particulars. I know they are the persons.

ABRAHAM EMANUEL sworn.

I live in Houndsditch, about ten or twelve houses from Ebenezer-square. On Monday was three weeks, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw, near Woolpack-alley, three fellows, one of whom had a box upon his head; that man is the prisoner Moses. Isaacs, the other prisoner, had a box under his arm; there was another man, who appeared to be an Englishman. I looked at them; one had a cutlass, the other had a club-stick in his hand; one said to the other d - n your eyes, why don't you bear a hand along? the other made answer, I cannot come faster it is so heavy. I was going to follow them to see where they were going to. I followed them a little way; Moses turned round and saw me; he said, d - n your eyes! if you follow me any farther I will cut your head in halves; upon which I desisted and went home.

AARON MENDOZA sworn.

I live about fourteen or fifteen houses from Ebenezer-square. About nine at night I went to the bottom of Bartholomew-court, where I live; I saw these two prisoners come along first, and another English young lad

behind them, with a box on his head; it was a whitish deal box, such as pedlars travel the country with. I did not see the prisoners have any; a little after I saw all three of them return back empty handed; I had seen them several times before that night.

THOMAS WITHERS sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for to the prosecutor's; I saw the house was broke open; I went in search of the prisoners, but could not meet with them that night; I took them the next morning in Gravel Lane. The prosecutor had given a description of them. When I took them I did not find any thing upon them: they said they heard I was after them, and were coming voluntarily; they made no resistance.

NATHAN LYONS sworn.

I was with Withers at the taking of the prisoners.

[The prisoners in their defence said, that they were innocent; that hearing Withers was after them, they surrendered themselves without making any resistance.]

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17781021-43

781. DANIEL MURPHY was indicted for that he did feloniously and falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and did cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, a certain promissory note for the payment of money, purporting to be the joint and several promissory note of him, the said Daniel, and one Patrick Murphy , and to be subscribed with the proper hand of the said Patrick Murphy , the 14th of May, 1776, whereby they promised to pay to John Sherwood the sum of 8 1. 15 s. with intention to defraud William Wilson , against the statute.

2d Count. For uttering and publishing the said note, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

3d Count. For forging the said note, with intention to defraud John Sherwood , against the statute.

4th Count. For uttering and publishing the said note, knowing it to be forged with the like intention, against the statute.

5th Count. For forging and counterfeiting the said note, purporting to be subscribed by Patrick Murphy , with intention to defraud William Wilson , against the statute.

6th Count. For uttering and publishing the said note with the like intention, against the statute.

7th Count. For forging the said note with intention to defraud John Sherwood against the statute.

8th Count. For uttering and publishing the said note with the like intention, against the statute.

Mr. WILLIAM WILSON sworn.

Counsel for the prisoner. You are an attorney? - Yes.

Have not you proceeded to judgement and execution upon these notes? - I have.

Against the two persons that signed it? - No; against Daniel Murphy only; not to execution, but to judgement; he absconded and could not be found.

Then the action was brought against him singly? - Yes.

Counsel for the crown. You had authority to sue the prisoner for a debt due to Mr. Sherwood? - I had.

You sued him and recovered? - Yes; a verdict of five pounds; the costs were twenty one pound ten shillings, making in the whole twenty six pounds ten shillings.

I believe you went so far as to take an execution out against him? - Yes. At the time the execution was in his house he came to me in great distress, and said if I proceeded in the execution, he should be inevitably ruined; he mentioned that he owed his landlord rent, and should not be able to continue in his business; I said if he could give me good security I would not distress him, for the plaintiff did not wish to distress him, if he could have any security for his money; he said he would get his brother in Drury-lane to join with him in three notes, payable at different times; I told him I would make enquiry of his brother's character; and if he would call in a day or two, I would acquaint him with the result; at the same time knowing that Mr. Hill, who was then under articles to me was acquainted with his direction; I mentioned the circumstance to Mr. Hill, and asked him if the prisoner had

a brother in Drury-lane, he said he believed he had; but he would make enquiry of some neighbours whom he knew; he made that enquiry, and told me there was a Murphy who kept a cook's shop in Drury-lane; when the prisoner came again, which was in a day or two, I told him I would withdraw the exetion; and if he would bring his brother I would take the notes, but he must pay the expence of the execution, which he willingly consented to, it was added together, and he gave me three notes; he brought his brother on the 24th of May, that was a few days after; the execution was not in the house in the whole but four days; he brought a man on the 24th to me, whom he told me was his brother Patrick Murphy , of Drury-lane; having made enquiry, I asked no further question than if it was his brother of Drury-lane. I drew these notes for the whole sum, the first for 8 l. 15 s. at three months; I gave him a receipt for these notes, a copy of which I kept, particularly mentioning that it was in discharge of debt and costs; I asked him at the time what number his brother lived at in Drury-lane; he told me No. 120. They both as near as I can recollect made the same answer; at the same time I minuted it upon the back of the draft of the receipt I kept; I wrote that immediately in their presence, and underneath I wrote Daniel Murphy , where he used to live; I repeated what I had wrote to them, and they signified that it was right; I rested satisfied till the first note became due; I then gave it to Mr. Hill to demand payment of Daniel Murphy , he went to Daniel Murphy , but could gain no intelligence where he lived; at the time that Daniel and his brother came to give me the notes, Mr. Hill was not in the office; there was no one there but myself. Mr. Hill brought me word that the man in Drury-lane did not acknowledge the note; I went with him and found that man was not the man that came to me with Daniel Murphy .

Did he live at No. 120? - This brother who live in Drury-lane, his name is Peter. I have since found out that he lives at No. 6 or 7; no such person ever lived at No. 120; and that his brother Peter was not the man that came with Daniel and signed the note; I thought it proper to let the matter rest, till such time as the notes became due, and if possible to arrest Daniel for the amount. Some time in September. Mr. Hill found out where he lived and arrested him upon the three notes and recovered judgement against him; but I could hear nothing of him when I had obtained the judgement.

