Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th July 1778.
Reference Number: 17780715
Reference Number: f17780715-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 15th of July, 1778, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir JAMES ESDAILE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar,

MDCCLXXVIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JAMES ESDAILE , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir GEORGE NARES , Knt one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas, The Hon. FRANCIS BULLER , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices, of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Kingsbury ,

Richard Wright ,

John Raymond ,

James Blundell ,

William Bromley ,

John Newbull ,

Joseph Proctor ,

Stephen Adams ,

Robert Underwood ,

John Wickerman ,

John Brookes ,

William Palmer .

First Middlesex Jury.

Solomon Hudson ,

William Greenhill ,

Samuel Calderwood ,

Thomas Gibson ,

John Winstanley ,

John Hobcraft ,

Nath. Darvin ,

Alex. Rutherford,

Thomas Bannister ,

William Walmsley ,

Edward Oxlee ,

Charles Jacks ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Rempell ,

Thomas Bannister ,

William Thompson ,

Thomas Baker ,

Samuel Norgrave ,

John Hetley ,

Thomas Tubb ,

William Lowe ,

Alexander Creighton ,

Ambrose Bradbury ,

Anthony Artes ,

Jonathan Mann .

Reference Number: t17780715-1

512. PETER DOYNE was indicted for stealing eight pair of men's thread lace ruffles, value 20 l. one linen shirt, value 20 s. one woollen cloth surtout coat, value 2 s. one pair of silver candlesticks, value 6 l. twelve silver table spoons, value 6 l. Eight silver tea spoons, value 16 s. one silver punch ladle, value 20 s. one pair of silver bottle stands, value 40 s. and one pair of silver salts, value 10 s. the property of Richard Holland , in the dwelling house of Francis Carberry , July 1 .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called and not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-2

513. ROBERT PRICE was indicted for stealing two silver tea spoons, value 5 s. the property of John Wheeler ; and one pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. the property of John Davidson , June 10 .

JANE WHEELER sworn.

I am the wife of John Wheeler ; we rent a room of Mr. Wilmot, but I had let this room to one John Davidson ; it is a front room up two pair of stairs. As I was going up stairs on the 11th of June, at about four in the afternoon, I heard somebody going up into the garret; I apprehended it was somebody that wanted to avoid being seen; I stopped at the landing place; the person who is the prisoner then came down and passed me; I immediately perceived that the two pair of stairs fore room door had been broke open; I observed the bureau was broke open; I went down and told Mr. Wilmot of it, and showed him the man. I am certain the prisoner is the person; there were two tea spoons in a closet in the room that was broke open.

What distance might you be from the prisoner when you showed him to Mr. Wilmot? - It might be fifty yards or rather more.

Whether another man was not stopped? - Another man might have been stopped or spoke to, but this is the first man Mr. Wilmot took; as soon as I came up Mr. Wilmot asked me if I was sure that he was the man, I said I was very sure he was the man. I locked the door.

(The spoons were produced in court, and deposed to by Jane Wheeler .)

JOHN DAVIDSON sworn.

I took a room of John Wheeler ; I went out that day between twelve and one, and returned about six; I missed the shoe buckles, I left them I think in the room about the eighth of June; but I rather think I saw them in the drawer that day.

(The buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by John Davidson .)

JOHN GLASS sworn.

I saw the prisoner at the cellar window of the Marlborough Inn where I draw beer; he was there a considerable time; I went down into the cellar to draw some beer, and found two silver tea spoons, the gentlewoman's property, in the cellar; the cellar window was open, they were about three yards from the window; I carried them to the justice's.

ROBERT SINGER called.

Court. How old are you? - I don't know.

Have you any relations here? - No, my mother is dead; my father is run away; I draw beer at the Bull's Head and Feathers, Oxford road.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - No.

You come here to speak the truth; do you think you are obliged to speak the whole truth; you know you ought to speak the truth? - Yes, my lord.

How old do you think you are? - I am about twelve. (He is sworn.)

Court. Now you have called God to witness to the truth of what you say, you must speak nothing but the truth? - I saw the prisoner running up Blenheim steps, and saw Wilmot collar him; I saw him chuck the buckles on a hamper and I took them up; I was coming from over the way with a pennyworth of beer; I gave them to Mr. Ryan who lives opposite, and he went immediately after Mr. Wilmot with the buckles; Wilmot then being gone on with the prisoner towards the justice's: Mr. Wilmot came to me afterwards in about a quarter of an hour, and desired I would go with him to the justice, which I did. I was asked the same questions there as I have been here, and gave the same account.

Prisoner. Whether you did not say before the justice that you found the buckles in the cellar? - No, I never said so, I said I found them on the hamper at the top of Blenheim steps.

RICHARD RYAN sworn.

I am a bookseller. I know this boy, living near him; he took up the buckles and gave them to me; I went with them after the prisoner, who was then in the hands of Mr. Wilmot: the boy never said that he found them in the cellar: the soldier said he found the spoons in the cellar. The prisoner denied the whole.

I saw the boy before he gave any account of the buckles; he was then standing near the prisoner.

- WILMOT sworn.

On the 10th of June, Mrs. Wheeler came down to me and said a man had been up stairs and the room had been broke open; that he had passed by her without saying a word. My house is in Poland-street, almost opposite Marlborough-street, she took me to the corner of Marlborough-street, and showed me the man who was then turning into Blenheim-street; I pursued him and stopped him; I said you are accused of a theft, and I desire you will stay till your accuser comes, which he did; then Mrs. Wheeler came up and said that was the man, and that she would swear to him. Some people came about him; when they were near the cellar door that has been mentioned; the prisoner made a stop; I carried him home to my own house. Mr. Ryan came to me and told me that he had got the buckles; that they had been dropped at Blenheim steps, in consequence of this, Ryan went with me before the justice; I went for the boy and he came, and gave exactly the same account he has now.

THOMAS DUNDERDALE sworn.

I am a constable; all these spoons were given me by the justice. I found some keys and a chissel upon the prisoner. Mr. Wilmot desired me to go to the place, to try how far it corresponded with the hole that had been made; the key opened the door; when I came to the bureau there were several splinters broke off the bureau, which lay in the room then; I took them up and joined them to the several places, and when they were joined, I took the chissel and tried it and it exactly sitted the hole where it had been put in to break it open.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. Wilmot came up to me; there was a man went past me and dropped these things in a handkerchief, upon my honour, and upon my soul; Mr. Wilmot came up and laid hold of me and challenged me, he said, with the theft! I in my fright put the things into my hand; he challenged that man and then let him go again.

To Wilmot. Did you challenge another man first? - No. I saw nothing drop; I did not lay hold of any other man; I found nothing upon him, for I did not search him.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-3

514, 515. JOSEPH COX , otherwise WILCHER , and CHARLES WATSON , otherwise BOND , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Morrill , Clerk , on the 20th of June , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a sash screw made of iron and brass, value 6 d. the property of the said William, in his dwelling-house .

[At the request of the prisoners, the witnesses were examined apart.]

Rev. WILLIAM MORRILL sworn.

I am a clergyman ; I live at No. 30, Hatton-garden , or as it has been lately called Hatton-street. I went about the 7th or 8th of June with my family to Hampstead: I secured my house in the strongest manner I could; the doors were barred and bolted, and all the windows were fast; I examined the windows of the kitchen myself; I saw the screws safe; one of which was afterwards broke. I came to town occasionally, and then I looked at my house and saw that all was well. A message was sent to me on the 20th of June that my house was broke open; I came immediately to town, and found one of the bars wrenched, and found the screw of the window taken; it was screwed in the inside and could not have been taken out without some person having put their hand into the window; the sash of the window was up and a pane of glass was broken; I myself picked up a chissel in the area next morning, and there were marks of violence on the door; and on the other windows, the area is twenty feet deep.

ANN TAYLOR sworn.

On the 20th of June, at eleven at night, I went into a fore garret in a house in the neighbourhood, near the house of Mr. Morrill; the window was open; I saw a man

walk by Mr. Morrill's house; I observed that when, any body was there, he walked on; when nobody was there, he clapped his hands; I heard Mr. Morrill's window shutter wrenched and the glass fall into the area; the noise continued till half after twelve; then a servant of Mr. Baldero's came home and I alarmed him.

RICHARD MORRIS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Baldero; I came home from Kent, where I had been express about my master's business; about half after twelve Ann Taylor called to me, and told me there was somebody at Mr. Morrill's house; I ran round but could see nobody. A gentleman that is here pushed down his stick afterwards and the sash was found open, upon that I went down the area and found the two prisoners in the area; I took them to the watch-house; there was a tinder-box and pistol near them.

WILLIAM PEARCE sworn.

I am watchman; going my rounds at that time, I heard a noise; I went down, but the other people had got into the area before I came; I found a tinder-box in the area; a chissel was picked up the next day in the area; indeed, I saw it there as soon as it was light; I asked the prisoners how they came there; the answer they gave me was, there had been a great riot and noise in the street, and they went there to conceal themselves.

A WITNESS sworn.

I am a watchman; I found the pistols and tinder-box in the area; when I went down, the prisoners were sitting under the arch in the area, about a yard from the window; there were remains of violence on the kitchen door, on the street door, and likewise the other window. I took the screw up in the window; it lay by the pistol and tinder-box.

RICHARD POWEL sworn.

I heard the cry of watch; I went down; there were five or six watchmen there together; they said there were thieves in the house; they did not choose to go in; at last, I jumped into the area; I saw both the prisoners under the arch against the wall; I called for my bludgeon; the prisoners said, don't insult or ill use us, and we will surrender ourselves; upon which we handed them up and got them into the street, and they never spoke a word more.

RICHMON BRIDGE sworn.

About half after twelve at night, I saw Mr. Baldero's coachman watching the house; I asked if there was any fire, he said no, but thieves; I saw the window-shutter loose; I put down my stick; the sash was up and a pane of glass broke: the prisoners were taken out and carried to the watch-house.

COX's DEFENCE.

All I have to urge in my defence is this, at the time the burglary was committed, I was clerk to an attorney in the city, who, I believe, is in court now to give me a character. I left the office at eight in the evening; I spent the remainder of the night with a friend, with whom I drank rather too free; I left him; I believe, it was past twelve o'clock, in order to go home; coming along Hatton-street in my way home, I heard an alarm, and understood by a woman who was at a window, that there were thieves in the area; I looked round in order to see if I could get any assistance; I saw my fellow-prisoner coming towards the place on the other side of the way; I called to him, and told him what I had heard, and asked him, if he would go over the area with me, to see if there was any body there; he readily complied, and we got over, which, I believe, we should not have done if we had been in our proper senses; for he was also in liquor; we were hardly down but we were surrounded by the watchmen; we called to them, and told them we could not see any body there, or any thing like thieves, and desired to be helped over; that man came over and used me ill. I desired to be helped out, and said, I would readily go wherever they should take me; they helped us out and took us to the watch-house.

WATSON's DEFENCE.

The evening the robbery was committed, I had been at Sadler's Wells, after the entertainment was over I drank pretty freely; I met some acquaintance that kept me rather

late; coming along Hatton street, Mr. Cox called to me over the way, and said here is an alarm of thieves; I can find no watchman to come to detect them; he said, if you will get over the area I will go and see if there i s any body there; I complied with it; I saw no body there; the windows were shut when I went down.

For the prisoner:

Mr. SPOTTESWOOD sworn.

Cox has been clerk to me since November 1775.

What has been his behaviour? - Exceeding regular; he married a year or near two years ago; he was then absent about a month from me.

Did you ever know him guilty of any such crime before? - Never, he was always exceeding regular and honest; I have often trusted him with two or three hundred pounds at a time to carry to my banker; and he never wronged me in his life.

Mr.TODD sworn.

I have known Cox and his parents and their connexions twenty six years; they live in a reputable way, and give him a good example; and in my own knowledge of him and his family I never heard any ill thing of him till the present affair.

(All the witnesses for the prosecution were asked whether the prisoners were intoxicated with liquor when they were taken out of the area.)

They all said they both appeared to be very sober.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-4

516. JOHN STEWART was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Vezey Bishop , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, 6 s. in monies, numbered, the property of the said Vesey , June 3 .

VESEY BISHOP sworn.

On the third of last June I was robbed about half a mile on this side Newington town; it was about twenty minutes after ten o'clock, it was a very moon light night; as I was walking upon the causeway on the side of the road, I was met by the prisoner and another man; I could see them about forty yards before they came to me; they were in the high road; the prisoner separated from the other and came into the foot way; when they came almost even with me I saw what they were about, it was very light, I could see them distinctly at forty yards distance; when I saw him separate and come towards me from the other man I apprehended that they intended to rob me; I attempted to run past them; the prisoner put out a great stick, I apprehended he was going to knock me down; I threw myself against the bank; the prisoner laid hold of me, and told me to give him my money; I put my hand into my pocket, I recollected I had a pocket piece that I did not wish to part with, I let it drop, and a half guinea which I knew it to be by the feel of it; I took out about 6 or 7 s. and gave into the prisoner's hand; he swore at me and said that would not do.

You did not see any fire arms upon either of them? - No, only this great stick; he said that would not do; I drew my pocket up with my hand; the other man put his hand to my pocket to feel if I had left any money in my pocket, but the pocket being drawn up he did not feel it; I went on to a public house that adjoins the Palatine houses.

What is the sign of the house? - I believe it is the sign of the Hare and Hounds, I am not positive as to the sign; they refused to lend me any assistance. I thought they would see my watch, I concealed it; the next morning I gave information at Mr. Wilmot's office that I had been robbed; they sent me word in the evening to attend; that a number of people were apprehended, I was so much hurried there that I could not at first say any thing to them; when they came to be arraigned at the bar the prisoner struck me instantly, then I knew him directly; but I rather chose to see him a second time before I swore positively to him; he was committed the first time for further examination, because the man whom I suspected was along with him was not then taken; on the Tuesday following the justice told me to attend again, which I did, then they had apprehended

the other man, there were many circumstances that would have induced me to believe the other to be the man, but they were not sufficiently satisfactory to myself.

Were you certain on that day to the prisoner? - Yes; though the prisoner had taken some pains to deceive me in his dress, yet I was satisfied from a particular circumstance.

What created a doubt the first time? - The difference of his dress; I had rather a little doubt, but I was then pretty certain he was the man.

Can you take upon you to swear now that is the man? - I can positively.

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn.

Mr. Bishop gave an information at Mr. Wilmot's office that he had been robbed on the third of June, and according to the intelligence he left, we suspected the prisoner and the other man; I apprehended them, and when Mr. Bishop saw them he swore positively to the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I was taken up at Robinson's, this and another man desired me to go with him, I went directly to Mr. Wilmot's office; I sat in the public house there with some more men; this gentleman came in, he said he believed me to be the man that robbed him; I was ordered to go down to prison; they let me go to and fro as I pleased; I went away and went home; knowing myself to be innocent, I directly went down to New Prison for fear any thing might come of it; I asked there if any thing was alledged against me; they said no there was not; I staid at Mr. Bond's for some of Mr. Wilmot's men for two hours; I left word with Mr. Bond where I was going to; and if I should not be there, I should be at home, and if there was any thing against me, I would come up the next morning on Tuesday; accordingly this Yardly came to my house next morning, and knocked at my door; I let him in; he asked me how I came to go away, and if I would come after him to the justice's; I said I would, I went and washed myself while he waited an hour for me in a public house; when I went there was no prosecutor to be seen; I was ordered down to New Prison; I came up on Tuesday, the prosecutor came up; then he ordered me to put the coat of the man on I stood at the bar with, which I did; all my other clothes which I had were produced; when I put it on, he directly swore to me; he said he saw me ten minutes after ten with a handkerchief over my nose; and that he knew me well by my eyes.

Jury to the prosecutor. I think you said there was a particular circumstance that induced you to believe that he was the man; what was that circumstance? - I thought it would not be favourable to the prisoner to mention it; and I thought it not altogether evidence; the person that was taken with him that they called his partner had the great coat on before the justice that the prisoner had on when he robbed me; I said to the justice I was sure that was the coat the prisoner had on when he robbed me, the prisoner swore many oaths that he would not put it on; the justice insisted on his putting it on; he said they should cut his arms off before he would put that great coat on; I afterwards told the justice I was very well satisfied as to his person without it; then the prisoner said, to satisfy me he would put it on; he put it on; though I was sufficiently satisfied before, yet that made me exceedingly more satisfied afterwards.

For the prisoner.

RICHARD BOND sworn.

What I am subpoenated for, is to prove that he came on the 5th of June to New Prison and knocked at the gate; he wanted the key, I said you cannot get in Stewart, it is after the time of the bell ringing; why said he I should get in as a prisoner; there was a jew young fellow that I never saw before with him; he came in a coach; the prisoner told me he had been taken up for a footpad robbery, and had been examined before Mr. Wilmot; I asked him where the commitment was, he said he had none; I looked upon it that he was only in joke, so did the turnkey at the gate; I asked him where it was that he ran away from the constable; he said he got over the wall, and went from there to Whitechapel and got in a coach, and came down; I kept him in talk a good while; by and by one of our men who attends at Mr. Wilmot's office, and two men came

in search of him; I said he has been with me above an hour and half; I could hardly credit what he said, he told me that if the men that attend justice Wilmot's office came, they would find him at home; they went afterwards and found him at home.

ELIZABETH POYNTER sworn.

I lived servant at the Gun and Holly Bush in Cable-street, in the parish of St. George; the prisoner and his spouse were at my master's house on the 3d of June; the prisoner came in with some lobsters; he asked if he could have them dressed, my mistress said yes, and bid me get a sauce-pan to dress them.

How came you to remember the day? - Because the next day was the king's birth day, which made me take the more particular notice of it; he staid there from between seven and eight till half past twelve; I lit him out of bed then, I mean out of the street door then.

Court. Did he use to come to the house? - Very often, just to have a pint of beer, or such a thing.

How often in a week might he come there, four or five times? - Sometimes more, sometimes less, I never made any particular remark of that.

What can make you fix upon the 3d of June as the particular day more than any other? - Because the next day was his majesty's birth day.

Was he there the next day? - Yes, in the morning he was.

Did he use to sup at your house? - Not very commonly.

How came you to say it was seven o'clock? - Between seven and eight I cast my eye to the dial in the house to see when they would be boiled enough; that was a few minutes after he came into the house.

Was any body with him? - Nobody but his spouse.

They came together? - No, he came in first, she afterwards.

JANE PECKOVER sworn.

- Peckover. Mylord, that young woman that is now getting up to give evidence is my wife, I believe she has been persuaded to come up here; I make no doubt but she saw the young man at the time that she is going to speak; I desired her to have nothing to do with it, not say any thing about it; now she has gone and opened her mouth; and they have subpoenaed her upon this.

Court. Why would you persuade her not, if you believe she speaks truth.

Peckover (to his wife) If you do give evidence, I'll go home, and sell off all your goods.

To the witness. What is you name? - Jane Peckover ; I was afraid my husband should know of my coming here, and so I put my name down as Jane Bell , which was my maiden name.

Court. What are you? - I keep a chandler's-shop in Cable-Street.

What do you know of the prisoner? - The night the robbery is said to have been committed, I went to the Gun and Holly Bush to order a pint of beer; the prisoner sat there drinking a pint of beer; I had some pig's-face in a plate; the prisoner took a piece out and ate it; he asked me if I would stay to eat some lobsters that he was going to have for supper, the sauce-pan was on the fire at the time.

How long had you known the prisoner before? - A very little time, I never changed ten words before.

What time did you go there? - A little after ten o'clock.

How much after? - I cannot swear to a minute, it might be ten minutes after, or less.

Can you swear it was ten? - Yes, past ten o'clock.

What makes you say that? - I usually have my supper about ten; as soon as the clock struck ten I went to a shop just by, and bought a pig's face and went back.

You had no acquaintance with the prisoner? - No, I never had any conversation with him; I have seen him four or five times pass and repass.

How came you to offer him some of the pig's face? - Because he asked me what I had got.

How near is your house to this public house? - About five doors.

What day of the week was this? - Wednesday night.

Do you know the day of the month? -

The third of June.

How do you know that? - Because on the Friday he was taken up, and I recollected myself that it was but as the night before last.

Court to the prosecutor. When was he taken up? - On Friday the 5th of June.

Court to Bond. When did he come to you? - On Friday.

CHARLES COTTER sworn.

I was in the house when these gentlemen came and took him; they called for a pint of ale and asked him to drink; then they said, he must walk with them; he said, he was very agreeable; I went with him to Wilmot's; they had five people at the bar: this gentlemen came and looked at him as if he was to be the man pitched upon.

Did the prosecutor fix upon him? - No, Mr. Wade, the man that is here, pointed at him; the gentleman said, I believe that to be the man; I cannot swear to him; he had other clothes on; the prisoner said, if you think I am the man, I will send for all the clothes I have got. Mr. Wade went and brought all the clothes he had in a handkerchief.

Court. Did he bring the great coat? - I cannot say; I was not there upon the second examination.

For the Crown.

- WADE sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner the first and second time.

Where did you apprehend him? - The first time at the Gun and Holly Bush , the second time at his own house, where he lived, three or four doors beyond the Gun and Holly Bush . The first time I apprehended him he went with us to Mr. Wilmot's office; the gentleman was present; but he was examined while I went for the prisoner's clothes.

Did you find a great coat at his house? - I will not be positive, whether there was a great coat or no.

Was the prisoner pointed out in the public house? - I saw nothing of the kind.

Did you point at him? - I did not.

Are you certain of that? - I am positive of it.

Court to Mr. Bishop. Did any body point to the prisoner when you went to the public house? - No one went into the public house with me but Mr. Wilmot's clerk; he defired me to look at them; I said, it flurried me exceedingly, to see so many young fellows in such a predicament. I was flurried, and said, I could not take any notice then.

Court to Elizabeth Pointer . What time was he at your house the next morning? - Between eight and nine to the best of my knowledge, when he came in along with Wade.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

(The prosecutor humbly recommended the prisoner on account of his youth, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Reference Number: t17780715-5

517. ALEXANDER LEITH , Baronet , was indicted for stealing a mahogany dining-table, value 40 s. two other mahogany tables, value 4 l. one mahogany dressing-stand, value 40 s. one mahogany dressing-box, value 21 s. two mahogany clothes presses, value 7 l. one harpsichord, value 66 l. one mahogany breakfast-table, value 31 s. three mahogany knife-cases, value 52 s. twelve silver handle knives; value 11 l. twelve silver three-prong forks, value 25 l. thirty-five silver tablespoons, value 21 l. four silver candlesticks, value 20 l. one flat silver candlestick, value 3 l. two silver salt-sellars, value 20 s. two silver salt-spoons, value 6 s. two silver coffee-pots, value 14 l. one silver tea-urn, value 36 l. one silver argyle, value 3 l. one silver cross, value 6 l. one silver chafing-dish with a silver cover, lamp, and stand thereto belonging, value 20 l. four silver watches, value 10 l. one silver soup-spoon, value 34 s. one silver punch-ladle, value 17 s. one silver sugar-bason, value 50 s. one silver sugar-spoon, value 6 s. one silver cruet-stand with cruets therein, value 4 l. one silver handle bell, value 22 s. four silver bottle tickets, value 7 s. one silver punch-strainer, value 22 s. two hundred and forty-six printed books bound in leather, value 49 l. forty-four music-books, value 8 l. thirty-six ivory handled knives, value

40 s. thirty-six ivory handled forks, value 23 s. one ivory handled carving-knife, value 2 s. one ivory handled carving-fork, value 2 s. five pictures painted on canvass, value 15 l. and one oval looking-glass, value 25 s. the property of Benjamin Pope , Esq .

2d. Count. For stealing three geldings, value 70 l. the property of the said Benjamin Pope , Esq; April 30th.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

Mr. Bearcroft,

May it please your Lordship, and you Gentlemen of the Jury; I am of counsel for the prosecutor, against Sir Alexander Leith , who now stands at your bar charged with the offence of larceny, in stealing the several goods named in this indictment; among the rest three horses; these goods being the plate and furniture of a house laid to be the property of Benjamin Pope , Esq.

The circumstances of this case are somewhat particular, and they will require more than ordinary attention; but as it is a prosecution for felony, I shall content myself with stating the circumstances as I am instructed; they will be proved by the witnesses, with as much precision as possible, and then I shall state what I apprehend to be the law upon those circumstances, in which, if I am wrong, I shall receive correction from the Court.

Gentlemen, Sir Alexander Leith , in March last, was deeply in debt to Mr. Pope the prosecutor, to the amount (as stated to me) of 4000 l. It was agreed between Mr. Pope and Sir Alexander Leith , that Sir Alexander should sell to him the lease of his house which he then lived in, together with almost all the property he had in the house, and some other things, for a sum which was then due to Mr. Pope; and an additional sum was made up and paid to him at the time of his executing a bill of sale, and an assignment of the lease. It was agreed between Mr. Pope and Sir Alexander Leith , that an inventory should be taken of the goods, and the value set by a Mr. Watts; with which Watts, Mr. Pope had no connexion, but he was named on the part of Sir Alexander Leith.

