Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd December 1777.
Reference Number: 17771203
Reference Number: f17771203-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 3d of December, 1777, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir JAMES ESDAILE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 31, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar.

M.DCC.LXXVII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JAMES ESDAILE , Kn. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir RICHARD ASTON , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bch; the Honourable Sir BEAHMONT HOTHAM, Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Charles Sherbone ,

Ebenezer Braithwaite ,

William Emery ,

Philip Stevens ,

James Matthews ,

James Harris ,

Robert Marsh ,

Joseph Cover ,

James Lawson ,

John Viven ,

Henry Stent ,

David Gardiner .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Wingfield ,

James Walsh ,

John Gregory ,

John Evans ,

John Mace ,

Edward Bevan ,

John Middleton ,

Christopher Spencer ,

Charles Stewart ,

Joseph Edmondson ,

James Simonds ,

Richard Walker .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Bush ,

Richard Gimbert ,

Stephen Thorncastle ,

John Venables ,

John Tetlow ,

Abraham Smith ,

Joseph Whitehead ,

William Whiteside ,

William Jover ,

William White ,

William Stennell ,

James Brownell .

Reference Number: t17771203-1

1, 2. JOHN STORER and SAMUEL BLAKEY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Newby on the 25th of October , between the hours of twelve and one in the afternoon, ( Ann Penny spinster , servant to the said Richard Newby , being in the said dwelling-house) and stealing a white linnen bed-quilt,

value 10 s. three linnen shirts, value 15 s. two linnen shirts, value 10 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 4 s. two muslin aprons, value 7 s. a white linnen apron, value 1 s. four pair of womens cotton stockings, value 4 s. a linnen napkin, value 1 s. a mahogany tea-chest, value 10 s. a time-piece, value 5 s. a tortoiseshell tobacco-box set with gold, value 2 guineas, and a shagreen knife-case, value 5 s. the property of the said Richard; and a black mode cloak trimmed with lace, value 28 s. the property of Ann Penny .

RICHARD NEWBY sworn.

I am clerk to a merchant in the city. I live in Tokenhouse Yard, and have likewise a house at Islington . My house at Islington was broke open on Saturday the 25th of October. I know nothing of the fact, as I had not been at the house after the preceding Tuesday morning.

ANN PENNY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Newby. I was at my master's house at Islington. On Saturday the 25th of October I went accidentally, between the hours of twelve and one, into a bed-room, and caught the prisoner Storer at the drawers. I asked him what business he had there; he told me two men sent him in at the window; the window looks towards a field. I found a cloth apron, a napkin and a pair of cotton stockings, upon Storer; he had them in his hands; they were taken out of the drawers in the same room. I found the knife-case hid under some rubbish in the field. I did not see the prisoner Blakey near the house.

Do you know the ages of the prisoners? - I understand Storer is fourteen years old, and Blakey twelve.

( The goods mentioned in the indictment, which had been recovered, were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM HATFIELD sworn.

I am a constable. Ann Penny sent for me, and gave me charge of Storer. I put him into the ge. I asked him where Blakey was, because I knew they were connected together. He told me Blakey was gone home. I went according to his direction, and found Blakey, and took him into custody. He owned to me that Storer had had this tobacco-box. He took me to some rubbish near Mr. Newby's house, where I found the tobacco-box.

STORER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty.

BLAKEY was not put on his defence.

STORER GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 4 s .

BLAKEY NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

JOHN STORER and SAMUEL BLAKEY were ( a second time) indicted for stealing a linnen sheet, value 4 s. three muslin neckcloths, value 4 s. two muslin aprons, value 12 s. a check apron, value 1 s. 6 d. two linnen caps, value 4 s. and two linnen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Green , September 20th .

JANE GREEN sworn.

I am the wife of John Green. The wearing apparel mentioned in the indictment was hanging up to dry in the garden. I saw them between ten and eleven o'clock, and I missed them at about twelve. I found them afterwards at a pawnbroker's on Saffron-Hill.

(The goods mentioned in the indictment were produced in court by the pawnbroker, who deposed that he received them of Storer.)

STORER's DEFENCE.

I found them in a field.

BLAKEY was not put on his defence.

STORER GUILTY .

BLAKEY NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-2

3. SEBASTIAN BISHOP LAND was indicted for stealing a muslin apron, value 5 s. and a pair of muslin ruffles, value 3 s. the property of Janetta Nettleton , spinster , September 12th .

JANETTA NETTLETON sworn.

I live in the house of my sister in Charles-Street, Portland-Square ; she lets lodgings.

The prisoner was servant to a gentleman who lodged in the house. I missed the wearing apparel mentioned in the indictment after the prisoner was gone from the house; the apron was taken from among the dirty linnen, the others were taken out of my box.

GEORGE CHURCHMAN sworn.

I am brother to the prosecutrix. I heard she had lost these things. I found them at a pawnbroker's.

EDWARD CLARKE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in pawn this apron and these ruffles of the prisoner on the 12th of September; I lent him seven shillings upon them. He pawned them in the name of, Thompson, who is a customer at our shop. That is the reason why I did not ask him any questions.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-3

4. JOHN FREE , otherwise BEAUMONT , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Bland on the 21st of October , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a small wicker basket, value 2 d. and 360 halfpence and 1056 farthings, the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. For stealing the above goods in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Bland , and then burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house against the statute.

THOMAS BLAND sworn.

I keep a house in Cow-Lane . I went to bed on the 21st of October at twelve at night. When I came down the next morning at a little before seven, I found the door of the tap-room, which goes into the passage, standing open. I found my bar open, and I saw a pane of glass was broke, so that a hand might have been put through to open the bar. Then I found that the halfpence, which were kept in a basket in the bar, and which I had seen there the preceding day, were gone. I did not know exactly how much there was, but I suppose there might be about forty shillings worth. I had barred and locked both the doors over night; I found them open in the morning when I came down. A person told me, two or three days after, of a boy's having been stopped with some half-pence; that led to a discovery.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner at two o'clock in the morning with this basket and the halfpence in it (producing them). He had the basket on his arm. I asked him how he came by the halfpence, and where he was going: he said his master had sent him for the halfpence. I suspected him, and took him into custody.

Prosecutor. I swear to this basket. It has hung in the bar for many years; we used to keep halfpence in it. Here is a paper bag, which I likewise swear to; it contains farthings.

JOHN HALLIDAY sworn.

I was the officer of the night. James Hall brought the prisoner to the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was walking with a link in Moorfields, I found this basket hid under some stones. I am not fourteen years old.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing the goods and money .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-4

5. JOHN GAHAGAN , and ELIZABETH his wife , were indicted for stealing in the dwelling-house of James M'Donald a bank note for 20 l. the money payable and secured by the said bank note being then duo and unsatisfied, to James M'Donald the proprietor thereof. - Against the statute .

Second Count. For stealing a silver watch, value 5 l. a silver watch chain, value 10 s. a silver watch key, value 2 s. three silver seals, value 14 s. a picture ring, with garnet stones round it, set with gold, value 15 s. two stone rings set in gold, value 15 s. a black enamel'd

mourning gold ring, value 10 s. a gold locket, value 5 s. a box made of mother of pearl and mounted with silver, value 10 s. a box made of ivory and mounted with silver, value 2 s. 6 d. a large silver soup spoon, value 36 s. a silver cream pot, value 2 s. and five guineas and eight half guineas, the property of the said James M'Donald, in his dwelling-house.

ANN M'DONALD sworn.

I am the wife of James M'Donald, my husband keeps the Lord Tyrawley's-head, a public-house, in High-street, Marybone : on the 5th of last month, at about twelve at noon, I changed a twenty-pound Bank Note for a neighbour; I gave him in change nineteen guineas and a shilling; I put the Bank Note into a drawer in the chamber up one pair of stairs, in which drawer were five guineas and eight half guineas; there was a half guinea in it which I had given to my husband some time before to weigh, he told me it was a good half guinea and he should know it again; I locked the drawer and left the key in it, and I locked the room door and took the key away with me. The prisoner is a bricklayer, I saw him at twelve o'clock in our house; he was in the house at the time I changed the Bank Note; the twenty pound Bank Note, and this money and rings, were taken out of the drawer.

JAMES M'DONALD sworn.

I keep the Lord Tyrawley's-head: on Saturday the first of November my wife gave me a half guinea, which she asked me to weigh, I told her it was good; a great deal of company were in the house; then I told her I knew the half guinea very well, there was a nick in the eye, likewise in the G, and a little line upon the head; I gave the constable an account of these marks upon the half guinea before it was found at Gahagan's: to my recollection, upon the 5th of November I did not see the prisoner at my house, I went out; I did not return till between seven and eight o'clock. I saw that particular half guinea on Wednesday at about nine in the morning; I went then up stairs in order to count my money, and in the chamber there were twenty-four guineas and eight half guineas, this was before the Bank Note was changed; I came home between five and six in the evening, and saw this money at about seven or eight at night.

[The witness inspected the half guinea and deposed to it.

DENNIS MACDONALD sworn.

Mr. Macdonald, who keeps the Lord Tyrawley's-head, had said, that he suspected the bricklayers to have stole this money; accordingly myself and another went to search Gahagan's room; we found only Gahagan and his wife; when I was about to search t he cupboard, I saw a tin box in Mrs. Gahagan's hand, which she put between her legs; I took the box from her, and it contained four half guineas and four guineas; and we found a guinea and four half guineas sewed up in her petticoats, which together made nine guineas. Mr. Macdonald told me, before I shewed it him, that one of the half guineas was very remarkable. I found a key in Gahagan's passage, which upon trial opened the door of the prosecutor's room; I tried it; I asked Mrs. Gahagan how she came by this money.

COURT. What she said is not evidence. - Her husband said he gave her the money.

HENRY GAHAGAN sworn.

I worked with Gahagan on the 5th of November, he left work at a quarter past two, and was not at work again till after half past three o'clock.

ELIZABETH FIELD sworn.

I am a widow; I live in M'Donald's house; I came down stairs at half after two o'clock; while I was standing at the door of M'Donald's house I saw Gahagan and another man pass by me, they went up stairs, I saw their legs through the rails of the stairs; I waited a quarter of an hour at the door, but I did not see them come out again.

ANN YORK sworn.

I am the wife of a bricklayer; I lodge up three pair of stairs in this house; I saw John Gahagan ; at half after two he came up stairs to me for a hammer the bricklayers use, which was in the room. I had come up stairs about five or ten minutes before, and I then saw the door of this chamber a-jar, and thought that the maid was in the room.

JOHN COLEMAN sworn.

I am a constable. I was at the searching of Gahagan's house. Gahagan himself was in bed. I saw Gahagan's wife put her hand to her pocket, and then put the tin box between her legs. Gahagan said, that if McDonald had not exposed him, he would have put him in the right hit, or right way of getting his money again.

JOHN GAHAGAN 's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the matter. The money I had is what I got by my own labour. I have several witnesses to call.

ELIZABETH GAHAGAN was not put on her defence.

FOR THE PRISONER.

THOMAS THORNTON sworn.

I have known Mr. Gahagan fifteen years. I went at about eight o'clock in the morning on the 4th of November, to borrow some money of Mr. Gahagan, because my wife then lay in. Mrs. Gahagan took out a tin box, and emptied several guineas and half guineas into her hand. She offered me half a guinea. I said I did not want so much; so I only took five shillings.

JOHN YORKE sworn.

I am the husband of - York, who has been examined. Gahagan worked for me ever since I took task work, which has been these last three or four months. I have paid him sometimes 30, sometimes 27 or 25 s. per week, for himself and his son. I paid him a guinea and some silver on the 2d of November at Mr. M'Donald's house.

From the Prisoner. Whether you did not pay me three half guineas and some silver on the Saturday before this affair. - I don't remember that.

Elizabeth Field . I do believe, to the best of my knowledge, that Thomas Thornton is the man who followed the prisoner along the passage.

JOHN GAHAGAN GUILTY . Death .

ELIZABETH GAHAGAN NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

Reference Number: t17771203-5

6. THOMAS POPE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Catharine Jackson , widow , on the 17th of November , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing an iron Japan box, value 1 d. - pieces of christal, value 7 s. seventeen pieces of copper, enameled, value 1 s. 6 d. one hundred and forty pieces of paste, value 1 s. four Mocoa stones, value 1 s. a silver ear-ring, value 6 d. and a pair of pistols mounted with brass, value 20 s. the property of Frederick Usener in his dwelling house .

FREDERICK USENER sworn.

I am a jeweller , and live in Mrs. Jackson's house. I had been out on the 17th of November, and therefore know nothing how the fact was committed. I swear to the property being mine. I brought them from abroad.

ELIZABETH USENER sworn.

I am wife of the last witness. I had been out upon that day the 17th of November. I came home about seven in the morning. I found my parlour window in Albemarle-street wide open, the shutters not shut to. I found the prisoner in my room; there was no candle in the room. I asked him what he wanted: he said he had jumped in to get his hat out. He tried to go away. I took hold of him by the shoulder, and said he should not go till I was a little better satisfied. I called out to Mr. Sexton, who was coming by, and Mr. Murrell the constable was also coming by at the time the boy was endeavouring to get out at the window. Mr. Sexton seized and secured him. I saw him searched in my back parlour, and in his waistcoat pocket was found the box, containing the stones and paste.

[The box and its contents were produced in court, and Elizabeth Usener deposed, that they were her husband's property.]

THOMAS MURRELL sworn.

I came up just at the time the prisoner was taken by Mr. Sexton. I took charge of him, and immediately carried him into the back parlour of the house. I saw taken out of his waistcoat pocket the box, containing these things. The prosecutrix immediately claimed the box as hers, and said she would

go back to the bureau from whence it was taken. The box was not there.

Question. Was it easy to get over the area into this room? - It was; the space of the area is very narrow.

JOHN SEXTON sworn.

As I was coming by this house, I caught the prisoner making his escape out of the window, he begged of me to let him go, but I would not; Mr. Murrell came up and he was taken into the back parlour and searched, and in his waistcoat pocket, the box and things were found.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I fell down in the mud, I was wiping myself by the light at the chandler's shop, where this young man lives; seeing four or five men looking at the window I stopp'd, and they began to beat me for looking at them; two men then ran down the square, two towards St. John's-street, they throwed my hat into the window; I saw this box on the pavement and took it up, I thought the house had been an empty house and went in at the window to get my hat.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing the goods .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-6

7. JOHN NORTH was indicted for stealing a bey gelding, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Clement , November the 18th .

JOSEPH CLEMENT sworn.

I am a gardener at Isleworth. On the 25th or 26th of October, I lost a bay gelding, which was at grass, from a field near the eight mile stone; my servant had been out with it all the preceding day; it was brought home on the Thursday following by John Furning and Thomas Downing ; I have had the horse half a year or more; I am certain it is the same horse: the prisoner worked with me about a month.

JOHN FURNING sworn.