(The note was produced in court, and read as followeth.)

London, 24th May, 1776, we jointly and severally promise to pay to Mr. John Sherwood , or order the sum of 8 l. 15 s. for value received,

8. 15 s. Daniel Murphy , Patrick Murphy .

Cross Examination.

What induced you to take that note was, that there was a brother of his of the name of Murphy living in Drury-lane? - That was certainly the inducement.

The fact certainly was true that there was a brother of his living in Drury-lane? - Yes.

Mr. JAMES HILL sworn.

You was clerk to Mr. Wilson? - I was at the time these notes were given.

I believe you know something of the connections of this Murphy? - From the information, I believe, of Mr. Sherwood that he had a brother living in Drury-lane.

You was not present I believe when the notes were given? - I believe I had been out of the office five minutes.

Court. You did not know the person of Peter or Patrick at the time the notes were given? - I do not know that I should have known the brother, though I have seen him with the prisoner two or three times; I took the note to Peter Murphy , he denied knowing any thing of it; he said he never had joined in any note with his brother. Peter lived in Drury-lane at No. 6; I went with Mr. Wilson to No. 120.

Who lives there? - Mr. Hardy, I believe, kept the house. When the three notes became due, I heard accidentally that the prisoner lived in Dean-street, Soho; I went there three or four different times to seek for him; I met him one evening at the door, that was I believe in the month of February 1777; he asked me to go into the house with him, I did, it was a publick house, the Green-Man, I think, in Dean-street,

Soho. A good deal of conversation passed between us respecting these notes; I told him he had imposed a person upon Mr. Wilson who was not his brother; he for some time alledged that it was his brother who lived in Drury-lane who had signed the notes with him; I told him I was convinced it was not him, because I had presented a note to him, and he totally denied the fact; and that Mr. Wilson had likewise seen him, who said that was not the person that came and signed the notes; after some further discourse he told me that it was not his brother who lived in Drury-lane that had signed the notes.

Were those the words that he said, that it was not his brother who lived in Drury-lane that had signed the notes? - I believe those are exactly the words; I asked him then who it was that he had brought that had signed the notes with him, and I said if I had been in the office he could not have imposed another person upon Mr. Wilson, for I should have known his brother; he said he knew that very well, and therefore he had watched the opportunity to see me out of the office. I asked him who the person was, and where he lived; he said he did not know who he was, for he had given him five shillings to come and sign the notes; and that he was then dead or gone to sea, and he could not tell where he was. We had some further discourse upon the impropriety of his conduct; I said he had behaved exceeding ill to Mr. Wilson, who had indulged him so far; he still persisted that he would not pay the money; I came away and he was arrested next morning.

JOHN HELEY sworn.

I had a warrant against the prisoner. I was at Hick's-hall, and he sent to me to come to him hearing I had a warrant against him.

It was not a warrant for felony? - No. It was for a fraud.

Had you any conversation with him? - Yes. As we were going along in the coach, I said I have known you a good many years, and never knew that you had a brother Patrick; (for his name was mentioned in the warrant); he said, O yes, you knew Pat Murphy very well; who, said I, Pat that was sent to Dublin upon a charge for murther? yes, said he; why, said I, he is no brother of yours; yes, (said he) he was; I said I have heard him say that he did not belong to your family. I had heard him say that, having had him in custody several times, he humm'd and ha'd, thinking I might know something of the man, and then he said he was not his brother. He did not say that it was not his brother that signed the notes.

Do you know what is become of that Murphy that went to Dublin? - I have been credibly informed, and believe it to be true, that he has been dead about a twelvemonth.

Court. You knew that Patrick did you? - Very well.

Where did he live? - When I first knew him he lived at Islington, another time in Cock-lane; and about the town in different parts.

Do you know of his ever living in Drury-lane? - No, never; I remember Peter, one of his brother's, he that lives in Drury-lane.

- HAMBOROUGH sworn.

You live in Drury-lane? - Yes.

At what Number? - At No. 120.

How long have you lived there? - Two years last August.

Do you know whether any such person as Patrick Murphy lived there in May 1776? - No. I have enquired, I never could hear that he did.

Who was in the house before you? - It had been empty a month I believe.

- MORLEY sworn.

I have lodged five years at No. 120. in Drury-lane; I came in November; I lodge there; I never knew any Patrick Murphy lodge there.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN FLASKEY sworn.

Where do you live? - In Ratcliff Highway. I am a baker.

Did you know one Patrick Murphy ? - Yes.

What brothers had he? - Peter, Daniel, and Philip.

Is that Daniel that you speak of the prisoner? - Yes.

Were you acquainted at all with the hand writing of Patrick Murphy ? - I have seen his writing.

Look at the note, and see if you believe that signature Patrick Murphy is of his handwriting?

- I don't know, it looks very much like his writing.

Cross Examination.

Court. Where did he live? - He used to lodge at his brother's in Drury-lane.

Is that the man that was sent over to Ireland? - I cannot tell; I knew him about two years and a half ago; and about six or seven years ago.

You was intimate with him? - Yes.

When he was a milkman and a bricklayer's labourer.

What transactions had you with him? - I only used to drink with him at his brother's house.

You never had any dealings with him? - No.

Did he ever write letters to you? - Yes.

Have you got any of them? - No; he wrote the last letter to me to come and sup at his brother's.

You have not got that letter? - No.

Court. When was the last time you saw him? - About two years and a half ago.

Where did you see him then? - At his brother's house.

Do you know what is become of him? - He is dead.

What size man was he? - Rather less than me.