This Watts made an inventory and appraisement of the goods; and on the 1st of April, in consideration of the sum of 3624 l. 13 s. (great part of which was made up by discharged judgements, which Sir Alexander Leith had given to Mr. Pope, and some annuities bought of him.) A bill of sale was executed by Sir Alexander Leith , on the 1st of April, for the goods in the house; and an assignment was executed of the lease of the house. After the execution of the assignment of the lease, Mr. Pope, and the men employed by him, were put in clear possession of the house and of the goods.

Gentlemen, if the question was merely concerning the property, as between Mr. Pope and Sir Alexander Leith , a bill of sale would be possession; but it is material to say in whom the possession was, in the case of larceny. Possession was delivered on the 1st of April of all the goods in the house; and thus described, Mr. Pope becomes intitled to the property of the house during that term; he likewise becomes intitled to every thing in the bill of sale. Sir Alexander agreed to quit; and as I understand, did quit the house; perhaps, one or two of the servants were permitted by Mr. Pope to remain in the house, which will make no difference, for b oth the property and possession of the goods were in the person of Mr. Pope. Mr. Watts, an acquaintance of Sir Alexander Leith , (who was nominated to set a price on the goods, and with whom as I before told you, Mr. Pope was entirely unacquainted) proposed to take of Mr. Pope this house ready furnished, as it was, for the term of two months, at a rate agreed between them. It is observable, that Mr. Watts, an upholsterer, should make this bargain for two months. Mr. Pope accordingly delivered over the house and the possession of the goods to Mr. Watts, the consequence of which was, which probably was the view in it, Watts lets Sir Alexander Leith return to the possession of these goods, Mr. Pope knowing nothing of the matter. Sir Alexander Leith continued in possession some time, at last he took upon him, without the knowledge of Mr. Pope, to remove three houses, and the goods mentioned in the indictment, and many more, to a place he had taken in Oxfordshire.

Gentlemen, the question will be under

these circumstances, whether Sir Alexander Leith has been guilty of a felony in that fact of taking the goods; it is true, by the agreement with Watts, he was in the possession of them; but with submission to the direction you will receive from the Court, I conceive, if you should be of opinion from the complexion of this business, that it was a contrivance between Sir Alexander Leith and Watts, to get them away without the leave of the owner, (for Mr. Pope, undoubtedly, was the owner of the goods.) It is a clear larceny if that was the intention, which it will be for you to judge.

Gentlemen, these goods, you will recollect, by Sir Alexander Leith 's agreement, were not his property; it will be for him to show that Mr. Pope had any knowledge of his removing them away.

Gentlemen, I will not conceal any fact from you; I have learned one since I came here, which I had not heard before; I have heard there was an action of usury brought by Sir Alexander Leith , prior to this charge. Whatever the motive is, that makes a man prosecute, if the facts are proved, it will be for you to consider the complexion of those facts, and if you should be of opinion that Mr. Pope would not have prosecuted, unless that action had been brought against him; still you will hear the facts and judge accordingly.

As to the facts, I don't know that they can be disputed; I shall prove them as I have already stated to you. I have learned, that it is said, on the part of Sir Alexander Leith , and insisted upon, that Mr. Pope agreed at the time of the sale of the goods to him, that Sir Alexander Leith should have any of the goods again at the appraised value that Watts had set upon them; but if there was in truth, an agreement of that kind, I am instructed it was in this way, that he should pay the money before hand. This is extremely probable, that a man, so much in debt as Sir Alexander Leith is, should not be permitted to take these goods away without paying for them. It this contrivance was between him and Watts to get the goods away, it will stand as it did before, and bear the same complexion.

Gentlemen, this is a case which requires to be stated minutely, and the law that arises upon it should be stated, that you may understand what the points are, and the evidence that is to be adduced to them.

This case was brought before Sir John Fielding ; he had his difficulties; at last he bound the prosecutor over to do what he is now doing, to bring the defendant to trial; but having his doubts about it, he admitted Sir Alexander Leith to bail.

Gentlemen, I say nothing about the rent, because that ought to make no alteration of the business. The real question is, what is the intention? If it was a fraudulent intention from the beginning; I conceive it makes out the charge of larceny.

JOHN COVEY sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Woolafter, an attorney. I attended at Sir Alexander Leith 's, in Newman-street, to see Sir Alexander execute a bill of sale of all his household furniture, and also, an assignment of the equity of redemption of his house. I saw it executed; he gave Mr. Pope a tea-chest, in the name of all the goods in the house. This is the assignment of the equity of redemption, (producing it;) there is a bill of sale, and an inventory of all the goods annexed. It was executed on the 1st of April. (It was read in court.)

Do you know the goods mentioned in the assignment? - No.

Court. Did you see any money paid? - No.

Cross Examination.

Do you know whether any body was put in possession by Mr. Pope? - I don't know.

RICHARD CARTER sworn.

Pray who are you? - Clerk to Mr. Watts.

Do you remember the transaction at Sir Alexander Leith 's house in April? - Something of it. I was in possession by a bill of sale for Mr. Pope.

Who put you in possession? - Mr. Pope. I beleive it was on the 4th of April, as near as I can recollect; I cannot be sure.

Do you know whether Sir Alexander did or did not quit the possession? - I cannot tell.

Do you know when he left the house? - No. I do not.

How long was you there? - Till the 13th of the same month, or thereabouts.

How soon after you was put in possession did Sir Alexander leave the house? - I cannot recollect, he was backwards and forwards at the house.

Was he backwards and forwards every day from the fourth to the thirteenth? - I cannot say, I believe he was away four or five days before.

Cross Examination.

He came when he chose? - Yes.

Were Sir Alexander's servants there? - Yes; all the time I was there.

All of them? - I cannot say that, he had some with him.

How many of his servants remained in the house? - I cannot say.

Did any servants that are called footmen remain in the house? - Yes.

How many? - One.

You was in possession from the fourth of April to the thirteenth; did Sir Alexander lie in the house from the fourth to the thirteenth? - I verily believe he did; I did not see him go to bed.

Counsel for the Prosecution.

Did Sir Alexander lie in the house the night you came in? - I believe he did.

The night after? - I believe he did.

The night after that? - I cannot say that.

Go on to the fourth day after you took possession, did he lie in the house that night? - I cannot say.

You are equally uncertain as to the fifth? Yes.

And on the sixth? - Yes.

Counsel for Sir Alexander Leith .

Among other servants there was a cook there? - While I was in possession there was a cook.

Who used to drink the champagne while you was there? - I was never in the cellar.

Were Sir Alexander's servants there? - Not that I know of.

Sir Alexander dined there occasionally with his lady? - Yes; both.

Who drew the liquor for them? - I don't know.

Who had the keys of the cellar? - Sometimes one servant, sometimes another; I never had them; the key's were got when the inventory was taken.

You had no keys? - I had none.

Court. You was put in by Mr. Pope? - Yes.

Court. Did Mr. Pope know that Sir Alexander Leith dined and lay there? - I imagine so; Mr. Pope came there every day, sometimes twice a day.

BENJAMIN POPE , Esq; sworn.

You are the person who bought these goods and took the assignment of this lease from Sir Alexander Leith ? - Yes.

And in consequence of this, the last witness was put in possession? - Yes.

After that you made some bargain with Mr. Watts about it? - I did.

You let this house ready furnished to Mr. Watts? - Yes, on the first of April.

The same day? - Yes, that is the agreement, (producing it.) [It was read in court.]

When you let it where was Sir Alexander Leith ? - In the house, he was present in the same room.

Was Mr. Watts an acquaintance of yours? - No.

Who was he recommended by? - Sir Alexander Leith , to make an appraisement of the household goods.

Positively you had no acquaintance before; you did not know the man perhaps? - No.

Do you know when Sir Alexander quitted the house? - He went away the 4th of April.

Did you give leave for Sir Alexander to stay any particular time? - Sir Alexander was to go out of town as I understood, and to take a house in the country to live in; he went away on the 4th of April.

Did your servants stay in the house? - Some of them did I believe.

This man was put in possession by you? - Yes.

You parted with the possession and let the whole of it on that very day to Mr. Watts? - Yes.

Did you ever learn afterwards that any of the goods were taken away? - I heard so towards the latter end of April, Joseph Hughes was in possession of the house; then I heard

that some of the goods were removing; that they were then packing up; I went to the house and protested against any goods being carried away. I went to Mr. Watts's and saw his servant that day, and protested against any of the goods being taken away.

Were the goods mentioned in the indictment and the three horses remov'd? - Yes.

Can you speak of the removal of any of these goods? - I did not see it.

Had he your consent to take away the goods? - Sir Alexander Leith sent to me that he should bring a gentleman to lay down the money for the horses and carriages, and some of the goods; I said any thing that he liked at an equitable price he should have.

What did you mean by an equitable price? - The price Watts set.

But first of all laying down the money? - Yes.

At the same price Mr. Watts put in the inventory? - Yes.

You mean the agreement was that he should have them at the same price that was put on them by Watts? - Yes, but the money was to be laid down first; the agreement was only verbal between Sir Alexander and me.

Upon your oath had you directly or indirectly given any consent to remove any of the goods, but upon the condition you have mentioned now? - No.

You say positively no? - Yes.

Cross Examination.

What are you Master Pope? - I live upon my fortune.

That may be, that is an answer commonly given at the Old Bailey; but I desire to know what means you take to make that fortune? - My fortune consists of leasehold and freehold estates and mortagages.

You carry on some trade? - No, no trade.

How long have you left off your old trade; what trade was you? - I was formerly a manufacturer of leather.

What is your present trade? - None at all.

Don't let us cavil about the word trade; its lending money to indigent people? - Only such borrow money.

What is your means of getting your living? - I have freehold and leasehold estates, and mortgages.

Where is your shop? - I have no shop at all.

I understand Sir Alexander Leith was recommended to you by a Mr. Teasdale, what was he? - Formerly a hatter.

Nothing else? - Only an acquaintance.

Was not he your agent and factor? - No, only an acquaintance.

So Teasdale during your intercourse with Sir Alexander Leith , stood in no connexion with you but a common acquaintance? - He has sometimes asked me to lend money to Sir Alexander Leith .

When he applied to you to lend money to Sir Alexander Leith , was it in consequence of an advertisement to invite Sir Alexander Leith and others to borrow money? - Teasdale has advertised, I did not.

Teasdale had no money of his own I believe to lend? - I don't know, I believe not.

He has been a bankrupt lately I believe? - I believe he has.

Where is his shop? - He lived in Suffolk street once, then in - street, Westminster.

You frequented the house in Suffolk street? - Sometimes.

What ten or eleven times in a week? - No, I did not.

How often? - Two or three times in a week sometimes.

Teasdale recommended you to several people besides Sir Alexander to borrow money of you? - Yes, but I never liked them, I discounted bills for them.

Teasdale then was the person who recommended you to Sir Alexander Leith ? - Yes.

In consequence of this recommendation you was very charitable, and lent him a great deal of money? - Yes.

There are actions of usury against you by Sir Alexander Leith ? - One I believe.

That is for a stout sum; 3610 l. I believe was the sum borrowed. Now you let this house then to Watts in the presence of Sir Alexander on the fourth of April? - On the first of April.

Sir Alexander was present? - I believe he was present at the time.

When was Watts to come into possession? - Directly.

Then you had nothing to do with the possession after that first of April? - I looked upon it I had nothing to do with it till Watts's time was expired.

You had nothing to do in the house? - With regard to the goods I thought they were my property.

We will speak to the property afterwards; you had nothing to do with the goods from the first of April, I mean as to the possession? - I gave Watts possession of the goods, upon the terms of the agreement.

And the possession of the house likewise? - Yes.

What do you mean by saying that Sir Alexander quitted possession on the 4th of April? - I said he went out of town on the fourth.

When you had let this house to Watts on the first of April, it was agreed was it not, that Sir Alexander Leith should rent it of Watts? - There was such a thing mentioned, I made no agreement.

You had let it to Watts, was there not an agreement that Sir Alexander should rent under Watts? - I heard something of it mentioned.

Was you present? - I think I was.

Are not you sure you was there? - I cannot be sure.

Then how came you to think of it? - I had some notion that it was mentioned.

Part of the conversation was, that Sir Alexander should be the tenant of Watts from that moment, was it not? - I cannot positively speak of that.

Was it not understood between you all three, that Sir Alexander Leith was to continue in the possession of it? - There was no positive understanding of it.

Court. Did you understand it so? - Yes; I did.

Among the rest of the good things left there I find there was wine left, that was let to Watts too was it not? - Watts had the key of the wine cellars on the fourth of April.

Why? - Because I thought he had a right to the whole of it.

But he only rented the wine, he could not touch it, for he could not draw a cork of the wine for that would spoil it, the Champagne particularly. When you had let this to Watts on the first of April, it was understood that Watts was to let it to Sir Alexander Leith ; what did you mean by Sir Alexander's quitting upon the fourth of April? - He went out of town upon the fourth of April.

How long have you quitted-the possession of your house? - From seven o'clock this morning.

Now we understand the terms of quitting as you quitted your house at Seven o'clock this morning, so Sir Alexander Leith quitted his on the fourth of April; Sir Alexander's servants remained there, did they not? - I think they did.

Towards the latter end of April you say you heard that the goods were taking away, and went and protested against it; at what time of day did you go? - In the morning after breakfast.

What did you see then? - I saw a waggon at the door.

Loading with some of the goods? - I did not see them loading.

Had they begun loading? - I believe not.

What time was that? - After breakfast, about ten in the morning, I staid about half an hour.

What did you do? - I protested against it.

You protested and they protested, and continued loading the waggon? - I did not see the waggon loaded.

You staid there half an hour, did they continue packing up the goods, or loading, or whatever, they were about? - I saw two of Watts's men as they told me they were; I saw them taking down some pictures.

And they continued doing the same, though you protested against it? - I believe they did.

Did you go again? - No; I got Mr. - to write a letter to Mr. Watts.

You went there no more for the course of that day? - I did not.

Did you ask any body if there was an inventory taken of the goods they were taking away? - I don't know that I did; I believe I did not.

Upon your oath you believe you did not ask for an inventory? - I only talked to

Joe Hughes , but not about an inventory.

Was there any mention at all made of an inventory? - I don't know that there was.

You don't remember upon your oath any talk about an inventory? - I don't know.

Will you swear there was not? - I cannot positively.

You knew this was a felony; did not you say is there an inventory taken of the goods? - I did not say so to the best of my memory; I did not say so.

You do swear that you did not say so; that you did not ask if there was an inventory of the goods taking away? - I did not.

You swear there was no mention made about an inventory? - I don't remember any thing about it.

Do you swear that there was no inventory talked of? - I don't remember that there was.

I will help you to particulars; you asked Hughes, whether Lady Leith had taken an inventory of the goods that were taken away; you were told she had; that Hughes told you he had assisted the cook in making out the kitchen inventory? - I don't remember any such thing; there was no mention of an inventory to me as I remember.

In your hearing was there any mention at all of an inventory; speak the truth for once, for the novelty sake; will you tell me whether there was any mention at all of an inventory? - I will swear to the best of my remembrance.

It is a material fact; I am instructed that you asked whether Lady Leith had taken an inventory of the goods; that Hughes said she had; and he had assisted the cook in making out an inventory of the kitchen furniture; if such a thing passed you could not have forgot it? - To the best of my remembrance there was no mention made of an inventory; not by Hughes as I know of.

Not by any body? - No; not by any body that I know of. I did not speak to any body else.

Sir Alexander Leith told you he would bring a gentleman to lay down the money; as the agreement was that he might have any thing at an equitable appraisement; when was that? - On the first of April.

Was Watts present? - I believe he was

Is he here? - I don't know.

What was the expression that was made use of; that he might take any thing at an equitable price? - Yes; that was the world.

By an equitable price, you mean the price you agreed to buy at? - Yes.

Among other things there was a picture of St. Caecilia by Raphael? - Yes.

I believe the value Sir Alexander Leith set on that was 2000 l.? - Yes, I heard that.

What price was set on that to you? - I believe there was no price set in the inventory.

What was you to give for it? - I believe I was to give 100 l. for it.

Then there was 1900 l. difference between your price and the equitable price; did you mean an equitable price, or prime cost? - Prime cost.

But you said at an equitable price, now the equitable price was 2000 l. So that the picture you gave 100 l. for he was to have again for 2000 l.? - No; I heard that it cost twenty two guineas.

When did Sir Alexander file a bill in Chancery against you? - In last June.

What time? - I believe about the 6th.

When was you served with the subpoena? - I believe the beginning of June.

Was it May or June? - I don't know; I believe the beginning of June.

When was you served with a copy of a writ in the usury cause? - I don't know.

Guess as to the day? - I don't know when it was, I believe in June.

How long was it before you cooked up this famous prosecution? - I did not cook it up; I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and informed him my goods were taken away.

When? - I believe the beginning of June.

Was it not after you was served with a copy of a writ in the usury cause? - I cannot tell that.

Yes you can and must. - I don't know the dates of either.

You can remember whether you commenced this prosecution before or after Sir Alexander Leith attacked you? - I cannot recollect, it might be afterwards; I cannot recollect.

Court, That is a question within your

own knowledge; you must know it. - I don't remember it, I cannot recollect.

You cannot forget who began the attack, Sir Alexander Leith or you; did Sir Alexander attack you in the civilsuit and the chancerysuit, or did you attack him first; you must know whether it was before or after? - I cannot recollect when, upon my oath.

I don't ask you to recollect the time; I ask you which was first, who struck the first blow, you or Sir Alexander? - I believe the bill in Chancery was first.

Was not the usury cause before the subpoena in Chancery? - I don't know which was first, I gave them both to the attorney.

You was served with them at your house near Black-Friars Bridge? - Yes.

These goods were removed the 28th of April: this felony, this curious robbery of your property was committed on the 28th of April; you was there and saw it doing and protested against it: now when did you commence your prosecution and make the charge? - I went to Sir John Fielding 's in June; I was informed Mr. Watts's time must be expired before I brought the charge, and it did not expire till the first of June; I said I would wait till the first of June, because Watts had promised to replace the goods again.

Court. I wish you would deliberately answer the question, whether you did or did not think of this prosecution before you was served with the writ? - I believe I thought of it; but did not go to Sir John Fielding 's.

How came you to keep Carter in possession after the 1st of April; if Watts had a right to all, why did you keep Carter in possession all the time? - Carter was Watts's servant, but put in possession by me.

You let the furniture, and even the wine in the cellar to Watts on the 1st, and on the 4th you put Carter in possession? - Yes; least any execution should come into the house.

Carter was to keep possession for you? - Yes.

And yet you had put Watts in possession. There is no man in the world I have so good an opinion of as I have of you, and when you swear that two and two make five; I don't doubt you; now you say, two and two make twice five. You say you let it on the 1st. of April to Watts, and on the 4th you put Carter in possession for you; that you was in possession and not Watts? - I was the proprietor of the goods, and Watts was in possession.

Carter was in possession for Watts then? - No, for me I understood.

You say Carter was in possession for you? - He was in possession to protect the goods from any execution that might be brought against them.

He was in possession then to swear upon occasion. You was to quit possession to Watts; but Carter, Watts's servant, was to be put in possession for you, to make the world believe you was in possession? - With my consent and Carter's, Sir Alexander was suffered to stay. Carter was in possession for fear of an execution.

An execution against whom, against these goods as Sir Alexander Leith 's? - Yes.

Would not Watts being in possession protect them from an execution? - He was not the proprietor of the goods.

Counsel for the Prosecution.

An execution took away some of the goods, but those mentioned in the indictment were left and taken away by Sir Alexander? - Yes.

Court. The horses stood in the same situation with the rest of the goods? - Yes.

Look at that paper? - (showing a paper to the witness.) That is my hand writing.

JOSEPH HUGHES sworn.

Are you a sheriff's officer? - No.

You was put in possession by an execution? - Yes, at the suit of Francis Rybott , at Sir Alexander Leith 's in Newman-street, the 9th of April.

That execution was satisfied? - Yes, the sheriff made a bill of sale upon it.

Were any pictures taken? - Yes, several pictures.

Was there any goods removed while you was there? - Yes, into Oxfordshire; the orders were sent to me from Mr. Mills the officer to let them go.

Who ordered them to go to Oxfordshire? - I don't know.

Who packed them up? - Mr. Watts's men, I believe; I was informed so.

Cross Examination.

The goods that went to Oxfordshire went towards the end of April? - Yes.

How long was the waggon at the door to take them away? - Best part of the day.

Did you see Mr. Pope there? - Yes.

Did he stay a good while? - No, he came in and went away again.

Did he see them putting into the waggon? - I don't know; he saw them packing up.

The waggon was at the door from three in the morning till three or four in the afternoon, I believe? - Till about four in the afternoon.

Nothing could be more public? - It was public enough.

The horses came round to the door? - I cannot say I remember that.

The coach horses were gone before the waggon? - Yes, I believe a week before.

Did they go by your master's orders? - No, I believe not.

They were under your master's execution? - Yes, I believe they were.

Mr. Pope was there when they were packing them up; and Mr. Watt's men packed them up you say? - I don't know the men; I believe they were Mr. Watt's men; there were three of them.

Did Mr. Pope ask you if Lady Leith had made an inventory of the things? - I don't know; Mr. Pope was not there.

Do you remember telling Mr. Pope that you assisted the cook in making the kitchen inventory? - I did, that was after the goods were gone.

Was he not told at that time, that Lady Leith had taken an inventory? - He asked me if I could tell what was gone, I said I did not know; I believed Lady Leith had taken an inventory of the rest; I was informed so by the servants.

And that you told to Pope? - Yes.

Was that the same day? - No, a day or two afterwards; Mr. Pope asked me if I knew what was gone; I said I did not; that I helped to take an inventory of the kitchen furniture, and I believed Lady Leith had taken an inventory of the rest.

Did Mr. Pope say any thing to that? - He did not say any thing in particular to me.

Counsel for the prosecution.

At the time the goods were moved, there was not a word said about the inventory? - No, not that I know.

To Mr. Pope. Do you recollect this now? - No, I do not.

Do you contradict him? - No.

Court. Don't you recollect it the least in the world? - No.

Court. Did you never ask about any account being taken or inventory? - No.

Counsel for Sir Alexander Leith .

I forgot to ask you Mr. Pope, did not you think it would be a convenient way of putting an end to the suit in Chancery, if Sir Alexander Leith was convicted on this occasion; did that never occur to you? - Yes, I have thought of it.

Court. Mr. Bearcroft, How can you make this a felony?

Mr. Bearcroft. I don't myself think, that when the question is asked me, it becomes me to say it is a felony.

Court. There never was a more scandalous prosecution carried on in a court of justice. If this gentleman had been convicted, he would have been liable to be hanged; now you hear from the prosecutor himself, that he never thought of this prosecution till after the bill in Chancery was brought against him, and an action for usury. It was agreed upon, that Sir Alexander should have any part of the goods at an equitable price; and it appears, that a regular inventory was taken; and now the prosecutor confesses, that it occured to him, that if he convicted this gentleman, there would be an end to the action in Chancery.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Mr. Serjeant Davy. I have the honour to appear at your Lordships bar, on behalf of a gentleman of great consideration and much reputation; a gentleman unfortunate in being connected with this infamous man the prosecutor; the least I can do, in order to bring this delinquent to justice, is to desire a copy of the indictment.

Mr. Bearcroft. My lord, after having so

candidly stopped in the prosecution, upon my word, I think it is too much for them to ask a copy of the indictment. Mr. Pope applied to a justice of peace upon the circumstances of the case, and the justice was of opinion it was a felony. The property, most undoubtedly, is Mr. Pope's. He lays the case before a justice; the justice has a doubt; he admits him to bail, and binds over Mr. Pope to prosecute.

Counsel for Sir Alexander Leith .

Mr. Pope appeared before the justice with counsel.

Mr. Silvester. I attended the justice as counsel for Mr. Pope. I pressed nothing against Sir Alexander Leith , nor did I object to the insufficiency of the bail. The justice of peace in the county, who is a man eminent in the profession of the law, was of opinion it was a felony, and therefore granted a search warrant, to search Sir Alexander's house. Sir John Fielding , before whom I attended, was of the same opinion, and therefore bound Mr. Pope over to prosecute. Mr. Pope was willing to accept of any bail.

Mr. Bearcroft. The gentlemen have asked for a means of obtaining a satisfaction; they have irons enough in the fire already; they have a bill in Chancery, and three actions for usury:

Mr. Justice Buller. I would not have stopped you in going on, if there had been the least colour for the prosecution. Nor could a thousand witnesses if you could call them, vary the case. Here it stands confessed, that the prisoner brought this indictment from principles of malice; for he says, that he thought the conviction of Sir Alexander Leith , would put an end to the bill in Chancery; upon that ground, I think we cannot with-hold a copy of the indictment.