I am a constable, Mr. Clements sent Downing and me to enquire at the turnpikes after North and the horse; we got intelligence of him at Colbrooke turnpike; we heard at another turnpike, that he had been through there, but I could get no farther intelligence; I had wrote letters for the prisoner to his wife's friends near Marlborough; so we went to Marlborough, we found him there, at his mother-in-law's house; when I went there I asked for John North , his mother hesitated a good while, and then went up and called him down; he came down within a few stairs of the bottom; I told him he was the person we wanted; I asked him where his master's horse was; he said, what horse? I told him, the poney his master rode, and the sack and halter; for there was a sack and halter missing as well as the horse; I asked him if I might go up to his wife; he said no, unless he went up with me; then we went up stairs together; his wife; was in bed; I asked again where the horse was; his wife begged him to confess; he said he would not tell me where it was, but he would go with me to the place; we went, and found it at the New Inn, near Hungerford and Newberry; he had sold it to the inn-keeper; he told me he received one pound two shillings for it; I saw the horse there, and knew it very well, I knew it before; we brought him up to Mr. Clements, and the next day he was taken before Sir John Fielding .

THOMAS DOWNING sworn.

I keep a public house, the Castle, between Brentford and Hounslow, the prisoner lodged at my house; Mr. Clements was at my house smoaking a pipe on Sunday evening, he sent his boy for his horse; the boy came and said he could not find the horse. Mr. Clements said, North had gone away that morning, and he supposed he had taken the horse; Furning and I enquired at several turnpikes; we got intelligence that he had been seen with the horse, we then went down to Marlborough, and found him at the house of his mother-in-law; at first when we enquired for him, she suspected us and hesitated a little, she called him down stairs; he asked who wanted him; as soon as he came near enough I laid hold of him, and said, I wanted him, and bid Furning take charge of him; he asked for what; I said for stealing his master's horse.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They said if I would tell them where the horse was they would set me free.

COURT. Did either of you promise, if he confessed where the horse was, to set him free.

DOWNING and FURNING.

We never made him any such promise,

Question to Downing. How long did he lodge at your house? - I believe he came the 1st of May, he behaved very well till this happened.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

Reference Number: t17771203-7

8. EMANUEL SIMON was indicted for stealing two linen handkerchiefs, value 6 d. and eighteen shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Roe , privily and secretly from the person of Elizabeth his wife , November 10th.

NOT GUILTY ,

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-8

9, 10, 11. THOMAS WEST , HARRIETT DAVIS , and CATHERINE WARE , were indicted for stealing a silver cup, value 3 l. and a broken silver lamp, value 3 l. the property of Frederick Kandler in his dwelling-house .

FREDERICK KANDLER sworn.

I am a silversmith in Jermin street, near St. James's church . On the 20th of last month the prisoners came into my shop, and wanted to buy a gold heart. I told them I was very busy, and could not shew them any. Upon that the tallest (Ware) advanced further into the shop where there lay a parcel of silver buttons, and clapped her hand upon them. There was no one in the shop but myself. I said, are you going to rob the shop? She said, no; she only wanted to see what it was. The next day, while I was at dinner in my back parlour, I sat so that I could see all over the shop, and into the street. I saw them in an instant all three in the shop. The little one (Harriett Davis) catched up the plate, and ran out of the shop immediately. She took this silver cup and broken lamp (producing it): it was standing just as it is. I cried out the shop is robbed, and ran after her, and cried stop thief. A carter and I followed her, and took her in a stable yard in York-street, and we found the plate upon her. We brought her back to the shop: when we came back, the boy and the other girl were secured. I sent for a constable: he got a search warrant and searched their lodgings, but there was not any thing of mine found.

SAMUEL COX sworn.

I am a carter. I stopped the little girl in the stable yard, and took the lamp and cup from under her arm.

ALL THREE GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-9

12. ELIZABETH COLWELL was indicted for stealing a watch, with the inside case made of silver, the outside case Nassau skin, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 6 d. a stone seal set in metal, value 2 d. and a brass watch chain, value 1 d. the property of David Thomas , privily and secretly from the person of the said David , October 19th .

DAVID THOMAS sworn.

As I was coming home from the country, on the 13th of October, between two and three in the morning, I met the prisoner in the Strand, there was another woman in company with her, I was rather in liquor; they picked me up.

Or did you pick them up? - They picked me up, they stop'd me twice. The other woman took hold of me, and the prisoner took the watch out of my pocket.

How do you know it was the prisoner that took the watch out of your pocket? - I can swear it was her; the other had her hands about my neck at the time.

Whereabouts in the Strand was it? - Near Charing Cross .

Did you meet any one before? - No, nobody.

Have you seen the watch since? - Yes; it is here. [It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.] I had it last Monday from the constable of the night. I missed my watch, and immediately pursued the prisoner. I charged the watch with her, and Waters the watchman found the watch upon her.

CHRISTOPHER WATERS sworn.

I am a watchman of St. Martins in the Fields. Between two and three o'clock I heard a person call Watch. I took my lanthorn and met the gentleman and the prisoner with him. He charged her with picking his pocket of his watch. She said, she had not taken it, but the other girl had. I bid her give me the watch if she had it. She gave it me, and I delivered it to the constable of the night. The prosecutor mentioned the number of the watch before it was opened in the watch-house. [It was produced in court.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going down St. Martin's-lane, I saw the watch lying on the ground, and took it up.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not privily and secretly from the person .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-10

13. SIDNEY MACDONALD , spinster , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Shields on the 25th of November , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a piece of diaper clouting, value 11 s. six yards of sheeting, value 7 s. three yards of long lawn, value 6 d. half a yard of clear lawn, value 1 s. a linen gown, value 7 s. a scarlet cloak, value 5 s. a child's linen frock, value 1 s. a pair of child's stays, value 6 d. and a cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of the said William in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM SHIELDS sworn.

I came home and found my wife in the act of stopping the prisoner. They had all the linen under their feet.

- SHIELDS sworn.

I am wife to the prisoner. I was going into the back shed between seven and eight o'clock. I went out of the room where I was at work upon this linen which was making up against my lying-in. I left a candle in the room, and came back in five minutes; I found the door open. I had not shut it ten minutes before that, and I found the prisoner in the room making off with the things upon her. I secured her. I latched the door before I went out.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not twelve years old.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-11

14. WILLIAM GARLAND was indicted, for that he in a certain field and open place near the king's highway in and upon William Smith did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a silver seal, value 6 d. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 3 s. and a pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of the said William Smith .

[ The prosecutor deposed that he was robbed of the goods mentioned in the indictment by three or more footpads in the road between Stepney and Mile-End , between ten and eleven at night of the 25th of July ; but that it was so dark that he could not distinguish the persons of the men who robbed him.]

[There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, but an accomplice in the robbery uncorroborated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-12

15, 16. GEORGE STEVENSON and THOMAS RAVEN were indicted for stealing four glass lamps, value 12 s. and four tin heads for lamps, value 4 s. and four tin burners for lamps, value 1 s. the property of Edward Collison , November 25 .

EDWARD COLLISON sworn.

I am a tin-plate worker ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment upon the 25th of November early in the morning, between the alm-houses at Shoreditch and Kingsland turnpike . They were lamps in the road. I contract to light the road.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Collins. I packed up one of these lamps in a basket, and sent it to Kingsland-Road to be put up on the road.

MICHAEL BROWN sworn.

I light the lamps on the Kingsland-Road. I received this lamp (pointing it out) of William Armstrong . I placed it at No. 19, in the road just by Shoreditch workhouse. I saw them all safe on Tuesday night at twelve-o'clock; the next morning it was missing.

GEORGE WALTON sworn.

I am one of the patrole on Kingsland-Road: two gentlemen came from Kingsland with me about a quarter before one in the morning, all was right then to the best of my knowledge.

JOSEPH KIDGER sworn.

I am a weaver; as I was coming home on Tuesday morning between one and two o'clock, I saw the two prisoners in Shoreditch, one had two lamps, the other had one: I thought they had stole them: I charged the watch with them; they first said they brought them from Mr. Savage's, at Kingsland; afterwards they said they had found them. I went up Kingsland-Road and saw that there were three lamps taken away, and one more broke, the lamps were left in the watch-house.

JOHN EDMUNDS sworn.

I am a watchman, these lamps were delivered to me by the last witness.

The prisoners said in their defence, that they were both hard-working men, that they found the lamps in the road, that they had been to drink after they had done work, and as they were coming out of the house, the patrole and two or three watchmen came up, and they gave them some liquor to drink.

Question to Walton. Did any thing like this pass between you and the prisoner? - I saw them that night at the King's Arms, Kingsland, at about twelve at night.

The prisoners called several witnesses who gave them a good character.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-13

17. WILLIAM BORDEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Colley , widow , on the 2d of November , between the hours of twelve in the night and four in the morning, and stealing two hundred pieces of silk ribbon, value 100 l. ten pards of plain gauze, value 14 s. six hundred and ten yards of blond lace, value 30 l. four hundred yards of black lace, value 25 l. twelve hundred yards of white thread lace, value 100 l. five hundred yards of white thread edging, value 25 l. one hundred yards of Persian silk, value 7 l. and fifty yards of alamode silk, value 9 l. the property of the said Ann, in her dwelling-house .

ANN COLLEY sworn.

I keep a milliner's and haberdasher's shop , at No. 95, in Shoreditch . On Sunday night the second of last month, at a quarter past ten, I came down into my shop with my shop-woman, and fastened all my doors. In the morning, about seven o'clock, my shopwoman came down to open the door; she returned instantly, and told me that the shop was broke open. I came down in five minutes. There were a great many marks of dirty feet in the shop; the window in the door had been broke open, I believe with a crow; a pane of glass was broke and taken out, by which they could get in to open the shop door. I missed more goods than I have put into the indictment. The counter was broke open where the valuable things were kept, and there was stolen from thence and the glass case all the goods mentioned in the indictment (reading a list of them). I saw some of these things on the Sunday night when I

came down; all my goods were then in the shop, and I saw that the padlock was on the chest. Miss Jennings, who had likewise been robbed, informed me that she had seen some goods in Holland's house which she thought were mine. After that I went with Miss Jennings to Justice Sherwood's; there I saw three or four bundles containing some goods of mine intermixed with some of Miss Jennings's.

[The goods were produced in court by Daniel Wallis the headborough, and some of them were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

ROBERT HOLLAND sworn.

That bundle my wife bought of Mr. Benjamin on Friday the last day of October, I believe.

SARAH KING sworn.

I came down stairs about seven in the morning, and found my mistress's House broke open; a screw in the shutter of the street door was forced out, and a square pane of glass was broke out. Somebody, I suppose, got through that, and unfastened the door on the inside. Then I alarmed my mistress, who came down as soon as ever she could. When the prisoner was before the justice, he said he bought these things of one Harris; but Harris, who was present, denied it.

[This witness deposed that many of the articles mentioned in the indictment, which were contained in the bundles, were her mistress's property.]

BENJAMIN BENJAMIN sworn.

I keep a shop in Little Pater-noster Row, Spital Fields; I sell linnens, ribbons and lace, and such things. I sold this bundle to Mr. Holland; I bought one lot on the 9th of October, and I bought another lot on the 3d of November of the prisoner and his wife.

COURT. Confine your evidence to what you bought on the 3d of November? - The prisoner and his wife brought them to my shop at about ten or eleven in the morning.

What did you give for them? - I gave him for some four shillings and sixpence, and for others two shillings and three pence a dozen. I bought them as old shop-keepers.

Were you used to buy goods of the prisoner? - I only bought these two lots of him.

Did you know that he kept a shop? - They are pedlars: I saw his wife once in a shop in Bartholomew Fair .

[Part of the goods bought by this witness of the prisoner on the 3d of November were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

GEORGE FORRESTER sworn.

I was sent for by Mr. Benjamin to take charge of the prisoner. I went to Mr. Benjamin's house. I saw the prisoner there fitting by the bundle. I asked him how he came by the goods; he said they were sent him out of the country. I took him to the justice's with this bundle: he would not tell me where he lived. We went to his lodgings at Cow-Cross. I found in one corner of the room a great quantity of goods hid under some cloaths and some baskets. His wife said that her husband gave forty guineas for them to one Harris.

[ Part of the goods found in the prisoner's lodging by the last witness were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

WILLIAM ELBEY sworn.

I attend at Justice Sherwood's office. I was with Forrester at searching the prisoner's lodging, when we found these goods.

[ WILLIAM BANT deposed, that the prosecutrix bought some of the goods found in the prisoner's lodging at his master's warehouse.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am really innocent. Mrs. Drummond bought the goods, and I have witnesses to prove that she paid for them.

FOR THE PRISONER.

MARY DRUMMOND sworn.

These things (which were found in the prisoner's lodgings) I bought of Thomas Harris on the last day of October, I believe.

William Forrester . This is the wife of the prisoner at the bar.

Drummond. I am not his wife.

Forrester. She called herself his wife at Justice Sherwood's; they passed as man and wife among all the neighbourhood. She offered me twenty guineas to get the prisoner admitted an evidence.

COURT to Drummond. Was that the only day upon which you ever bought any thing of Harris? - I never bought any other.

You never bought any at any other time after that, did you? - No. O yes, the 3d of October, November I believe.

You said that you bought them the last day of October, was it so? - Yes, I bought them the last day of October.

Did you buy any goods of him at any other time but that last day of October? - No: I bought these at twice; I had half at one time and half the other.

What distance of time was there between the two days? - Three days.

What was Harris? - A house-keeper: I never bought any thing of him in my life before, he was recommended to me to sell me a parrot; I took it of him for a debt. He told me he had been a shop-keeper, and had some goods on his hand which had lain by him a long while. and he should be glad to dispose of them because he wanted money. I bought some of the things that are here of Mr. Tillings a shopkeeper in Cloth Fair.

Do you live with the prisoner? - I have lived with him.

Do you know where Harris is now? - I believe he has made his escape since. Harris said before the justice that he had never seen us before.

DAVID LOCKYER sworn.

I keep a public house in Cow-Cross. I have seen Harris several times at the prisoner's. When I have carried purl and such liquors to his house, I have seen such things as these on the table when Harris has been there. I lent Mrs. Borden half a guinea on the 30th of October to make up a payment for some of these things.

Do you know what the half guinea was to pay for? - I do not.

The prisoner likewise, called Edward Butcher , who had known him nine months; Joseph Jennings , two years; Benjamin Payne , three months; - Croker, nine months; - Drake, nine months; and James Idingslon , who had known him from a child; who all gave him a very good character.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-14

18. WILLIAM AVERY was indicted for ripping cutting, and breaking, with intent to steal, twenty pounds of lead, value 2 s. the property of John Chopping , the said lead being affixed to a certain building called a stable, the property of the said John .

EDWARD CHOPPING sworn.