Had he a wig or his own hair? - His own hair; he used to carry milk at Battle-bridge; I knew where he lodged; when I saw him last it was at his brother Peter's in Drury-lane, who keeps a cook's shop.

Can you write? - Yes.

Do you ever remember his living in Cock-lane? - No.

Nor at Islington? - Not to my knowledge.

What did he write to you? - He was a very indifferent hand writer, he did not write very well; he wrote better than I, I am a very poor writer.

I suppose you can read? - Yes.

Court. Give him the note and see if he can read it. (The note was given him to read; and he read it.)

WILLIAM SINGLETON sworn.

Did you know Patrick Murphy ? - Yes.

Do you know what brothers he had? - I have heard him say he had two or three.

Do you know any one of his brothers? - Yes. Daniel and Peter, I saw them come after him several times; he worked at my father's.

Were you acquainted with Patrick's handwriting? - I cannot say that I was, but I believe I should know it if I saw it.

Have you seen him write? - Yes; he wrote a straggling hand.

Do you remember going with him and Daniel any where to sign a note? - I went to Wood-street with him, we went to Haberdashers hall; I did not go into the hall, I stopped at the door till they came out, then we went into Wood-street, and had a pot of beer at the Magpye.

Was that Patrick the brother of Daniel? - They always passed for brothers.

Did you see any paper when they came out? - I saw a little bit of a receipt; they said they had made it all up, and would go and have a pot of beer.

Cross Examination.

He wrote a straggling kind of hand. - Yes.

Do you mean a bad hand? - A large widish hand.

Not a good hand, nor the letters well cut? - Not at all, he could make shift to write his name not much better:

And was that legible? - Plain enough that any body might understand it.

You could just make out his name; it was not a plain hand? - No. Not a plain hand; he would join his letters together sometimes, and sometimes write quite wide.

What size man was he? - About five feet and a half, or five feet five.

Did he wear his own hair, or a wig? - His own hair; he wore a wig when he first came to London.

Look at this Patrick Murphy . Does that look like his hand-writing? - I believe that is his hand-writing according to the best of my judgement.

What was this Patrick? - He worked day labouring work, and after that carried milk about.

Was this the same Patrick that was sent over to Ireland? - Yes.

How long had you known him? - Ever since the second day he came to London. He worked with my father seven or eight years.

Where did he live in May 1776? - In Drury-lane.

At what number? - Near the top of Drury-lane, at a cook's shop.

At No. 120? - No, within half a dozen doors of the top, in St. Giles's.

Who did he live with? - At the house of Peter Murphy .

What time of day was it you went to Haberdasher's-hall? - It might be between two and three o'clock; I do not take upon me to say justly; I did not think of being called upon. He asked me if I did not remember going to Haberdasher's-hall with him, and into Wood-street.

How came you to remember it being so long ago? - I was asked by him about it.

How came you now to recollect that you went to Haberdasher's-hall? - It was about April or May, I think; I cannot be certain.

Did you put it down! - No.

How came you to recollect that it was the month of May? - Because I know it was near upon Whitsuntide.

You are not an Irishman! - No.

When did your acquaintance begin with Patrick? - He worked for my father, that was the first acquaintance I had with him. I could bring twenty or thirty people to prove that.

What was your father! - A bricklayer; I am of the same trade.

Did he give your father receipts or what? - No, we used to pay his wages every week.

You was not intimate with him! - As intimate as I might be with my own brother; I used to have the paying of him myself.

Was you here last sessions when the fraud was to be tried? - No.

Was you subpoenaed the? - Yes, upon this thing.

How happened you not to come? - I did come; I was here

PETER MURPHY sworn.

I understand you are the brother of the prisoner Daniel? - Yes.

You live in Drury-lane? - Yes, I did.

What other brothers had you? - Jack, Peter, Patrick, and Daniel.

Patrick was a brother of yours, was he? - Yes.

What is become of him now? - He is dead.

Cross Examination.

You have no other brothers but these three? - We had several brothers, but they are all dead but us three.

What kind of a hand did Patrick write? - A kind of a scrawling hand.

What do you mean by that? - An indifferent hand.

A large or small hand? - He could write both.

In which did he commonly write his name? - Generally small hand.

But a very bad hand? - An indifferent hand, not a very bad one.

And you had no other brother in England but Jack, Peter, Patrick, and Daniel? - No; and one that died in West Chester, that was William.

Look at the note, and see whether, it is your brother's hand writing? - This is both Daniel and Patrick's hand writing.

You had no brother of the name of Christopher. - Never.

Nor James? - No.

Nor Philip? - No.

You are sure you have none of these other names? - None.

Court. You have seen that note before? - I never saw it before.

Court. Why did not Mr. Hill come to you to demand payment of it? - I never saw any body come to demand payment for it.

Court. What did nobody come to demand payment of you? - No; my brother lodged up in my one pair of stairs fore room, and one Singleton lodged in the back room up one pair of stairs; my brother Daniel asked me to go and join him in these notes; but I would not, my wife said I should not lead a happy life if I did: Singleton, my brother Patrick, and Daniel went together to Haberdasher's-hall, and gave their notes.

After that, was this note never brought to you and payment demanded of you? - As soon as my brother was arrested Patrick went off from me, and I did not know what was become of him till he died here in the Old Bailey; they asked for my brother Patrick; he was gone as soon as Daniel was arrested.

Court. Who came to you to ask for Patrick; was it that gentleman Mr. Hill? - I cannot tell; I was busy; it was at the dinner hour; I told them that my brother Patrick was gone from me, and I did not know where he was; that was the answer I made.

Court. Did he show you the note? - He pulled it out of his pocket, but I never looked at it.

Court. Did not the gentleman ask you whether you had signed a note? - He never asked me.

Court. Did not you tell him you had not signed the note? - No, I told him that I knew nothing about it, I told him that my brother Patrick, and brother Daniel, and Singleton had been together to Haberdasher's-hall to give a note.