Mr. Justice Nares. If the opinion of a justice of peace was to be a bar to any remedy, there might be the most villainous prosecutions carried on with impunity. I presume in this, as in every other instance, the justice of peace acted fairly, according to the facts before him. What was in the private knowledge of the prosecutor, and what he concealed from the justice is not before the court. I never saw a case in my life where there was so little colour, or pretence, to make it a criminal prosecution. I think there never was an instance where a court ought more to interfere, and grant a copy of the indictment.

(A copy of the indictment was granted.)

Reference Number: t17780715-6

518, 519. SARAH GODDARD and ELIZABETH COCKWINE , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Lovelace , on the 5th of June , between the hours of one and three in the afternoon; (no person being in the said dwelling-house), and stealing a cloth coat, value 30 s. a cloth waistcoat, value, 10 s. a pair of corderoy breeches, value 8 s. three wire caps, value 20 s. three lace caps, value 2 s. two linen gowns, value 35 s. a white corded dimity petticoat, value 10 s. a muslin apron, value 8 s. a lawn apron, value 4 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a pair of women's stuff shoes, value 4 s. twelve childrens diaper clouts, value 14 s. seven childrens linen shirts trimmed with lace, value 6 s. a child's white cotton jam, value 10 s. a child's linen jam, value 4 s. a child's white dimity petticoat, value 3 s. a child's printed linen petticoat, value 3 s. seven childrens linen caps, trimmed with lace, value 5 s. two childrens linen bed-gowns, value 4 s. a woollen blanket, value 18 d. a yard and half of flannel, value 18 d. a pair of white cotton stockings, value 2 s. three links of silver sleeve buttons, set with stones, value 2 s. a pair of woman's cotton gloves, value 18 d. a pair of woman's linen shift sleeves, value 18 d. four linen half handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and two linen pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of the said Joseph in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH LOVELACE sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live in St. Luke's parish. I went out to work on the 5th of June; my wife went out at the same time to speak to a nurse, as she was near her time of lying in; we went out together, but my wife fastened the door. This sleeve button (producing it) I saw in Sarah Goddard 's sleeve; I saw her drop it, and took it up; it was stolen out of my house.

- Lovelace. I am the wife of the last witness; I came home before my husband; I found the door broke open; I lost all the

things mentioned in the indictment ( repeating them); I took this half handkerchief (producing it) off Elizabeth Cockwine 's neck.

ELIZABETH POWELL sworn.

I know the prisoner, though I have seen her but once before. About two o'clock on the 5th of June I saw Sarah Goddard come out of Lovelace's house; I am certain as to the day, because it was the day after the King's birth-day; I saw that she had something in her apron; what made me take notice of her was, that she spoke to me as she went through the place I live in. I had a child in my arms; she asked me, whether it was my child; I recollected having seen her and Goddard the night the robbery was committed; but I said nothing of it then, because I did not hear at what time Mrs. Lovelace went out of the house; but hearing next day that she went out about nine in the morning, and knowing that it was after that time that I saw her come out of the house; I discovered to Mrs. Lovelace that I had seen her there.

From the Prisoner. Whether you did not say that I had a black crape gown on? - I did say so; she had a black crape gown on, and a silk bonnet with green ribband.

MARY PITCHER sworn.

I live near Mrs. Lovelace's; I saw the two prisoners on the 5th of June; I am sure that was the day, because I am sure that was the day, and because I went to my place that day; they asked me whether there were any lodgings thereabouts to be let: after that they went to the Tabernacle-walk, near to where Lovelace lives; they returned in about half an hour after; they had then each of them a bundle under their arms. I am certain they had neither of them a bundle when they spoke to me.

GODDARD's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of what the gentleman has said; Phillip Gosset brought a button up; the two women said they did not know either of us, but the woman in the green hat.

To Lovelace. Is that true? - They neither of them said a word to me of that.

( Elizabeth Powell and Mary Pitcher both declared, that they said directly contrary to what had been asserted by the prisoner.)

COCKWINE's DEFENCE.

I bought the handkerchief in Rag-Fair for 3 d. and I gave a shilling for this cap which I have on at the same time.

(Goddard called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

Both Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-7

520. ELIZABETH JONES , was indicted for stealing eight silk handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the property of Sainsbury Sibley , July 11th .

HANNAH SIBLEY sworn.

I am the wife of Sainsbury Sibley, who is a haberdasher . On Saturday the 11th of July, between six and seven in the morning, I was called down stairs by our journeyman; he told me the prisoner had stole some handkerchiefs; I took her up into the kitchen; I untied her cloak, which fell backwards into the chair; and the handkerchiefs mentioned in the indictment were in the cloak. The prisoner immediately fell on her knees, and begged I would let her go.

(The handkerchiefs were produced in court, and deposed to by Mrs. Sibley.)

BENJAMIN SMITH sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Sibley; the prisoner and another person came to the shop last Saturday morning, and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs for a man's neck; they fixed upon one at 4 s. and 4 d. I went to give them change; as I stooped to give them change, I perceived some handkerchiefs under the prisoner's cloak; I stopped the prisoner, and called my mistress.

CHRISTIANA HARDY sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Sibley. My mistress called me; I went into the kitchen, and saw the prisoner on her knees to my mistress; I saw the cloak in the chair, and the handkerchiefs in the cloak.

STEPHEN ELSTON sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; I was taking down the shop shutters; I perceived a piece of handkerchiefs under the prisoner's clothes upon the ground; the prisoner and

the woman, who was with her, were talking about paying for what they had bargained for; I saw the prisoner put her hand through her pocket-hole, and draw up the handkerchiefs from the ground.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As they have all spoke so hard against me; I have nothing to say to any of them; I shall leave it to the mercy of the court to be as favourable as they can.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-8

521. JOHN WIGMORE was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Edward Edwards , June 8th .

EDWARD EDWARDS sworn.

I was buying some peas in the Fleet-market on the 18th of June; I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket; I turned, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; he was going to put it into his pocket. I secured him, and delivered him and the handkerchief to the constable. I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief behind him, and I took it up.

WILLIAM MARTIN sworn.

I am a constable; I received the prisoner and the handkerchief from the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going home, they laid hold of me; this gentleman said I had picked his pocket; I never touched his pocket; I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-9

522. ELISABETH MUNROE was indicted for stealing a pair of striped muslin ruffles, value 5 s. four yards and a half of silk ribband, value 3 s. a piece of blond lace, value 6 s. a worked muslin apron, value 4 s. a remnant of flowered book muslin, value 2 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. and 6 d. and a child's linen shirt, value 1 s. the property of Nathaniel Jones , Esq . Andrew Hudleston , Esq . John Lloyd , Esq . William Jones , Esq . and William Morgan , Gent. June 4th .

2d Count. Laying them to be the property of James Cockran .

3d Count. Laying them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

[There was not any evidence given.]

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-10

523. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing a woollen hammer cloth for a coach, value 10 s. the property of William Mansfield , Esq . June 12th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-11

524. JOHN BEAUMONT JAMES was indicted for stealing twenty-four pounds weight of brass, value 20 s. the property of Charles Samers , July 2d .

CHARLES SAMERS sworn.

The prisoner was my servant about five years; he was in my service when he was taken up; I have lost brass several times to a considerable amount; I saw an advertisement

of some brass being stopped by Mr. Porter, supposed to be stolen.

JOHN PORTER sworn.

On the 18th of June, Michael Jacobs , a Jew, came to my house, and offered twenty-four pounds of metal for sale; I asked the price of it; he said six pence a pound; he said he had it of a Mr. James; I stopped it, and bid him fetch Mr. James; I afterwards delivered it to Mr. Payne.

MICHAEL JACOBS sworn.

I saw the prisoner standing at a door in Field-lane; he asked me if I would buy some brass; he showed me the brass; I said I did not know the value of it; he gave me a sample, and I took it to Mr. Porter's; Mr. Porter was not at home; I showed it to his man; he said it was worth six pence a pound; I went the next day and bought it of the prisoner's wife at four pence a pound, and carried it to Mr. Porter, who stopped it.

Prosecutor. The prisoner lived with his wife in Field-lane.

[ William Payne , the constable, produced the brass in court.]

Prosecutor. Some of the brass is rough, and some of it is weights finished, with the initials of my name upon them; I have no doubt but the whole of the brass is mine; it is just the quantity that I have missed out of my Compting-house since February; the prisoner has five children; I never suspected him before.

[The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called several witnesses who gave him a good character.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-12

525. MARTHA HUTCHINSON was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. a stuff curtain, value 10 d. and a copper sauce pan, value 2 s. the property of John Mickson , the said goods being in a lodging room, let by contract by the said John to the said Martha , June 13 .

JOHN MICKSON sworn.

I keep a public-house ; I let a room to the prisoner ready furnished. On the 13th of June, I saw the the prisoner at my tap drinking the beer; I told her to provide herself a lodging, for she should stay no longer in my house; I asked her for the key; she said her husband, who was a gardener at Greenwich, had the key; I waited till Thursday, and then she said her husband had it, and might keep it as long as he pleased; I shoved open the door, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I pawned the things; I would have fetched them out, but he would not take them without the rent, which I could not accomplish then.

GUILTY B. and IMP. 1 month .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-13

526, 527. MARY the wife of WILLIAM HIDE , and MARY the wife of WILLIAM HICKS , were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Marsh .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-14

528. ROBERT RYDER was indicted for stealing a cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. and a linen cap, value 1 d. the property of Anne Shury , spinister , a hair trunk, value 5 s. a gold locket set with crystal, value 7 s. three silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. four dimitty petticoats, value 12 s. four flannel petticoats, value 4 s. a dimitty jacket and petticoat, trimmed with muslin, value 40 s. four lawn frocks, value 40 s. two muslin frocks, value 20 s. three linen gowns, value 14 s. five linen pin-cloths, value 5 s. two linen shifts, value 3 s. a pair of linen shift sleeves, value 12 d. four linen towels, value 18 d. a child's stay and petticoat, value 4 s. four linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two linen pockets, value 6 d. three linen caps, value 2 s. four muslin tuckers, value 6 d. and a pair of linen gloves, value 6 d. the property of Richard Palmer , in his dwelling-house , June 27th .

RICHARD PALMER sworn.

About seven in the morning on the 27th of June, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, out of a one pair of stairs room; some were taken out of a trunk.

DANIEL JEWERS sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief as I was in the parlour; I threw myself out of the window; secured the prisoner, and brought him back to Mr. Palmer's; he had a bag and hair trunk with him which Mr. Palmer secured.

ANNE SURY sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; my master lost these things; I am sure they were all in the house not half an hour before they were missed; I was in the kitchen; I saw through the window a boy pass by with a bag on his back, and the trunk in his hand; I asked him what he wanted; he returned back and said he wanted one Mr. Williamson; I said there is no such person here; he directly flung the bag down and said, d - n you I am off, and ran away; I cried out, stop thief! and he was soon after taken, and was charged with this; he at first denied knowing any thing of the matter; but on the Monday following, he said he had done it by mistake, for he had gone into this house instead of going into his uncle's.

From the prisoner. Did not you see me pick it up and bring it into the house? - No; for I saw him pass by the window with the bag upon his back, and the hair trunk: the hair trunk had a handle upon the top of it by which he held it.

[The things were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming down Red Lyon street, I saw a man coming out of the gentleman's house with these things, and several other bundles under his arm; he dropped these two; I picked them up and threw them into the passage and run after the man; that gentleman got hold of me, and said I was the person he believed; they took me into custody and sent me to gaol; I did not expect my trial to come on till to morrow, or my friends would have been here.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-15

529. EDWARD HARROLD was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 4 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. a pair of thread stockings, value 6 d. two linen shirts, value 2 s. two linen stocks, value 6 d. two guineas, and a half guinea, the property of William Haines , in the dwelling house of John Thompson , July 8th .

WILLIAM HAINES sworn.

Last Wednesday was sen'night my clothes and two guineas and a half were taken from my lodging between four and eight in the evening; I saw them in the morning; my money was in my breeches pocket; I left the room locked up; the goods were found pledged in Drury lane.

THOMAS BROWN sworn.

The coat and waistcoat were pledged at my house by the prisoner for 2 s. on last Wednesday night, he brought a shirt; I asked him where he got the coat and waistcoat, he said he brought them for a young man; when he saw I scrupled him he ran away; I pursued him and secured him; he struck me and abused me very grosly.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the clothes of a man in Stanhope-street; I pawned them to make up the money to pay for them; I have no witnesses; I did not get any, because it would be very prejudicial both to my character and my business.

Guilty of stealing the coat and waistcoat to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-16

530. JANE BERRYMAN was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. a linen bed gown, value 4 s. a pair of pattens, value 3 d. a flat iron, value 4 d. a canvas bag, value 4 d. a linen apron, value 4 d. a tin tea kettle, value 12 d. and a China bason, value 4 d. the property of James Anderson , June 12 .

ANNE ANDERSON sworn.

I lost the things mentioned in the indictment from my lodgings; I went out and left

the prisoner some work to do; for I had employed her some time at seven shillings a week, and gave her her meat and lodging; I locked up the room that she had no business in and came away; she worked for me on regimental clothes; I found the door of that room open and the things gone; I charged her with taking them.

CHARLES RICHARDS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Drury-lane; the prisoner pawned these things with me (producing them). She had used my shop eleven months.

Prosecutrix. When I first charged her with it she denied it; she afterwards said she pawned them, but hoped before the end of the week she should redeem them again.

MARY TOWNSEND sworn.

I went out with Mrs. Anderson; she locked the room door when she went out; when she returned she found it open. (The goods were deposed to by the Prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I pawned them; but intended to redeem them, and give them to her again.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-17

531. THOMAS BAYLISS was indicted for stealing one hundred iron keys, value 3 s. eighteen iron locks, value 4 s. two iron door fastenings, value 6 d. four iron latches, value 6 d. four brass locks, value 2 s. two iron bolts, value 2 d. a brass door plate, value 2 d. a brass striking plate, value 1 d. three iron padlocks, value 3 d. a pair of iron hinges, value 3 d. an iron handvice, value 1 d. a pair of iron compasses, value 2 d. two steel screw plates, value 6 d. a steel saw, value 6 d. a steel drawing knife with two wooden handles, value 3 d. and an iron draw board pin with a wooden handle, value 2 d. the property of Thomas Thornton , June 23d .

THOMAS THORNTON sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; he neglected my business; I gave him warning to quit my service, which he did a fortnight before Whitsuntide; he said he had taken a room to do jobs for himself, and asked me to employ him in the lock way; I went with a job to him; and as I came out I saw a remarkable lock of mine lying on the outside of the door exposed to sale; I went home, looked in my garret, and missed a great number of things; I went with a neighbour to the prisoner's about three o'clock, he was not at home; I looked round the shop and saw a great number of my things; we took no notice to his wife, but went to meet him. I met him and told him I was sorry to find him such a man as he was; that I had found a great many things of mine in his house. He said he took the locks to repair; and when he had repaired them he meant to return them. I asked him if I had ever given him them to repair; he then said no; that he was very sorry for it, and hoped I would forgive him.

John Wells who went with the Prosecutor confirmed his testimony.

Thomas Hinde produced the goods in court, which were deposed to by the Prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had them in my possession when I went away; I took them to finish.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-18

532. JOHN MEADOWS was indicted for that he in the King's highway upon Anne Maxwell , widow , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a silk purse, value 1 s. and two guineas in monies, numbered , the property of the said Anne, July 10th .

Mrs. ANNE MAXWELL sworn.

I was robbed on Friday last, at about ten minutes before twelve o'clock in the forenoon, on Finchley Common , as I was going in a chaise to Southgate, in company with Miss Masters. I saw the prisoner for some time before he stopped the chaise; he rode past the chaise and then turned back again; he put a pistol near to me and bid me deliver my money and my watch.

Did he use any threats? - No, he only bid us deliver our money. I gave him a silk

purse with about two guineas in it; I don't know that there was any thing else; when I gave him my money he demanded my watch; I said I had none; he said no more to me; he spoke to us in general; he said, ladies deliver your purses, your money, and your watches; as soon as he had got the money from me and Miss Masters he rode off.

From the prisoner. What do you know me by? - By his clothes, his face and his size.

Are you certain as to his face? - To the best of my knowledge I am.

Have you any doubt of it? - None.

Did you before he came up to you observe his horse? - We did not think that he was a highwayman; we saw him for ten minutes; he walked his horse across the fields very gently.

What coloured horse was he upon? - A sorrel I think; he was not well mounted.

Was it a stout horse? - I think not.

Miss SOPHIA MASTERS sworn.

I was in the chaise with Mrs. Maxwell last Friday.

When did you first perceive the prisoner? - Ten minutes before twelve; he was then coming across the heath. When he came up to the chaise, he demanded our money; I gave him all that I had loose in my pocket, which was three guineas and some silver.

Court. You need not mention that now. Did he demand Mrs. Maxwell's money? - Yes; and I saw Mrs. Maxwell give him her money.

Are you certain as to the person of the prisoner? - I am.

From the prisoner. Whether you did not say at Sir John Fielding 's that you did not see my face. - I did not say so; I saw his person a great while before he came up to us.

Court. Did you see his face? - I saw his whole person.

Did you see his face as well as the rest of his person? - I did.

Prisoner. All the witnesses said they believed me to be the person by my clothes; I brought a person before the justice to prove that I fetched the clothes I have on out of pawn on the Tuesday following.

To Mrs. Maxwell. What clothes had the man on who robbed you. - The clothes the prisoner has on now are the same he had on when he robbed us.

Miss Masters. He has the same clothes on now that he had then.

Did you see any pistol? - I did; it was not held to me; he came to Mrs. Maxwell's side of the carriage.

JOHN FISHER sworn.

I drive a job sometimes, and sometimes a chaise; I drove Mrs. Maxwell and Miss Masters on Friday last.

Did you see the prisoner? - I am pretty certain I saw him at a distance.

Where did you see him first? - On the high road going to Coney Hatch and to Hendon; I perceived him about a mile before me, then he turned across the common; I thought him to be a gentleman riding there to ease his horses feet, so I took little notice of him; he came within a little distance of the chaise, passed it and turned about again and called to me; I could not perfectly understand the words he said; I looked behind me and saw a pistol held out by him towards me, and he called stop; I pulled my horses up immediately; then he went up to the chaise and demanded the ladies money; I heard the money chink; I heard him demand their watches; the ladies said they had none; then he bid me go on.

Look at the prisoner; are you certain that is the man? - I am, as near as possibly I can recollect.

Have you any doubt about it? - None.

What coloured clothes had he on? - The same coloured coat that he has on now.

What was the colour of his horse? - A chesnut horse with a white face; it was a smallish size.

- CARPENTER sworn.

I am an officer, belonging to Sir John Fielding ; upon an information being given at Sir John Fielding's office by these ladies of their having been robbed; I was sent to apprehend the prisoner; I took him in Castle-street, Long-Acre; Mrs. Jones, at whose house he was, said at first, that no such man lodged in her house; but the next door neighbour told us that he lodged up one pair of

stairs along with a girl of the town; when we offered to go up stairs, Mrs. Jones catched hold of us, and said there was no such man; we forced into the house and went up stairs; the prisoner had run up stairs; the girl he had been with ran into another room adjoining, in her smock; in searching the prisoner's room, I found this (producing a pocket pistol) upon the bed's head; it was not charged.

To Mrs. Maxwell. What sort of a pistol was it that was presented to you? - I did not take particular notice; I took him to Sir John Fielding 's.

Was any thing said there? - He said, he fetched his clothes out of pawn the day before.

One of the Jury. I think you said he took every method to run away? - Yes; he ran out of the room; I found him immediately; I saw when I got into the room that two people had lain in the bed.

Had he the same clothes on when you took him that he has now? - Yes, he had.

Did you make any enquiry about the horse? - We found where he had had horses at different times; and with the pistol I found a ticket of a turnpike on that road, of the day this robbery was committed; that ticket was examined at the turnpike.

Where is that ticket? - It was produced before Sir John Fielding ; but Jealous has that now, and he is gone to Guildford; he was sent for last night to look at a prisoner there and he forgot to leave it; he will be in town this morning.

Court. Then you must not mention any thing about the ticket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the robbery; I have a person here to prove that I was at her house at the time.

For the Prisoner.

SARAH YOUNG sworn.

The prisoner came to my house for a clean shirt, rather before eleven than after. on last Friday. I live in Queen's-head-Court in the Strand, opposite the Adelphi; he came rather before eleven than after; he stayed in our house playing with my little girl till half past twelve; I believe, he did not go away till near one; he had on a nankeen waistcoat and breeches.

Is that a nankeen waistcoat that he has on now? - No, these are not the clothes he had on then that I am positive of; the waistcoat and breeches were new nankeen. He was at my house again about six and stayed there till eight; he came again that night and stayed at our house with my little girl and me till twelve o'clock at night.

What was he doing at your house all this time? - He drank tea, and played about with my little girl and went into my yard.

He came to your house before eleven and stayed till twelve at night? - No, he went away little before one in the forenoon, and came back about six and drank tea with me.

Which was the truth; did he go away at six or return at six? - Returned at six and drank tea with me; that was the real truth.

He went away before one? - Rather before one; I cannot say how many minutes before one; that was at noon; if he had done any mischief, it was before he came to our house.

What did he stay at your house from six till twelve? - Yes, he went to the fore-door backwards and forwards.

That is not leaving the house? - He did not leave the house from six till twelve.

What did you mean just now when you talked of eight o'clock? - He went and sat down at the fore-door with my little girl; I went backwards and forwards about my business; and he came backwards and forwards from a little before eleven till one; he never was out of my room, which is an under apartment.

The whole employment he had there was playing with your little girl? - No, it was not; I had several books which were in the window, which he took about and read; he went into the yard and took up the ax and cut some wood.

Jury. How old is your little girl? - Five years old the 2d of last June

Jury. And did she sit up till twelve o'clock? - No; she lies in the same room.

Court. With whom? - With me.

Did you lie in the same room where the prisoner was? - No, I have a bed that turns up; I did not let it down; I put her in a little bed by the side.

What time do you put your child to bed? - Sometimes by eight or nine.

Are you married or single? - Married.

Where was your husband? - Upon watch.

What became of him in the morning? - He carries coals about; he is not at home from eight in the morning sometimes.

Was he at home any of the time that day? - Yes, at home to his dinner.

Did the prisoner dine with you? - No.

Then he was not there at any time that your husband was? - I cannot recollect, whether he was or no.

Is he here? - No.

Prisoner. He was there; I treated him with a pot of beer? - My husband shuts up shops; he might see him; I cannot tell whether he did or not.

Jury. Did not you see him; he says, he drank some beer with him? - I might be absent up stairs; I had rooms up stairs.

Did you drink any beer with him? - No, it is seldom I do in the day.

Prisoner. Here is a gentleman that was present at Sir John Fielding's; I beg he may be examined.

JOHN GROVES sworn.

I can give no evidence that will be of service to the prisoner.

Prisoner. When you saw these people at the bar could they swear positively to me.

Groves. What people do you mean?

Prisoner. The ladies - I saw Mrs. Maxwell and the postillion at Sir John Fielding's, would you have me say what they said?

Court. Yes, by all means. - Mrs. Maxwell did not then swear positively, not so point blank as she has done; to say I am certain, I am sure he is the man; but you are certainly the man to the best of my knowledge and belief.

What did Miss Master's say? - There was no second lady there at the time I was there; I mean the Wednesday's examination, that was the first.

Was the post-boy there? - There was a postillion there; he is now disguised he was then in a postillion's dress; I believe he is the man, the first account he gave was in my hearing; and he picked him out I believe from eight or nine men; and when he came before Sir John Fielding the second day, he knew nothing at all of the man.

Carpenter. There were nine men put into a back room; I was one of them myself, the postillion was put into the room; he looked round; he then turned his eyes to the prisoner; he touched him and said that is the man.

Groves. That is the fact; when Sir John questioned the postillion which he then did, and frequently reminded him of the nature of an oath; he then lowered a peg, and said he believed the clothes were the clothes the man was in that robbed the ladies.

Jury. Was you merely there as a spectator? - Yes.

Had you no business there? - None at all; at the first time when they picked him out I was there as a spectator; the second time I was there upon business.

Jury. Was you subpenaed here? - I came this moment into court; I knew nothing at all of it, and if I had thought I should have been called upon, I should have kept out of court; because I knew very well I could say nothing to serve the man.

Court. The prisoner and the public are entitled to your testimony, if you can say any thing upon the subject. - It is a disagreeable business.

Prisoner. My Lord, the advertisement in the Daily Advertiser the day after I was examined at the Justice's, says, that the ladies could not swear to me. I beg your lordship will see the advertisement.

[ An officer brought the news paper.]

Court. Will you point out the advertisement.

Prisoner. I cannot see without a glass. I can read only A and B and so; but I often look into books.

Court. It is an anonymous account of what passed at Justice Fielding's office.