I am son to John Chopping the prosecutor. My father keeps livery stables . I was out of town two or three days. Upon my return I found the prisoner in custody.

JOHN ALLEN sworn.

I had the care of these stables. I heard the dog bark between eleven and twelve at night on the 5th of November. I looked out and saw the prisoner ripping the lead off the stable. I got assistance The prisoner heard us, and jumped off the building. I pursued him and took him before he got an hundred yards. He struggled with me for about two minutes. He drew a large knife, and swore that he would rip me up if I would not let him go. Upon that I let go my hold of him, and cried out, Stop thief; upon which he was taken. I went to the stable, and found the lead ripped, and lying on the stable. We took him to the watch-house, where we found some tinder and matches, and a slint and steel wrapped up in a paper.

Another witness deposed that he saw the prisoner jump off the stable.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a soldier , and am quartered at Knightsbridge. I was going home to my quarters at near eleven o'clock. As I came past Hyde-Park Corner, this man came up and collared me; I thought he was going to rob me, so I drew my knife, and said I would rip him up, which I could easily have done, as he was alone. He let me go, and after that he called out, Stop thief, and I was taken.

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-15

19. CHARLES STARR was indicted for stealing three men's hats, value 10 s. the property of Henry Greenhill , November 23 .

HENRY GREENHILL sworn.

I am a hat-maker at Brentford . The prisoner was my apprentice . I lost three hats

on Friday was se'ennight out of my work-shop, the window of which was broke. I suspected the prisoner: I went in search of him to Hanwell, and from thence to Uxbridge, where I found him the next day, with the three hats in a bundle that he had with him. He begged to be forgiven, and said he would come back and serve his time out, but I insisted upon prosecuting him; then he behaved very riotously, and endeavoured to make his escape.

[The hats were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

The constable, who was with the prosecutor at the apprehending of the prisoner, confirmed that part of the prosecutor's testimony.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-16

20. THOMAS LAWS was indicted for stealing a scythe, value 1 s. and thirty pounds of potatoes, value 8 d. the property of William Busby .

The prosecutor, who is a farmer at Poplar , deposed that he caught the prisoner in his potatoe-field very early in the morning with a bag of potatoes which the prisoner had dug up, and a scytbe of his upon his arm which he had stole out of his field.

The indictment being laid wrong with respect to the potatoes, the prisoner was found

GUILTY of stealing the scythe to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-17

21. RICHARD ALKIN was indicted for stealing nine engine screws made of mixed metal, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Hadley , October 23d .

SAMUEL HADLEY sworn.

I am an engine-maker , and live-in Long-Acre. On the morning of the 23d of October, when I came from Pockham, I was informed by some of my men, that they suspected that the prisoner, who worked for me, had stole something. I saw the prisoner cross the way; I pursued him, and seized him by the collar, and brought him into my shop, where one of my men, in my presence, took these screws out of his pocket. The prisoner begged for mercy.

They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.

One of Mr. Hadley's men deposed, that he searched the prisoner, and took the screws out of his pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found these screws in a bag. I did not know what they were. I put them in my pocket.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-18

22. MARTHA JONES was indicted for stealing two guineas in monies numbered, the property of Richard Bagg , November 13th .

RICHARD BAGG sworn.

On a Friday about three weeks or a month ago as I was going by St. Paul's Church at about ten in the evening, the prisoner came up to me, and as she was against me I felt her hand go out of my pocket, she turned away, but I caught her by the other hand, and said she had picked my pocket. She immediately cried out for assistance, upon which two other women came up, and she gave something to them. I suppose my money. As she took her hand out of my pocket, she drew my pocket almost out, I am sure it was the prisoner's hand that was in my pocket. My money was lose in my pocket. I could not see what it was she gave to the other women. She shoved her hand in their face. I took her to the watch-house, where she was searched, but nothing was found upon her.

Was any one else near when her hand came out of your pocket? - Nobody so near as she was. She called out to the others; they come up and blasted her, and bid her give it to them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been at a christening, and had drank rather more than did me good. As I was coming down Ludgate-Hill I was sick. I turned up a court; two women were coming out of the court, the gentleman laid hold of me, and said he believed I was one of the women he was with. He laid hold of both my hands, and led me to the watch-house. I was searched immediately, and nothing found upon me but a shilling and a thimble. He never loosed my hands till he brought me to the watch-house.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-19

23, 24. JOHN MINSHER and JAMES CLOAK were indicted for stealing seventy yards of raw-silk, value 60 l. and a hempen bag, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Streeton , Bryant Trotton , and Richard Briggs , November 23 .

THOMAS STREETON sworn.

I live in Bishopsgate Street. I am in partnership with Bryant Trotton and Richard Briggs . On Sunday the 23d of November I dined abroad; when I came home in the evening about five o'clock my servant told me he had met with a misfortune, that going with some silk to an inn it had been stole. I can only speak to the property.

JAMES BARKER sworn.

I am servant to Messrs. Streeton and Company. I had the charge of some silk to carry to the Swan on Holborn-Bridge. I took it in a coach. It was in an hamper and a truss. While I went with the coachman to carry the hamper down to the warehouse, the truss was taken out of the coach.

Do you know who took it? - No.

Did you find it on any person? - No, we immediately advertised it.

JOSEPH LEVI sworn.

I attend the rotation-office in White-Chapel. On Sunday the 23d of November, I was informed by a man that three suspicious persons were gone into the Bull with three bundles. I looked through the window, and saw Cloak and Hawes in the room. I went in and asked where the 3 d man was, they said he was gone up stairs. I desired them not to let any one out. I went up stairs, and saw Minsher in the chamber with three bundles. I told him he was my prisoner. I secured them. Hawes asked to be admitted an evidence. He took me to No. 10, in New-Court, Fleet-Market, where we found the rest of the silk. I locked up the prisoners, and the next morning I saw the silk advertised.

EDWARD HAWES sworn.

Cloak, and Minsher, and I were at the sign of the Butcher's Arms in Chick-Lane; we agreed to go out together. We saw a coachman take a hamper down the inn-yard. When the coachman and the man went down the yard, Minsher opened the other door of the coach and took the truss out. We went to No. 10, in New-Court, Fleet-Market, with it. We afterwards took it to the Bull in Petticoat-Lane to dispose of, and there we were secured.

MINSHER's DEFENCE.

While I was sitting in a public house Hawes came up to m e. He asked me to take a walk with him. I went with him to No. 10, New-Court, Fleet-Market. He tied some silk up in a handerchief of Cloak's. He told me he got the silk from on board a ship. I went with him to the Bull in Petticoat-Lane.

CLOAK's DEFENCE.

I met Hawes. He asked me to have part of a pot of beer with him. I went with him to the Bull's-Head. I never saw him before.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Minsher:Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Cloak:Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-20

25, 26. ANN HAWKINS spinster , and ELIZABETH SUMMERS , spinster , were indicted for stealing a woollen cloth cloak, value 4 s. the property of John Taylor , October 30 .

JAMES BRUNSELL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. John Taylor , who is

a mehere . The prisoners came into our shop; soon after they had left the shop, a person informed us that he saw them have a cloak. I followed and overtook them a little way from the shop, and saw this cloak under Summers's arm, when I got up to her she dropt it.

[ The cloak was produced in Court, and Jones Brunsell deposed it was the property of the prosecutor.

HAWKINS's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter. I was not on the inside of the door.

SUMMER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the cloak till I saw this gentleman pick it up.

HAWKINS NOT GUILTY .

SUMMERS GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-21

27. JANE BRISTOW , spinster , was indicted for stealing a pair of plain gold earrings, value 10 s. and a stone ring set in gold, value 10 s. the property of Jacob Bazier , October 22d .

JACOB BAZIER (a Negro ) sworn.

I am servant to a lady. I was going to Oxford-road, at nine o'clock at night, to fetch some water. I stop'd at a shop and asked what they would take for a seal that I saw in the window, they asked me one shilling and sixpence; I said I would give a shilling for it if they would give change, they agreed to that. I took a little box out of my pocket, in which I kept my money, to pay for it; the earrings and ring happened to be in that box. The prisoner stood by me; when she saw them, she said, let me see what you have got there; I held them at a distance, and said, why you can see them here; upon which she snatched the box and the rings out of my hand and ran away with them.

Was you acquainted with her? - No, but I know her by sight.

- SWEETMAN sworn.

I heard the prisoner and another woman quarrelling; the woman said to the prisoner, you did not give me my share when you stole the ring and ear-rings from the black, upon which I took her up.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never saw the black in my life before I saw him at the Justices. I kept Sweetman company some time, we left out, and he owes me a grudge.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-22

28. CATHERINE HAMMOND , spinster , was indicted for stealing a cloth hammer cloth, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Davis , November the 4th .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I am nephew to Joseph Davis , who lives at Hampstead, and is a coach-master . I put an old cloth hammer cloth upon a coach-box on the third of November, the coach was out till ten at night; the cloth was missing the next morning.

JOHN FULLER sworn.

I am a watchman. As I was going home, on the fourth of November, at half past five in the morning, I overtook the prisoner just by the three tuns, seeing that she had something under her arm, I asked her what she had got there; she said, nothing but what was her own; I examined, and found it was an old hammer cloth; she offered to carry it back to the place she had taken it from if I would let her go; but I secured her.

[The hammer cloth was produced in Court, and William Davis deposed that it was the property of the prosecutor.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-23

29. EVAN STEPHENS was indicted for stealing twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 20 s. the property of Alexander Macdonald , October 21st .

MACDONALD sworn.

I am a linen-draper , and live in Russel-court, near Covent-garden . On the twenty-first of October, as I was very busy in the shop waiting on two ladies, there was a cry of stop thief, my young woman ran out to see what was the matter, I thought some of the neighbours had been robbed; she told me a piece of cloth had been taken from our window. The prisoner never was in the shop; the windows are open, there were twenty-two piles of cloths lay in the window; it was about nine o'clock at night. The cloth was brought to the shop afterwards.

[ The cloth was produced in Court by John Wright , and deposed to by the prosecutor.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the cloth out of Mr. Macdonald's window; I am sure he is the man; I pursued him; he was taken in a few, minutes in White Hart-yard; the linen fell from him as I was running after him, it fell on the groud in Russel-court; I was so near him that I did not see it fall, but I had like to have stumbled over it.

Was it wrapped up when he took it? - Yes; there were eighteen or twenty pieces in the window. I believe, I did not stop to take the cloth up, but pursued the prisoner. I saw the cloth in motion on the ground.

From the Jury. It is a good way from Russel Court to White Hart Yard, where you took the man? - Yes; a quarter of a mile.

Did you lose sight of him in the pursuit? - He might be out of sight, but I am sure he is the man.

- WILSON sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Macdonald. On the twenty-first of October in the morning, I laid twenty-two pieces of cloth in the window; at night there was one missing, I saw it dropp'd in the court by a person in green cloaths; the prisoner had green cloaths on; I only saw the back of him after the cry of stop thief. I did not know it was taken away till I heard. I am sure it is my mistres's cloth by the mark on it.

The prisoner in his defence denied the charge, and called several witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-24

30. 31. JAMES TURNER and CHARLES ANDERSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Adams on the eighteenth of November , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a featherbed, value 20 s. two bolsters, value 3 s. a pillow, value 1 s. and a linen pillow case, value 6 d. a dressing-glass, value 2 s. a mattrass, value 4 s. a bed quilt, value 2 s. 6 d. three window curtains, value 3 s. two linen night caps, value 6 d. two pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. two silver tea spoons. value 3 s. a silk and cotton gown, value 2 s. a muslin laced cap, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 4 d. a linen napkin, value 2 d. a linen table cloth, value 6 d. an oval looking glass, value 5 s. a surtout coat, value 1 s. two Wilton carpets, value 5 s. a paper snuff box, value 1 d. and a pint of Geneva, value 1 s. the property of the said William, in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn.

I am a peruke-maker , in Dean-street, Soho. I have a country-house near Marybone fields , where my family are most part of the Summer. On the 18th of last month, in the morning I received intelligence that my country-house was broke open; I was there on the sixteenth day, but I had not been there for a fortnight before, I saw the things safe on the Sunday; this was the Tuesday. On receiving intelligence that the house was robbed, I went down; as I was going cross a field, a neighbour told me they had Anderson in custody at a publichouse; I went to Justice Blackborough's. I first saw most of my things in Clerkenwell watch-house, and then went before the Justice.

The goods were produced in court by Joseph Bostick , the watch-house keeper, and deposed to by the prosecutors.

COURT. How did you find the house when you came to it? - There are two rooms below. They had broke the sash, and got in at the kitchen window. I found the drawers broke open.

Had that window been secured? - Yes, they went up a staircase on the outside of the

house, and forced open the casement which was fastened with a button to get into the bed room.

When did you see the other prisoner? - I believe they were both taken together.

JOSEPH BOSTICK sworn.

These things were brought to me on the 18th of November by three watchmen who stopped the prisoners, and brought the things to a house in Islington-Road. It was between five and six in the morning. There were three of them, but one escaped. The two prisoners were brought to the watch-house. These are the very things that were brought to the watch-house.

DAVID MORRIS sworn.

Between five and six in the morning my partner came to me, and asked me to help to stop three men he suspected. I stopped one of them. I believe Anderson. Between us we stopped them all three near the Angel at Islington. They had three large bundles with them. They said they were their own property, and that they were running away from their landlord, because they owed rent.

JOHN LEWIS sworn.

About a quarter after five in the morning I saw three men coming loaded with three bundles. I thought it not proper to stop them by myself. I followed them till I came near Morris. I called him to assist me. We stopped them near the Angel.

Are you sure the prisoners are two of them? - Yes, they are, we took them to the watch-house. I saw the bundles opened in the watch-house. These things are part of the contents of the bundles. The first person said they were the other persons property, and that he was under a cloud, and wanted to get these things off for fear his landlord should seize them.

TURNER's DEFENCE.

The man that made his escape asked me to carry these things for him, and told me he would satisfy me for my trouble.

Turner called one witness who gave him a good character.

FOR ANDERSON.

- REDGRAVE sworn.

I was present at the justices.

Was there any promise of mercy made to Anderson if he made a discovery? - There was by Justice Blackborough, and he did very honestly give the best information he could respecting his Confederates. I am sure he made all the discovery he could. I went after the persons, and found every information he gave me true, though I was not successful enough to take the persons. Anderson seemed very affected and sensible of his faults. The justice promised him mercy if he would do all he could to bring his accomplices to justice.

COURT. The justice has behaved exceeding ill.

TURNER NOT GUILTY of the burglary, but GUILTY of stealing the goods .

ANDERSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

JAMES TURNER and CHARLES ANDERSON were a second time indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Hubert Pent , on the 18th of November about the hour of two in the night, and stealing two cheque mattrasses, value 5 s. two pillows, value 1 s. and a linen bag, value 1 d. the property of the said Hubert in his dwelling house .

HUBERT PENT sworn.