Court. You told that to the gentleman, did you? - Yes, and that my brother Patrick was gone from my house; I was in a hurry backwards and forwards, minding my business during the dinner hour, and did not take much notice of it.

Court. Was you asked whether your name was Patrick? - Yes, I said my name was Peter; I told him my brother Patrick was gone from my house,

Court. Did you tell him so? - Yes.

Court. What is become of that Patrick? - He is dead.

Court. Was he the Patrick that was sent to Ireland? - No; I did not know any thing of that Patrick that was sent to Ireland.

To Mr. Hill. You are the person who went to Murphy? - Yes.

Court to Murphy. After the first person came to enquire after Patrick Murphy , do you remember Mr. Wilson coming to you? - I don't know Mr. Wilson, there was only one person called, I cannot tell who that was.

Had you no conversation with Mr. Wilson? - No; there was one gentleman called; I was busy with my customers.

To Mr. Hill. Tell what passed when you went there? - I demanded of him payment of the note of hand, in which he had joined with his brother; he denied knowing any thing of it. I asked him if his name was not Patrick Murphy; he told me I might find that out; then suspecting the fraud, I went directly to Mr. Wilson; Mr. Wilson came with me up to Peter Murphy 's within a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Murphy. Did you see me at home? -

Hill. Yes; in the house; and Mr. Wilson did; he said he was not the person that had signed the note.

Court to Hill. Had you any conversation with him? - None.

Court to Murphy. How long had your brother lodged at your house? - Backwards and forwards for almost two years.

Court. How much time in all? - About twenty two months.

How many nights might he lay in your house in the twenty two months? - Very often; he went to the coast of Sussex; we were so much alike, that I was taken up for him by an Exchequer writ, and kept four days at Mr. Armstrong's.

[The counsel for the defendant said, that Patrick Murphy died in the Old Bailey, and was buried at St. Sepulchre's church, and the officer of the parish was ready with the register to prove that a Patrick Murphy was so buried.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE.

Reference Number: t17781021-44

782, 783, 784, 785, 786. GEORGE WILSON , EDWARD BLACKBURN , JOHN MILLER , THOMAS SLATER , and GEORGE HARGRAVE , were indicted for conspiring together falsely to charge one Robert Rigals (a bankrupt) with having feloniously concealed and secreted his effects from his creditors .

EDWARD BELL sworn.

(Produces the commission under the great seal.)

Cross Examination.

Is that commission in force now or superseded? - Superseded.

Have you got the supersedeas there? - I have. (The supersedeas produced.)

Have you the petition here? - No.

Then you do not know upon what ground it was superseded? - No.

It was superseded on the application of Mr. Rigals himself? - It appears so.

ROBERT RIGALS sworn.

On the 22d of March, 1774, I was declared a bankrupt; according to the notices in the Gazette I each time attended; I was heard on my last examination according to that notice, and Mr. Railton, who was then employed by the creditors, and who had been my attorney before, attended; an altercation arose, and the examination was put off, at the request of Mr. Railton, for fourteen days; at the expiration of that fourteen days, I attended again; then, upon what ground I cannot take upon me to say, it was put off for fourteen days further; at the expiration of that fourteen days I again attended, and was under a most severe examination for five hours, with as much as could be put upon one man under my circumstances; at that time I was discharged by the commissioners.

I wish you would apply yourself to the conduct of the defendant in procuring that warrant? - Being discharged, I think it was towards the middle of June, 1774, I was informed that there was a warrant, charging me with concealing my effects.

Counsel for the crown to the counsel for the defendant. That warrant we have given you notice to produce; it was made special to Blackburn, one of the defendants; you have the custody of it; if you will not produce it, we must give parol evidence of it.

Rigals. A person said he could be able to get me discharged from that warrant, if I would meet him at the Coach and Horses in Cross-street, Hatton Garden. I attended; I had not been in the house I believe more than five minutes, when two men rushed upon me, and dragged me out of the house with the utmost violence, and I was bruised in several parts of my body; they dragged me to the Globe Tavern in Hatton Garden, one was George Hargrave , the other one Thomas - . Hargrave is a defendant. When I arrived at the Globe, there were then waiting Mr. George Wilson and Mr. Edward Blackburn , two creditors; as soon as I entered the room they shut the door, and said I was their prisoner. I told them I did not know for what; if they had any authority to keep me, I desired them to let me see it; if they had any warrant, I then must submit; they would not let me see the warrant, but told me that I should go to Mr. Miller's, that is John Miller 's, the defendant, who keeps the Blue Boar in Whitechapel ; being pretty strongly guarded by the defendants and the men that took me, and a multitude of people, I arrived at Mr. Miller's house, and I was then ushered into a back room; I believe it might then be about five in the afternoon, and I under-went

a buffetting, and sometimes fair words and sometimes foul; at last it arrived till it was, I think, Saturday two in the morning; I told them I wanted to know what they intended to do with me; that they should show me by what authority they held me; that I thought it using me excessive ill. At last Slater said, I'll tell you what, friend Rigals, if you will be the honest man, and I believe thou art an honest man, we amongst us will set thee up in business, and if you will confess to what these men have sworn to be true, it shall be all very well, and you shall go home and lay at my house, and no harm shall come to you. I objected to that, and Mr. Slater came and sat down by me very close; he clapped my knee, and said, come friend Rigals, do not be obstinate, you know the consequence; for if you go to gaol, thou shalt not get out till thou hast paid the utmost farthing; but if thou wilt confess, we will give thee two hundred pounds, (fifty pounds a piece) if you will own to what the men have sworn to be true; I kept my resolution; then Mr. Blackburn said I have a warrant against you; I said why did not you let me see it before, I have often requested it: why, said he, it does not signify; now I will let you know it; he pulled out the warrant; I read the warrant; I found that warrant was on the affidavit of George Hargrave and Giles O'Neal , for feloniously secreting my effects, and it was granted by Alderman Oliver. On the margin of the warrant was written, Black-burn, special.