Court to Carpenter. You said you found out several places where he had hired horses? - Yes.

Did you find out the horse he had that day? - No, Fisher remained to look at the horses.

To Fisher. Did you find the horse? - I did not.

THOMAS RENSHAW sworn.

Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Did he ever pawn the coat and waistcoat he has now on with you? - Yes.

When? - On the 27th of June he pawned a coat for two shillings; but I cannot say whether that is it or not; we have had that coat in pledge before.

Did he pawn any thing on Friday last? - No, nothing.

Prisoner. Did not I fetch out this coat on Tuesday? - On Tuesday last; he serched a coat out for two shillings.

Jury. Is this the coat? - I am not certain.

Jury. Why you lent the money upon it? - I cannot say now; last Tuesday he pledged a coat and nankeen waistcoat and breeches for 16 s. and took a coat out; I never remember his having any other coat but this, and that we have now; he had a coat out for two shillings at the time he pledged them.

Did he ever pledge more than one green coat with you? - Yes.

Prisoner. The other coat that I have is a different coloured green coat; the ladies did not look at my eyes when they were robbed; here is a surgeon in court, he may see how bad my eyes are.

Mr. KITCHEN sworn.

Were you before the justice? - Yes, there was another coat produced which he had at that time; and this was brought then by somebody.

Mrs. Maxwell. The other coat is a green coat, but it is more upon the brown, with brass buttons.

Mr. Kitchen. This coat was brought; the ladies were of opinion that the coat he then had on was the coat he had on when he robbed them; he said he was not the person, and would prove that coat was then in pawn; and that he wore this coat that day; that he had fetched it out of pawn, and pledged the other coat; as that coat fetched more money.

Did he say when he pledged it? - I think not on Friday, I am certain to that.

Prisoner. The lady said she was robbed in this coat; I have proved this coat to be in pledge at the time; the ladies did not swear to me the first day; I believe Sir John's people persuaded them to it.

To Sarah Young . Did you ever see the prisoner in more green coats than one? - I cannot say I ever saw him have any thing but that green coat.

Prisoner. I have another.

Young. Yes; he has another; but it is not so dark as that.

One of the Jury. When Fisher gave his evidence first of all, he rather faultered, whether he was the man; but I believe he did afterwards faintly say that he was the man; I wish to ask him again; whether he is or not certain that the prisoner is the man.

Court to Fisher. Have you any doubt whether the prisoner is the man that robbed the ladies? - None.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Sarah Young was committed to Newgate for perjury.

[See her trial for perjury, which will be printed at the latter end of the trials in this sessions.]

Reference Number: t17780715-19

533. MARY WEST , otherwise GROVES , was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 6 d. two crown pieces, and four shillings and six-pence in monies, numbered , the property of John Bastin , June 8th .

[The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.]

MARGARET BASTIN sworn.

I am the wife of John Bastin . I was in old Palace-yard on the 8th of June, at about four in the forenoon; the prisoner and a person she called her aunt stood by me; I had my child by me; the prisoner offered to assist me to go in to see Lord Chatham, who lay in state; I thanked her, and said I had been in the day before; as she was by my side, I felt her hand in my pocket; I put my hand into my pocket and missed my purse; I charged her with having my purse; she denied it; Mr. Lucas, the head constable, came up and asked what was the matter; I told him the prisoner had got my purse; he

secured her, and took her down to the lobby, and I saw her put my purse on a ledge; Mr. Lucas took it off; I said it was mine, and told him what was in it; there is now two crowns and four and six-pence, and a baker's account in it, which I put into it the morning before; he brings me an account every week.

From the prisoner. Did you see me put the purse on the ledge? - Yes, I did see her put the purse upon the ledge. The aunt was walking off and Mrs. West was following her; I pulled my glove off, put my hand in my pocket and found my purse was gone.

What passed in the lobby? - Mr. Lucas drove her down to the lobby; after Mr. Lucas had secured the prisoner, he went to see for the person she called her aunt: the prisoner was taken to Sir John Fielding 's.

Court. What led you to distinguish at the time, whether it was her hand or her aunt's? - She was close to my right side; her aunt was before me; I felt her hand in my pocket; I could have taken her hand in my pocket, but I pulled my glove off, and then when I put my hand in my pocket my purse was gone.

[The purse and its contents were produced by Mr. Lucas.]

To the prosecutor. Is that your property? - I can swear to this crown; it has a particular cut in it; it has been in my pocket a number of years; one is a King William's, the other a Queen Anne's.

Mr. LUCAS sworn.

This purse and the pieces of money I saw the prisoner lay on a corner of a kind of ledge, at a door-way that enters into the Board of Works; I immediately laid hold of her; I had before seen her in the painted chamber where Lord Chatham lay in state; I told her she had no business there, and desired the officer to turn her out, and said, if she came there any more I should order the officer to take her into custody.

Prisoner. Mr. Lucas was not in the place at the time the lady said she lost her purse; another woman and me were together.

Lucas. As I came down stairs, the prosecutrix and the prisoner were by the door of the Board of Works. Upon hearing a contest between them, I took Mrs. West up into a corner that she might not get near any body till the officer came.

Prisoner. When I saw Mrs. Bastin, he was not near the place; I was not near the ledge; I never had the purse in my hand. I have a material witness that is not come to town.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-20

534. 535. ANN DYAL and MARY DONKAY were indicted for stealing thirty-three pounds in monies, numbered, the property of Edward Moody , in the dwelling-house of Ann Dyall , July 13th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-21

536. 537. 538. JAMES HOSIER , ANNE HALL , and MARY, the wife of Thomas BESWICK , were indicted, the first for stealing one hundred and thirty-two pair of worsted stockings, value 18 l, and twelve pair of thread stockings, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Young , and John Newberry ; and the other two for receiving the same goods, well-knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute, &c . May 29th .

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-22

539. 540. CHARLOTTE PICKERING , otherwise WARE , and HARRIET DAVIS , were indicted for stealing a flowered muslin gown, value 10 d. the property of Elizabeth Miller , spinster ; and a pair of leather shoes, value 10 d. the property of John Quarterman , June 6th .

MARY QUARTERMAN sworn.

My husband is a shoe-maker . The prisoners came into our shop: Pickering tried

on a pair of shoes which she did not like; as they were going out, I missed a pair of shoes, and I saw Davis drop them.

Puckering was not put on her defence.

Davis said nothing in her defence.

PICKERING NOT GUILTY .

DAVIS GUILTY W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-23

541. SARAH JORDAN was indicted for stealing a watch with an inside case made of base metal, and an outside case of shagroen, value 20 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 1 s. a black sattin cloak, value 6 s. a linen shirt, value 8 s. a copper sauce-pan, value 4 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a callimanco petticoat, value 10 s. and a check linen apron, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Waidson , May 11th .

THOMAS WAIDSON sworn.

I left my watch when I went out in the care of my wife.

MARY WAIDSON sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor; my husbands is a servant to a brewer; he went out on the Monday morning as it is usual for him to do; he did not return till the Saturday following: the prisoner has worked with me by the week for two years together; she never wronged me till this fact of a needleful of thread all the whole time; I had some business on Monday which called me into Wood-street; I left her to take care of my child; I stayed about three hours; when I returned home, the prisoner was gone from the house and had locked the child into the form, a sort of go-cart: I found two drawers open, and I missed a metal watch, a silk-handkerchief, a new callimanco petticoat, a silver tea-spoon, and some other things; but I found nothing but the silk handkerchief, and the callimanco petticoat, which I have now on; both these were taken by the prisoner, as was also a silver tea-spoon, which I have at home; the prisoner told me where they were pawned; I took them out of pawn in consequence of that information. She confessed it voluntarily before the justice, and told me where the things were.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the robbery.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-24

542. ISAAC BAILEY , otherwise BAILLE , was indicted for the wilful murder of Arthur Forrester , by shouting him in the right side of his body near the right breast, there by giving him a mortal wound, of which he languished from the 30th of May to the 5th of June, and then died.

He was charged with the like murther on the coroner's inqusition.

[The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.]

WILLIAM LUCAS sworn.

What are you? - I was a waterman at that time, attendings the hackney coach horses at Fleet-ditch; I happened to hear a demur; crossing on the other side Fleet-street I made a stop at the post opposite the obelisk a it was about a quarter after nine: it was the night the man was killed in Roll's Buildings, I heard one man say to the other, what do you mean by stopping me here, you have stopped me twice before; he immediately rode up to him, whether he struck him or not I cannot say, but the man's head fell towards the horse's mane.

Who rode up and struck the other? - The man that was killed I understood; he struck the man there had the led horse in his hand and he fell down, his head to the horse's mane, and the horse turned round, and immediately Mr. Forrester rode up Fleet-street. towards Temple-bar; this man turned his horse's head round and rode after him with both horses, and cried, stop thief, more than once or twice; he rode up Fleet-street after Mr. Forrester as fast as he could, and I heard no more of them; they got out of my sight.

Cross Examination.

You say the blow that was given, was given with so much violence that his head fell down? - I did not see whether he was hit; but I saw his head fall down towards his horse's mane.

EDWARD TURNER sworn.

I am a watchman.

Do you remember any thing happening on the 30th of May last, the night the man was killed in Rolls Buildings? - Yes.

What did you see? - I had just began to cry the hour ten; I was in Fetter lane; I met the deceased sitting upon his horse; I held up my lanthorn, I said what is the matter; he said, he was shot; I asked who shot him; he said, the man that was gone down Rolls Buildings; I said stop, I will see for the man; I met another man who had got him by the collar; he said Turner, this is the man that shot the man; I said bring him along; I took hold of one arm, he took hold of the other, I brought him up to the deceased; the deceased said that is the man that shot me; the prisoner said, yes, I am.

Look at the prisoner; is that the man?

Counsel for the prisoner. There is no doubt of that; that is not disputed.

Witness. We carried the prisoner to a watch-house, till the surgeon came and dressed him. The prisoner was very badly cut, you could not see a bit of his face for blood; he had a great many cuts, one on each side of his eye, and the back part of the right ear; I did not see any others; he stayed at the watch-house about an hour and half before they could stop the blood to get him dressed.

Did you see the horses come up Fetter-lane? - Yes; I did.

Who was the first? - The prisoner, and he led a horse.

Did you see them go into Rolls Buildings? - They did not all three horses go into the buildings, the two horses did; the other Forrester's horse did not enter the buildings; the man with the led horse, the prisoner, turned into Rolls Buildings.

How long after turning into Rolls Buildings was it that the pistol was fired? - They were not above a couple of minutes after leaving me before the pistol was fired.

Where was Forrester at the time he was shot? - At the front of the horse's heads when he was shot.

Was he going on or standing still, or what was he doing? - They went a great pace indeed, as hard as horses could lay their legs to the ground.

Court. The prisoner first went into Rolls Buildings? - Yes.

Court. Did Forrester follow him? - The horse over shot the building; Forrester rather turned in the length of the horse on more.

The deceased had a whip in his hand? - Yes.

Did he hold that up to the prisoner? - He held it up towards him when I first saw him.

Did he hold it up before the pistol was fired? - I did not see that.

When he turned in before the pistol was fired, did you see whether he held it up then? - I was not near enough to see that.

PAYTON BECK sworn.

Was you in Fetter-lane on Saturday night the 30th of May when the man was shot in Rolls buildings? - I was; as I was coming up Fetter-lane about five or six minutes after ten; I heard some horses come galloping up the lane; I was at Mr. Read's, the pawnbroker's door opposite Rolls Buildings; I saw one man turn in first with two horses into the Building's; they made a stop first; the deceased was almost thrown off his horse by a jirk in stopping; about ten yards down the building I saw one man turn his horses about; I saw him draw a pistol from his side and shoot the other in the breast.

In what position was he when he was shot? - On horseback.

Doing or attempting to do any thing? - No; he turned his horses head round directly after he was shot.

What did he do before, did he past the end of the lane with him? - No; he turned in after the man with the two horses.

What was that owing to his giving a sudden jirk? - His stopping the horse short.

Was the horse going right up the lane, free of every thing? - Yes.

And the man that was shot stopped the horse himself? - They were so close together.

Do you mean the prisoner's horses stopped Forrester's horses? - Yes, by stopping in a jirk they were so close together.

Was it the nearness of the prisoner's horses that was the cause of his stopping with a jirk? - I believe it was.

Was the man that was shot going up Fetter-lane, or going down Rolls Buildings? - Down Rolls Buildings.

That is your opinion? - Yes.

How near was you to him? - Six or seven yards at the farthest; the deceased was brushing something off his stomach when he turned his horse round; I said what is the matter, he could not speak to me the first time; I asked him again what is the matter; he said; I am a dead man; I am shot; directly as he said that I pursued the prisoner and catched him down in Bond's Stables.

How far is that from the place? - About two or three hundred yards; no it is not so much, I believe it is about two hundred yards, the length of the place, the prisoner was standing by the horse pond upon his horse.

Did you search him? - Yes, I found two pistols upon him; one was loaded, the other was discharged; I went with the prisoner to the watch-house and delivered him to the watchman.

Cross Examination.

You live in that neighbourhood? - Yes.

You know that there is no thorough-fare there for any horse? - One horse might go.

There is no thoroughfare, horsemen do not ride through Rolls Buildings to go any where, except they go to the stables? - No.

These horse were galloping as hard as they could? - Yes.

The prisoner was going first, he turned sharp up the corner into Rolls Buildings? - Yes.

Do you pretend to say that the deceased's horse did not over shoot Rolls Buildings some way? - No; it did not.

How far did he go down the Buildings? - Eight or ten yards.

Court. The prisoner was not at the end of the Buildings when he shot? - No; after he had shot him he rode away and called out for his master; when he shot he was about eight or ten yards down.

Court. Was the deceased close enough to him to have struck him with his whip if he had chose it? - Yes; but there was no blows struck that I saw.

JOSEPH KAY sworn.

Was you any where near Rolls Buildings when Forrester was shot? - I was standing at Mr. Simpson's door about tea in the evening.

How far from the end of the Buildings? - About twenty yards.

What did you see? - I heard the noise of horses coming from Fleet-street, in Fetter-lane; I stepped down the steps and I saw the horses came running against the end of the Buildings; they rode against the wall by turning so quick; one of the horse men says, d - n you, now I have you; and immediately the pistol was fired; I saw the flash of the powder and heard the report of the pistol.

Court. Which of the horsemen said that? - I don't know which.

Court. Was it the man that was nearest Fetter-lane, or the man that was farthest? - I cannot tell.

Who went first into Rolls Buildings? - I don't know; I believe the man with the led horse was on the side next the Buildings, and the other on the other side towards Fetter-lane; they were both nearly abreast, but he with the led horse was next the Buildings; then I stepped down between the horsemen and asked what was the matter, one was holding his hand at his right breast; he said; I am shot, I am dying; I stept up to the other man and asked him if he fired a pistol at the man; he said he did; I was rather amazed, I stood a little while to look at that man; he got off his horse holding his hand to his breast, and said he was dying; I went to Mr. Read's the pawnbroker's shop; I opened his clothes and his shirt and saw the blood running out of his breast, he said he was dying; and desired to be taken to the Blue Boar in Holborn; then I went to see after the other man; the watchman had him in the Buildings.

GWYNN OWEN RADFORD sworn.

I was in my master's house in Fetter-lane, about five yards from Rolls Buildings on the thirtieth of May when the man was shot.

Did you see the horses come up the Buildings? - No; I heard the report of a

pistol; I went to the door and saw Forrester the deceased sitting upon his horse leaning forward.

Counsel. If you was not there when the horses came up I will not trouble you any farther.

ROBERT GHENT sworn.

Was you any where near Rolls Buildings when the man was shot on the 30th of May? - I was about seven yards off.

With respect to the horses coming up, who came up first to Rolls Buildings? - The two horses came up first; I was going homewards, I saw these horses coming up as hard as ever they could; I stopped to see what was the matter, I went after them and was about seven yards from the Buildings when he let off his pistol; Forrester was out of the Buildings; he desired me to help him off his horse, for he was a dead man.

Where was the deceased's horse just before the pistol was fired? - He was about four yards in the Buildings.

Did the deceased before that pass the end of Rolls Buildings and turn back? - He passed it rather, and turned his horse short round into the Buildings.

Cross Examination:

His horse was so much upon the full speed that he could not stop him short enough? - He over shot the Buildings, and then turned his horse round and went into the Buildings after the other man.

Did you hear any expressions made use of? - No.

Counsel for the Crown.

We will now call witnesses to prove some declarations made by the deceased relative to the cause of his death; call Richard Forrester .

RICHARD FORRESTER sworn.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

In the deposition that you made before the coroner relating to what your brother told you, he talked of it as if he hoped he should survive? - When I first when to him it was on Sunday morning; I was called up at three o'clock, I went down there, I asked him how it was; and how it happened; he told me how it began:

What I ask you is this; whether in the course of that Sunday morning he did not say that he had some hopes of recovering or surviving? - No; nothing of that kind was mentioned on Sunday morning that I recollect.

What time in the week was it that he entertained some hopes of recovering? - I was with him every day, I cannot say what day it was.

But there was a period of the illness in the course of that week when he himself entertained hopes of surviving it? - Yes; he did say he hoped he might get over it.

Counsel for the Crown.

I called you to give an account of some declarations of your brother, made by him of this unhappy accident; at the time the declaration was made was he of opinion that he should die or live? - At the time I spoke to him on Sunday morning he thought he could not live, and every body about him thought so.

Court. I think this evidence ought to be received; I shall tell the jury that if afterwards the deceased thought himself better; and there was a difference in the story he told; I shall lay the whole declaration out of the case.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

So that the evidence of the declaration is received with that caution, I can have no objection to it.

Forrester. I asked him how it happened; he said, he was coming just by Black Friars Bridge when Brice and his man over took him, they crossed him, two or three different times.

Court. What is Brice? - William Brice the master to the prisoner.

Court. Did your brother know Brice? - I don't know that he did.

Court. Because you said he told you Brice was there by name? - Yes; he said Brice and his man; he said, they crossed him two or three times coming up the Bridge; that at the end of Fleet-market. they attempted to lay hold of his horse, and he struck at them, and blows ensued; and that he called out to the people that were standing round, as there was a mob got round; that these two people either intended to rob or murder him, and begged their assistance; upon which Brice rode off; that he rode down Fleet-street, and Brice's man followed him and got before him; that at the corner of Rolls Buildings he turned round upon him and said d - n your eyes I have got you

now, I will do for you, and fired a pistol immediately; I asked him if he was willing to make oath to what he told me, and mentioned the dangerous situation he was in; that there was not a probability of his living; he said he was; I then went to Justice Girdler, and got a gentleman in the neighbourhood to go with me; I saw Mr. Minors the surgeon, he advised me not to get a magistrate, for he was in a very dangerous situation.

Had your brother a whip? - Yes.

Do you know what whip your brother had at that time? - No; only that he had a whip.

Who took the whip out of his hand? - I don't know.

ELISABETH LABETSON sworn.

Did you see the deceased Forrester on the thirtieth of May? - Yes.

At what time? - A little after ten in the evening.

Did he bring that whip with him that is in your hand? - Yes.

(produces a small riding whip.)

Had you any conversation with him during the course of his illness? - Yes.

One of the jury. I am a whip maker; that is a light common whip.

Had you any conversation with the deceased relative to the cause of his death? - Yes.

Upon what day of the month? - To the best of my knowledge the third of June; it was the second or third, the Tuesday or Wednesday; it was between five and six in the evening.

Was he of opinon then that he should live or die? - It really was a matter of doubt whether he should or not.

As to what was his own opinion? - He really did not know.

Court. Under these circumstances I don't think that evidence ought to be received.

JOHN LAUGHTON sworn.

Had you a conversation with Mr. Forrester when he was shot? - Yes.

Was it on the day that he died? - It was about six in the afternoon, he died about eleven.

Do you know that was his own opinion then, whether he would live or die? - He did not tell me, I did not put that to him; he was, at that time very ill in a very languishing condition.

Court. And he was sensible of it himself? - Yes.

What declarations did he make to you? - He sent his man in the afternoon, and desired I would come and speak to him; I had seen him before several times, but never had spoke to him, for fear it should hurt him, or set him a bleeding; I sat down by him and asked what he want ed; he said, he wondered that Brice was not taken into custody; I said how did this happen, tell me as gently as you can, and the heads of it; because I told him it was proper a justice should be brought to take his information; he said, he was coming very gently, for he had given his horse a quantity of water, and so was riding very gently between the Magdalen and Black Friars Bridge, when he was overtaken by Brice and his man; that they crossed him two or three times and looked very hard at him; upon which he asked them what they wanted; and they said d - n your eyes we know what you are; he said, that they passed on till they came on this side the Bridge near the turnpike; there he said they stopped him; one laid hold of his horse's bridle, and they insisted upon his going with them; he said he would go with them to the Bell Savage, and no where else; upon that Brice ordered his man to draw his pistol or pistols; that the deceased up with his whip and struck the man; and believed he brought him along side his horse.

Court. Did he tell you whether the pistol was drawn before he struck him? - He did not; he said, upon the strength of that, bearing a pistol was ordered to be drawn, he up with his whip and struck the man that had hold of his bridle; that he got loose and turned his way up Fleet-street; I heard no more of him; I asked him no more questions, fearing it would hurt him; and I made that reserve till I could get Mr. Girdler.

Did you hear any more from him? - No more.

Cross Examination.

He told you he was met by Brice and his man? - He was overtaken by Brice and his man.

He told you that he struck the man and not Brice? - Yes.

Mr. MINORS sworn.

What was the occasion of the death of the deceased? - His being shot throught the lungs.

Was it a common size ball? - I have the ball in my pocket; it was cut out from under the skin in his back.

How did it pass? - Just under the edge of his breast through the lungs, and lodged under the skin in his back; it is about a quarter of an ounce ball I believe.

Cross Examination.

He had no other wound of any sort? - None that I saw but that.

Not Guilty of Murder, but Guilty of Manslaughter only .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-25

543. WILLIAM BRICE was charged upon the coroner's inquisition, for aiding, abbetting, assisting, comforting, and maintaining Isaac Baille , to kill and murder the said Arthur Forrester .

[There was no evidence given.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17780715-26

544, 545. SARAH TYLER , and ELIZABETH BREEZE , were indicted for stealing four linen shirts, value 10 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Miller , July 1st .

(The witnesses deposed, that they saw Breeze come out of the prosecutor's house with the shirts in a handkerchief in her hand; Tyler was standing at a distance, and that Breeze said, she waited for her.)

[The shirts and the handkerchief were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

BREEZE's DEFENCE.

I met a young woman who asked me to carry the bundle for her, and said she would give me six-pence.

Tyler was not put on her defence.

TYLER NOT GUILTY .

BREEZE GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-27

546. MARY, the wife of John Willis , was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 5 s. a linen table-cloth, value 6 s. a pair of laced ruffles, value 7 s. three other ruffles, value 1 s. and a laced cap, value 6 d. the property of Richard Ramsay , July 14th .

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-28

547. WILLIAM DUTTON was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value 3 s. a steel watch key, value 6 d. a base metal watch hook, value 3 d. and a silver seal, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Heslop , July 13th .

THOMAS HESLOP sworn.

On Monday last the 13th of July, as I was going from chambers in Clifford's-inn to Surry-street in the Strand, just as I came through St. Clement's Church-yard , Dutton pushed up against me and pulled my watch out; I luckily was putting my hand to my watch and the watch came out of my fob into my hand; he pulled and I pulled; I cried stop thief; he let go the watch, and the mob took him immediately; and he was carried up to Sir John Fielding 's.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-29

548. THOMAS WILLIAMS , otherwise JAMES SMITH , was indicted for

stealing a hair trunk, value 10 d. two silk gowns, value 50 s. five linen aprons, value 5 s. a dimity petticoat, value 3 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. two linen shifts, value 1 s. and two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Thornton , spinster , June 6th .

ELIZABETH THORNTON sworn.

I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM GILBY sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the trunk off one Homer's cart on Finchley Common , and set it down; I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till I took him. I left the box standing on the common, another cart was coming along which took it up while I secured the prisoner.

JOHN HOMER sworn.

The box was in my cart; I received it from a Mrs. Harwood in Goswell-street. When I was in Finchley Common, I went to the back of my cart to get some hay to seed my horses and missed the box; I stopped my cart and took my nag and rid back in search of it; I found it in the possession of two young women who delivered it to me.

[The box and its contents were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of the affair; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-30

549. ANNE, the wife of Robert MURRAY , was indicted for stealing a stuff petticoat, value 6 s. a linen shift, value 4 s. a laced cap, value 3 s. a pair of stone sleeve-buttons set in silver, value 3 s. a pair of plated shoe-buckles, value 2 s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. and a pair of scissars with silver handles, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Robinson , spinster , July 6th .

MARGARET ROBINSON sworn.