I live in New-James-Street. I have a country-house near the country-house of Mr. Adams. On the 18th of last month a neighbour informed me that my house was broke open. I had been there on the Sunday before. I left the house fast, and the things mentioned in the indictment were in the house. I went down and found the door and windows broke open. It is all on one floor. All the bottom parts were broke. I lost two mattrasses, two window curtains, two pillows, a cloth waistcoat, and a bag. The waistcoat I used to work in. They were found in the custody of the watch. I went before the justice who ordered me to have my things, and said I need only produce the waistcoat here.

[The waistcoat was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

DAVID MORRIS sworn.

I saw this waistcoat taken out of one of the bundles found on the prisoner.

JOHN LEWIS sworn.

I saw the waistcoat taken out of the bundle.

TURNER NOT GUILTY of the burglary, but guilty of stealing the goods .

ANDERSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-25

32. FRANCIS MERCIER , otherwise LOUIS LE BUTTE , was indicted for the wilful murder of David Samuel Mondrey , October 12 .

He likewise stood charged, on the coroner's inquisition, with the said murder.

When the prisoner was set to the bar and arraigned, he stood mute; therefore the Court directed the sheriff to return a jury to enquire whether be stood mute through obstinacy, or by the visitation of God. A jury was accordingly returned by the sheriff, and had the following oath tendered to them:

"You shall diligently enquire and true presentment

"make for and on behalf of our Sovereign

"Lord the King, whether Francis Mercier ,

"otherwise Louis Le Butte, the now prisoner at

"the bar, being now here indicted of the wilful

"murder of David Samuel Mondrey , stands

"mute fraudulently, wilfully and obstinately,

"or by the providence and act of God, according

"to your evidence and knowledge.

"So help you GOD."

JOHN GRETTON , Esq; sworn.

You examined this man relative to the charge with which he now stands indicted. Did he, upon such examination, understand you in the English language? and has he himself spoke English? - I examined him in the English language; he answered me in the English language: I have many letters wrote by him to me in the English language; and I apprehend him to understand it nearly as well as he does his own, which is the French.

WILLIAM GOODMAN sworn.

You are a servant to Mr. Akerman? - I am.

Have you attended the prisoner? - I attended him up to the court.

Did you hear him speak? - Coming up stairs, when below, I said, You had better set him down on the bench, as he can't stand. He said, No, I can't sit.

Cross Examination by the Prisoner's Council.

In what state of health has this man been for some time past? - I cannot say whether he has been sick or not.

WILLIAM HATCHMAN sworn.

I am a ward-man; I take care of one of the wards in the gaol the prisoner is in.

Have you heard him talk either to-day or yesterday? - I heard him talking to one Mr. Redshaw, a gentleman that is, I believe, to be upon the trial, he was with him last night, and they had some wine; but as for this morning, he muttered and mumbled, but I could not understand him. He has not been out of bed these four days.

Cross Examination.

And this morning you have not been able to understand him? - No.

COURT. Did he appear to understand you when you spoke to him this morning? - I don't know; there were three of us obliged to lift him up; I could make nothing out of what passed this morning, he only mumbled.

How long were Mr. Redshaw and he together last night? - It might be ten minutes, or more.

COURT. What is Mr. Redshaw? - I don't know.

THOMAS REDSHAW sworn.

I was with him last night about eight o'clock; he then talked as hearty as I ever heard him in my life. I found him in bed. I conversed with him upon some business I went about. He talked very hearty, and with as much spirit as ever I heard him. He understands English as well as I do.

Cross Examination.

You have not seen him to-day before you came here, have you? - No.

Council for the Crown. In the conversation you had with him last night, did he say any thing whether he would or not plead this morning? - He said, that if he was in the health that he had been in three months ago, he should be able to go through all the evidence without the assistance of any counsel whatever.

Did he say whether he would or would not plead this morning? - He did not say whether he would or would not.

Mr. JUSTICE ASTON.

'Gentlemen of the Jury, Francis Mercier ,

'alias Louis Le Butte, stand indicted of the

'wilful murder of David Samuel Mondrey .

'He has been called upon to plead, and

'makes no answer at all: he, as it is called,

'stands mute. You are impannelled to try

'whether he stands mute wilfully, fraudulently,

'and obstinately, or by the visitation

'of God.'

One of the Jury. My Lord, the Jury would be glad to have the opinion of some medical gentleman, whether the prisoner may not have taken some medicine that might have produced the effect to take away his speech.

[Mr. Ogle, a surgeon, being in court, was requested to examine the prisoner, which he did.]

Mr. THOMAS OGLE sworn.

I observed you asked the prisoner some questions; did he give you an answer? - No; he only shook his head, and put his hand upon his breast.

Is it possible for you to form a judgment whether this man is or is not capable of speaking? - I look upon it as impossible. I can only speak as to his pulse; it is exceeding languid, low, and quick. There is no swelling upon the pit of his stomach, or his belly; his tongue is rather moist.

The Jury, after consulting together for a short time, found that be stood mute fraudulently, wilfully, and obstinately, and not by the providence of God .

Upon which Mr. Justice Aston (in the absence of the Recorder) immediately passed sentence upon him,

' That he should be executed on Monday, December 8, and his body be afterwards dissected and anatomized .

'- Which sentence was accordingly executed upon him .

Reference Number: t17771203-26

33. MARY RIPPON was indicted for stealing two shirts, value 15 s. and a linen cloth cloak value 4 s. the property of Mary Cooper , widow , September 5th .

MARY COOPER sworn.

I live up three pair of stairs in Castle-court, Poppins-court . I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of my room; I had them to wash, as I take in washing. On the Friday night I went to bed and left the prisoner in the room; soon after I was in bed I missed her out of the room and when I got up on Saturday morning, I missed the shirts and the cloak, I found them pawned.

(The pawnbroker's sorvant produced a shirt which he deposed he took in pawn of the prisoner in the evening of the fifth of September, in the name of Mary Davis , the shirt was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

ANN ROSE sworn.

I went to the pawnbroker's and found this shirt.

Prisoner's defence.

I did not pawn the shirt; I was cleared last sessions for the same thing.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-27

34. JOHN MORTON was indicted for stealing a wooden box covered with hair, value 18 d. two pieces of linen cloth, containing forty yards, value 4 l. and two silk waistcoats, value 10 s. the property of John Seddon , October 18th .

JOHN SEDDON sworn.

I am a surgeon and apothecary . On the eighteenth of last October, I sent for a coach to take me to the Mitre, in Mitre-court, Aldgate ; I saw the coachman put the trunk into the coach, in Mitre-court, he returned into the house, as I did, I returned in about two minutes, and missed the trunk; we pursued the prisoner, and took him in Jewry-street, and brought him back with the trunk, and the next day took him to the Counter; there was in the trunk a piece of cloth and some waistcoats; there was nothing lost out of it.

( The trunk was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JAMES ACORN sworn.

Between eight and nine in the evening, a coach came up the gateway to Mitre-court,

and presently after, a man came up the gateaway with a trunk; a person that was with me, bid me stand out of the way, and said, he believed the man had stole the trunk. Just after, a gentleman came and said he had lost a trunk; I told him a man had, gone by with a trunk; we pursued him and brought him back in about ten minutes. I ran along White Chapel, thinking I had missed the way the man took, I turned back, and a man asked me if I was running after a man with a trunk, I told him I was; he said he saw a man running with one, and directed me up Jewry-lane, and there I took the prisoner with the trunk. I am sure the prisoner is the man that ran past me.

JOSHUA GRAY sworn.

On the 18th of October, twenty minutes before nine, as another young man and I were standing at the corner of Jewry-street, we saw the prisoner run by with a trunk upon his back, he ran against the young man, and pushed against me; I suspected he had stole it; then I saw the last witness run past me towards White Chapel; I said, I believed they were in pursuit of the man with the trunk. I stood at the end of the Minories; the last witness turned back, I stopp'd him, and asked him if he was pursuing any body; he said, yes, a man with a trunk. I went with him to George-street, in the Minories, there we asked a woman if she had seen a man with a trunk, she said no; I then heard somebody say, oh! upon which, I turned, and saw the prisoner with the trunk; another young man immediately laid hold of him, and Acorn came up.

Cross Examination.

You lost sight of the man? - Yes.

And you never saw him before? - No. He had on a pair of boots, and a sort of a blue frock; he seemed to be in a great hurry, which gave me a suspicion he had stole it; I took it on his back.

THOMAS BAILEY sworn.

On the eighteenth of October, between eight and nine o'clock, as I was coming out of the Minories, turning down George-street, three men came running by me, I was informed they were in pursuit of a man that had stole a trunk; I ran after the man, and presently saw the prisoner with a trunk; I stopp'd him, he begged me to let him go; and said, a boy gave it to him; they came to my assistance, and he dropped the trunk.

JOHN WALL sworn.

I put the trunk in the coach, I missed it in the space of a minute or less; I turned about to put another parcel in, and the trunk was taken out of the other door.

Prisoner's defence.

I went down to White Chapel to get a pair of shoes; I picked up the trunk in the street; I don't deny it was found upon me, but I found it.

The prisoner called several witnesses. who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-28

35, 36. MARY STONE and ALICE BELLAMY were indicted, the first for stealing a pottage pot, value 10 s. the property of John Scandaret ; the other for receiving it, well knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute , &c. November 3 .

JOHN SCANDARET sworn.

I lost a pottage pot out of my yard on the 3d of November about eight in the evening. Stone was at my house not above ten minutes before I missed it; she has chaired at my house; I found the pot pawned at a Mr. Nooths.

WILLIAM MORGAN sworn.

I am a pawn-broker; Alice Bellamy brought the pot to my house on the 3d of November, and pawned it in the name of Alice Bellamy .

[It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN VITTLES sworn.

On the 3d of November, about seven o'clock, I went to Mr. Scandaret's with a friend, and drank a pint of beer; as I was coming out at the door, I saw Mary Stone with a pot in her hand; it was then about eight o'clock, she was coming out of Mr. Scandaret's yard; I said, Poll, you are hard at work; she said, hard indeed; you little rogue hold your tongue, and off she went with it.

MARY KAY sworn.

A little before nine o'clock on the 3d of November Alice Bellamy called upon me. She cried and said she was in a great deal of distress to pay her rent, and asked me to carry a pottage pot to pawn. I said I would not carry it, but I would go with her. She said it was her own. I asked her why she did not wash it first. She said she had not time.

RICHARD STREETON sworn.

I was present with the prosecutor at the finding of the pot. It was pawned at Mr. Nooth's in Russel-Court. I took Stone, and she confessed taking the pot. There were no promises made to her.

STONE's DEFENCE.

I had not been in the house all that day.

BELLAMY's DEFENCE.

I had been out at work. I went into Scandaret's to have a pint of beer. I did not pawn the pot. I never set my eyes upon it knowingly in my life.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Bellamy:Branding. See summary.]

[Stone Bellamy:Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-29

37. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Jupp , December 1 .

JOHN JUPP sworn.

I am a journeyman picture-frame-maker and gilder . Coming from work I stopped to see a quarrel at the Fleet-Market . I felt something at my pocket. I turned and saw Jones standing against a window with his hands behind him under his coat. I asked him if he had not an handkerchief more than his own. He said he had not. I pulled him from the window, and found the handkerchief in his hand, and immediately secured him. I had used it not above a minute before.

[The handkerchief was produced in court by Richard Streeton , the officer, who had charge of the prisoner, and was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was standing in the crowd. A boy chucked something to me. I took it up, and the prosecutor laid hold of me by the collar.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-30

38. MARY EYRES was indicted for stealing two china cups, value 6 d. and two china saucers, value 6 d. the property of James Cuthbert and William Herring , November 29 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-31

39, 40, 41. RICHARD GREEN , JESSE BATES , and THOMAS KING , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Maydwell on the 25th of October , about the hour of one in the night, with intent to steal the property of the said Samuel in his dwelling house .

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-32

41. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing a half guinea, two half crowns, and 3 s. in monies numbered , the property of Richard Price , October 23 .

RICHARD PRICE sworn.

I am a coachman . The week after last sessions while my coach stood in piccadilly I fell asleep in it for about 10 minutes. It was about four in the morning the prisoner put his hand into my pocket, and took my money out. In pulling his hand out he waked me. I made a catch at him, and he jumped out of my coach, and shut me in. I saw his face when he shut me in. I got out and went into a public house to see for him, where I had seen him drinking with another man; I called to that man, and said, Tom, I have been robbed by the man that was drinking with you; he said, D - n him, he came in; and said you was asleep in the coach, and how easily he could do you. I went in pursuit of him, and found him at a public-house in James's-Street asleep with his head on the table. I brought him out, and charged him with taking my money; he offered to give me all he had got, which was 9 s. 6 d. I would not take it; I told him he should have what was allotted for him. I took him to Bow-Street, and one of Sir John Fielding 's men took charge of him.

THOMAS BULL sworn.

Coming down Bow-Street on the Thursday after last sessions, the prosecutor said he had been robbed. I took the prisoner to the round-house, and asked him next morning what he had done with the half guinea; he said, he never had the half guinea.

Prisoner's Defence.

The money was my own; I changed a half guinea the night before.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-33

42. THOMAS PATMAN was indicted for stealing five linen sheets, value 30 s. a cotton counterpane, value 15 s. three linen shifts, value 10 s. three pair of thread stockings, value 4 s. a linen apron, value 1 s.

two cotton tippets, value 6 d. two linen pin cloths, value 1 s. two linen towels, value 1 s. and eleven linen clouts, value 3 s. the property of Joshua Woolland , November 6th .

JOSHUA WOOLLARD sworn.

I live at Dagenham in Essex; my wife takes in washing; the things mentioned in the indictment were stole out of my house on the 6th of November; they were taken on the prisoner.

ANN WOOLLARD sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. I had those things from squire Chitty's to wash. I had them on Monday. I missed them on Thursday morning about seven o'clock when I got up.

[The goods were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

JOHN ALDERMAN sworn.

The prosecutrix informed me she had lost some linen, and suspected the prisoner; who lived in Shakespear's Walk, and we went and took him. The prosecutrix charged him with it. At first he denied it. He afterwards said if she would not hurt him he would tell where the property was. She said she would not if she got her goods again. He then said he had pawned some of the things.

ELIZABETH BRADSHAW sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Shadwell. I took in pawn a sheet, a pair of stockings, and a towel of the prisoner on the 6th of November, about six in the evening. I believe these to be the same.

JOHN BRABROOK sworn.

I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner on the 6th of November in the Essex road.

ELIZABETH DUNDARD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in a pair of sheets of the prisoner on the 6th of November.