The defendant, Blackburn, was made the special constable for executing the warrant? - Yes. They then conveyed me to the Poultry Compter; the next morning Mr. Slater came to the Compter, and he said, Rigals, will you drink a glass of wine and let us settle this matter? I said, settle! what do you mean, I have nothing to settle: says he, I believe thee to be an honest man; I said, you have no great reason for thinking so; said he, there is something in that to be sure; I said I do not choose to drink any wine with you; soon after Mr. Railton came and tried to persuade me to acknowledge it; he said it would be better for me; I said as I was under the hand of the law, the law should take effect, I waited then three days under very disagreeable circumstances, and at the expiration of the third day all the defendants came, excepting Hargrave. Slater, Wilson, Miller, and Blackburn came. Blackburn said, I am constable; let me see, I am informed you have knives about you; let me search you; I turned my pockets out, and I was taken then to the Mansion-house before Alderman Bull, the then Lord Mayor. I had a counsel which I expected here this morning; and upon the investigation, George Hargrave deposed, that I was at the Hope, in Mitre Court, in Fleet-street, on the 2d of June, 1774; that he saw me in company with Taylor, Burton, and others; that he saw me give them bank notes and cash to a considerable amount; that I laid the bank notes upon the table; that I said to Taylor here are bank notes, and the writings of an estate that has been purchased for me. I never saw the man in my life before. I thought it was very strange.

That was the charge he made against you, and that was upon the oath of Hargrave, was it? - Yes; and O'Neal.

What became of that; were you committed upon it or discharged? - Upon the investigation of the charge the man was interrogated; and the other witness that came to give the same deposition, he rather being fearful.

Counsel for the defendants. Was this taken in writing before Mr. Alderman Bull? - I should suppose it was not, because we have made strict search and enquiry.

Do you know or not? - I do not know. I was discharged upon the acknowledging of Charles Dyson . There was one of the counsel who threatened, that if the men did not take care, they would be in a situation not agreeable; and the man said I know nothing about it; I only went to Mr. Wilson for the money that Hargrave was to have, and I have paid him the money.

Did you know any thing of Hargrave or O'Neal before? - No; I have seen O'Neal, but never was connected with him at all.

Did any such circumstances as they alledge happen at the Hope? - No, never; I never was in the house that I know of.

Cross Examination.

How long is this ago? - Upwards of four years.

How did you pass the intermediate time from this supposed examination at my Lord-Mayor's; in the first place you describe yourself in a commission of bankruptcy as a pawnbroker and mercer in Queen street, Southwark? - Yes.

You had a warehouse too in Watling-street? - Yes.

How long had you had that before the commission? - About three or four months.

You gave an account in your examination that the goods from this warehouse were sent to a supposed correspondent of yours, one Mr. Hallinger at Amsterdam? - Yes.

And that he was indebted to you four hundred and seventy pounds? - Yes.

Have you got an account with Mr. Hallinger? - What account I have I entered in the book under the commission.

You have no other then? - No.

Had you any book of the goods in the warehouse in Watling-street? - No.

Nor any account with Mr. Hallinger but what was in the proceedings under the commission? - No.

Counsel for the prosecution.

The commission I admit, for it will be proved that it was found to be a fraudulent one, upon an issue directed to be tried in the court of King's Bench; but though it was so, the whole of the counsel for the defendants examination is to show the fraud of this commission; the charge against the present defendants, is, that they, from an over anxiety to punish the prosecutor, made use of very improper and wicked measures for that purpose, by procuring the affidavit of two men of the name of Hargrave and O'Neal, (we shall show the sort of men they are presently) they procured these men to make this charge against the prosecutor; and whatever other charge might be true against him, this was a false charge; and it subjected him to be punished as a felon; therefore the examination respecting the fraud of the bankruptcy may be spared.

Counsel for the defendants. Then you admit him to be a dishonest man.

Counsel for the prosecutor. An honest man or a dishonest man may be charged unjustly.

Counsel for the defendants. As three or four years are now elapsed, did your assignee recover this four hundred pounds of Hallinger?

Rigals. I cannot take upon me to say they have.

I believe you can take upon you to say they have not? - How can I say that.

Counsel. Try? - Suppose I say no.

Have they or have they not? - I believe no.

Are not you sure no? - There is no certainty of any thing; how can I take upon me to say whether they have or have not; how can I take upon me to say whether they have wrote letters or sent any person, they may have done it and I not know it.

Do you not know upon your oath that there is not a farthing recovered of him?

Give an answer, is there any thing recovered by your assignees from Hallinger? - I do not believe that there is.

What was the amount of the debts that you gave in as owing at the time of your commission; have you got the total amount? - I cannot take upon me to say that I have.

Do you remember to make up the deficiency of those debts, how many notes and bills you gave in as owing to your estate? - I gave in 245 notes, I told the commissioners that three parts of the notes had been paid to persons who had not enquired after them; other notes were due; Mr. Bargrave, one of the commissioners cast them up, and said there was about 1000 l. that might be recovered.

How many bills of exchange? - I cannot positively say.

I believe twenty three? - I cannot positively say.

You gave all these in, did you not, as being due to your estates? - Not as being due to my estate, I gave them in as in my possession.

Not as due to your estate? - Not all.

Which of them? - I cannot tell, if I

had had the accounts I could have stated which was due, and which not due.

Have any of these 245 notes and 23 bills been recovered? - Bills! I don't understand what you mean by that; they might be bills that I have been paid, they might be bills that I have paid. I have paid Mr. Wilson 600 l. a year. I gave them as being in my possession under the commission.