I came from Scotland, in Captain Keith's vessel; on Sunday I came on shore to see the city; I returned on board on the Monday, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment; I left them in the vessel; the prisoner came over with me in the vessel; I found the prisoner at her husband's lodging in Pye-street, Westminster; she had my petticoat, my smock, my stockings, my apron, cap, buckles and buttons, on her person.

THOMAS JONES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in pawn three handkerchiefs, and a pair of silver bowed scissars of the prisoner, in the name of Anne Murray .

PETER GOUGH sworn.

I took the prisoner, and found the prosecutrix's things upon her; she owned they were Margaret Robinson 's, and said, she took them out of a bundle in the ship.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The day we set sail from Leith, I gave her half a guinea to keep for me as I had no place to put it in, and she gave me her clothes to take care of; I would not return them till I had the half guinea, and then she beat me; I went to get a warrant for her, and she got a warrant for me.

Prosecutrix. I never saw any of her money, I rather lent her money; she never had the care of my clothes.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-31

550. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing seventeen iron locks, value 20 s. four brass locks, value 7 s. four brass cocks, value 4 s. two cork-screws, value 1 s. two silver watches, value 42 s. six dozen of watch-glasses, value 3 s. a watch screw plate, value 1 s. and a magnisying glass, value 1 s. the property of John Anns , June 4th .

JOHN ANNS sworn.

I am a watch-maker and ironmonger at Staines; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, between the 4th and 13th of June; the prisoner was my journeyman ; he left me and took a shop at Bagshot; I got a search-warrant,

and went thither, and found the watch-plate in his room and the other things.

[They were produced in court, and the prosecutor deposed to the watch-plate and seventeen locks.]

CHARLES HAYTER sworn.

The prisoner had taken a shop near me; he came to me with these locks, and said, he had formerly dealt in these things, but wanted money, and asked me twenty-seven shillings for them; I offered him a guinea; I said, that was as much as they were worth to me; but I did not want to take the advantage of his poverty: hearing afterwards that there was a search-warrant in his house, and fearing that these things might be stolen, I went and informed the prosecutor I had bought some locks of the prisoner; the prosecutor looked at these and said they were his, and had been stolen.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The things are my own property.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-32

551. ROBERT POOR was indicted for stealing a stone knee-buckle, value 1 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 8 s. a silver pepper-castor, value 25 s. three guineas, one half guinea, and two six-pences, the property of Richard Anson , in his dwelling-house , June 12th .

RICHARD ANSON sworn.

I keep an eating-house in Chapple-street, Soho . On the 12th of June last I lost the several things mentioned in the indictment, which before I had put into a drawer in the parlour behind the shop; a servant came to me in the evening and said I had been robbed, upon which I went home: the prisoner is a slater by trade; he used my house.

MARGARET ROSEMAN sworn.

The prisoner came into the shop about seven in the evening and asked for some soup; another man came with him; we had none; I gave them some tripe, which they had in the parlour; they kept the door half shut; afterwards a gentleman came in and the prisoner walked off; in about a quarter of an hour after they were gone, a pick-lock was found on the chair; I am sure, there had been no other person in the room but the prisoner and his companion. On the Sunday after, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane; I watched him to Brown's; I told my master of it; he went and he was then gone; at half after nine we watched him to Wild-street; he trembled very much; he was taken up on the Monday following; none of the things were found again; he gave before the justice very different accounts of where he lodged; he would not tell where he really lodged. Haines was not in the room half a minute before he turned back, and said, he had found the pick-lock.

JOHN HAINES sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; the prisoner and another man had some meat; we not having soup; when they were gone, I found a pick-lock key in the chair; I called the maid; we opened the drawer and found the things gone.

THOMAS LYONS sworn.

I am a constable. I took the prisoner; I found this pick-lock and this instrument, this for opening locks (a small crow) upon him (producing them.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

If your Lordship looks into their examination before the justice, you will find they swore different to what they do now.

Court to the Clerk of Arraigns. Where is the deposition before the justice?

Clerk of Arraigns. They are not returned here.

Court. I am very sorry that they are not here, and the justice should understand that he does not do his duty if he does not return here those examinations, and the court must inforce the order: I have often seen very serious consequences attend the returning or not returning these examinations, because when returned to us, it is a direction to the court to see whether they vary or not in their accounts.

Prisoner. She swore before the justice that her master discharged her about this robbery.

For the prisoner.

ESTHER WILSON sworn.

I have known the prisoner going on of three years.

What is he? - A slater;

Did he work for you at the time he was taken up? - Not that week for me, but he worked the week before in Compton-street, for one Mr. Sparks; he has been employed in a great many of the first nobility houses in Europe; he is a sober, honest, young man. The first job he did was at the Duke of Marlborough's, then at Lord Godolphin's, and then at Eton College, and at several noblemen's houses: I trusted him with some scores of pounds; I never knew him wrong me of a penny.

Did the girl give a contradictory evidence before the justice? - Yes, quite contrary; at the last examination I was not there; at the first, and at the second time, she said, there were two men besides this man there; she said the prisoner went out first, that another followed him some time after, and one of them took to his heels and had like to have thrown a woman down.

Court. Was Haines examined before the justice as well as Margaret Roseman ? - Yes.

How many people did he say were there? - Two, besides the prisoner, Margaret Roseman said.

Did John Haines say so too? - I cannot say I heard him say so.

Court to Haines. What was said before the justice about the number of people that were there? - There was no more than that man.

Did Margaret Roseman say, that there were too? - No; she said, there was only this man there.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-33

552. MICHAEL WELCH was indicted for stealing in the dwelling-house of Thomas Rudkin , four pair of laced ruffles, value 30 l. three pair of leather breeches, value 30 s. three pair of silver knee-buckles, value 15 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 6 s. ten pair of silk stockings, value 50 s. the property of Richard Wilson , Esq ; and a bank note, value 20 l. the property of the said Richard; the same note being due and unsatisfied to him the said Richard , March 21st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17780715-34

553. SARAH, the wife of Thomas ATKINSON , was indicted for stealing a linen sheet, value 6 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 1 s. and a pair of bellows, value 18 d. the property of Edward Watson , in a ready furnished lodging , May 29th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-35

554, 555. THOMAS RAYSON , and THOMAS STEPNEY , were indicted for stealing five live hens, value 4 s. and a live cock, value 18 d. the property of David Harris , June 7th .

DAVID HARRIS sworn.

I live at Battle-bridge ; on the 6th of June I lost four hens and a cock out of my hen-house in my yard; I afterwards saw three of them; two were without their heads; I am certain they were mine.

JOHN WESTON sworn.

I live next door to Mr. Harris: on Sunday morning the 7th of June, I heard Mr. Harris had lost some fowls; I suspected the prisoner Rayson; I acquainted Harris of my suspicion; by his desire, I got a constable, and went to Rayson's lodging; I met him coming down stairs; the constable laid hold of him; we secured him, and searched his room, where we found two hens without, and one with a head; we took them to the White Hart at Battle-bridge, and sent for Mr. Harris. Rayson said, he bought them of a man at ten o'clock on Saturday night.

[ John Evans the constable, confirmed Weston's evidence, and deposed that he found a dark lanthorn in Rayson's pocket and a large bunch of keys, and a chissel in his lodging.]

RAYSON's DEFENCE.

The other prisoner gave me the fowls.

(There being no evidence to affect Stepney, he was not put on his defence.]

[Rayson called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.]

RAYSON GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

STEPNEY acquitted .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-36

556. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a bank note, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Field , in his dwelling-house; the said sum of ten pounds secured by said note, being due and unsatisfied to the said Thomas, against the statute, &c. June 18th .

THOMAS FIELD sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; she had lived in my service a fortnight or three weeks: on the 14th of June I missed a ten pound bank note, which I had received of Mr. Hutchinson, made payable to him for ten pounds; I gave it my wife to put by; it was afterwards missing; I suspected the prisoner and took her up, and in consequence of my saying it would be better for her she confessed taking it: I saw it afterwards in the hand of a Mrs. Garratt; I got a description of the note of Mr. Hutchinson, and compared it with the note in the hands of Mrs. Garratt, and it answered the description.

MARY GARRATT sworn.

The prisoner changed a bank note with me as from her master; she lived there then; I think it was No. 616; I have since parted with it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found this bank note at the passage-door as I went in at my master's house; I kept it in my pocket three or four days; I did not hear any body ask for a note or say they had lost a note. My master keeps a livery-stable, and as a great many gentlemen come there, I thought some of them might have dropped it.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-37

557. WILLIAM DANIELS was indicted for stealing three linen gowns, value 30 s. a muslin apron, value 1 s. a muslin cap, value 2 d. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Catherine Jones , spinster , June 16th .

[The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.]

CATHERINE JONES sworn.

I lived servant with Mr. Whitehead a grocer in St. John's-street , who was a bankrupt; there was to be a public sale of his effects; I corded up my box in the garret ready to take away when I should be discharged by the assignees; the said prisoner came on the 16th of June the day before the sale began, at about four in the afternoon, to view the goods; I attended him up into the two pair of stairs room, when he had been there some time, he went into the garret, there being nothing there in particular, I did not follow him; but just before he came down I heard the box lid flap down; I did not think of my box at that time; but, he came down with his hand under his coat; he had nothing but a catalogue in his hand when he went up; I went up stairs and saw the cord of my box cut and lying on the ground; I ran down stairs to the porter who was in the dining-room, and told him the man had robbed my box and gone off; we pursued him; he was taken and brought back; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES MYCOCK sworn.

On the 16th of June, as I was walking up St. John's-street, I heard the cry of, stop thief! and saw the prisoner running on the other side of the way; I followed him; he ran down the Cross-Keys inn, which being a thorough-fare, I ran round the other way to meet him; he was taken in the yard; I saw him drop the bundle.

MARY DENTON sworn.

I picked up the bundle in the Cross-Keys yard; the prisoner was just by; he was immediately secured.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter; my witnesses are not here.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-38

558. JOHN BLAND was indicted for stealing an iron axle-tree, value 4 s. and two iron boxes, value 1 s. the property of Christopher Hall , June 17th .

CHRISTOPHER HALL sworn.

I lost an axle-tree and two iron boxes; they were taken out of my shed; I saw them the night before; they were brought back, and the prisoner, by my servant John Rogers ; I knew the axle-tree and the boxes to be mine.

HENRY TAFF sworn.

I saw the prisoner with them upon his shoulder, going from Mr. Hall's house; I asked him what he did with them; he was then within six yards of Mr. Hall's premises; he asked me if they were mine; I said, no; then he said, they are mine; I told Charles Rogers of it.

CHARLES ROGERS sworn.

I followed the prisoner to Benjamin-street with then upon him; he said, he was going to sell them; I took hold of him and brought him back.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going to my daily labour in the morning, I happened to go across this hill; I saw the axle-tree lie along side the dust-hill, I took it up; I did not know whether it might not be dropped out of some cart the over night: I took it up and carried it a little way over the hill; that man hallooed after me, and said, where are you going with that? I turned about and put it off my shoulder; I said, if it is your property it is not mine; if it is your's take it, or if it is your master's take it; he said, it is not mine nor my master's as I know of; I said, if it is not your's lend me a hand with it upon my shoulder, which he did; I went on with it to Benjamin-street, and rested several times; Rogers came up to me, and asked me where I was going with it, I said, if it was not his or his master's I was going to sell it.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-39

559. JOHN GOODALL was indicted for stealing a weather sheep, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Baker , May 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-40

560. JOSEPH PENTERCROSS was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 10 s. two linen stocks, value 2 s. a woollen cloth coat, value 10 s. two pair of thread stockings, value 2 s. five guineas and eleven shillings and nine-pence, in monies, numbered, the property of Richard Payne , in the dwelling-house of John Payne , June 14th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-41

561. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing two linen table-cloths, value 10 s. and two linen napkins, value 5 s. the property of Richard Miflin , July 8th .

RICHARD MIFLIN sworn.

I am a porter ; I had the charge of the things at a sale; the prisoner came and asked me for a catalogue; when he went out; I was informed that he had stole something; I followed him, and found the two tablecloths and two napkins in his breeches; the lot was on them in my own hand writing.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOSEPH PHILIPS sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the linen and put it under his waistcoat; I informed Miflin of it; we pursued him and took him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They were given me by a person to keep for him; I have made all the enquiry I could, but can hear nothing of him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-42

562. ISAAC ROY was indicted for stealing three silver table-spoons, value 20 s. and a silver milk pot, value 5 s. the property of James Hobson , July 1st .

JAMES HOBSON sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Seddon, a cabinet-maker, in Aldersgate-street. On the 1st of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by my wife, that there was a thief in the house; I ran up stairs and saw the prisoner; he ran out into the street; I pursued him and brought him back, and sent for a constable, who searched him and found the plate mentioned in the indictment upon him; the constable is not here.

ELIZABETH HOBSON sworn.

On the 1st of July between seven and eight in the morning, as I was in bed I heard a noise in the pantry, I got out of bed and went to the door and saw the prisoner in the pantry with the spoons and milk jug in his hand; I called out thief! he looked me in the face about half a moment and then ran down stairs; my husband pursued him and took him in the yard.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to enquire for Mr. Smith an engraver: the main door of the house is always open; as I was going up stairs a man ran past me down stairs, and I found the spoons and milk pot on the second pair of stairs; as I was taking them up, a man came out and laid hold of me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-43

563. WILLIAM THELTIC was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Cox , June 10th .

ANNE COX sworn.

I am the wife of Benjamin Cox ; I lost a shirt out of the yard on the 10th of June, about eight o'clock; it was found on the prisoner by Mr. Brown.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

I am a publican; on the 10th of June I heard a noise; I went out and saw the prisoner and a number of people about him; they said he had been into a house; I searched him and found thirteen pick-lock keys in his pocket, and a shirt in his bosom; I delivered him and the shirt to Edwards the constable.

[The shirt was produced in the court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-44

564. RICHARD MARTIN was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of James Cockerell , June 22d .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-45

565. THOMAS ROBINS was indicted for stealing a cheese of the weight of 9 lb. value 3 s. the property of Thomas Hall , June 20th .

THOMAS HALL sworn.

On the 20th of June about ten in the evening, I sent my boy with a cheese to Fetter-lane; in about half an hour after a person came and informed me that the cheese was lost, and the boy was in the watch-house; I went and found him and the prisoner in the watch-house together; the boy is turned of fourteen years old.

JOHN CHARLTON sworn.

The prisoner took the cheese off my head and gave it to another man, who ran away with it; I ran after him and cried stop thief! and the prisoner was taken. I am sure he is the man that took the cheese.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He told me a man had taken a cheese from him and asked me to run after him; as I was running I was stopped and dragged to the watch-house.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-46

566. PETER DANIEL was indicted for stealing 30 lb. of raisins, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Chinner , July 3d .

THOMAS CHINNER sworn.

I am a watchman on the Keys; I had the charge of some raisins on Fresh wharf ; the prisoner was on the wharf; I asked him if

he belonged to a lighter that was just come up, he said he did; I asked him to take care of the lighter with the raisins while I went to get a pint of beer; I had not gone far before I saw him take a frail of raisins and run up the gate way; I pursued and took him, he dropped the raisins.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I don't say any thing against it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-47

567. 568. WILLIAM BANTON and JANE GOWEN were indicted for stealing a mahogany tea chest, value 3 s. and three silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the property of John Ravenhill , June 8th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-48

569. ANNE SMITH , otherwise MAC REA , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Solomon Solomons , on the second of June , about the hour of five in the afternoon; and stealing a cloth coat, value 20 s. a cotton gown, value 5 s. five brass candlesticks, value 3 s. a linen handkerchief, value 2 d. and a check apron, value 1 s. the property of the said Solomon, in his dwelling house .

SOLOMON SOLOMONS sworn.

I live in Three-Tun-alley, Wentworth-street, Petticoat-lane ; on the second of June I went out about three o'clock, and returned at about seven; then I found the back door broke open, and the things mentioned in the indictment gone; the door was bolted on the inside; it is a loose door, a knife had been put in, to push back the bolt; there was the scratches of the knife on the bolt; my wife and children went out with me; I left no one in the house; I have found none of the things again but a gown that was pawned.

Thomas Townsend the pawnbroker produced the gown, which he took in pawn of the prisoner, and it was deposed to by the Prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 3 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-49

570, 571, 572, 573, SUSANNAH DUNN , MARY GREEN , SAMUEL WAITCROFT , and JANE GARDENER were indicted, the two first for stealing silver watch, value 5 l. the property of William Hardy ; the other two for receiving the same, well knowing it tohave been stolen, against the statute , June 16 .

WILLIAM HARDY sworn.

I live at Westminster, as I was going home disguised in liquor, I was picked up by Dun and Gardener at the Horse-Guards; they took me into their room and locked the door; and both got about me to persuade me to stay all night; they asked me what I had got for them; I said but one shilling in the whole; they insisted upon having that; and drew my watch out of my pocket before I had time to give it them; then they went to the window, threw up the sash, and called out to a man whose name was Biddle, and said, you may come up we are ready; he came up, they let him in; the first words he said was, d - n you, you rogue, what do you do with my two wives; that man was taken up and bailed for an assault in striking me; when he had beat me as long as he pleased, he ran down stairs, and I ran to the window to call the watch; I then asked the two girls whether he had got the watch or they had got it; they said he had got it; I ran down stairs to call the watch; I lost him in the street; I went to the watch-house and he was afterwards brought there by a gentleman; I got a constable in the morning and took him up; he confessed being with the girls over-night. I never got my watch again, it was a silver watch with a landscape on the face, and the initials of my name were engraven on the back of the case in a cypher; the maker's name is Dunstaff, at Newborough, Leicestershire.

Did you stay with them all night? - No; I did not stay ten minutes.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I keep a public house, Dunn and Green came to my house about a month ago; I know nothing of the other two; they had a watch, and were disputing who should have the possession; I did not make particular notice of the watch; I believe there was something remarkable in the dial plate.

Was there a landscape on it? - I believe some such thing.

GREEN's DEFENCE.

Dunn and I were coming along together; the prosecutor asked if he should go home with us, we said yes; he said he had but one shilling; when we came home we said it was too little; he said he would leave his watch for five shillings and fetch it next day; and he gave me the watch.

DUNN's DEFENCE.

He had but one shilling; he said he would leave us his watch for five shillings; and when he brought the money he should have the watch; he went to bed two hours, and then got up and demanded his watch; we did not choose to let him have it without the money.

GARDENER's DEFENCE.

I went to the room where the women live, to see if they would come to breakfast with me; I saw the watch in Waitcroft's hand; I did not know whose property it was.

Prosecutor. I took them up on the morning of the 16th of June.

Did they say any thing to you about your pledging the watch for five shillings? - No.

Did you let them have the watch for five shillings or any other sum? - No; I did not.

Did you go to bed for two hours? - No; in the morning they handed my watch about, and Samuel Waitcroft said he would hide it under a stone in the yard for them; he said before the Justice he had hid it under some stones; and when he went to look for it he could not find it.

- DURDEN, Esq; sworn.

These people were all four before me.

Were their informations on oath? - I believe they were and are returned.

Did the two women give the same account then as they do now? - No; to the best of my recollection they said the man picked them up at Whitehall; that they took him home, but denied knowing any

thing of the watch; the soldier (Waitcroft) said he had taken the watch, and hid it under some stones, but thought some person had seen him; for when he went to look for it, it could not be found; the prosecutor has told your lordship the same story he told me.

That Waitcroft had hid it for them? - Yes; he said so.

You are certain that the women denied knowing any thing of the watch? - Once they denied it; and then they said they handed it about from one to the other.

WAITCROFT's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

DUNN GUILTY .

GREEN GUILTY .

WAITCROFT GUILTY .

GARDENER NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Dunn Green:Branding. See summary.]

[ Dunn Green:Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Waitcroft:Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-50

574, 575. ELIZABETH, the wife of William DAVIS , and ELIZABETH GREEN were indicted for stealing five yards of printed linen cloth, value 4 s. the property of Jacob Worthy , July 9th

ISAAC HAWLEY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Worthy, who is a haberdasher in Oxford Road ; on the 9th of July the two prisoners came into my master's shop together, about the middle of the day; Davis said she wanted half a quarter of clear lawn; I desired them to walk up to the upper part of the shop; they had a child which both of them had hold of; when they were going out of the shop, a lady that I was serving said she was certain that one of them had taken something; I went out after them, and the girl (Green) threw down this bundle and took to her heels; the girl said she took it by the direction of the other woman; and that she had given her a glass of gin to do it; the girl told me where the other woman was gone, and that she had something under her stays; I went in pursuit of her and searched her, but she had not.

ELIZABETH GLOVER sworn.

I saw this girl throw the bundle down within a yard of me; I stepped out and catched hold of her; the woman was not there then; the girl said the woman gave her gin to do what she did, but before the Justice they said they knew nothing of one another; at last they both acknowledged they were acquainted.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I am a stranger to the girl. I know nothing of it.

GREEN's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the woman.

Both guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-51

576. HENRY DENTON was indicted for stealing four linen aprons, value 4 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. and three muslin caps, value 1 s, 6 d. the property of William Tower , July 2d .

MARY TOWER sworn.

On the second of July I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of an upper drawer in a bureau in the parlour; I saw them a little before twelve; soon after I saw the prisoner in the room, he was in a closet when I first saw him; upon my coming in, he ran into the court; I ran after him and called to the neighbours to stop him, and he was soon taken.

JOHN DRAPER sworn.

I saw the prisoner running away with these things; I saw him drop them and I took them up.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM DRAPER sworn.

I saw the prisoner drop the things, and secured him.

[The prisoner called six witnesses who gave him a good character, till within this three weeks, when they said he absconded from his master.]

GUILTY B .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-52

577. THOMAS THORNTON was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 5 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. and a cornelian seal set in gold value 5 s. the property of George Newport , June 30th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-53

578. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 10 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6 s. and a pair of cloth breeches, value 4 s. the property of Walter Grove , June 27th .

WALTER GROVE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Scott in Wimpole-street : on the 27th of June I had been out, as I returned home I met the prisoner on the area steps coming out of the house with my clothes over his arm; I secured him: the clothes were in the servants hall.

( Robert Cape , who was with the prosecutor when he took the prisoner, confirmed his evidence.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the clothes in the street.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-54

579. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Curtis , June 27th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-55

580. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing 20 lb. weight of copper, value 20 s. the property of William Arnold and Lewis Berriman , June 19th

HENRY BARRETT sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutors who are porters at the water side appointed by the Goldsmiths company. On the 19th of June I had 461 pieces of copper to ship off; I missed a piece, and was told that the prisoner was gone up the gate way with it; it was at Galley Key . I pursued him, he had the copper under his arm; I saw him drop it; I took him, he begged I would take pity on him and his wife and family.

(The copper was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

HENRY MARTIN sworn.

I was on the Key, and saw the prisoner take it away, and informed the last witness of it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

If I did it I know nothing about it; I don't know that I did.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-56

581. JACOB JONAS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of James Woodgate , July 6th .

JAMES WOODGATE sworn.

On the 6th of July, going down Whitechapel, at the end of Pettycoat-lane , I felt a hand in my pocket; I immediately missed my handkerchief; I turned about and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; I was going to secure him; he was delivering it two women.

THOMAS THOMPSON sworn.

I was charged with the prisoner by the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take his handkerchief.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-57

582. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing eighteen pair of silver shoebuckles, value 12 l. two silver milk ewers,

40 s. two silver pepper castors, value 20 s. three silver punch ladles, value 20 s. six silver table-spoons, value 4 l. four silver desert spoons, value 30 s. and two silver salt spoons, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Moore , June 5th .

THOMAS MOORE sworn.

I am a silver-buckle-maker ; on the 5th of June I sent my apprentice with the things mentioned in the indictment, in a box, to the Spread-Eagle inn; they were directed to a Mr. Longhurst of Steyning; the box was stole, and I advertised it.

JOHN MOORE sworn.

I am the prosecutor's brother's son; I am going of sixteen. I was sent with this box to the Spread-Eagle; my brother, who is younger than me, went with me; as we were going up the inn yard, the prisoner and another man stopped us, and asked where the box was going, I said to Mr. Longhurst of Steyning; he said, he was the bookkeeper; I did not take much notice of what he said, but went up the yard; the box being heavy I gave it to my brother; the prisoner snatched it off his head and put it under his arm and went up the yard with it; I followed him, and called stop thief. I got into Leadenhall-market; I returned back through a court into the inn, and asked if they had heard any thing of the box; they said they had not; we went home.

From the prisoner. What did you do when you found your mistake? - I went to the book-keeper, and she said, she would lay me a hundred pounds I had lost the box by two sharpers.

What reason have you for knowing me? - By the lamp; there was a lamp before your face.

What coloured clothes had I on? - He had a round hat, a pen in his ear, a white waistcoat and a long pair of metal buckles in his shoes, and he had a light blue coat.