[They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to Rumford to seek for some work. I got in liquor: and as I was coming back I found these things in a field under a hedge.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-34

43. MARY LLOYD was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 2 s. two pewter spoons, value 1 d. four stone plates, value 4 d. two earthen dishes, value 4 d. two iron candlesticks, value 1 d. and 16 lb. weight of feathers, value 14 s. the property of John Ryan , being in a lodging room let by contract by the said John to the said Mary against the statue , October the 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-35

44. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing two leather saddles, value 40 s. and a leather bridle, value 5 s. the property of Francis Parker , July 31 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-36

45, 46. ABRAHAM ADAMS and JOHN FOOT were indicted for the willful murder of Elizabeth Jefferies ; the first, for that he with a certain pistol, value 5 s. charged with gunpowder, and divers pieces of paper, called wadding, which he had in his right hand, to, at, and against, Elizabeth Jefferies , an infant about the age of 11 months , feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did shoot off and discharge, thereby giving the said Elizabeth, with the said paper wadding, in and upon the right side of her loins, one mortal wound, of the depth of two inches, and of the breadth of two inches, of which said mortal wound, the said Elizabeth languished from the said 5th of November until the 20th day of the said month, and then died; and the other, for being present, feloniously, wilfully, and of his own malice aforethought, aiding, abetting, comforting, assisting, and maintaining the said Abraham, to do and commit the felony and murder aforesaid, in manner and form aforesaid .

(They were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with feloniously killing and staying the said Elizabeth.)

GEORGE JEFFERIES sworn.

I am the father of the child that was killed: it was eleven months old: it died the 20th of November. I was present three minutes after this wound was received, which was about nine o'clock at night of the 5th of November: the child was all of a gore of blood: the wound was on the right side of the back bone, and was about the size of half a crown: I fetched Mr. Ogle a surgeon to it: I took up these two lads (the prisoners). First I took up Foot; he said he had no concern at all in the matter; that Adams was the person. I then took up Adams, and he owned that he fired the pistol. There was no quarrel subsisting between me or my family and Adams or Foot, or any thing of that sort: said Foot he loaded the pistol, and Adams said he directed him where to fire it: Adams said he saw a woman but did not see a child at who saw the prisoner go by and heard Foot the door: a woman was at the next door say to Adams, not that door - that door.

SARAH JEFFERIES sworn.

At about nine o'clock in the evening I was standing in my entry in Swan-street, Bethnall-Green ; I was about a yard from the street door, and in about five minutes I saw an arm thrust into my entry; there was a pistol in the hand; it appeared to be a large pistol; a great deal of flame came out, and it made a large report; upon which I turned out of my entry into my kitchen with the child in my arms; immediately I lost my senses with the fright and the report of the pistol; after some minutes I recovered myself and spoke to my sister who was in the kitchen: I thought that my child and I were both blown up; my sister took the child from me, but I did not apprehend at that time that the child was wounded in its body; I only applied some sweet oil to its face, but then I saw the blood running off from the childs toes; I said to my sister I am afraid my child has a bullet in its body for there is a great discharge of blood: I took it in my lap, turned up the cloaths, and I perceived a wound in the right hi p and the blood running from it very fast; my husband sent immediately for Mr. Ogle; he came; a large quantity of paper was taken out of this wound; the paper was very hard; the child lived fifteen days; It died on the 20th of November. I believe the wound to be the occasion of its death, for the said child was very hearty before. There were two of them together when the pistol was fired off, but I cannot tell who they were, and they went away directly. I think they could not but see me, because there was a great bonfire opposite my door, and there were I suppose, a dozen little children of about twelve years of age that were round this bonfire.

ELIZABETH LAMPSON sworn.

I live in Swan-street, the door on this side of Mr. Jefferies'; I was standing at my door about nine o'clock, with my child in my arms, two young men, Foot and another, came unawares upon my left hand side, I thought they were going to throw a serpent or squib, or something of that sort at me; I stepped a foot off the threshold and no farther; I did not go into my house; I knew John Foot before this; Foot then said to his companion, not that door, that door; they went on and Adams fired immediately in Mr. Jefferies entry, after which they walked off and said nothing; I did not see any body in the entry, but the door was wide open; about ten minutes after that Mr. Jefferies' boy came and said I believe my mamma is killed, and my sister has got a hole through her body; upon which I went into Mr. Jefferies and I saw the child in a neighbour's lap, and the blood was dropping off its toes. The boys did not stop at the door or go into the entry but only fired as they past by.

SUSANNA ROWLEDGE sworn.

I was standing in Bateman-street, a little way from Swan-street, to see the bonfire; I saw two young men come up to my sister's door, they were loading a pistol; I don't know which it was that loaded it, Foot was one of them; one, but which I don't know, said to the other, which way shall we go to wind towards Swan-street; in a few minutes after I heard a pistol go off; I went then to the corner of Swan-street to see what was the matter, and then I heard from the people what had happened.

Mr. THOMAS OGLE sworn.

I am a surgeon; I came in to see the child at about ten o'clock, there was a large contused

wound above the hip, from the right side of the back bone; I examined it particularly, I found every thing so exceedingly tight, that I thought it would be extremely dangerous to attempt an extraction of any thing; I probed it, it was about two inches deep, and ran obliquely upwards towards the back. On the tenth, which was five days from the accident; I took out part of the wadding, which came away very easy.

What was the wadding? - Paper. And on the thirteenth, Mr. Morris, my assistant, in the evening when he dressed it found some more wadding in the wound and took it out; there were three pieces; I examined the wadding very particularly, I found it to consist of nothing but paper, the discharge was exceeding large; the child sunk every day, and on the twentieth died.

What do you think was the occasion of its death? - I apprehend, the consequences of the wound; there was not strength of constitution sufficient to counteract the discharge.

You have no doubt about this wound being the occasion of the child's death? - I have no doubt about the consequence of the wound being his death; there was a very great discharge; the tender age of the infant was insufficient to counteract the consequence of the discharge.

From what was extracted, was it a larger quantity of paper than is usual? - I cannot particularly say that: the paper is in court.

Cross Examination.

Do you look upon the wound to be a mortal wound of itself? - It is not what we term a mortal wound, it was a wound of the muscular flesh.

Jury. Did the wound penetrate through the child's cloaths, or was the body naked? - It had on a blanket and a little light bed gown; the threads of the cloaths were taken out at times, it did not come out in pieces, but the threads of it; it was torn all to pieces.

GEORGE JEFFERIES .

These are the cloaths the child had on.

(Shews the hole in the blanket and bed gown.)

Mr. LAWRENCE MORRIS sworn.

I was called in the day after the accident happened; I took out some wadding on the thirteenth; I attended the child every day twice a day, from the time of the accident, omitting only one afternoon. I attended every morning with Mr. Ogle.

Do you agree in the account Mr. Ogle has given of it? - I do.

You drew out some wadding on the thirteenth? - Yes, three pieces of paper.

Did you extract any of the cloaths or blanket? - No.

Can you tell whether that is a greater quantity of paper than is usually put into a pistol over powder? - I cannot say.

What do you attribute this child's death to? - The consequence of the wound.

The mother said the child was very healthy before; did it appear to be so when you first saw it? - Yes, the child, for a few days, took a good deal of nourishment, and then sunk off by degrees, and expired on the twentieth. I have not the least doubt but it died in consequence of this wound.

ADAM's Defence.

I leave it to my counsel.

FOOT's Defence.

I leave my defence to my counsel.

Counsel. I have witnesses to call to shew these are industrious harmless lads.

COURT. I should suppose there is no occasion to call to their character, the whole depends upon the act itself. Is the pistol here.

A Witness. No, but it is about fourteen inches long.

Both NOT GUILTY of murder, but GUILTY of manslaughter only .

Branded and imprisoned one month .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

Reference Number: t17771203-37

47. SARAH BRIDGEWATER was indicted for that she, on the King's highway, in and upon Lucinda Pyke , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear

and danger of her life, and stealing from her person, a black sattin cloak, value 10 s. the property of Jane Taylor , spinster , from the person of the said Lucinda , November 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-38

48. ANN NAUL was indicted for stealing a linen shift, value 4 s. the property of John Ledger , November 25th .

There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-39

49, 50. MORGAN RICE and BENJAMIN JOHNSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Hull , on the second day of December , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing twelve saddles, value 3 l. two breast-plates, value 2 s. two girths, value 1 s. one horse hood, value 3 s. and four saddles, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling-house .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

THOMAS HULL sworn.

I am a stable-keeper in Chiswell-street . On last Tuesday night early, or on Wednesday morning, my stable, which is a part of my dwelling-house, was broke open; I saw my stable window safe at ten at night, as I generally go down myself to see that every thing is fast; it does not open into the street, but into the Artillery ground; I found in the morning that a chain had been broke, and the window was broke open, and the lock was forced; I believe I was the last in the stable; I looked round, I missed four saddles and ten or eleven bridles, and the rest of the things that are mentioned in the indictment. Morgan Rice lived servant with me about two years ago, and indeed was in the yard about a month.

SAMUEL BOLTWOOD sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; I left the stable over night, before my master and I locked it, all was fast when I went away; when I came at six in the morning I found the window open, and missed two saddles and one bridle; I apprehend that they got in and out again at the window which was broke.

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On last Wednesday morning, upon information given in the yard by Mr. Quince, that some saddles had been brought to his house by a lodge, I went directly to Quince's house, and up into the room where Morgan Rice was in bed, and I found lying dispersed about the room, the four saddles and several bridles.

(They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor and servant.)

Dinmore. Rice told the Justice, in my hearing, that he got them from Mr. Hull's stable, it was by that means that I was able to discover to whom they belonged; I went up and informed Mr. Hull of the matter.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

I went also to Quince's house, Quince directed me to Johnson's the other prisoner, on Saffron-hill; I went into Johnson's room, and found three or four bridles in a closet in his bed chamber; Johnson said, when they were found, that they were not his property, but he did not say whose they were.

Johnson. I went home with a woman over-night, they were her bridles.

Redgrave. A woman did come into the room after I had broke open the door.

THOMAS ISAAC sworn.

I am an officer; I heard Rice the prisoner, say, when he was carried before the Justice, that he did get them from Mr. Hull's.

WILLIAM QUINCE sworn.

Rice lodged with me; I live in Peter-street: I let the first floor of my house to Rice and his wife. On Wednesday morning between seven and eight o'clock, she came crying to my door, and said, her husband had been out all night with Johnson, he came in just after and asked me to drink

part of some purl, I drank part of two pots of purl; he said he was exceeding cold, having been out all night; he then called me into his room and shewed me the bridles and saddles, which are now produced; he told me that he had sold one of them, a new one, for a guinea and an half; I always thought that Rice was an ostler; I suspected immediately that he could not come honestly by such a quantity of saddles and bridles, therefore I asked him how he came by them, he certainly must have stole them; he equivocated, at first he denied it, at last he said he did.

How came he to shew you these things to produce such evidence against himself? - He might be a little in liquor at the time. I directed the officers to Johnson's house in consequence of what Rice's wife had told me that he had been out over night with Johnson.

JAMES BAXTER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Quince, by order of Mr. Quince I went to Johnson's up two pair of stairs, I found him in bed at Saffron-hill. Redgrave took two bridles out of a closet in that room, a white one and a black one; I cannot positively swear to them, but I do believe these to be the bridles that are produced, and which Redgrave took out of the closet; when we asked for Johnson, a woman locked the door and put the key in her pocket, which made me suspect he was there, and accordingly the door was forced open.

RICE's Defence.

I know no more of it than the child unborn.

JOHNSON's Defence.

They asked me how the things came there, I told them I met a woman upon Ludgate-hill, and that I was a bed by half past ten on Thursday night.

BOTH GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-40

51. CATHERINE HAMMOND was indicted for stealing one cloth hammer-cloth, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Davis , November 4th .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I am nephew to Joseph Davis the prosecutor. My uncle is an hackney coachman , and lives at Hampstead. I put a old hammercloth upon the box on the 3d of November; it was lost the next morning; the coach was out till ten at night; I don't know whether it came home with it or not.

JOHN FULLER sworn.

I am a watchman. I overtook the prisoner as I was going home at half past five, just by the Three Tuns; she had something under her arm: I asked her where she was going, and what she had under her arm; she said, Nothing but her own. I searched her, and found it to be this hammer-cloth: I took it from her. She said she would carry it back to the place where she had it from, if I would let her go. I secured her.

[The hammer-cloth was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-41

52. SARAH MILLER was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of Lancelot Knowles , November 10 .

LANCELOT KNOWLES sworn.

I met the prisoner in Holborn; she inveigled me into an house to treat her with a glass of wine; we staid in the house till about half past two.

Did you sit up or go to bed? - We did not go to bed. At the corner of Kingsgate-street, while she and I were talking, the patrole was coming by; he came up, and said, Before you part with this woman, I beg you will see that every thing is right. I put my hand down, and missed my watch. I said, She has robbed me of my watch, I desire you to secure her directly; upon that he laid hold of her. She cried, and said that she would have an action for scandal, for taking her up upon such an affair. Another man was going past;

he took hold of her other arm, and they led her along the street to St. Giles's watch-house. There she was searched, and I saw the watch found in her right-hand pocket.

Was you at this time drunk or sober? - I was in liquor a good deal.

Was you so sober as to be able to say, upon your oath, whether you might not have given her this watch? - I am pretty positive that I had not given her the watch.

But you must be very positive; what money had you about you? - A guinea and a half, and some silver; I gave her, I fancy, between four and five shillings, to the best of my knowledge.

You did not lose any money? - No, only the watch. I am very certain I did not give it to her.

JOHN ATWOOD sworn.

I am the patrole. I found the watch in the prisoner's right-hand pocket. She stifly denied it till we found it upon her.

[The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

OLIVER COX sworn.

I saw the watch taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

Prisoner's Defence.

The prosecutor asked me where I was going? I said, Home, into King-street, Bloomsbury. He asked me to drink a glass of wine with him, for it was a cold night. We went in and had two pints of wine. He was very much in liquor. He was so much in liquor, that he let his money fall about the room, and the people of the house picked it up. He said he was afraid he should be too late to get in at home, and should like to leave his watch. I said he might leave it in the house, and have a bed there. He said he did not know these people, he would give it me, and come and dine with me next day. We were both in liquor. They asked me if I had the watch. They laid hold of me in a rude manner, and dragged me to the round-house. He was so much in liquor, that he did not recollect that he had given me this watch.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-42

53. THOMAS WYNN was indicted for stealing ten bank post bills, value 10 l. each . the property of John Forbes , Esq ;

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of John Lamb , Esq ; October 8th .

THOMAS HENRY COX sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Lamb. I took out ten post bills from the Bank on Tuesday the 7th of October; I had them made payable to the Honourable John Forbes . I put them up in a letter from Mr. Lamb to Admiral Forbes . In the evening of the same day I sealed that letter, and directed it to the Honourable Admiral Forbes ; the letter so sealed Pinck sed in a frank to Lady Mary Forbes at Margate. I put my letters into the receiving houses, sometimes at Mr. Robson's in Bond-street, and sometimes at the office in Coventry-street. I don't recollect which office I put that letter into; I am inclined to think I put it in in Coventry-street. Admiral Forbes had particularly desired that these bills should be sent on Friday the 7th of October; he did not receive them in due course, and sent and acquainted me of it. I accordingly made application at the Bank and Post-Office to obtain what intelligence I could, and to stop the payment at the Bank.