How many of the 245 notes that you gave in were recovered; or were any way recovered? - That I cannot take upon me to say, I have recovered none.

Don't you know that none of them have been recovered? - I have heard so.

Why don't you know so? - I don't.

Of the debts that you owe, I think there is a note that you gave to one of these men that you now think proper to indict, Edward Stack , one of your notes was given in, as owing from you forty pound to the defendant Stack? - Given into where?

To the commissioners? - Yes. He had a forty pound note of me; he swindled me out of it.

You was the swindlee there then instead of the swindler. Was Stack one that signed your certificate? - I don't know that he was; I cannot take upon me to say. (The certificate was referred to, his name was not to it.)

There was another note, I believe, to O'Neal, another of the defendants? - I cannot say positively.

Did not you give a note to O'Neal? - I cannot say whether I did or not.

Because you dropped before that you might have seen him.

"Did you know, O'Neal, said

"the learned Counsel? Why, yes, I might

"have seen him before.

"Now, upon your oath, whether you gave O'Neal a note and for what money? - It is more than probable that I did.

Yes; because it is certain. Now did you or not give him a note? - Yes; I think I did.

How came you to give O'Neal a note when you doubted almost whether you had ever seen him before; you had no dealing with him of any sort you say? - No; he applied to me, and had a note of me, and told me he could get it discounted for me.

Did you tell the Commissioners this? - Yes, I think, I did. I am not sure.

Yes, you are sure you did not? - I cannot take upon me to say nay. Can you recollect what passed five years ago?

Counsel. Yes; I could in so material a matter as that.

Court. Answer the questions; if you don't know; say you don't know.

Counsel. I ask, upon your oath, did you tell the Commissioners that he had taken it of you in order to get it discounted, or did you not give it in as one of the debts owing from you? - Not as one of the debts to the best of my knowledge, but I cannot take upon me to say.

I asked you about Stack's note. Did you give Stack a note? - He had a note of me.

For how much money? - I cannot say.

Did you swear that was due, because you said you knew nothing at all of Stack? - Yes; I think I made oath that he had a note of me.

A note from you to him which was a charge upon your estate; do you know now that you swore that that was due to him? - I don't know that I did.

Will you say you did not? - I might, probably, as he had a note of me; it was my debt to him, and I was accountable for it and liable to be arrested.

Then whether this money was owing to Stack or not you don't know; or that you swore it before the Commissioners? - He was to get me money for the note, or something of that sort.

So that was a swindling thing of you by Stack? - Yes.

You had no goods at all of him, but gave him this note to negociate? - I think I had some part in goods that he had; he had got money for the note.

You say he got the money? - Yes.

Then how came you to swear that you owed him the money? - The note was due, therefore it was a debt from me.

Did you give it in as a debt due from you to him? - I very likely might.

Did you know one Thomas William Robertson ? - Yes.

Did you give him any note? - I think he had a note.

Why don't you know? - I believe he had.

What is become of your list of the people to whom you gave notes? - I kept no accounts since I gave my papers to the Commissioners.

Had you no list? - I don't know that I had.

Will you swear that you had not a list of the people to whom you gave notes; and of Robertson among the rest? - I had not; not that I can recollect.

You had no list in writing then of a note to Mr. Aiken for 1700 and odd pounds? - No.

A bond? - No.

You know Nathaniel Aiken I hope. He was an acquaintance of yours was not he? - No.

Then you never knew him at all? - I have seen him.

Of course you never put his name in any list of your creditors? - No.

Never? - No; not to the best of my knowledge.

There was a note I think you say to Robertson? - I cannot take upon me to be positive.

I will wait till you are? - You will wait a good while I believe.

You are determined not to be positive? - How can I be positive when I cannot be certain.

Do you mean to swear that you never gave Robertson a note? - Upon my word I cannot.

As to your word; you will excuse me, you know you are upon your oath; don't you know that you gave Robertson a note? - No.

You never had any dealing with him? - No.

That you are sure of? - Yes.

Did you ever give Michael Clare a note? - No.

You never had any dealings with Clare? - No; to the best of my knowledge. I will not be positive; I know the name of Clare; I cannot recollect whether I did or did not.

I understand you to swear that you never had a list with Aiken's name on it? - No.

Did you ever give him a bond for 750 l. - Not that I remember; not that I can recollect.

Court. Have you given Robertson any security for money? - Not that I can recollect.

Counsel. I will give you from September 1773, to about April or May 1774; that is rope enough.

Court. Recollect yourself and be correct in your answer? - I cannot take upon me to say whether I did or not.

Court. Mind you are not asked about the particular sum; but wheher you gave him security for any money at all; did you give him any security for any sum at all? - I don't recollect that I did.

Court. Were there any money transactions at all of any kind between you? - No.

Counsel. Had you any dealings with Martin Armstrong ? - I think I have had dealings with an Armstrong; I don't know whether it was Martin or not.

Where did he live? - The Armstrong I dealt with lived in Holborn.

Whereabouts? - About the middle of Holborn, I think.

What number or next to whom? - I cannot take upon me to say what number.

Near to what street? - The Martin Armstrong I dealt with, lived near to Middle Row.

What was he? - A man that used to deal in petticoats and stuffs.

What was owing to him? - I cannot say.

He was not a silk mercer was he? - No; a private person who kept a little bit of a place up stairs.

Did he prove any debt under your Commission, do you know? - I do not know.

There is but one Martin Armstrong is there with whom you had dealings at all? - No.

Then if any Martin Armstrong proved under your Commission, it must be him? - Yes.

I believe you was examined. Do you recollect the debt due to Armstrong? - Yes

Seventy-three pounds ten shillings.

Did not you swear him then to be a silk mercer? - We deem them mercers that deal in any thing of that sort.