Did you never declare that you was not sure I was the person that took the box from you? - No, I did not.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

On the 6th of June, the prisoner was stopped by one Aldus with a pair of buckles, and was brought to the office in Litchfield-street; there was a hand-bill printed of these goods; the buckles answered the description in the hand-bill: I searched him but could find nothing upon him, but as we were going to the round-house, I saw him shuffle something into his waistcoat pocket; when we came to the round-house I searched him, and found eight guineas upon him; he asked me to give him the money again and he would give me three guineas; he said afterwards, that it was produced from the prosecutor's plate.

JOHN BROOKES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; on the 6th of June I took in a pair of silver buckles, to the best of my knowledge it was of the prisoner; it being nine in the evening I had not a view of his face, but he was exactly his size and like him in person.

(The buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GEORGE GABET sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of June at about seven in the evening, I took in a pair of silver buckles, not of the prisoner but of another man, at about half after eight; I received a hand-bill from Goldsmiths Hall, with an account of their being stolen, and a description of the person, which seemed to correspond with the person I took the buckles of.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JAMES EVERAND sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a pair of silver buckles on Saturday evening the 6th of June, I believe of the prisoner; I cannot so positively swear to him; to the best of my recollection it was the prisoner; I will not swear to him; I believe him to be the man; he was about his size and age.

(They were likewise produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JAMES ALDUS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought a pair of silver buckles to me about eight o'clock on Saturday the 6th of June; I had just before received a hand-bill; I stopped the prisoner and the buckles and took him to the office in Litchfield-street; he told me he bought them at Portsmouth.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the buckles of a man that came from Portsmouth, and wanting to make up a little money; I pawned them.

GUILTY N. four years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-58

583. JOHN CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing thirty-six linen shirts, value 5 l. eight pair of thread stockings, value 10 s. and two pair of black silk stocking breeches, value 20 s. the property of James Brown in his dwelling-house . June 11th .

CECILIA BROWN sworn.

I am the wife of James Brown ; my husband is a prisoner for the Crown in the King's Bench; he had been a prisoner there ten years; I keep a house in Fleet-lane in the city; my house was broke open on the 11th of June a little after there in the morning. As I lay in my bed I saw the prisoner do it; I had four children in bed with me; the room I lie in is very near the shop; I saw him take out a panel of the window, and take the things mentioned in the indictment and a great many other things off the shelf; I had a great deal of property in the shop; I got up at four, the things were then gone and the place broke open; I knew the prisoner; he is a neighbour's child; his mother lived with the people in the house before I took it: they had a light with them; there was more than one; they had two pistols, whether they had any more I cannot say; the prisoner had the same dress on then which he has now, only he had not the same handkerchief on.

Have you found any of the goods again? - No; he has said, if I will get him clear, he will let me have the goods out of pawn.

RICHARD GLYNN sworn.

I am a constable. On the 21st of June I had the prisoner in custody, and hearing that Mrs. Brown had been robbed, I sent for her; she came and saw him in the watch-house, and said he was the boy she had seen take the things off her shelf; I took him to the Compter, and when he was before the magistrate, she gave the same account.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know no more of it than the child unborn; the prosecutrix said, if I would tell her where the things were or fetch them out, she would not prosecute me; I was down at Portsmouth at the time, to see if I could get a captain to take me to sea.

(The prisoner called his aunt to his character, who said, she did not know what business he followed, for she seldom saw him, but she had never heard any harm of him.)

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-59

584. THOMAS GUNNELL was indicted for stealing a carcass of mutton, 50 lb. wt. value 15 s. the property of Thomas Massey , May 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-60

585, 586. ANNE UNDERWOOD , and SARAH CORDEROY , were indicted, for that they in the King's highway in and upon William Frost did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a chrystal seal set in silver. value 2 s. a brass watch key, value 1 d. and four shillings and sixpence in monies, numbered, the property of the said William, from his person , June 6th .

WILLIAM FROST sworn.

I have known Underwood two years; she lives in the same neighbourhood; she walks the streets; I know nothing of the other, only I have seen her go backwards and forwards. On the 6th of June, a little after twelve at night, I passed the two prisoners in Aldersgate-street ; they were standing together; they came after me and pulled me down; Underwood put her hand in my pocket and took out four shillings and sixpence,

and pulled my watch half out; she then called to Corderoy and said, d - n his blood, take his watch out! it is half out! and she came and took it out; there was a silver seal to the watch: as soon as they got the watch and money, they went off, and I saw no more of them; I went home, and when I came to myself, on Sunday morning, I heard they were in the watch-house.

In what manner did they throw you down? - They pulled me down backwards both together; I saw no body but them; I am sure the prisoners are the two women. I was stunned with the fall; I did not know what way they took.

Jury. Was you sober? - Yes.

JOSEPH LEVY sworn.

I am a constable; I had an information that two women had committed a robbery; the prosecutor said, one was Underwood, and the other Cut-throat Sall; and he believed they were at a public-house.

Did she go by the name of Cut-throat Sall before? - Yes, I did not know her other name; I found her sitting with two or three men at the Bull in Whitechapel; he said that was the woman; I asked her what she had done with the man's watch; she said, she had no watch; I searched her; I felt something under her left breast, I said, I thought it was the watch; she said it was only a bit of rag; I put my hand into her bosom and took out the watch; about an hour after that, I heard that Underwood was in Bell-yard, Wentworth-street; I went and took her. The prosecutor described the watch before he saw it.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

UNDERWOOD's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor offered to make it up for five shillings before the justice.

Levy. They wanted him to make it up before the justice but he would not.

Q. to the prosecutor. Did you then, or at any other time, offer to make it up? - No, I did not; she said before the justice if I would make it up, she would give me five shillings, I said I would not, she should have the regulation of the law.

BOTH GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-61

587. PHILIP ARCHER , otherwise ADSHED , was indicted for stealing a cloth livery coat trimmed with silver lace, value 30 s. a cloth livery waistcoat trimmed with silver lace, value 15 s. and a man's hat trimmed with silver lace, value 15 s. the property of Mumbee Goulbourn , Esq ; July 12th .

JAMES DOUGLASS sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Goulbourn. On last Thursday morning my master went to Portsmouth; I carried my clothes up stairs into the room where I lie over the stable; some people got through the top of the ceiling, and by that means got into the room where my clothes were left, and took my coat, waistcoat and hat. I have never heard of the hat since.

(The coat and waistcoat were produced in court by John Atwood , and deposed to by the prosecutor)

BRYANT CARTY sworn.

The prisoner lodged with me a fortnight, being in my yard I suspected him; I searched under the bed where he lay, and there I found these clothes; he had lain there a fortnight; he kept good hours: he said they were given to him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A great number of people lay in these apartments; sometimes I had a bed-fellow, sometimes I had not; I know nothing of the things; I worked in a brick-field at Tottenham Court Road; but I cannot remember the name of the master I worked for.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-62

588. SARAH DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. two

linen stocks, value 1 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. two thousand four hundred and forty-eight yards of silk ferreting, value 30 s. and a pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Delegall , June 11th .

JOSEPH DELEGALL sworn.

One William Bowman , a headborough, came to me on the 11th of June, and asked me if I had lost any sheets, stockings, and shirts; upon examining, I missed several things. He took me to London Wall, then to another place, where some of my goods were; my suspicion falling upon the prisoner who was my servant, I took her up; I had before seen the ferreting concealed under the stairs; I told her to take the ferreting from under the stairs; at first, she denied she knew any thing of it; I repeated my command, and then she went down on her knees and begged forgiveness, and said, she it did at the instigation of a mantua-maker, who said she would make her clothes for nothing if she would bring some of her master's goods.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

WILLIAM KNIGHT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the things delivered to Delegall are the same which a woman pawned with me; she said the person they belonged to was at the door but did not choose to come in.

Court. How came you to take things in under such suspicious circumstances? - I did not suspect her; she has used our shop often.

Court. She told you enough to make you suspect her, when she said the person that brought the goods did not choose to come into the shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of these things; my master took me by the left shoulder and shoved me back, and said I knew of this ferret and these things; I knew nothing of them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-63

584. NICHOLAS TODD was indicted for stealing a tin box, value 1 d. and six shillings and sixpence, in monies, numbered, and a counterfeit sixpence , the property of Michael Willey , July 7th .

ANNE WILLEY sworn.

I am the wife of Michael Willey ; the money was taken out of the till in the shop on the 7th of July, at about six in the evening; I was turning my eye that way and saw the prisoner behind the counter; he had been taking something out of the till; I immediately called stop thief. I lost six shillings and six-pence good money, and a box with a counterfeit six-pence in it: there was three shillings in sil ver, a half crown and three six-pences. George Glass brought the prisoner back, and I received the money from Glass.

GEORGE GLASS sworn.

Upon the prosecutrix calling out stop thief! I followed the prisoner to Tottenham-street; I lost sight of him some little time, at last he turned round towards the dunghill, there I saw him sitting down upon the dunghill, as I imagined, easing himself; I went up to him, took hold of him and took him back to Anne Willey , upon her telling me she had lost three shillings, a half crown, and three six-pences; I went back to the place where I had seen the prisoner upon the dunghill, and there I found this money. I found the box before.

(The box and the counterfeit six-pence were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

[The prisoner in his defence called several witnesses, who gave him a very good character.]

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-64

589. HENRY SCOTT was indicted, for that he in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, in and upon John Higgins , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and

stealing from his person a silver watch, value 3 l. a silver stock-buckle, value 3 s. a linen stock, value 1 s. and three shillings in monies, numbered, the property of the said John , June 17th .

JOHN HIGGINS sworn.

The prisoner robbed me in the Green Park, near St. James's Park , on the 17th of June at past twelve at night; I was waiting for an acquaintance; we had been walking before in St. James's Park; we had been talking with some girls; he left me in the Park, and I waited for him; I went by the sentry-box where the prisoner was, and went part of the way up the walk and returned back expecting to meet my friend at the door there, as he had the key of it; the prisoner came immediately out and laid hold of me, and asked me what money I had got, I said only two or three shillings; he said d - n your eyes! what do you come out with so little money for? he said you have a stock-buckle and a silver watch, and said if I did not give them to him or made any resistance, he would pull out his bayonet and murther me; I refused giving the property to him; he d - d my eyes many times, and said he insisted upon it, if I did not give it him he would get the bayonet out of the box and murther me.

Did you see that he had a bayonet? - I cannot say, I suppose they are not without a bayonet when they are on duty.

You are certain he was on duty? - I believe he was, because as I went past, he was standing by the box; there was no other person there, and he wished me a good night; I believe, he had a musquet in his hand then.

Was his box in St. James's Park? - No, in the Green Park.

Did he take the watch from you, or did you give it him? - He insisted upon the whole, stock-buckle, watch and money; he insisted on my pulling my stock off, I did; I took the buckle out and was going to pin the stock on; he d - d my eyes, and said, he would have the stock likewise; I gave him the stock and came away; he told me if I made any resistance in going off, he would murther me. I went the next day into the Park, and enquired how I could find who was on duty at such an hour in that box; I at last found one James Neale , who found out the prisoner: he was taken in St. John's church on the Saturday following. My Lord, I forgot one thing, I desired the prisoner to let me have my seal, because I valued it; he d - d my eyes, and said I should, and he broke it off; there is part of the chain to the watch and part I have.

JAMES SMITH sworn.

I went down with Jones to church on Sunday and took the prisoner as he came out; I held him while Jones searched him; he found a pawnbroker's duplicate of the stock buckle in his pocket; the prosecutor said he had lost a stock as well as the buckle; we found the stock pinned on his neck; we were informed that one Barber knew something of the watch; I saw Barber standing at a door; I asked him if he knew any thing of a watch Scott had robbed a man of; he said he did; that it was in a box at his lodgings, for Scott and he lodged together; I took him into custody; we went with him to his lodgings and found the watch; he was admitted to bail to give evidence.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOHN BARBER sworn.

This watch, to the best of my knowledge, on Saturday morning the 20th of June, was put into my box by Henry Scott ; we lodged together, the box lid was open.

JAMES NEAL sworn.

I am a private soldier; I know the prisoner, but have no particular acquaintance with him; he belongs to another regiment; the prosecutor came to me in the morning and asked me if I could find out the person that stood sentry between twelve and two in the Green Park; there is but one box there; he said he would treat me if I found it out; he did not tell me his business. I asked the corporal, who said it was Scott; I told the prosecutor, he said that man had robbed him of his watch and stock-buckle; I went to the prisoner's house by the prosecutor's desire, and asked him why he robbed him in the park; and whether he was in liquor, he said he was not; and that his fire-lock

was in the box; I asked him then how he came to do it; he said I cannot tell, and I don't know what to do; he turned away, I told him he had better go to the gentleman, he said he did not know what to do; I said I wondered what brought a gentleman in the Park at that time of night, perhaps he was one of the b - gg - rs; he said no he could not say he was; there is some gentlemen attend that Park and affront the sentinels.

THOMAS JONES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I received a silver stock-buckle of the prisoner.

(The stock buckle was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

HENRY JONES sworn.

I attend the public office in Petty France; I took the stock off the prisoner's neck, and found the duplicate of the stock buckle in his pocket, (producing it.)

Jones. This is the duplicate I gave him.

(The stock was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the man's things; I never had any of them in my possession; the stock and stock-buckle were my own. I know nothing of the watch.

The prisoner called his Serjeant who said he had been in the regiment between five and six years, and was a clean soldier.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17780715-65

590. JOSEPH CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing two cloth coats, value 6 d. a child's linen coat, value 3 d. two cloth waistcoats, value 6 d. a pair of cloth breeches, value 2 d. and a pair of women's callimanco shoes, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Willden , spinster , June 22d .

MARY WILLDEN sworn.

I live in Westminster; I am a washerwoman . I had the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them.) in a bundle under my arm; I was going to sell them for an acquaintance: as I was coming along from Spring-Garden-Gate I saw the prisoner follow me; it was about-half after nine at night; just as he got opposite the Gun he snatched the bundle from under my arm, and went off to the Horse-guards; I lost him in the Horse-guards.

How soon was he taken? - About ten o'clock. I was standing at the Star and Crown door in the Broad-way, Westminster; and the prisoner came by with the bundle; I said to one William Butler whom I was talking with, that is the man that robbed me; and that is my bundle; Butler immediately took him.

If he had not had the things should you have known him? - I cannot say I should.

WILLIAM BUTLER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Robson who keeps the Star and Crown a public house, Westminster, the prosecutrix was telling me of the robbery; and the prisoner went by with the bundle under his arm; she said that is the man; and that is my bundle; I stopped him and took the bundle from him.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

JAMES LACOCK sworn.

I helped to take the prisoner; I know nothing of the robbery.

Jury to Butler. What did the man say to you when you stopped him? - He was obstreperous, he d - d me, and threatened to punish me for stopping him in the street and robbing him of his bundle. I said he had stole the bundle from that young woman; and desired he would give it to her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was walking on the parade with my gun fixed I picked this bundle up; I went to the Broadway, and this man laid hold of me; I said I would go to a Justice of peace.

Butler. When I took him he d - d me, and said the bundle was his own property; when he was before Justice Durden, he said, he saw a man take it from this woman; and that the man gave it to him, because he could run fastest.

(The prisoner called the Serjeant of his company, who said be never heard any thing of this kind of him before.)

Court to the prosecutrix. When the man

came by was it the bundle or the appearance of the man that struck you? - I thought I knew both the man and the bundle.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-66

591. JOHN PINK was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. and a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of David Ezard , July 1st .

DAVID EZARD sworn.

I am groom to Mr. Beedd in Charlotte Mews ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of my chamber; I saw them about twelve at noon and missed them about four; the prisoner sold them to a woman.

ANNE ADLAM sworn.

The prisoner came to my house in Bennet's court, Drury-lane, on Midsummer-day, at about six in the afternoon, and sold me these buckles; I gave him twelve shillings and sixpence for them, and he gave me a receipt.

RICHARD ROWNEY sworn.

Anne Adlam came to our shop on the third of July in the forenoon and bought some sheets and a quilt and something else; she had not money enough to pay for them, she took the buckles out of her shoes and pledged them for half a guinea to pay for the things.

(The buckles were produced in court; and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To Adlam. Were the buckles that you pawned with Rowney the same that you bought of the prisoner? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about the buckles.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-67

592. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing ten live geese, value 30 s. the property of Richard Hedges , July 5th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-68

593. JOHANNAH GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing six yards of linen cloth, value 7 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. and a linen apron, value 2 s. the property of Jeremiah Potter , June 5th .

CHALOTTE POTTER sworn.

I am the wife of Jeremiah Potter , my husband is a chairman ; I sell things about the streets; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of my room; I saw them on the fifth of June, about a quarter before eight at night; I missed them about half after eight; they were taken while I was gone on an errand to Jermyn-street, the prisoner was then in the house; I found them at a pawnbroker's; the prisoner had absconded when I returned.

WILLIAM WARREN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a handkerchief of the prisoner on the 5th of June.

THOMAS BARBER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a piece of new cloth for a shirt of the prisoner; it is a shirt not quite finished; I took it in on the 5th of June.

JOSEPH SHEPPARD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's apprentice; the prisoner pawned an apron at our house on the 5th of June in the evening; the things were produced in court by the several pawnbrokers, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I pawned them through distress; she said if I would make an open confession she would take the money at 3 d. a week, or any how that I could give it her.

Prosecutrix. I said no such thing.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-69

594. CATHARINE SPARKES was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Withey , July 11th

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-70

595. JOHN KING was indicted for escaping out of the lighters, and being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to hard labour on the River Thames , June 7th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-71

596. ANNE HARVEY was indicted for stealing twenty four large silver table spoons, value 12 l. twelve silver desert spoons, value 3 l. five silver tea spoons, value 10 s. a silver marrow spoon, value 6 s. a silver soup ladle, value 8 s. a silver strainer, value 10 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 6 s. and a silver handle fork, value 1 s. the property of George Nelson , Esq ; two woollen waistcoats, value 8 s. one striped waistcoat, value 2 s. a linen shirt, value 5 s. one linen frock, value 6 d. a base metal stock buckle plated with silver, value 6 d. and a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Meredith , a mahogany tea chest, value 8 d. two tin cannisters, value 1 s. and a quarter of a 1 b. of green tea, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Brooks , spinster , in the dwelling house of the said George Nelson , June 10th .

GEORGE NELSON , Esq; sworn.

I live in Queen Square ; on the ninth of June, Mrs. Nelson and I were out of town; I left the butler and some other servants in town to take care of the house; on my return I found the plate mentioned in the indictment missing; I saw it at Latchfield street.

( John Coleman produced the goods, which he received of the watchman.)

DANIEL BUCKLEY sworn.

I am a watchman; at half past two in the morning of the 10th of June, I saw the prisoner coming towards me, when she saw me she started and then stopped; I went up to her to see what she had got; and told her I would ease her of her carriage, and I took all the things mentioned in the indictment out of her apron, and secured her; (The several articles mentioned in the indictment were deposed to by the several persons whose property they are laid to be.)

JOHN MEREDITH sworn.

I am butler to Mr. Nelson; I was in the house; I missed the things and found them again before my master came home. My master and mistress went out of town on Monday; I had a holiday on Tuesday; I went with some friends on a party of pleasure; I got very much in liquor, coming home I picked up this woman; she said she had no lodging to take me to for she should be locked out; so I took her home with me to my master's house; I said she should sleep with me, I came home about a quarter after twelve; Mrs. Brooks let me in.

With the woman? - No; after Mrs. Brooks was gone to bed I let the woman in and took her into my pantry; she pretended to undress herself; I being sleepy fell asleep; I waked at seven o'clock, and missed the things; I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and there was an information just come that the things were in Litchfield-street; she undid the lock with a silver fork and bent it very much.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He picked me up and took me home to his bed; he was to give me some money, he had none; he said I might take the things to make money of.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-72

597. WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing thirty two guineas, the property of William Bowls , in the dwelling-house of Gertrude George , June 17th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-73

598, 599. ANNE GILLAM and ELIZ. REDDALL were indicted for that they

in a certain field and open place; near the king's highway, in and upon Susannah, the wife of Richard Smith , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a silk gown, value 10 s. a muslin apron, value 6 d. a pair of women's shift sleeves, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of lawn ruffles, value 1 s. a woman's black silk hat lined with white silk and trimmed with lace, value 1 s. 8 d. and a yard of silk ribband, value 6 d. the property of Richard Smith , July 12th

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-74

600. ALEXANDER DUNCAN was indicted for stealing three yards and a quarter of cotton joan, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Ham , July 14th

THOMAS HAM sworn.

I am a linen-draper . On Tuesday last while I w as at dinner I saw somebody come into the shop and run out again; I ran out and saw the prisoner; he threw one piece away, then he turned down Temple-lane; I did not stay to take up the first piece; he dropped the other piece in Temple-lane; I instantly took him and carried him to Sir John Fielding 's.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-75

601. JAMES TATE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Walter , July 10th

(The prosecutor missed his handkerchief; he suspected the prisoner; he immediately searched him and found it upon him. The prisoner said nothing in his defence.)

GUILTY W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-76

602. WILLIAM ATHILL was indicted for stealing a mahogany tea chest, value 4 s. a linen bed quilt, value 2 s. a linen bed-gown, value 2 s. a silver watch, value 20 s. three silver tea spoons value 3 s. and a gold ring, value 5 s. the property of John Smith , December 20th

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am a lamp-lighter ; I live in Plough-street, Whitechapel. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of my apartment in Billiter-court, Billiter-lane ; I afterwards found the bed quilt and a pincushion in the prisoner's apartment, in Prince of Orange court, Petticoat-lane; the bed quilt was on his bed; I went out between seven and eight in the morning; I returned in the evening and found the shutters broke open and all my things gone but what I had on; his acquaintance fell out with him and came and told me some of my things were pawned at a Mr. Goodman's in Bishopsgate street; and some were at his apartments; the pawnbroker would not come.

How do you know it is the prisoner's lodging? - I have seen him and his wife there continually almost; I light the lamps in the court, and see them there.

SAMUEL YARDLY sworn.

I am a constable; I found the things in the prisoner's room; he came in while I was searching it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The room the things were found in was not my lodging; I used to call and see the woman that lodged there sometimes, and I happened to come in while they were searching the place.

(The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-77

603. ANNE Hill was indicted for stealing two brass candlesticks, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Francis , June 5th

(The prosecutor was called but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-78

604. THOMAS CRAYTON was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Catchart , July 14th

THOMAS CATCHART sworn.

On the 14th of July turning the corner out of St. Paul's church-yard on to Ludgate-hill ; I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned and saw the prisoner with his hand behind him; I laid hold of him and found my handkerchief concealed behind him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the handkerchief.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17780715-79

605. MARY FULL was indicted for stealing a canvas bag, value 2 d. five guineas and a half guinea , the property of William Meredith , July 3d

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizances to be estreated)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-80

606. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing 230 lb. wt. of iron nails, value 4 l. 5 s. and two hempen bags, value 3 d. May 25. 220 lb. wt. of other iron nails, value 4 l. 2 s. and two hempen bags, value 3 d. May 29. 240 lb. wt. of other iron nails, value 4 l. 10 s. and two hempen bags, value 3 d. June 1. 240 lb. wt. of other iron nails, value 4 l. 10 s. and two hempen bags, value 3 d. June 4th . the property of Theodosia Crawley , widow , the Rt. Hon. John, Earl of Ashburnham , and Charles Boon , Esq ;

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-81

607. ANN CAVERNER was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 10 s. a woollen cloth waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of black stocking breeches, value 2 s. and a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. the property of William Fuller , July 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-82

608, 609. ALICE SHARXEN and ANNE COOPER were indicted for stealing 8 lb, wt. of pewter, value 4 s. the property of persons unknown, June 16th

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-83

610. SAMUEL PEARCE was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to hard labour on the river Thames , June 12th

[There was no evidence given.]

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-84

611. MICHAEL SWIFT was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to hard labour on the river Thames , June 12 .

[There was no evidence given.]

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17780715-85

612, 613. SAMUEL PEARCE and MICH. SWIFT were indicted for stealing two kits of salmon, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Butcher , June 12th

THOMAS BUTCHER sworn.

I lost two kits of salmon out of a warehouse under Dice Quay ; I saw it in the warehouse on the 11th of June, at about seven or eight in the evening; I found it in the watch-house the next morning; I was called out of bed, I am sure it was mine, because there was a mark upon it; I missed three kits, two were found in their custody; and one afterwards in a cart.

LUKE HONOR sworn.

On the 12th of June as Honeyball and I were coming down St. Dunstan's hill, we met the prisoner Swift with the salmon on his head; I went across the way and asked him where he got it; he said from a man on the Keys; I asked him to go and show me the man; when we came to Thames-street, he threw the salmon off his head upon me; one kit cut my eye; the other stunned me. Honeyball pursued him, and I recovered myself and went round the gateway and stopped him and carried him to the watch-house; one of the kits broke in the fall; from that mark I know it: we did not see Pearce at the time.