The first I heard of these notes was on Thursday the 30th of October. The numbers of the notes were V 2, No. E 7526, continued to 7535. - Mr. Frederick Nocke came to me on the 30th of October at about twelve at noon, and asked me whether I knew of any Bank post bills being lost; he said they had come to his hands; that he had advertised them, and had left them at Mr. Davis's, a publican's in Portland-street. I went with him to Mr. Davis's for the purpose of seeing the bills. I received nine at that time from him, and immediately put a mark upon them. (They were produced in Court, and inspected by the witness.) These are the bills; here are ten: I received at first but nine; I called the next day, and received the tenth of Nocke at Davis's; I put them into the hands of Mr. Parkin of the Post-Office, who has had them ever since.

COURT. Are these the ten notes you inclosed to Admiral Forbes ? - I am inclined to think they are; they exactly answer to all the descriptions of them.

Have you any doubt about it? - No, none at all.

Mr. ANTHONY PARKIN sworn.

I am solicitor to the Post-Office. I received these bills from Mr. Cox; they are in the same condition as when I received them; they have been in my hands ever since.

FREDERICK NOCKE sworn.

What are you? - I was clerk to a gentleman in St. Martin's Lane a month or two ago; I am out of employment at present: I know the prisoner. On Saturday the 18th of October, about eight or nine in the morning, I was at a stable in Green-street, Grosvenor-Square, near where the prisoner lived, and where he puts up his horse at bringing home the mail. The hostler told me that the prisoner's wife wanted to speak to me. I saw her about twelve that day; she said she wanted to speak with me; I went home with her. The prisoner came in in a minute or two; he lived at the back of the Three Compasses in Green-street, in a little alley. There were ten notes shewed me before he came in. When he came in, he said he found them. I asked him where he found them; he said, in the necessary at the Post-Office, and that he did not know what they were; he wanted me to tell him what they were, and he asked me to advise him what was best to do with them, for that his wife told him they were lottery tickets. I saw them, and explained to him what they were. He said he found them rolled up like waste paper. He said there was a letter and seal to it, but that the seal was broke, and the bill rolled up in the letter. I asked him what became of the letter; he said he had used part of it at the necessary in the Post-Office; that he went out with his mail; and the next morning, when he returned to the stable, he made use of the other part in the stable. I asked him how long he had had them; he said, on the Tuesday or Wednesday se'nnight before that: this was on Saturday the 18th. He asked me what I could direct him to do with them; I told him he should have carried them to the office: He said he could not do that, for he knew they were so strict and severe at the Office, that they would imagine that he had taken the latter himself, and would not believe that he found it. I said, as he had kept it so long, they certainly would now, and I did not know how to advise him in it. I asked him if I should take them myself for him; he objected to that, because he had had them so long by him, and said, he wished it had happened at first. He said he could neither write nor read, and begged I would look in the Papers, and see if they had been advertised during the time he had had them. I searched the Papers, but found nothing advertised concerning the notes. I returned, and told him they had not been advertised. I asked him if he had constantly attended his duty; he said, Yes, and drove the mail every night, and had paid great attention to see if there was any enquiry concerning such notes at the Post-Office, but had heard of none there. That was the whole of the conversation at that time. This was on the 18th.

COUNSEL. How came he, if he thought they were lottery tickets, to say he paid great attention to touching these notes; it seems as if he knew as well as you that they were notes? - That I cannot tell; that was what he said, if there was any enquiry touching the letter or the things he had. On the Wednesday or Thursday he came down to me a mile out of town, and said he was very uneasy concerning the notes, and desired to consult with me what was best to be done.

Where did he come to you? - To Westmore-Green, just beyond Paddington; he said, he was very uneasy while they were in his possession. I told him I would do the best for him when I was at leisure, for I was very busy then, but the day following I told him I would call upon him in a day or two. I saw him again on the Monday; he wanted to have something done with these notes; he said he was uneasy while they were in his possession; and he said, if they did him no good they should do him no hurt, and talked of making away with them. I proposed finding out the parties to whom they belonged, as I thought it not so proper to go then to the office. I thought him a very honest man; I could think of no way of finding out the parties but by advertising them, for which purpose I had drawn out an advertisement; this was Monday the 27th of October. I had drawn it up some days

before; I read it to him, he approved of it, but was not willing to deliver the notes to me on those conditions, without I would take it upon myself.

Take what upon yourself? - Take the charge upon myself, and say I found them; I said I would immediately go and advertise them, and find out the parties to whom they belonged if I could; he would not agree to that, unless I would say that I found them myself. He said, Could I, if put upon my oath, swear I found them? I said I did not suppose I should be put upon my oath; he then took them from me, and proposed dropping them for me to find them; then he proposed burning them rather than he should receive any hurt; he took them, and went into Hyde-Park, and I followed him, and he dropped them, and I picked them up and went immediately to Portland-Street, and told Davis I had got the notes I spoke to him of before.

I do not recollect you have mentioned that before? - I had told Davis of the notes the week before, and that I should advertise them in the course of the week. I put them into Davis's hand, and desired him not to deliver them to any body unless I was present, and then I went to advertise them in the Daily Advertiser; the advertisement came out on Wednesday the 29th of October; I attended Davis on the 29th, but nobody came to enquire about them; as they were not enquired after I thought it would be proper to apply to the parties named in the bodies of the notes; I had heard of Admiral Forbes , and that he lived in Saville Row; I went to his house, there I was directed to go to Mr. Lamb's; I went to Mr. Lamb's on Thursday the 30th; there I found Mr. Cox, and I told him the whole of it. Mr. Lamb came in and desired Mr. Cox to go with me to Davis's; we went to Davis's, and I received nine of them, and delivered them to Mr. Cox; a person whom I had known before had called at Davis's, and desired to look at one of the notes, and had taken it in his pocket to find out the parties; he had promised to return it the next day, it was accordingly returned the next day to me, and I gave it to Mr. Cox; I believe I should know the bills if I was to see them, I put my name on them: [looks at them] These are the bills.

[One of the bills was read in court, and exactly corresponded with the indictment.]

EDWARD DAVIS sworn.

I keep the Cock in Portland-Street; there were some bills left at my house on the 27th of October by Mr. Nocke; he told me he had something to advertise at our house; that he had had the good luck to pick up some bank post-bills; I said if he came by them honestly he might advertise them; he said, he would bring them; he brought me three on the Sunday, and said, These are part of them; I said, I will have no concern with them; bring them to me when they are advertised, not before; I did not take the three of him; on Monday morning he called with the ten, and said they would be in the paper on Wednesday; I told him I would deliver them to him, or any body that enquired after them. On the Wednesday they were advertised, and nobody came after them. On the Wednesday afternoon he called, and said, I find nobody has been after the notes; I told him nobody: he said it was to be inserted again on Friday. On Thursday he told me he had been to Mr. Lamb's, and on Thursday afternoon Mr. Lamb's clerk and he came together, and I delivered to him nine of the notes; a friend of Mr. Nocke's, one Mr. Richardson, had been there and taken one away; I told him I would be answerable for it; I delivered it to him on the next day, and he gave it to Mr. Lamb's clerk.

Mr. SAMUEL POTTS sworn.

I am comptroller of the Inland-office at the Post-Office.

Do you know the prisoner? - I have seen him constantly attending his duty. On the 3d of November when he came in with the mail, he was taken into custody by the porter, and kept till I came; on his examination by me and the solicitor, he said, he found the letter in the passage leading into the back yard.

What letter? - This letter addressed to Lady Mary Forbes .

That is remote from the necessary? - A great way from the necessary, there is a yard between the passage and it, that is a common

thoroughfare from the Post-Office into Abchurch-Yard till twelve o'clock at night; he said, he was very sorry for ever having had the letter in his possession, and wished to God he had burnt it; he said he had opened the letter and made use of the cover, and that he delivered the notes into the hands of Mr. Nocke.

It does not often happen in the Post-Office to have letters dropped in the passage? - Letters may be dropped by persons that bring them, but never any that have been in the office, or brought by any of the receivers in bags.

Mr. MATTHEW VERNOR sworn.

I am an officer of the Bank of England: ( inspects the notes) These bills are my entering; I entered them I believe on the 2d of October; I am not certain as to the day.

Were these the only bills that were issued that day payable to Admiral Forbes ? - They are.

They are signed by Mr. Gardiner? - They are.

Countersigned by you? - Yes.

They are still standing out? - Yes.

Unpaid and unsatisfied to Admiral Forbes and Mr. Lamb? - They are.

Prisoner's Defence.

Just at the bottom of the steps in the passage in the yard where the clock stands I found the notes, but I did not know that it was a letter; I had it seven or eight days or more in my pocket before I discovered the notes; I went out every night in my life.

JURY. What access has the prisoner to the office? - He comes into the office to take the mail away, when the letters are ready they send for the boys in to drive the mails.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. JUSTICE ASTON.

He was a second time indicted for stealing from the General Post Office a packet directed to lady Forbes at Margate, containing a letter signed and subscribed John Lamb , Esq; and directed to the Honourable Admiral Forbes , containing therein ten bank notes, value 100 s .

Second Count. For stealing a packet directed to Lady Forbes, Margate; consisting of ten bank post bills, value 100 l. the property of John Forbes , Esq.

Third Count. Laying them to be the property of John Lamb , Esq; October 8th.

There was no Evidence given.

NOT GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-43

54. ANN QUARRY was indicted for stealing 25 lb. of moist sugar , the property of persons unknown, October 26th.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-44

55. THOMAS FIELD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Whitehead on the 26th of November, about the hour of three in the night, and stealing a canvas bag, value 1 d. and 50 l. in monies, numbered, the property of the said John in his dwelling house .

JOHN WHITEHEAD sworn.

I am a grocer in St. John's-street ; on the 26th of November my house was broke open; I went to bed about eleven o'clock at night; I was the last up in the house; in the morning my shopman came up and told me that my desk was open, and a square of the sky light taken out; I came down and found it so; I missed about 50 l. in a canvass bag; I missed some drafts, some papers, and a tea warrant, besides, which are not in the indictment. The prisoner had lived with me about a year and a half, and had left me about a year and a half; he served behind the compter; I was convinced from a view of it that somebody had done it that knew the way of my house, because they did not get out the same way they came in, but at a private door from the shop that went into a court just by; therefore I suspected the prisoner: I had parted with him for something amiss; I got a warrant from Sir John Fielding , and employed

a constable, who took him and brought him next day to my compting house; there we searched him, and found in his pocket 11 guineas, and 4 s. 6 d. in silver, and six pennyworth of halfpence, and a key, which the constable and I both tried, and it unlocked the desk as well as my own; he acknowledged that he was the person that came into my house in this way through the sky light; he went along with us and shewed us the place where he had secreted the papers, which was at the edge of a pond near White Conduit House; he took them out of the pond and gave them to the constable. (They were produced in Court and deposed to by the Prosecutor.) From thence we went to Mills' the Clogmakers, where he last lived, in St. John's-street; the draughts were there produced; these papers and draughts were in my desk that night; he owned he took a square out of the sky light with a knife; he said another person was concerned with him, that was Mills, and that he had the rest of the money.

Whether any promises were made him? I said I would be as favourable as ever I could; that I would not hurt him if it was in my power to prevent it with justice to myself; I likewise told him he must take the course of the law.

ELIJAH JEFFERIES sworn.

I am a constable; I took the prisoner up and brought him to his master's house; his master challenged him with this fact; at first he steadfastly denied it, but at last he confessed the whole matter, that he did the fact in the manner that his master has mentioned; I saw the money found upon him and the keys; the prisoner said, if Mr. Whitehead would be favorable to him he would shew him the notes; Mr. Whitehead said he would be as favourable as he possibly could.

Was that said after the prisoner had been searched, and owned the manner of his coming into the house and taking the money, or before? - It was afterward; we went to the pond, and he gave me the papers, they were under a stone at the edge of the pond; he said in the compting-house, that Mills was concerned with him; as to the money, he said, he had so much of the money, but did not say what was become of the rest; he said there was not so much taken out of the desk, he said there was taken out about 34 l.

Prisoner's Defence.

One Mills, and two or three others, that I left at St. John's-street, whom I had been drinking with, induced me to shew them this place; I am about seventeen years old, so is Miles, my master did promise me that I should never go to goal.

(Mr. Whitehead and Jefferies both deny that the prosecutor made any such promise.)

The prisoner called several witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

He was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy.

Reference Number: t17771203-45

56, 57. WILLIAM POLLARD and ANN PURYER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Longworth , on the twenty-seventh of October , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a silk cloak, value 10 s. a cotton bed gown, value 6 d. a woollen cloth coat, value 3 s. a wooden box, value 2 s. and a gold balance in a Brazil case, value 5 s. the property of Richard Longworth , in his dwelling-house .

MARY LONGWORTH sworn.

On the twenty-seventh of October, between seven and eight, I fastened my window and door and went up stairs; soon after I heard a great alarm, I ran down stairs again immediately to the street door, looked out and found the sash of the window up, I went into the parlour and observed the door was rather wrenched; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment. (repeating them) I found a candle dropp'd just by the window; I went immediately to the chandler's shop, and asked if any body had been there to buy a candle; I was informed there had been such a person there as the prisoner at the bar.

What was the noise that alarmed you? - A little girl called out that my window was open.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for on the twenty-eighth of October; I examined the shutters, there appeared a graze on the shutter about the length of my finger, it appeared to have been done with a small chissel; Pollard was suspected; another constable, and myself went to his lodging, and found him in bed; he got out of bed and opened the door; Dinmore, the other constable searched the pockets of the woman who was in bed with him, and found a tin box with two bottoms, between the bottoms he found five duplicates, one of which was for the prosecutor's cloak; I asked him where the box was, he said he gave the things to his wife, the other prisoner, to pawn; this was in the morning of the twenty-ninth, upon which he secured them.

( Joseph Sims , and John Dinmore , who went with Redgrave to the prisoner, confirmed his testimony.)

WILLIAM EDLEY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I know the woman prisoner by the name of Ann Pollard . On the twenty-eighth of October in the morning, she pledged this cloak with me in the name of Ann Pollard ; in the evening I received a hand bill, describing the cloak, upon which I took it to the prosecutrix, and she said it was her property.

[The cloak was produc ed in Court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

ELIZABETH FRY sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop. On the twenty-seventh of October about eight in the evening, the prisoner Pollard, came to my shop and bought a three farthing candle and lit it twice in my shop; I live two doors on this side the court Mr. Longworth lives in.

Prisoner's Defence.