How came you just now to say he was not a mercer? - We call them so; we call people that deal in stuffs mercers.

Upon your oath was he a mercer? - No; he kept a place up stairs.

Did he keep a shop? - Not at the time I had the goods of him; he did not, I think not; he had kept a shop.

Did he when you was last examined before the Commissioners keep a sale shop? - He kept a shop private.

Aye, a private gentleman I know he was; we will give some account of him presently; however this private gentleman you gave in a debt of 73 l. due to him? - I have sold thousands of pounds out of a private room.

You know one Edward Reynolds too, I believe another private gentleman? - Reynolds!

Why you astonish me not to know your old friends; I ask you, did you know Edward Reynolds ? - I think I have seen the man.

Now is that all I can get of you, try again? - Tell me what you want then I will tell you.

Counsel. No trust me for that? - I think I do know him.

Is that all that I can get, that you only think you know Edward Reynolds ? - I think I have seen the man.

Have you talked with him? - I cannot recollect whether I have had much conversation with him.

Did he ever lend you any money? - No.

I believe this Edward Reynolds was so obliging as to sign your certificate as a creditor for money lent for 86 l. 4 s. 8 d. do you know that or not? - I don't know that he has signed it.

You don't know that he has signed it? - No.

You never was at any meeting where he promised to sign it? - No.

Do you know that he proved a debt of 86 l. 4 s. 8 d.? - I do not know that he did.

Be so good as to give us a little history of this time. I believe you was arrested at the suit of one or other of these gentlemen or creditors, either Wilson or Slater in August 1774? - Yes.

I believe you applied to be discharged under the Act of Parliament as a fair bankrupt, claiming the same privileges that an insolvent debtor would have; did you or did you not apply to be discharged? - I did.

Did you make that application to the late Mr. Justice Aston? - Mr. Tew the attorney did for me.

I believe that was ineffectual, you was refused to be discharged? - Certainly, or else I should not have been four years confined.

Did you make a second application to the same judge? - Not that I know of; I cannot take upon me to say what the attorney did. I was not discharged.

Did you not know that a second application was made to the same judge, Mr. Justice Aston? - I do not.

Do you know of a third application made to Lord Mansfield? - I have been informed that it was moved in the Court of King's Bench.

No; we will come to that by and by; was there not an application made to my Lord Mansfield as a judge at his chambers? - No.

Then Mr. Tew has been obliging enough to do this for you unknown to you? - Only the first I know of.

Do you know of the application to the Court of King's Bench? - Yes.

You made a very long affidavit yourself, in order to obtain a rule for them to show cause why you should not be discharged? - Yes.

Do you know whether you then swore that all these were true debts; that they were fair creditors; and the debts justly due to them? - I do not think I did.

You did not mean to swear so? - I do not think I did swear so.

Would you have sworn so? - No, I should not; I think not; if I had read the affidavit.

Then, if you have made any such affidavit that has slipped your memory, now what became of this application to the court of King's-Bench. - They granted a rule;

something, I do not know what they term it.

I will tell you. They granted an issue to be tried upon this simple question, whether your commission was a fraudulent one; yea or no; and it was found fraudulent, was it not? - Yes; I think so.

Do not you know that? - Yes; I am certain of that.

So am I, for I happened to be at the trial; then that commission was found to be fraudulent; now upon its being found to be fraudulent, I ask you whether so late as March 1777, you did not apply to the late Lord Chancellor to have this commission superseded as fraudulent? - I applied to Judge Ashhurst in 1776 to be discharged; he told the Clerk that he had seen a record of a verdict; that the commission was fraudulent, and that I could not be discharged as a bankrupt, but must be discharged as an insolvent. I waited till the insolvent act took me up to St. Margaret's-Hill; I was remanded then as a bankrupt; I could not be discharged as an insolvent.

In March 1777 did not you petition to have this commission superseded, because it was fraudulent? - If I had not endeavoured to supersede the commission, I should have been confined for life.

And was not that the reason why you applied to have this commission superseded, being fraudulent? - Yes; because it was fraudulent; that was the intent of my Lord Chancellor, by giving me the supersedeas.

Was it not that because this commission was fraudulent, therefore your discharge was so long withheld from you; that, if you had done all fairly, you would have been entitled to be discharged between the summer of 1774, and the summer of 1777? - I could not blame the judge for not discharging me when those people went and swore that they could prove I had concealed many thousand pounds.

There is no doubt now I hope that it was fraudulent? - There cannot be a doubt because there is a verdict.

You was taken from the Poultry Compter before my lord mayor; I ask you whether you did not, while you was in the Compter, tear some papers, and fling them either out at the window or upon the floor? - I tore I believe two or three letters, or a letter that I had in my pocket; I cannot take upon me to say, or some memorandums, or something.

It is that very something that makes the whole difference; be so good as to say whether Mr. Aiken's name was contained in that something that was tore? - I cannot say it was.

Do you say it was not? - No; the whole was not bigger than that piece of paper, (about inches six square.)

Was or not Aiken's name in any paper that you tore in the Compter? - Not that I know of.

You knew nothing of him? - I gave him a bond for seven hundred pounds; his name might be on a paper.

Why was it to be torn when you was taken into custody? - I have a right to tear what is in my possession.

And I will answer for it you had a reason for tearing it? - I cannot take upon me to say that I had no particular reason.

Do you mean to swear that you had no reason for tearing this paper that had Aiken's name in it? - I do take upon me to say so, as far as I can learn, for I do not know that his name was there.

Why did not you keep the paper in your pocket? - Because I saw that I was beset.

Counsel. And so you was afraid of some innocent thing, set down upon that paper, popping out of your pocket.

Court. What reason had you for destroying that paper? - I had been making some minutes of how I had been treated.

Counsel. But this paper would help to defend not convict you; did not you think that there was something in them that would bite; you tore them all? - I tore them all! if you had seen the paper you would not have thought much about it.