( John Honeyball confirmed the evidence of Luke Honor ; and added, that Pearce said before the justice, commit us both for we were both concerned together.)

SWIFT's DEFENCE.

A man called me and asked me if I wanted a job; he had three of kits of salmon in his cart; in Thames-street he put two on my head; Honor ran against me and knocked them off my head, and then said, I threw them at him.

PEARCE's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

PEARCE NOT GUILTY .

SWIFT GUILTY N. 3 years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-86

614. ELIZABETH ROCK was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Young , spinster . June 10th

MIRANDA GORDON sworn.

On wednesday the 10th of June, two gentlemen quakers called at the house of the prisoner, and enquired whether one Miranda Gordon lived there; after seeing me and asking me several questions, they gave me a trifle of gold, taking the deceased to be the landlady of the house; they called to her, and begged she might stand by while she heard the trifling conversation that passed between them and me; one of them gave her half a crown and desired she would take particular care of me till he should call in the afternoon, upon which he withdrew; the prisoner came to me and told me I had got a quantity of gold and she demanded half of it; but I refused to give it her; she told me it was the custom of her house that all her lodgers should give her half of what money they received; I told her that if she had any demand the maid should have a trifle for the while the gentlemen staid, if she demanded half a crown she might have it, which she did; she also demanded the half crown of the maid, Eliz. Young, which she refused to give her; but to pacify the prisoner she went to market and bought dinner for better than half the money, but that did not satisfy the prisoner, and a quarrel ensued which continued the remaining part of the day; Elizabeth Young went as I suppose to a publick house and got a little in liquor; which she came home she was coming in at the door; the prisoner went to the door insisting she should not come in, and the deceased still insisting to come in, the prisoner lifted up her hand and gave her a blow on the stomach.

With a clinched fist or how? - I cannot say, I suppose with her clinched fist, but I cannot be positive, she gave her a blow in the stomach and pushed her down and she fell into the kennel, and with the other hand the prisoner shut too the door; I took the candle to run up stairs, but in going two or three steps I heard a violent shrieking, which occasioned me to return; and on going to the door I saw the deceased; two or three people were bringing her in at the door, not knowing her to be so bad I went out of the house and slept out that night; at ten the next morning I returned again; the deceased called to me, she called me Nancy, as my own name was rather difficult to pronounce; she said Nancy, Nancy, look at my leg; saying, she believed Mother Rock had killed her; I looked at her leg and found it swelled amazingly; I came down to the prisoner and told her Elizabeth Young was in a bad state of health, and that if she did not immediately send her to the hospital, or send for a surgeon, she would be a dead woman; the prisoner desired me to mind my own business, and said she would do neither the one nor the other; she continued that day and the

next, during that time I saw no manner of nourishment provided for the deceased but a few-eels on Thursday, which she could not eat; on Friday night I sat up with her till about twelve o'clock; the prisoner called out to me at twelve and desired me to go to bed, and said she would admit nobody to sit up in her house, especially a stranger; at seven next morning she called to me and desired me to come down stairs for she believed Elizabeth Young was dead.

What time was the blow given? - On Wednesday; she died on Saturday morning; I found her dead upon the floor when I came down.

Court. Who attended her? - No one; the parish sent a surgeon to examine her after she was dead, but she had no attendance while living that I could see, nor no manner of nourishment given her.

What time on Wednesday did you see this? - The gentlemen gave me the money between nine and ten on Wednesday morning; at about nine or ten at night the accident happened.

Then you did not see her fall? - No.

How came you to call it a push before the coroner? - I said before I could not tell whether it was with a clinched fist or no; I saw her lift up her hand towards her, and with the other hand she shut too the door; the door being a heavy door and shutting too pretty fast, hindered me from seeing her.

Cross Examination.

Counsel for the prisoner. What country woman are you? - My Lord, I am not come to inform the court of that; I beg pardon for lording you; (speaking to the counsel) I will not tell; it does not concern the cause.

Are you ashamed of your country? - That is a matter of no concern.

How long have you lodged in this house? - A fortnight and a day I believe.

You say two quakers came to you? - There were.

Are you a quaker? - I am not to tell.

Court. If any of these circumstances should happen to be material you will be obliged to answer? - But they are not material my lord.

Court. You are not to judge of that, if the court insist upon your answering, you must.

Counsel for the prisoner. Because she has worn.

Court. You took the oath very willingly and freely, you made no scruple? - None; because I have nothing to say but what is truth.

Counsel for the prisoner. You lodged there about a fortnight? - Yes.

This evening after this accident happened, did you go into the next door? - I did not; I went by the next door.

Had you been at the next door the next morning? - I had never been within side the next door in my life till Rock was taken prisoner. I stood at the window, and had been speaking to them how cruelly Rock used the maid, and ill used me in scolding me, because I did not give her part of my money.

How came you to swear now that the prisoner gave the deceased a violent blow, and before the coroner you said a push, can you reconcile that? - She lifted her hand, and gave a blow, I told his Lordship I could not tell whether her fist was clinched or no.

Have you had a quarrel with the prisoner? - Never in my life.

You speak warm against her? - Nothing but for justice; what I do is against my will that I was ever brought an evidence; I was kept prisoner some days in the Compter, but I must tell the truth when called upon.

The steps are very near to the door? - They are.

A small push I believe would push any body down at the door? - I don't know but it may; I am not to tell that, I never tried it.

Whether a small push would not push a person down into the alley from that door? - I don't know but it may, but I never tried.

You swear positively that there was a push? - Positively I swear that there was a push.

WILLIAM LUTWYCHE sworn.

On Wednesday the 10th of June at about ten at night, I am not certain whether the clock had struck or not; my wife informed me that she heard some groans; I followed my wife out of the house, which is next door to where the melancholy accident happened, into the court; there I found the deceased in the kennel; I asked her how she came there; she said Mrs. Rock (the prisoner) had just pushed or shoved her out, I am not positive to which expression, she called out Sukey, Sukey, come up, help my lame leg, my

leg is broke, and I am a dead woman; a lodger of mine who was behind me, one Thomas Bailey and me were endeavouring to get her up out of the kennel; we got her up, the door was then shut as she sat by the side of the steps; the deceased had been endeavouring as 'I think to get away by herself, without calling for assistance, but the door being shut I knocked at it and it was immediately opened; I am not positive whether by Miranda Gordon or the prisoner, but the door was immediately opened, and we saw them both in the entry of the passage; we carried her through the entry into a parlour which is adjoining, and put her upon a settee bed then we got a chair and put up the broken limb; the deceased looked very wistfully and very wild (I believe that was through liquor) at the prisoner, and said, you have been my bane, God forgive you for I do; the prisoner said, poh! poh! woman don't make a noise here, come get out of my house all of you; then we all went out of the house, except the witness Gordon, the deceased, and the prisoner; and from that time I know nothing more till I heard she was dead on the Saturday which was preceeding.

Cross Examination.

What age was the deceased? - A corpulent elderly woman, and lame withal; she had an iron upon her leg and she was the worse for liquor.

She loved a glass of gin? - Yes, as well as any body else, or brandy, or any thing of that kind, nothing would come amiss.

THOMAS BAILEY sworn.

About the hour of ten at night in the month of June; I was just going to supper at Mr. Lutwyche's, Mrs. Rock flung this Mrs. Young the deceased into the kennel.

Did you see her do it? - No, we found her in the kennel; the deceased called out for God's sake for somebody to come and relieve her, to help her up; she called out for Sukey Napier, who was out of doors, to help up her lame leg; for Mrs. Rock she said had pushed her out of doors and broke her leg; she begged us to help her up, and help her in doors, we took her in; as soon as we took her in doors the prisoner desired us to walk out, and asked us what business we had in her house; we walked out; as soon as the deceased got in she said to Mrs. Rock, you have been my bane, but God forgive you, I do.

ABRAHAM FREELOVE sworn.

I happened to be in the court, hearing a woman cry out, I ran to her assistance and found the deceased in the kennel; I went to help her up but she was rather too heavy for me to lift; some other people came and helped her up, and we set her upon the step; we knocked at the door and the door was opened, and the door was shut again against the deceased with these words that she should not come in there, that she was a drunken bitch, or drunken whore, I will not be positive which were the words, I stood below. The deceased said, Mrs. Rock is the person that has murthered me, I am a dead woman, or dying woman, I don't know which; the word she used was either murthered or killed, or was the cause of her death; she charged Mrs. Rock with having shoved her out of doors.

SUSANNAH NAPIER sworn.

As I was in Church-yard court, a young woman came and said Sarah Young was in the kennel; I went to see her, she begged I would lift up her lame leg, as I knew which it was, I did; I asked her how she came to fall in the kennel, she said, Mrs. Rock had shoved her out of doors, that her leg was broke; and she was a dead woman; we got her in with great difficulty, we put her upon a settee bed in the room, and put her leg upon a chair; she turned to Mrs. Rock and said that she had been her bane, but hoped God would forgive her, and she did likewise; Mrs. Rock insisted upon e very body going out of her apartment, which we did, and I saw no more of her.

ELIZABETH LUTWYCHE sworn.

On the tenth of June I heard Mrs. Rock's door shut very hard; presently I heard some body scream and groan, I went out with my husband; we saw Sarah Young in the kennel; he asked her how she came there, she said Mrs. Rock had pushed her out, and her leg was broke; I held the candle while they carried her in and came away directly.

Mr. BENYON sworn.

I am a surgeon; I examined the body of Elizabeth Young ; I was called there on the Sunday after she died, by the desire of Mr. Wagstaff the overseer. I

could find no marks of violence, except the fracture of the leg; I take that to be the occasion of her death; it was very much tumefied and very black; I imagine that occasioned her death by not having timely assistance; if she had had assistance directly, she might have stood a chance to have saved her life.

It was her lame leg? - Yes.

She had a very bad habit of body? - Yes, I imagine so; she might have stood a better chance if she had had a healthful body; but living so bad a life it brought on an inflammation.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

She was very much in liquor when she came in; I was in a passion with her; I said Betty Young how can you serve me so; she said where she had been, she would go again; I said then you shall stay out all night; I thought she was off the step of the door and I slapped to the door; I don't deny what I did: she was a woman I loved as I loved my soul.

Miranda Gordon . During my stay in the house I always took them for two sisters till this accident happened; they acted as two sisters: when I took the room it was of Young, I did not see Rock.

Court. How came the surgeon not to be sent for in two days?

Gordon. That I don't know; I desired a surgeon which was refused.

Prisoner. There was a doctor came.

Gordon. Yes, after she was dead.

For the prisoner.

EDWARD TURNER sworn.

I believe you are the watchman? - Yes; after some time I came; Young was then in the house; I was calling the hour of ten; Mrs. Sanday at the Swan said, Mr. Turner when you have done your hour I will be obliged to you to come to me; I did go there; she said Mrs. Rock and Mrs. Young had been drinking, and that Mrs. Young could not get up stairs; will you go and lend her a hand up stairs? I went; there was the prisoner and Mrs. Young sitting silent together in their own apartment. Young said, lend me a hand up stairs, I said I would if she would get up upon her legs; she got up, laid her hands over my shoulder and I helped her up stairs; she said undo my iron, which I did; she desired me to put some brandy upon her leg; I got her to the bed-side, pulled off her shoe and stocking; I said, for decency, pull off her petticoats and I will rub the remainder of the brandy upon her leg. I have known them three years, they were always loving and in unity like two sisters; there was always never no words; the prisoner was always very kind and humane to her.

Court. What did you apprehend was the matter with her when you rubbed her leg with brandy? - She said something was the matter with her leg.

Court. Did not she say her leg was broke? - She did not say it was.

Court. Did you think her leg was broke? - I did not think it was; I left her that night and went next morning again.

To Mr. Benyon. Whereabouts was the fracture? - Just below the knee.

Was it upon that leg she wore an iron to? - I cannot tell.

Court. Could she have walked? - No, both the bones were broke.

SARAH HANCOCK sworn.

I have known the prisoner five years; all the time Elizabeth Young lived with her, I always looked upon them to be two sisters; she behaved very humane to her in every respect.

MARY SANDY sworn.

I live in the neighbourhood; I have known the prisoner and the deceased going on three years; they were very friendly and sociable; they lived like two sisters; I came home that night and found the deceased very much in liquor in my house; she said her friend and she had fallen out, I said be of a mild temper; she said she would, and would go home; she went out of my house at about a quarter before ten, somebody came and said, Mrs. Young was pushed out of doors into the alley; I went out to see, and Lutwyche and another man were helping her up; I asked Lutwyche what was the matter, he said Mrs. Rock had flung her down, the deceased said it is no matter to you, Mr. Lutwyche; whatever Mrs. Rock has done to me is nothing to you; I went into the house afterwards, and she was examining

her knee; I asked her if her iron was broke or any of her straps broke; she said no, if I would send some brandy in to do her leg, she would be obliged to me; I did not understand at that time that her leg was broke; I knew the person that helped her in and the prisoner were not on good terms; he asked what she shut the door for, she said that was no business of his and bid him go out, and he civilly went out; I sent in the brandy by the watchman to do her leg, and bid him not come out till she was in bed; they were both in liquor; he said afterwards I had given him a hard task, but he had got her to bed; I asked in the morning how she did, the prisoner said, she believed pretty well, all her cry was for liquor; she said, she was a little feverish; I said if she could not do for her, she had better send her to an hospital; she said why did I say that; while she was with her she should want for nothing; I heard no more till Saturday, when the prisoner told me she was dead.

To Mr. Benyon. Are you positive that there was a fracture of the leg? - I opened it and there was; it was a simple fracture, not a compound one; both bones were broken.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

Then as there was a great swelling, ignorant people might not be able to judge whether there was a fracture or not? - No man I think could be so ignorant as to over look it.

Does it not frequently happen that an inflamation must be got rid of before the fracture can be dealt with? - By internal and outward applications.

(Two other witnesses deposed that the prisoner and the deceased lived together upon good terms.)

Not Guilty of Murther, but Guilty of Manslaughter only . B. and Imp. 1 Year .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-87

615, 616. ROBERT ALLEN , and JOHN MILBOURN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Otley , on the 11th of June about the hour of two in the night, and stealing ninety guineas and ten half guineas, the monies of the said George Otley and Richard Otley , a bank note for forty. pounds, two other bank notes for thirty pounds each, another bank note for twenty-five pounds, ten other bank notes for twenty each, two other bank notes for fifteen pounds each, and eight other bank notes for ten pounds each, the said several notes at the time of committing the felony and burglary aforesaid, being the property of George and Richard Otley , and the said several sums payable and secured by the said several bank notes, being then due and unsatisfied to the said George and Richard Otley, the proprietors thereof .

2d Count. Omitting the burglary and laying it to be in the dwelling-house of the said George Otley .

[The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.]

GEORGE OTLEY sworn.

My brother and I are partners; we keep a shop in Holborn , and have another shop in Bond-street, which my brother keeps; he does not live with me in Holborn; we fastened the shop over night by a bar with lock and chains; at the back part of the shop there is a window; there is a shutter puts up and a bar goes across it, that bar was put up, and there are two bolts in the door; I saw it fastened at I believe, more than a quarter before ten at night; on the next morning at about six or rather sooner, the maid came up and waked me; I ran down stairs and found the house broke open; the door between the back and fore-shop was not broke open; the door into the yard was wide open; the shutter was taken down; there was a glass broke, in which a person might put in a hand to open the bolt; they had then undone the door and came in; there stood an escrutore, which they had opened the flap of apparently with a crow by the marks; they had broke off the inner lock; they had undone all my drawers, and spread all my papers upon the table in the compting-house; they had opened the secret drawers and taken the papers out; in two of the drawers there was silver and I believe some gold, but I will not swear to any they had taken; in one of the drawers there was about four hundred and sixty-three pounds worth of bills of exchange and

notes of hand; they were all taken out and missed for a considerable time, but I found them all afterwards upon the floor and in different drawers they were so dispersed; after that they came into the back shop; they pulled down the cloths and carried three pieces of superfine cloth into the garden, and packed up abundance of velvet and velverets, and carried them into the yard; they had spread the cloths that it might not make a noise at the grating over the bars to walk upon; I have an iron chest where I had four hundred pounds in cash and a forty pound bill, that I received between nine and ten that night from Mr. Nixon, and I think, two ten pounds and other notes; they broke that chest open; we found an iron crow and a dark lantern, which had a candle in it burnt down to an inch; and a key was left there.

Cross Examination.

This house is in Holborn? - Yes.

Whose was it? - Mine, and my brother's; we rent it together as partners; it is a joint affair.

Counsel for the Crown.

You live in this house? - Yes.

And your brother in Bond-street? - Yes, but we are equal partners; my brother pays half the rent of my house and I pay half the rent of his.

Court. What domestic servants are they in your house; has your brother any domestic servants at this house? - None.

The household is entirely your's? - It is.

EDMUND FRANCIS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Cow-Cross; I know the two prisoners: Robert Allen came on Friday the 13th of June and Saturday the 14th; he came and fetched some things out of pawn; I gave him change for a ten pound bank note; he asked me afterwards, if I could get him change for any notes and he would give me something for it; I scrupled it, and said no, I should not like it, for I did not like to have any thing to do with the transaction; he asked me again, and said, he would give me twenty shillings if I would get him change; I got change for a ten pound note for him; afterwards he brought me a thirty pound note; then he came again on Saturday and brought three others, and I got change for them; then Allen and Milbourn came together on Monday and brought three others.

Do you remember the sums or dates of either of them that were brought on Monday the 15th of June? - I have it set down in my pocket-book.

(The witness read the dates and the names of the persons to whom they were made payable, and the sums.)

What did you do with that note of forty pounds? - I got it changed by Mr. Lawes a baker, opposite my house.

Had you had any conversation with either of these prisoners or both of them respecting these notes, and how they came by them? - I think it was on the Monday Allen said, that they came out of the house of a woollen-draper, nearly opposite to Hatton Garden, that they had broke open and robbed of the notes, and upon that account I took this minute of the last notes.

Which said that? - Robert Allen .

Was the other prisoner there? - They were both together.

Counsel. Repeat that again? - Robert Allen said, that the woollen-draper's in Holborn nearly opposite Hatton Garden was the house that they had broke open, and that these notes came from thence.

That was said in the presence of Milbourn and not denied by him? - Yes.

Have you at any other time since that had any conversation with the prisoners or either of them? - I went to Tothilfields Bridewell when they were there; on the 28th of June Robert Allen said, that the money that was found in the shoes in Voiture's house, was part of the money that he had, and that the money that was found on Voiture, was a part of John Milbourn 's share, which was the produce of the notes or money out of Mr. Otley's house; he likewise said, that there were two parcels of notes about eighty pounds a piece, and two parcels of notes were then in a bag in a friend's cellar under a brick in a friend's necessary, and that he had taken the dirt up to put the bag underneath; that he went afterwards but it could not be found out; going to Milbourn to hear

what he said about it, he said his mother had fortunately taken it away before they ransacked the place.

Court. At your first conversation on Monday, were both Allen and Milbourn there? - Yes.

Cross Examination.

What are you? - A pawnbroker.

Where do you live? - At Cow-Cross.

Because I would have every body that hears you know what you are and where you live; how much of the money had you for your transaction? - Between eleven and twelve pounds.

For changing bank notes? - Yes.

And one of the prisoners told you that they had broke open a house and stole these notes? - They did.

That was before you had got cash for them all? - It was.

You changed some of the notes for them after that? - I did on the Monday, which made me take the minutes down.

You went to Milbourn's mother and got some money of her I believe? - Yes, I have it in my pocket now.

You pretended that they sent you to the mother? - Yes.

And went and asked her for bank notes? - I did.

And the money you got you have kept and never given her? - No, I have it now; I did it according to the order of the Bench.

Counsel for the Crown.

Explain how you came to do that? - I went from Milbourn to his mother's; I asked her about the notes that she had taken from under the brick in the cellar, and where they were, and that if she would give them to me I would take them away; she said, she knew nothing about them; I said I had been to her son and Allen, and Allen wanted some money, and I was going to carry him some; she said I have got none, but will borrow a guinea, which guinea she borrowed, and I have it here.

Counsel for the Crown.

Was you directed by any body to go there? - By Mr. Bond at Sir John Fielding 's; I was then detained.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

Did not you tell Mrs. Milbourn that you never had received any notes whatever from this young man; at least from Allen or her son? - No, I never said any such thing.

WILLIAM LAWES sworn.

You received a bank note from Mr. Edward Francis ? - I did.

On what day? - That, I cannot positively say.

Do you know what day of the week it was? - I cannot say, I had no apprehension that any thing would attend it, therefore I did not take particular notice, but this is the note I had of Edward Francis for forty pounds.

Francis. This is the note I received of Allen and Milbourn, and changed with Mr. Lawes.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Brown and Collinson.

Did you pay that note to any body? - I cannot say positively to the note; I can speak to the entry; it appears by my entry, I have a memorandum of it here.

Did you pay a note of these marks? - Yes, I did for a draught of forty-one pounds odd.

Cross Examination.

Do you remember the letter? - I do; it is K. 212.

Who signed the note? - I cannot say.

WILLIAM PAUL sworn.

I was sent on the 11th of June by Mr. Nixon, to Brown and Collinson's, with a draught of forty-one pounds sixteen shillings; I received the money from Mr. Johnson; a forty pounds bank note and one pound sixteen shillings in cash; I delivered the forty pounds bank note and the cash to Mr. Nixon.

JOSEPH NIXON sworn.

On the 11th of June, I received a forty pounds bank note from William Paul; I gave it the same night to Mr. Otley.

Mr. Otley. I received a forty pounds bank note of Mr. Nixon that night, between nine and ten o'clock, and locked it up immediately in the iron chest from whence it was stolen; but I did not take notice of the number of the note.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I went on the 26th of June to apprehend Milbourn; I received an information on the 25th, that Voiture and the two prisoners used the Three Hats at Islington, and breakfasted there generally in a morning; I went on the 26th; they did not come; but opposite the Three Hats, Milbourn was a-bed up one pair of stairs; I sent the officers over; he was apprehended and kept in custody for about half an hour; I sent him home and went down to his mother's and Voiture's; for they live together in Goswell-street; when I came there I shut up the door close; in about a quarter of an hour the prisoner Allen came in; he was taken into custody likewise; I searched the room, and in one corner of the room there was a trunk, which I broke open.

Had that trunk any name upon it? - No; the first thing I saw was two suits of brown clothes with plain silver buttons on them; a quantity of other clothes, and five pair of new shoes, and in the foot of one of the pair of shoes was I think forty-two guineas and two half guineas; and I found this pocket-book in it, (producing it.) Allen owned that that pocket-book was his; in that pocket-book there is a bill and receipt of the purchase of some buttons. (The bill and receipt was read in Court.) He said before the justice, that what was written in the pocket-book was his own writing. They both lodged in that room and lay together; there was all their clothes in that one box in that room. I found thirty-nine guineas upon Voiture.

[In the pocket-book there was an account of expenditures from the 15th of June, to the amount of two hundred and thirty-two pounds five shillings and seven-pence.]

ANNE HARRIS sworn.

You are servant to Mr. Francis? - Yes.

Do you remember seeing either of the prisoners there in June last? - Yes, I saw them both; they put some papers upon the table and my master gave them some money.

Do you recollect what day it was? - I cannot recollect what day.

Did you see them more than once? - No; Mr. Allen asked my master if he could not send me out; but I did not go out at all.

ALLEN's DEFENCE.

The clothes are my property. I am quite innocent of the robbery.

MILBOURN's DEFENCE.

The money Mr. Clark took from me belongs to me.

Q. to Johnson. Can you say what was the letter and number of the note? - It was letter K. number 212; that is all that is in the entry.

Court. Upon your memory you undertake to say it was forty pounds? - Yes.

Whether in the course of circulation there may be two notes of the same letter and number? - There may in the course of circulation but not of the same day.

Mr. Otley. Mr. Nixon paid me a note letter K. No. 212, which was lost that night.

[The prisoners called several witnesses, who gave them a good character.]