I had been out to sell my work; I received eight shillings in halfpence and some silver; as I was going along dropped a half crown, I bought a candle to look for it.

PURYER's Defence.

My sister gave me the cloak to pawn, I gave her the duplicate, she put it in the box, then she laid the box down and went away; Pollard was not at home when she brought it.

POLLARD GUILTY , Death .

PURYER NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-46

58, 59, 60. JAMES WILLIAMS , WILLIAM YARDLEY and JOSEPH BARTIER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Bullman , on the twenty-third of September , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing eleven yards of silk, called tobine, value 5 l. a steel reed, value 20 s. thirty wooden bobbins, value 12 d. and two ounces of unwrought silk, value 4 s. the property of Charles Dalbiac , Stephen Barbut and John Jordan ; a wicker basket, value 3 d. and a wooden flask, value 1 d. the property of the said Samuel Bullman in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Against JAMES WILLIAMS , WILLIAM YARDLEY and JOSEPH BARTIER for stealing the same things in the dwelling house of the said Samuel Bullman .

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury.

JAMES WILLIAMS and WILLIAM YARDLEY were a second time indicted for stealing a copper tea kettle, value 7 s. a copper coffee pot, value 5 s. a fire shovel, value 2 s. a pair of tongs, value 2 s. an iron poker, value 1 s. a scarlet cloth waistcoat laced with gold, value 20 s. a pair of mettal candlesticks, value 7 s. the property of Margaret Owen , widow , and a pair of fustian breeches, value 8 s. the property of David Owen , August 27th .

MARGARET OWEN sworn.

I live near Shoreditch . On the twenty-fifth or twenty-sixth of August, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of

my house, I had seen them the evening before.

DAVID OWEN sworn.

I can swear to these breeches, I had them several months.

JOSEPH BARTIER sworn.

I was with the two prisoners, we broke open Mrs. Owen's house, and took these candlesticks and breeches, the candlesticks were pawned once or twice, and taken out again.

SARAH FENNER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Sykes, a pawnbroker; I took in these candlesticks of Williams, he said they were his own.

WILLIAM COWAN sworn.

I am an ironmonger, I sold these candlesticks to Mrs. Owen.

WILLIAMS's Defence.

That man swears very false, he was not with me; I know nothing of it.

YARDLEY's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-47

61. WILLIAM VANDEPUT was indicted for stealing two silk handkerchiefs, value 6 d. and one hundred linen handkerchiefs, value 50 s. the property of persons unknown, November 13 .

THOMAS LYONS sworn.

I am a constable; I found these things [producing a large quantity of handkerchiefs, several pistols, crows, chissels, gimblets, pick-lock-keys, a dark-lanthorn] that I found in the prisoner's room; he said his wife dealt in old cloaths; Hyde also found some cutlasses in the room in a box.

[Hyde confirmed the evidence of Lyons, and the things were produced in court.]

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baxon HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-48

62, 63. BRIDGET MURPHY and ELIZABETH KELLY were indicted for stealing six guineas in monies numbered , the property of Dennis Daley , November 4 .

DENNIS DALEY sworn.

I am a gardener , and live in Phoenix-Alley; I was going from Covent-Garden market about eight in the evening of the 4th of November; I went into the Feathers in Hart-Street ; I met an acquaintance there and drank with him; Kelly came into the room, and Murphy followed him; we afterwards went all four to bed; I put my breeches under the bolster and went to sleep; I waked in about an hour, and found my breeches above the bolster; I got up and alarmed the house, and they called the watch, who came and searched the prisoners, but found no money upon them; we took them to the round-house, and the next day before Justice Welch, where they both confessed that they had taken the money; the justice remanded them again to the round-house. There was but one bed in the room, Murphy lay with me, the other two lay in a bed in a little room adjoining.

JOHN HIDE sworn.

On the 5th of November I was at the Rotation-Office in Litchfield-Street; the door-keeper asked me to take Kelly to the privy-house; I went with her over the way; she gave the master of the house a guinea to change, and offered me 5 s. to go with her to buy her a pair of shoes; I immediately went back and informed them of it; I took the guinea from her; she said then that Murphy had two more guineas, and that she had chucked the rest behind a bureau bed, in the bawdy house where they were; I went to the round-house to Murphy, and she gave me two guineas; I went to the house they had been at, but could find none there.

KELLY's Defence.

I know no more of it than the child unborn.

JOHN YOUNG sworn.

I am keeper of St. Giles's Round-House; I assisted in searching Murphy, and found two-guineas in her stays, or in the pleats of her petticoat.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-49

64. ELEANOR LOCKET was indicted for stealing 3 guineas in monies numbered , the property of John Sullivan , October 9 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASTON.

Reference Number: t17771203-50

65. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Stephen Clark , October 21 .

STEPHEN CLARK sworn.

On the 21st of October as I was going down Fish-Street-Hill , I was told I had lost my handkerchief; I turned about, and saw my handkerchief in the hands of another man.

THOMAS BARBER sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket; I took the handkerchief from him.

[The handkerchief was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-51

66, 67. RICHARD HARTLEY , otherwise CORKS , and PHILIP ADSHED , were indicted for stealing a silver butter-boat, value 30 s. a silver pepper castor, value 10 s. a surtout coat, value 29 s. and a pair of men's leather shoes, value 6 d. the property of Frederick Knor , October 26 .

FREDERICK KNOR sworn.

I am a sugar-baker in Queen-Street, Cheapside ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of my house on the 26th of October; the plate was stopped by a Jew who advertised it.

JOSEPH MOSES sworn.

The prisoner Hartley brought the pepper castor and butter boat to me to weigh on the 28th of October; I stopped it, and we took him before a justice.

JAMES HENDERSON sworn.

I took the two prisoners before the justice, there Hartley said he bought the plate of the other prisoner; Adshed denied knowing any thing of it.

HARTLEY's Defence.

I had it from Adshed to make what I could of it.

ADSHED's Defence.

He never had it of me.

HARTLEY GUILTY .

ADSHED NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-52

68. NOAH ESALL was indicted for stealing fifty-six pounds of butter, value 14 s. and a wooden firkin, value 6 d. the property of George Gee , November 19 .

GEORGE GEE sworn.

I had twenty-five firkins of butter at White-Chapel; I delivered them to a carman to take them to a wharf in Tooley-Street; I had marked them.

THOMAS KEEN sworn.

I take the toll at London-Bridge; on the 19th of November, between six and seven in the evening, I saw a man take a firkin of butter out of a cart that was going along, and deliver it to the prisoner who stood to receive it; I secured the prisoner, the other man made his escape.

THOMAS PENN sworn.

I am the carman; a man came after me on London-Bridge, and informed me that I had lost a firkin of butter; I went back and saw it at the toll house; I then counted those in my cart, and found one missing.

The prisoner in his defence denied the charge

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-53

69. JAMES BEAN was indicted for stealing a guinea in monies, numbered , the property of Thomas Perkins , November 5th .

THOMAS PERKINS sworn.

I am a broker . The prisoner was my servant . I marked thirty-two guineas with the point of a pair of scissars, and put them in the cupboard: I missed one of them; I charged the prisoner with stealing it, and immediately found it in his stocking. I had counted them about ten minutes before. I believe the cupboard was locked.

[The guinea was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

WILLIAM HALLIBURTON sworn.

I searched the prisoner, and found a key upon him which will unlock the cupboard door.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-54

70. JOHN BRAZIER was indicted for stealing a watch with a case made of gold, value 5 l. a gold watch chain, value 20 s. two Cornelian stone seals set in gold, value 10 s. a gold watch-key, value 5 s. one red morocco leather pocket-book, value 5 s. and sixteen guineas , the property of Robert Sheffield , Esq ; November 15th .

ROBERT SHEFFIELD , Esq; sworn.

The prisoner was my servant . On last Saturday was fortnight I enquired for him, and found he was gone out of town. I then immediately missed the things mentioned in the indictment. My watch was on the table in the dressing-room. My money and my pocket-book were in my pocket the night before. I saw the prisoner at Sir John Fielding's on the Wednesday following; I recovered my watch and key, but the chain and seal are gone. I have recovered my pocket-book and nine guineas and an half of the money. Sir John Fielding asked him whether the nine guineas and half were part of the money he took from me? He said, Yes, and he was willing I should have it again.

[The pocket-book and watch were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

WILLIAM BARNETT sworn.

I attend at Sir John Fielding 's. I found the watch, the pocket-book and money, upon the prisoner. He said he had thrown the key and seal away.

Prisoner's Defence.

I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-55

71. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing a quart pewter pot, value 13 d. the property of John Martin , October 22d .

NOT GUILTY .

She was a second time indicted for stealing two pewter pint pots, value 13 d. the property of John Priest , October 22d.

JOHN PRIEST sworn.

I keep the Yorkshire Grey, a public-house in Eagle-street . I lost two pint pots on the 22d of October out of Mrs. Skidimore's passage.

[The pots were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

CATHERINE SKIDIMORE sworn.

I saw a woman stoop down in my passage on the 22d of October; I ran out into the street after her; I laid hold of her apron, which was tucked up, and two pint pots of Mr. Priest's fell down at my feet. The pots stood in the passage.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in her passage in my life.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-56

72. JOHN CUERDON was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 4 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 2 s. a cloth surtout coat, value 4 s. five linnen shirts, value 7 s. 6 d. and a man's hat, value 2 s. the property of Robert Paterson , October 15th .

ROBERT PATERSON sworn.

The prisoner came to lodge in the same house where I lodge. I went out on the 15th of October, and when I returned to my room, I missed the things mentioned in the indictment: I found part of them at a pawnbroker's.

RICHARD GREENWOOD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: the prisoner pledged these things with me on the 15th of October, in the name of George Lee .

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Prisoner's Defence.

I beg as much lenity as the Court can shew me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-57

73. MARY WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing three linnen shirts, value 3 s. and a linnen gown, value 2 s. the property of Lawrence Crow , November 24th .

LAWRENCE CROW sworn.

I live in Onslow-street, Great Saffron-Hill . The prisoner lived servant with me. On the 24th of November I sent her on an errand; she did not return again; then I missed the things mentioned in the indictment. I saw her at Woolwich on the 28th; I brought her to London; she confessed taking the things. I found them at Mr. Wallis's the pawnbroker by her direction.

[ Hugh Wallis produced the things which he deposed he received of the prisoner, and the prosecutrix deposed that they were her property.]

Prisoner's Defence.

He said, if I would confess where the things were, he would not hurt an hair of my head.

Prosecutrix. I did not say any such thing.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-58

74. CHARLOTTE WALKER was indicted for stealing half a guinea in monies, numbered , the property of James Hoare , November 20th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-59

75. ANN SPENCE was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 3 s. a linnen gown, value 5 s. a paste necklace, value 5 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 3 s. two linnen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three linnen shirts, value 3 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 18 d. four yards of linnen cloth, value 4 s. a linnen apron, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 2 d. the property of Rupert Atkinson October 11th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-60

76, 77. GEORGE HULL and ELIZABETH BOND were indicted; the first for stealing a silver table spoon, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Watmore , Esq ; and the other for receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute, April 19th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-61

78. WILLIAM WALTON was indicted for stealing three pair of thread stockings, value 5 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 4 s. and a pair of women's shoes, value 2 s. the property of John White , September 17th .

JOHN WHITE sworn.

I live in Blackman-street, Clare Market . On the 18th of September there was a sale of goods at my house. As I was moving, the prisoner was put there to lot the goods. My wife, in moving, left a box in a closet. I went back, and taxed the prisoner with knowing something of the box; he denied it. I advertised these things; and on the 18th of last month I went to a sale, there I saw the

prisoner with one of these pair of stockings upon him; I immediately apprehended him; I searched his lodgings, and found six pair more; the marks were all cut out of these stockings; I believe they are mine, but I swear particularly to one pair of them. I also found a pair of shoes at his lodgings. (They were produced in Court.)

MARY WHITE sworn.

I am the prosecutor's wife; these are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence.

My wife is a washerwoman; she worked for a gentleman, who gave her these stockings for half a guinea he owed her.

GUILTY of the stealing only.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-62

79. JOHN HOLT was indicted for stealing a mare ass, value 40 s. a mare ass soal, value 10 s. the property of Edmund Crayton , October 12th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-63

80. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing two wicker baskets, value 12 d. and two bushels of apples, value 8 s. the property of William Saville , November 28th .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17771203-64

81. ANN ATHILL was indicted for stealing five pounds weight of black dounce silk, value 8 l. twenty-one wooden bobbins, value 12 d. and a linnen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Mangard , in the dwelling-house of Richard Williams , November 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-65

82, 83. DANIEL BEAN and THOMAS NICHOLS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Burges on the 20th of September , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing a silver watch, value 4 l. a brown great coat, value 12 s. a guinea and three shillings in monies, numbered, the property of the said James, in his dwelling house .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-66

84, 85. HENRY HART and ROBERT SMITH were indicted for stealing three pair of blankets, value 40 s. twenty-eight pair of stays, value 12 l. twenty stuff petticoats, value 40 s. eighteen pair of leather breeches, value 3 l. three cloth waistcoats, value 15 s. two cloth coats, value 14 s. a cloth cloak, value 3 s. and a linnen wrapper, value 1 s. the property of John Pallett , October 28th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. JUSTICE ASTON.

Reference Number: t17771203-67

86. JAMES KNIGHT was indicted for stealing a pair of cloth breeches, value 5 s. the property of Robert Bridgefort , November 14 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-68

87, 88. THOMAS COLLINS and HENRY TODD were indicted for stealing nine live pigs, value 5 l. the property of Ralph Dean , November 27th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17771203-69

89. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing a pair of leather coach wheel harness,

value 40 s. and two leather bridles, value 10 s. the property of Richard Oliver , Esq . August 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

She was a second time indicted for stealing a pair of leather coach wheel harness, value 20 s. the property of Oliver Toulmin , August 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17771203-70

90, 91. RICHARD SHEERING and ROBERT HARVEY were indicted for that they, in the king's highway, upon John Burton , did make an assault, putting him in corporal rear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a guinea and seven shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said John , November 26th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

They were a second time indicted for that they, in the king's highway, upon Andrew Rooke , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, an half moidore, a counterfeit shilling, three pieces of copper, value 3 d. and one shilling in monies numbered, the property of the said Andrew , November 26th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17771203-71

92, 93. THOMAS LEGGETT and RICHARD SCOLES were indicted for stealing two wooden puncheons, value 10 s. and one hundred and eighty gallons of rum, value 80 l. the property of William Timson and Robert Jones , November 8th .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

WILLIAM TIMSON sworn.