I have seen it, and therefore I do think much about it. - What I had been writing was nothing more than the minutes, and I do not know that Aiken's name was concerned about it; it was memorandums of what had passed before I came to the Compter.

That was your hand writing then? - Yes.

Court. Then will you swear whether Aiken's name was upon it, you must know that. - No.

Court. This is a most shameful answer.

Do the counsel for this prosecution wish to carry this cause on any further?

Counsel for the prosecution. I have no wish to press the prosecution any further, now I see the nature of it from this man's evidence I am satisfied about it.

Court. The man can have no credit; it is at least prevarication, and such as will take all kind of credit from him.

ALL NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17781021-45

JOHN ROGERS was indicted for obtaining by false pretences 168 lb. of moist sugar, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Joseph Stevenson , David Hewson , and Nathaniel Fen , August 10th .

RICHARD BLACKMAN sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. Stevenson, Hewson, and Fen, who are grocer s. On the 7th of August, Hughes, a porter, came to our shop for a hundred and half of sugar; he said he came from Mr. Hollard, and produced a letter. I know Mr. Hollard very well, he has credit at our shop.

(The letter was produced in court and read.)

THOMAS SKINNER sworn.

I am a waterman at the Three Crane-stairs; I carried John Rogers and the goods to Westminster-bridge.

Do you know of Hughes's bringing any thing on the 7th of August? - I cannot be positive to the time; I carried him two or three times.

About that time? - I cannot be positive to any time; I think I carried Rogers twice in the month of August; he always had sugar about a hundred and a half at a time; it was always brought by Hughes or one Osburn.

JOHN HUGHES sworn.

Do you know the defendant at the bar? - Yes; that is the young man that employed me.

Where did he employ you? - In the street on College-hill; he asked me if I was a porter? I said yes, if any body would employ me; he gave me a letter to go to Mr. Hewson's for some sugar; I went and delivered the letter to Blackman, the shopman; he ordered me to carry the sugar to the Three Cranes, and deliver it to Skinner. I did; Rogers was there at the time.

- HOLLARD sworn.

I live in Cheapside.

Is that letter your hand writing, or did you direct it to be wrote for you? - It is not my hand writing, nor is it wrote by any of my people.

Do you know Rogers? - No.

Did you ever employ him to get Sugar for you? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have no defence to make; I am innocent of the affair they charge me with. I have no witnesses; I did not know I was to be tried now.

GUILTY . Fined and imp. 1 day .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: o17781021-1

Received his Majesty's mercy on the following conditions.

Navigation for 3 years, 9.

John Smith , Edward Sullens , Thomas Coudon , Robert Harrold, alias Hutton, alias Sutton, alias Jackson , George Goodwin , Joseph Green , John Frederick, Ludovic Giebelhausen , and James Durham .

Navigation for 4 years, 9.

John Stewart , Robert Poor , John Chamberlain , Patrick Boyle , Robert Harding , John Rice , Edward Fossett, alias Faucett , Benjamin Dare , and Robert Hand .

Navigation for 5 years, 9.

Joseph West , Thomas Cantrell , James Gable , William Knight , John Hosier , John Anderton , James Mills , Joseph Dracot , and Thomas Henson .

Reference Number: o17781021-2

Imprisoned 3 years, 6.

Elizabeth Hart , Mary Williams , Anne Underwood , Sarah Corderoy , Anne Harvey , and Margaret Filston .

Reference Number: s17781021-1

The TRIALS being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgement, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 5.

William Holloway , George Graham , Mary Lightburn , Maria Graves , alias Pentecross, and Michael Swift .

Imprisoned 3 years, 8.

Susannah Johnson , Elizabeth Agan , Elizabeth Gardner , Mary Mollineux , Elizabeth Barber , Elizabeth Kelly , Sarah Lynch , and Frances Pearce .

Branded and imprisoned 1 year, 7.

Mary Forrester , Susannah Greenslade , Mary Butler , Sarah Wilson , John Lastrucci , John Wilkes , and Richard Bale .

Branded and imprisoned 6 months, 2.

Elizabeth Pringle , Thomas Cox .

Whipped, 2.

Sarah Briggs , Anne Hagger .

Whipped and imprisoned 6 months, 1.

Elizabeth Welch .

Imprisoned 1 year, 1.

John Bailey .

Sent to the Marine Society, 1.

William Beans .

Reference Number: s17781021-1

Received his Majesty's mercy on the following conditions.

Navigation for 3 years, 9.

John Smith , Edward Sullens , Thomas Coudon , Robert Harrold, alias Hutton, alias Sutton, alias Jackson , George Goodwin , Joseph Green , John Frederick, Ludovic Giebelhausen , and James Durham .

Navigation for 4 years, 9.

John Stewart , Robert Poor , John Chamberlain , Patrick Boyle , Robert Harding , John Rice , Edward Fossett, alias Faucett , Benjamin Dare , and Robert Hand .

Navigation for 5 years, 9.

Joseph West , Thomas Cantrell , James Gable , William Knight , John Hosier , John Anderton , James Mills , Joseph Dracot , and Thomas Henson .

Reference Number: s17781021-1

Imprisoned 3 years, 6.

Elizabeth Hart , Mary Williams , Anne Underwood , Sarah Corderoy , Anne Harvey , and Margaret Filston .

Reference Number: a17781021-1

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO THE KING) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED ( After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , ( WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: a17781021-2

*** The TRIALS (at large) of JAMES LARWELL for a RAPE on the Body of MARGARET EAST, and of JOHN JONES (lately executed) for a RAPE on the Body of JUDITH CHARLTON , are printed in the First and Second Parts of the Sessions Papers for the last Sessions.

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea. (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO THE KING) BRACHYGRAPHY OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.


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