BOTH GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-88

617, 618, 619, 620. JOHN HOLT , JOHN DAVIS , ANDREW CARLETON , and ALEXANDER CARLETON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Jobling , on the 4th of June about the hour of one in the night, and stealing sixteen silver dishes, value 110 l. four other silver dishes, value 25 l. four other silver dishes, value 41 l. sixty-six silver plates, value 285 l. fourteen silver soup plates, value 64 l. three silver tureen covers, value 30 l. three silver tureen ladles, value 4 l. four silver sauce-boats with covers, value 27 l. two silver sauce-ladles, value 30 s. two silver sauce-boats, value 6 l. six silver salt-shovels, value 20 s. one silver epergne with eight silver branches, four silver caskets and four silver saucers thereto belonging, value 40 l. one stand for a silver tea-kitchen, value 6 l. one silver tea-kettle with lamp and stand, value 15 l. one silver tea-board, value 30 l. two silver waiters, value 35 l. two other silver waiters, value 15 l. two

other silver waiters, value 10 l. two other silver waiters, value 8 l. one silver coffee-pot, value 8 l. one silver stew dish with lamp and stand, value 10 l. twelve silver desert-spoons, value 3 l. one silver sallad-fork, value 20 s. three silver escolopt shells, value 4 l. six silver skewers, value 20 s. two silver pint mugs, value 4 l. one silver pepper-castor, value 20 s. one silver mustard-castor, value 20 s. one silver mustard-pot and ladle, value 40 s. one silver soy-frame containing six glass cruers, value 6 l. two silver branches for candlesticks, value 3 l. one silver argyle, value 4 l. one pair of silver asparagus-tongs, value 20 s. one silver fish-trowel, value 40 s. two other silver fish-trowels, value 20 s. forty-eight silver forks, value 15 l. forty-eight silver table-spoons, value 20 l. twenty-two desert-knives with silver gilt handles, value 10 l. twenty-four silver gilt desert-forks, value 15 l. twenty-four silver desert-spoons, value 20 l. one gold desert-spoon, value 20 s. one gold desert-fork, value 20 s. six plated bottle-stands, value 20 s. one silver sugar-ladle, value 15 s. one silver bread-basket, value 20 l. one silver cheese-toaster, value 15 l. one silver pot for horse-raddish, value 2 l. one silver fork for horse-raddish, value 2 s. three pair of silver candlesticks, value 20 l. five silver nossels for candlesticks, value 4 l. and one pair of plated candlesticks, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Stapleton , Esq ; in the same dwelling-house .

GEORGE PARVIN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Stapleton. I packed up the plate mentioned in the indictment and sent it to the White-Horse Inn, Cripplegate, to be carried to Mr. Stapleton's house in Yorkshire; I delivered it to Bartholomew Cooper , a carman, to take it to the inn.

BARTHOLOMEW COOPER sworn.

I am a carman; I was employed to carry and deliver that plate which I received of George Parvin ; I delivered it at the warehouse at the White-Horse, Cripplegate .

THOMAS CROMPTON sworn.

I am book-keeper at the White-Horse Inn, Cripplegate. A large quantity of plate was delivered at the inn by Cooper, to be sent into Yorkshire. I have a room in the inn yard where I sleep; there is a room parted off that room which is a kitchen, where I keep and dress my victuals; I board myself; the ostler sleeps in an apartment over me; the warehouse into which I put the plate is on the ground floor; it was locked with two locks; I left it safe and secure when I went to bed, and there was a dog left loose in the yard that night: I did not hear the dog in the night. The ostler called me about five in the morning and said, the warehouse was broke open; I went to the warehouse and found it had been broke open with chissels; the staple was wrenched, the bar was bent double, and the padlock lay on the ground, and there was a great deal of plate gone; we found three of the pacquets broke open. A bricklayer came in the morning and informed us, that there was a great quantity of plate at the watch-house.

Cross Examination.

Is that warehouse close to Mr. Jobling's? - It is all Mr. Jobling's; he lives himself in Wood-street, Cripplegate Buildings; the warehouse is a hundred yards from his house.

GEORGE MASHAM sworn.

I am ostler at the White-Horse Inn; I got up a little after four; when I went to let the men in to their work I found the warehouse door open and the boxes broke open; I went and alarmed Crompton.

JOHN NEGUS sworn.

I am a constable of Cripplegate Ward, and a patrole likewise; I was employed to look after the watchmen. On the 4th of June in the night, just as I had been my rounds and returned into the watch-house at about two o'clock, a watchman came and said, he had for some time seen some suspicious people looking very hard at him. I went up Paul's-alley, which leads from Red-Cross-street to Aldersgate-street; I met two men in the alley; I took no notice of them, but went through the alley through Hare-court, into Aldersgate-street; I saw nothing amiss; I waited in Paul's-alley, and in about ten minutes Philips came to me; soon after we saw John Davis coming. The watchman would have ran at him when he was at a distance, but I took him by the arm and pulled him back, that the man might come nearer to us; when he came within about five yards of the watchman, I made a blow at him with the staff; but seeing the staff, he fell down before the staff touched him; the

watchman fell upon him and we secured him. Davis dropped the plate which John Sheppard took up, who came at that time; we carried him and the plate to the watch-house. There were a dozen plates in a bag which had a parting between every one; I suppose the bag belonged to the family; there were four silver butter-boats and covers, and I think a cream cover was found in his pockets when he was searched in the watch-house.

Cross Examination.

What o'clock was it when you searched Davis at the watch-house? - I believe it was just gone the half hour after two in the morning of the 5th of June.

How far was the man off when you saw him first? - We might perceive him come at the distance of fifty yards; I did not take particular notice of his dress; his hair was powdered; I took him to be a gentleman's servant.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a watchman. On the 4th of June a little before two in the morning, I saw two men come down Paul's-alley, which is facing my stand; one of them went down one side of the way; the other, the other; and I saw two men go up, and a man and a woman backwards and forwards; I thought by the manner of their going on, they were about something that was bad; I went up to the watch-house and spoke to Mr. Negus and Mr. Shephard; Mr. Negus and Mr. Shephard came down to see if any thing wrong was going forward; Mr. Negus and I went up into the alley; while he and I were talking together, up came Davis; I saw him very bulky in his pockets, and he had something under his arm; I asked him what he had got there; he gave me some brumpt answer; I insisted upon knowing; I seized him by the collar, and lifted up my staff in case he should resist; he did not do that; whether he tumbled back or I pushed him back I cannot say, but he tumbled down and I upon of him; Mr. Negus immediately assisted me; we pulled him up; there was a dozen plates in a pair of breeches fell down upon the ground when he fell down; the rest of the things were in his pocket; they were in a little boy's breeches; we took him to the watch-house; there were four butter-boats and the covers, and there was one tureen cover if not two when he was secured; Mr. Negus and I came out again to lay in wait, if we could light of any more of them; I went up into the alley, Mr. Negus stayed in the street; he said if any body came up, I was to attack them in the front and he would follow them and keep them up behind; soon after, two men Holt and Andrew Carleton came; I saw Holt with a little bundle in his hand; I was then standing in the alley by the wall; as soon as he came within a little distance of me, I attacked him, I said what have you got there? I was pretty sure he was one, so I seized him by the collar; he dropped a large parcel of plate out of his hand, done up in a green cloth like a bundle; and Mr. Negus seized Andrew Carleton much about the same time I did Holt. Several more of our people came up to our assistance, and we took Holt and Andrew Carleton , and the plate that was dropped by Holt to the watch-house. The bundle contained a piece of plate we don't know the name of; we called it a lobster*; it stands upon feet; and a bread-basket and a cover, and two candlesticks. Andrew Carleton was searched at the watch-house, and a loaded pistol was found upon him; two candlesticks were found upon him at the time he was taken; he wanted to shift them out of his pockets; I believe he did throw one down but I am not certain.

* The Epergns.

Cross Examination.

At what distance could you see his pockets look bulky? - It might be the distance of the width of this court; there were four or five lamps in the alley.

And you could see at that time clearly that it was bulky? - Yes, by the light of the lamps.

Should you have known him again from that first sight if you had seen him? - I believe, I might.

Counsel for the Crown.

Was this light you are talking of lamp light or sunshine? - It was not sunshine, it was rather dark, if the day had began to break it was as much as it had; when I first

suspected them, it was before the clock had struck two.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

Was not that just about the day breaking? - I believe the day might be breaking, it is not thorough dark all the night now as it is in the winter, you cannot exactly tell when the day is breaking at this time of the year, there is a sort of twilight all night.

Whether it was not so much day light that all the lanterns were out? - I put my lantern out at the watch-house and left it there because I would not be discovered by them to be a watchman.

Counsel for the Crown to Negus.

You apprehended Carleton? - I did; and searched him and found a pair of candlesticks and a I aded pistol upon him.

MARY SCOTT Jun. sworn.

Andrew Carleton lodged at the house where my mother and I lodge in Hare-court, Mr. Cockman keeps it; Carleton had a parlour and a little room up one pair of stairs, it is a double house; there are seventeen families live in it I believe.

Cross Examination.

You are not all very particular to lock your doors? - Yes; we are, because we don't know one another; I saw him take the apartments of Mr. Cockman as I was fetching up water; they moved in at four in the morning; I heard a noise and got up to see what was the matter, and saw the cart of goods at the door.

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn.

Mr. Carty and I searched the room in the house the last witness lives in, which she calls a parlour; Carty said what place is this under the stairs? Carleton then gave him a key out of his pocket, Mr. Carty went in and found a hanger and a pistol under the stairs going up by his room door; we found nothing in the parlour; the pistol was loaded three fingers deep.

SARAH WESTFALL sworn.

I live in Cloth Fair; Alexander Carleton lodged in the garret at my house: on the fourth of June he came home at half after ten at night; he said he must go out again for half an hour, I sat up for him till twelve o'clock, he came in again at twelve; I saw no more of him till eight next morning, he went into his own room then, and went out again immediately, he did not come in in the night, I locked and bolted the door myself, and therefore I am sure he did not come in that night; he lodged in the garret, when he came in at eight in the morning he had a parcel under his arm; he went up stairs and came down immediately, he said if any body called for him he should be in again very soon, for he should lie down to take some sleep for he had had none all night.

JOHN KIRBY sworn.

I searched the lodging of Alexander Carleton in Cloth Fair on the fifth of June; he had been discharged before Alderman Oliver because there was nothing found upon him; he said before the Alderman that he worked with one John Gammon , and by means of Gammon we found where he lodged; and Duncastle and I went to the house of Mrs. Westfall in Cloth Fair; we went up into the garret and there we found a dozen of silver plates, and half a dozen of oval silver dishes and a gilt dessert spoon, they were between the bed and the mattrass; we found in the chimney of that room a bunch of picklock keys and a hanger; I think Alexander Carleton said they were his brothers, and that he had hid them there.

To Westfall. Was the garret Mr. Kirby searched the room in which Alexander Carleton lodged? - It was; he went into that room when he came home at eight o'clock in the morning with the bundle under his arm.

ANNE SAUNDERS sworn.

I live at the George Ale-House in Paul's alley; I have seen a young man who was in light clothes, but cannot take upon me to say I saw him that night, and the other gentleman in the curled wig, ( Alexander Carleton ), I have seen him there; but I think to the best of my knowledge I saw him there that night.

Do you remember seeing either there on the night of the fourth of June? - I cannot say, I think to the best of my knowledge I saw that man in the curled wig there; there were four or five together, I was in a hurry; two or three were going to pay me; a man in a light coat stopped the others from paying me, and said be would pay.

Have you any recollection to say who that

man in the light coat was? - He is not here to my knowledge; there were a great many more people in the house that night.

MARY ARMITAGE sworn.

I am servant to the person who keeps the tap at the White Horse at Cripplegate. On the fourth of June, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw Holt upon the ruins at the back of our house, where there are some houses pulling down, he was in the yard; I did not observe him do any thing.

(The plate being produced in court, George Parvin who packed up the plate deposed to the different parcels found upon the prisoners being the same he packed up.)

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I had been at Barnet the day before with a pair of horses for a gentleman; as I was returning home with a Barnet chaise about two in the morning I saw a man coming along. Old-street; I stooped down just as I came up to him, the man did not see me at first; it was about fifty yards from the watch box, then he looked round and saw me and ran away immediately, I picked up the breeches; there were two or three covers in it, and the green parcel of plate by it.

HOLT's DEFENCE.

I lodge at my father's in Bishopsgate-street; on the fifth of last month in the morning I got up to go to a butcher in Aldersgate-street; coming along I met Andrew Carleton at Cripplegate; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink; we went to an opening at the bottom of White Cross street, where a number of drays stand; he picked up this bundle of plate and put it into his pocket; Phillips swears as false as the child that is unborn; I had no bundle when he stopped me; I had not a six-pence nor I believe a shilling in my pocket, no knife nor any thing; I believe these things were taken from Carleton when they stopped me; but I was not in company with him at that time.

ANDREW CARLETON 's DEFENCE.

We were in company and picked up the plate together; I picked up the two candlesticks in this wide place, and the pistol lay by it; some man I suppose left them there.

ALEXANDER CARLETON 's DEFENCE.

My brother and I and his wife and mine live in one house together; he lies below, I lie up one pair of stairs; I was a bed that night a little after eleven o'clock; I have people here to prove that in the morning between four and five my brother's wife came up into the room, and said for God's sake get up I am afraid something has happened to your brother; I got up and looked about and searched the apartment below stairs where I found these keys; I said if there is any thing amiss maybe somebody will come and search his apartments by and by; so I said to my wife I will take these to my lodgings for I had not forsaken it; and she took the bundle in her apron, this was about six o'clock in the morning; I looked about the room when I went home again at about eight o'clock, and there I found that cutlass, I took that and put the keys and cutlass up the chimney together; I was at my new lodgings in Hare-court, Aldersgate-street, I had not lain in that lodging for several nights; my brother's wife had a bundle when she went up stairs, I do not know what it was, whether it was the plate or not.

Court to Westfall. Did Alexander Carleton come in at eight o'clock in the morning by himself? - Yes; with a bundle under his left arm, with a silk handkerchief over it.

Court. Do you know Andrew Carleton ? - I never knew him.

Court. Do you know whether his wife came there? - A lodger of mine let him in about six o'clock.

Andrew Carleton . We have a person here that is a judge of this building, and has got the plan of it, to prove that it is nothing but a shed and out-house.

The prisoners Counsel gave up that objection.

All four GUILTY Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-89

621. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term of seven years for which

he had been ordered to be transported , June 5th .

(The witnesses for the prosecution proved that the prisoner had been tried for, and convicted of a highway robbery in 1773; and had afterwards received his majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation for seven years.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came over to England in consequence of General Howe 's proclamation; when I first went over I was sold to one Mr. Davis, who was made a rebel captain; he took me out about this time twelve month to Philadelphia in the rebel service; he forced me to go along with him, I was there four days; we heard the English troops were landed at a place called the head of Hell; I then deserted because I would not fight against my King and Country; I was taken again by the rebel light horse; I was then put under guard for deserting from them; I went back to Philadelphia till the battle was fought at Brandawine; I kept there about a month after the battle was fought; I was ordered to be shot there; but General Washington sent down to twelve of us, that if we would all take the oath of allegiance and serve the Americans, we should all be acquitted; I thought I had better do that than die; I did take the oath, after that another battle was fought. I was at that battle, but I could not make my escape; I would not fight against my King and Country; we retreated back to a place called Kensington, I staid there a month; I heard from a deserter that General Howe gave a proclamation that all that came to him should have a free pardon; upon which I and six more deserted to him to Philadelphia, there we took the oaths of allegiance, and I came home by the proclamation along with one Captain Malne . I sent to him; he sent a note that he could not come to day, but he would come to morrow morning; he was going out in a day or two's time about some business; I deserted from the Americans once; they took me again; I was cast for death for it, and was to have been shot for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-90

622. MARY WILSON was indicted for stealing five linen caps, value 4 s. and a linen shirt, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Charlton , July 2d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-91

623. ANNE WOOD was indicted for stealing three guineas, a canvas bag, value 1 d. a bank note, value 20 l. another bank note, value 15 l. and another bank note, value 15 l. the said notes being due and unsatisfied to Dennis Mac Donald the proprietor thereof, against the statute , May 8th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17780715-92

624. RICHARD GARDINER was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury in his evidence upon the trial of William Tyler , George Rook , and Lydia Hardy , at the last sessions . *

(The indictment was compared with the record.)

JOSEPH GURNEY sworn.

I took in short hand the evidence of the defendant Gardiner, upon the trial of William Tyler , George Rooke , and Lydia Hardy .

[The short hand writer read the evidence given by the defendant upon that trial, in which the defendant positively swore that Tyler was playing at skittles with him at the Windmill over Black Friars Bridge, on the 25th of May; and went from thence to the Mercer's Arms, in Mercer-street, and was not out of his company from ten in the morning till about ten at night.]

THOMAS PARKER , Esq; sworn.

I was present at the trial of William Tyler , George Rook , and Lydia Hardy , at the last sessions for a felony. On the 25th of May; they were brought before the sitting justices; I came to the office between five and six, they were then in custody, at about six Mr. Croft came into the office; and we had them brought into our room and examined them; there was no one there to prove the property; we advertised it, and in a few days the person came who had been robbed.

JOSEPH SMITH sworn.

I was one of the Jury that tried the parties upon whose trial the prisoner came to swear; I likewise saw Rook and Tyler taken into custody; one of my servants told me he saw some suspicious people out of my back window, in a room sorting linens which he thought were stolen; I went up to the window out of which my man saw them, and I saw a scuffle between the constables, and the prisoners when they came to take them; there were three, one got away; the other two were taken; this was about four in the afternoon of Monday the 25th of May; they were in custody between four and five; I cautioned Gardiner upon the trial to be careful in what he swore, but he persisted in it.

*** See No. 478, 479, 480. in the second part of the last sessions.

JOHN MABERLY sworn.

I was upon the Jury; the prisoner swore exactly as Mr. Gurney has read his evidence. Upon the day that Tyler, Rook, and Lydia Hardy were taken up; as I was coming home at about five or a little after five I saw a mob in the street, and I was informed that two men were taken up; I went up into

Mr. Smith's back lost, and it was then a little after five; and I saw the officers take them away with them to the Rotation office.

DENNIS MAC DONALD sworn.

I had both Rook and Tyler in custody at about half after four on the 25th of May; I had them in custody till Mr. Parker committed them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was with him the best part of the day; he left me at the Mercer's Arms.

GUILTY 3 years. N.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-93

625. SARAH YOUNG was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury in her evidence upon the trial of John Meadows at the present session .

(The indictment was compared with the record.)

JOSEPH GURNEY sworn.

I took down the trial of John Meadows at this session; he called the defendant to prove an alibi; she swore that John Meadows was at her house in Queen's Head Court opposite the Adelphi, from eleven o'clock till half past twelve on the 10th of July *.

* See her evidence at large, No. 532 in the second part.

Mrs. ANN MAXWELL sworn.

I prosecuted John Meadows for robbing me; I was robbed by him on Finchley Common, going to Southgate, on the 10th of this month, at about ten minutes before twelve o'clock at noon; I am positive Meadows was the person that robbed me.

MISS SOPHIA MASTERS sworn.

I was in the chaise with Mrs. Maxwell; we were stopped ten minutes before twelve; I am positive Meadows was the man that robbed us.

JOHN FISHER sworn.

I drove the chaise; the ladies were robbed by Meadows, who was tried for it upon Finchley Common, about twelve o'clock on last Friday was a week.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing more to say than what I said at first; Meadows was at my house at the time that I said, my friends that were here on Saturday were obliged to be in the country. I am informed the person that committed the robbery is now taken; I should be glad to put my trial off till next sessions.

Court. I cannot put it off now, you are upon your trial, and the jury is charged; you might have put it off; you had a right to traverse it, if you had applied.

For the Defendant.

WILLIAM BRIGGS sworn.

Where do you live? - At one Mr. Rowley's house; I have been out of place these few days.

What is your business? - In the hostlery way; I have a place to go to; I was hostler at the Half-Way-house, between Deptford and Greenwich; I have left that house five or six weeks.

Do you know Sarah Young ? - No; she is an entire stranger to me.

Did you tell any person that you was to be a witness for her? - I cannot say I did, any particular person.

Do you know John Meadows ? - I have seen him at the Bricklayers-Arms; he used to call there at a house I lived at as waterman; I met him in Grays-Inn-lane, and drank part of two pints of beer with him at the Green Man in Purpool-lane.

When was that? - Last Friday was a week.

What time of day was that? - It might want a quarter of ten o'clock, and I believe I was there with him till a quarter or half past ten; then I walked with him into the Strand, to Queen's Head-court, and then parted from him.

What time did you leave him in the Strand? - Near upon eleven, I believe.

And are you positive this was on the 10th of July? - It was last Friday week; I cannot say any further.

Defendant. Meadows came up to my house

at the time he said, rather before eleven; he was never out of my house till very near one.

Q. to Briggs. Was you present at the trial of Meadows? - No, I was in the Borough with a custom-house officer.

Did Meadows send to you? - He desired I would appear upon his trial; when I came the night before, he said, he did not think his trial would come on till Saturday: I came to him in Newgate the night before his trial came on.

Did you tell any person that you was to be witness for him? - I cannot say, I did, any particular person.

Do you know that young woman at the bar? - I never saw the woman, so help me God in my life, till I saw her since Meadows was cast for death, that was in prison; I heard when I came to see him, that she was committed for perjury.

What was the business that detained you? - He told me that he did not expect his trial to come on till the next day; he told me that the night before his trial came on: I was stopped upon a seizure; a man desired me to fetch a custom-house officer for a seizure of run goods.

Could not an hundred people have done that? - They might, but Meadows did not think any thing of his trial coming on then; he said, he hoped I would come and speak in his behalf, of drinking with him where I did.

JAMES ROBERTSON sworn.

I have known Sarah Young two years; she was sober, and industrious; she took in washing, and went out on messages and such like as that.

Q. to John Fisher . When Meadows robbed the ladies did his horse appear to be hard rid? - It was not very hot, it was in the midling way.

Briggs. Meadows told me Green was the man that committed the robbery: that was in the bail dock immediately after he was tried. I came here to give evidence but was too late; I left the custom-house officer in the Borough, and told him what I was coming on. Meadows said he was an innocent man, and that Green committed the robbery; what I say is true; else, I hope I shall never move my feet.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[ William Briggs was by the Court committed for wilful and corrupt perjury.]

Reference Number: t17780715-94

626. CHARLES HARIMONT was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17780715-95

627. EDWARD FARMER was indicted for obtaining by false pretences eight loaves of sugar, value 4 l. 18 s. 3 d. the property of Samuel Noton , Benjamin Noton , and John Ewer , July 1st .

CHARLES GOODYER sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Noton and Ewer. On Wednesday the 1st of July, the defendant came with a note to our house, as from Mr. Axford, for eight loaves of sugar; I opened it and read it; I looked in his face and asked if he came from Mr. Axford; he said he did; I went up and showed it to one of the partners, who ordered me to deliver the sugar, which I did. I should not have delivered it, if he had not brought that note.

(The note was read in court. It was signed Lucas.)

WILLIAM BERRIFORD sworn.

I am shopman to Messrs. Noton and Ewer; the prisoner helped me to weigh the sugar; he was so awkard at putting it into the scale, that I asked him if he lived with Mr. Axford; he said he did, but had not lived long with him.

[Mr. Axford deposed, that he did not sent the prisoner to Messrs. Noton and Ewer's, for any sugar, and that no person of the name of Lucas lived with him, and that the note was not sent from their house.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was called off the stand by a man who gave me a note, and took the goods of me; as I crossed the way; he said, they were to go into the crountry.

GUILTY Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s17780715-1

The TRIALS being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgement, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 15.

John Chamberlaine , John Holt , John Davis , Alexander Carleton , Andrew Carleton , Robert Allen , John Milbourn , John Stewart , Mary Williams , Robert Poor , John Meadows, Anne Underwood , Sarah Corderoy , Henry Scott , Anne Harvey .

And Lyon Lyons, whose-sentence had been respited for the opinion of the twelve judges.

Navigation for 3 Years, 6.

Richard Gardiner , James Chapman , Robert Price , Thomas Williams , Thomas Wilson , and Samuel Waitcroft .

Branded and imp. 6 months, 5.

Michael Swift , Elizabeth Jones, Elizabeth Athill , Sarah Devis, and Elizabeth Breeze .

Branded and imprisoned 6 months, 2.

Peter Daniel , and William Thomas .

Branded and imprisoned 2 months, I.

Thomas Robins.

Branded and imprisoned 1 month, 2.

Martha Hutchinson , Philip Archer , alias Adshed.

Branded, 7.

William Helty , John Beaumont , Rider, John Wigmore , John Williams , Roy, and Mary Willis .

Branded and imprisoned 1 year, 4.

John Jones , Susannah Dunn , Mary Green, and Alexander Duncan .

Branded and imprisoned 2 years, 1.

Mary West , alias Grove.

Imprisoned 3 years, I.

Anne Smith, alias M'Rea.

Whipped, 12.

Jacob Jonas , James Tate , Thomas Crayton , Sarah Goddard , Edward Harold , Jane Berrimond , John Bland , Sarah Jordan , Elizabeth Green, John Pink , and Elizabeth Cockwine .

Reference Number: a17780715-1

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) A NEW EDITION OF BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Of M. GURNEY may be had any of the former Numbers of the Sessions-Paper.

Reference Number: a17780715-2

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) A NEW EDITION OF BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED. (After more than Forty Years Practice, to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Of M. GURNEY may be had any of the former Numbers of the Sessions-Paper.

Reference Number: a17780715-3

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, ( DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO THE KING) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED after more than forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

The first part (price Six pence) containing the Trial of Sir Alexander Leith , Baronet, with all the arguments of the council at large, may be had as above, or any of the former Numbers of the Sessions-Paper.


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