I am a brandy-merchant , in partnership with Robert Jones . On Saturday the eighth of November, I had sixty-three-puncheons of rum at Smart's key , six were sold, and were to be sent to Mr. Nixon; the other fifty-seven were to be sent to the bonded warehouses in Seething-lane; Scoles was appointed to load them and take the numbers of the casks; the six that were to be sent to Mr. Nixon were put by themselves, and Scoles had orders to take them to Mr. Nixon's about five in the afternoon; when the puncheons were housed, the Excise officer came to me, and said, they had housed 55 puncheons only; I examined and found the puncheons mark'd 8 and 9 missing, which according to their situation on the key, must have been the fourth loaded; he went to Scoles, and came again; and said, that Scoles said, 8 had been sent to Mr. Nixon's; I sent a servant to Mr. Nixon's to see if he had received eight puncheons; he sent word he had but six; I suspected Scoles; I sent for him to the compting-house and charged him with it; he denied knowing any thing of it; I had learned that the carman that drove the fifth cart was Wiltshire; Scoles said he did not know Wiltshire, and declared his innocence.

Cross Examination.

Had not you made a bill of parcels of this rum to the master carman, and made him debtor for it? - I delivered him a bill of parcels; I did not make him debtor in our books; I considered him as accountable, till I knew whether our servants were concerned in it; the six that went to Mr. Nixon's were rolled, the others were carried in carts; Scoles has been employed in our service two years.

WILLIAM POUND sworn.

Scoles is employed by me; I ordered Scoles to load them, and take the number of all the carts; I desired Mr. White also at the warehouse, to take the numbers down for fear of mistakes; there were fifty-five brought to Seething-lane; Scoles's account corresponded with White's as to the numbers of the carts and the puncheons; I asked him what was become of the rest of the puncheons; he said eight

were rolled to Mr. Nixon's; Mr. Timson sent for White to know how many had been sent to Seething-lane, and that led to a discovery that two were missing.

Do you know Wiltshire? - Very well; the cart he drove that day is No. 333; that number was not included in Scoles's account. Scoles was to take care of the puncheons, and give an account of them at night, I have only the charge of loading them.

JAMES WHITE sworn.

I am the Excise-officer; I attended at Seething-lane to receive these puncheons from Smart's key; I received fifty-seven puncheons in twenty-seven carts, I took down the numbers of the carts [producing them.] that is what I took down at the time.

Did No. 333 come to the warehouse that day? - It did not, nor No. 8 and 9 of the the puncheons; I put them down on one side afterwards; I examined my list with Scoles's, and it agreed exactly; I compared with Mr. Timson in the evening, and we disagreed in the two puncheons; I went to Scoles, and he said 8 were rolled to Nixon's; I said, if there were, it was right, but Mr. Timson's account was but six to Mr. Nixon.

SAMUEL UNWIN sworn.

I am a master carman; Wiltshire is my servant; he has drove No. 333 fourteen or fifteen years, and no other. I saw Scoles in the evening at Mr. Timson's; he said there, that he knew no such man as Wiltshire; but he said at the Justices that he knew him very well. Mr. Timson made me a bill of parcels of the rum; but when he delivered it, he did not know that his servant was concerned in the matter.

Counsel for the prisoner to Mr. Pound. What character does Scoles bear? - I never knew the man do such a thing before in my life.

To Unwin. What character did he bear before this? - I knew nothing of his character.

RICHARD TOWNLEY sworn.

I was one of the carmen employed to remove the puncheons to Seething-lane; I saw Wiltshire there that day, he drove No. 333, I saw Scoles sling the two puncheons and put them into his cart; my cart was No. 190, I loaded the next after Wiltshire.

Cross Examination.

There were several other carts there at the time and a good deal of confusion? - Yes, Scoles bid the carman drive to Seething-lane.

SAMUEL CHARLTON sworn.

I know Wiltshire by sight; I helped him to strike two puncheons, which appeared to contain rum, in the Borough; one in Blue maid-alley, and the other in New-alley. I believe both these houses are Mr. Smith's; one is looked upon as his warehouse, the other as his shop.

JOHN SEARLE sworn.

I live with Mr. Nixon; I know Scoles; he came to me on a Saturday in November, to know whether the six puncheons were to be rolled home, or to be bonded; my master made answer, bring them home; he brought the first four, and then said, there were two more to come; they brought two more, and no more.

RICHARD WILTSHIRE sworn.

I am a carman; I have lived with Mr. Unwin, in the Borough, between fifteen and sixteen years; I know Scoles very well. On Friday the seventh of November, he told me he should have a load for me on the next morning; my cart is No. 333. On Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, he told me to get ready, for he should have two puncheons of rum for me soon; at about eleven I loaded the two puncheons; he told me to go up Mark-lane and along Fenchurch-street; and if any body asked me where I was going, to tell them I was ordered into the Borough with them; by him I drove them from there to Mr. Smith's house, in the Borough, by his direction.

Going up Mark-lane and down Fenchurch-street was very much out of the way? - Yes, but he said, I must go that way, because some of the masters would see them if I went along Thames-street; I went to Mr. Smith's-house, and unloaded one at Blue-maid-court, and the other in New-alley, in Mr. Smith's cellars; after putting them down, I went to Mr. Smith, and he gave me three guineas for Scoles, in part of payment; I gave Scoles a guinea out of the three, and kept two; Leggett was to have one, who was not there, and I the other.

Did you see Scoles in the evening? - Yes,

he met me coming over London-bridge with my cart; he said the two puncheons were missed; so we must go and have them back; he and I went together to Mr. Smith's; Mr. Smith's man said, we could not have them back, for that the puncheon's were emptied, and the casks knocked to pieces; Scoles said; he did not know what to do, the officer was waiting to take them in, and said, he must go directly back to the officer and say, he could not find them; I sent the cart home by a boy; I was so frightened I did not know what to do.

The prisoner Scoles called several witnesses who gave them a very good character.

LEGGETT, NOT GUILTY .

SCOLES, GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-72

94, 95, 96. ELIZABETH JOHNSTON , MARY MILBOURN , and MARY GARROWAY , were indicted for stealing a pair of metal shoe buckles plated with silver, value 1 s. 13 guineas, half a guinea, a crown piece, and 4 s. 6 d. 1/2 in monies numbered, the property of James Despaigne , in the dwelling house of Rebecca Clarey , October 28 .

JAMES DESPAIGNE sworn.

I am a brazier and tin-man ; I met a woman in Gracechurch-Street, who is not yet taken, and asked her the way to Darkhouse-Lane, as I was going down in a Gravesend-boat, and I was quite a stranger to the town; she pretended to shew me the way, and took me to a house in Gravel-Lane, Houndsditch , this was between nine and ten at night; she pushed me into a room and asked for money; I refused to give her any at first, but being apprehensive of danger I afterwards gave her a shilling; then Johnson came in and said she was mistress of the house, and insisted on my paying her for the use of the room; I gave her a shilling; then the first woman said, he has more money, let us down with him; upon which they threw me down on a bed, and with the assistance of two more took my buckles and money from me; the prisoners are three of the women; when they got me down I desired them not to use me ill; Johnson said, d - n his bloody eyes if he is not quiet flick a knife into him, and Milbourn and Garroway held me down while she took the money from me mentioned in the indictment; after which they left me; I had counted my money about two hours before; the buckles were made me a present of and were in my pocket.

MARTHA WOODMAN sworn.

As I was going on an errand the prosecutor met me in Gravel-Lane, and said he had been robbed of thirteen guineas, and he would give me a guinea to shew him a constable, I took him to Mr. Withers's.

THOMAS WITHERS sworn.

I am a constable; I went with the prosecutor and broke the door open, and found Garroway abed; the prosecutor immediately said she was one that had robbed him. I saw the other two prisoners coming up Gravel-Lane; I pursued them into a house, and took them in the one pair of stairs room; I searched them; upon Johnston I found three guineas and an half, and these plated buckles; I found three guineas and an half down Milborne's back.

[The buckles were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

The prisoners, in their defence, denied the charge.

ALL THREE GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not guilty of stealing them in the dwelling house .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-73

97. NICHOLAS LINDSEY was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Jackson , Nov. 7 .

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-74

98. DAVID CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing four gallons of sherry-wine, value 20 s. the property of Phillip Mallet and Charles Frisby , December 3 .

CHARLES FRISBY sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. Mallet; I know nothing of the fact.

JAMES JAGGER sworn.

I saw the prisoner knock the bung out of a barrel on Ralph's-Key , and take away half a gallon of the wine; there was more ran out into the street; I know the butt belonged to Mr. Frisby.

DANIEL SHIRLEY sworn.

I filled two butts with wine and left them on Ralph's-Key; there was some taken out of this butt; there were four or five gallons missing.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-75

99. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing fifty-six pound of butter, value 30 s. and a wooden firkin, 6 d. the property of John Bacon , November 18 .

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-76

100. ABRAHAM WOLFE was indicted for stealing a worsted stockings, value 6 d. the property of a person unknown, November 14 .

SAMUEL ROBERTS sworn.

While I was in Smithfield-Market on the 14th of November, I saw the prisoner take a stocking out of a countryman's pocket; I secured him and called to the countryman; he produced the fellow stocking to it; but said he was come a hundred miles out of the country, and could not stay to prosecute.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the stocking in the mob.

GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17771203-77

101, 102, 103. THOMAS METCHAM , THOMAS COLETHORP , and SAMUEL PEARCE , were indicted for stealing a wooden portmantua trunk; a woollen cloth waistcoat; a woollen cloth coat; two pair of velvet breeches; eleven linnen shirts, eleven neckcloths; a bank note, value 100 l. another bank note, value 25 l. two other bank notes, value 20 l. each, two other bank notes, value 30 l. each, and eleven other bank notes, value 10 l. each, the property of Thomas Mulliner , and the said notes being due and unsatisfied to him the proprietor thereof , November 6 .

[The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.]

THOMAS MULLINER sworn.

On the 6th of November last I came from Ipswich in the stage; my portmantua was put in the basket of the coach at Ipswich; it contained seventeen Bank notes, and the other things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them;) when we came to the Cross-Keys in Gracechurch-Street my trunk was gone; the coachman said, he believed it was taken out in White-Chapel , for there was a person in the basket; the portmantua was found the next morning on a dunghill; I have recovered some of the notes; we could only trace the trunk to the prisoners.

SAMUEL HOLLIS sworn.

On the 6th of November I saw a man in Leadenhall-Street running after a stagecoach; I believe it was the Ipswich stage; I turned my head and saw two boys in the basket put out a trunk, and the man behind ran away with it; I cannot speak to either of their persons; they were about the size of the prisoners.

THOMAS WITHERS sworn.

Upon the 6th of November while I was standing at the end of Woolpack-Alley, Colethorp and Metcham, and the other prisoner ran by me; they seemed very hot; Metcham's breast was unbuttoned; Pearce had a trunk; I pursued them; he hit the trunk against the side of a house; I thought he would have dropped it; they got off, and I could not overtake them (the trunk produced) it was like this trunk.

JAMES BIRD sworn.

On Thursday night about eight o'clock I met Sam the butcher, that is Pearce and Colethorpe; Pearce had a trunk on his head; I cannot swear to the trunk.

JOHN CHESTER sworn.

On Friday a little after six in the morning I was coming up Angel-Alley; I found this trunk; there was nothing in it; I took it to the justices.

Bird, I saw them in Wentworth-street, between Rose-street and Catherine-wheel-alley,

Withers. I saw them in Houndsditch.

Q. To Bird. Did you hear any conversation? - Yes, I said who is that, Colethorpe? He said, yes, What Bird? I said, yes; I stepp'd back and asked him what they had got there; he said, a Peter they had just knapp'd, meaning the portmantua I suppose; they bid me

take no notice, and I went about my business.

Jury. Which way were they going? - Up Still-alley, towards Gravel-lane.

Thomas Isaac sworn. I am a constable. Lee and Farrall sent for me. I went with them to Chick-Lane, and we took Pearce and Mitcham.

Christopher Welch sworn. I was coming home from work on the 6th of November; I saw Pearce and Colethorpe together. Pearce had a trunk on his head; there was a belt on it; it was like this trunk. Bird came along and spoke to them. Bird asked him what he had there? He said, it was a Peter he had just knapp'd, and bid him not take notice.

[The trunk was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PEARCE's Defence.

I never saw any of the evidences in my life but Bird; he goes about with a jack-ass, and is a bad fellow: I was out at supper that night, and not at home till eleven o'clock.

MITCHAM's Defence.

I know no more of it than the child unborn.

COLETHORPE's Defence.

I was at Pearce's house all the night that this affair happened; he left me there to take care of the place.

For PEARCE.

John Phillips sworn. I have known Pearce nine months: I have heard his father and mother, who lodge in my house, say, he bears a good character.

Samuel Blunden sworn. I have known Pearce about three months. He came to my house on the 6th of November, and staid with me from five o'clock till half after eleven; he was never out of my company five minutes of the time.

How far is your house from Houndsditch? - Half a mile.

For the Prosecutor.

Question to Withers. Do you know Pearce? - I have known him these two years.

What is his general character? - That of a pick-pocket.

Pearce. If I had had any money to see that man, he would not have come against me.

ALL THREE GUILTY .

Tried in the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s17771203-1

The TRIALS being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 7.

William Pollard , John Gahagan , John North , William Borden , Thomas Field , Morgan Rice, and Benjamin Johnson .

To work on the River 3 Years.

James Clark , John Merton , Thomas Wynn , Richard Hartley , otherwise Cork, Noah Esall , Richard Scoles , Nicholas Lindsey , John Jones , William Avery , James Turner , Thomas Patman , William Yardley , William Vandeput , and James Bean .

To be imprisoned 3 Months.

Martha, Jones, Mary Rippon , and David Cunningham .

Branded and imprisoned 1 Month.

Mary Stone , Elizabeth Summers, William Henley, Thomas James Chambers, George Edward Ditcher, William Foster, S Clark, and Patrick Mills .

To be imprisoned 5 Years.

Elizabeth Johnson , Mary Milbourn , and Mary Garroway .

To be imprisoned 3 Years.

John Storer , John Free , otherwise Beaumont, Thomas Pope , John Brazier , John Minsher , Alice Bellamy , and John Cuerdon .

Publickly Whipped.

John Williams , Thomas Jones , Abraham Wolfe , Ann Smith , and Mary Wheatley .

Branded and imprisoned 6 Months.

Elizabeth Stone , Thomas West , Harriett Davis, Charlotte Ware , and William Brown .

Imprisoned 12 Months.

William Walton , Charles Starr , Evan Stevens , and Henry Hart .

Branded and imprisoned 3 Months.

Sebastian Bishop Land , Sidney McDaniel , Elizabeth Colwell , George Stevenson , Richard Alkin , Jane Bristow , Catherine Hammow , Sarah Miller , Bridget Murphy , and Elizabeth Kelly .

Reference Number: a17771203-1

Trials at Law and Arguments of Counsel taken in Short-hand, also the Art of Short Writing completely Taught, by JOSEPH GURNEY , of Southampton-Buildings, Chancery-lane, Author of Brachygraphy or Short Writing made easy to the meanest Capacity.


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