Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th September 1777.
Reference Number: 17770910
Reference Number: f17770910-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 10th of September 1777, and the following Days;

Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM RICHARDSON ; AND SOLD BY S. BLADON, in PATER-NOSTER ROW.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Hon. Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir HENRY GOULD , Knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM BLACKSTONE , Knt. One other of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir RICHARD PERRYN , Knt. One of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; THOMAS NUGENT , Esquire, Common Serjeant; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Cook ,

William Palmer ,

John Almond ,

Richard Allen ,

Michael Ellis ,

John Dennis ,

Thomas Bird ,

John Lane ,

Abraham Ribbin ,

James Collings ,

John Keene ,

Thomas Gammage .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Marsh ,

John Bond ,

Benjamin Gee ,

Michael Comes ,

Benjamin Price ,

Thomas Boyce ,

William Geeves ,

John Parteridge ,

Thomas Nichol ,

Michael Nichol ,

John Skilman ,

George Presgrove .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Beeden ,

George Banks ,

Thomas Yeaw ,

John Lewis ,

Robert Hunt ,

Edward Cabe ,

George Lewis ,

John Day ,

George Walker ,

William Powlett ,

Henry Hook ,

John Sharp .

[Tuffin Hobbs served part of the time in the stead of Thomas Boyce and William Marsh .]

Reference Number: t17770910-1

497. SARAH SHAW was indicted for stealing a child's cotton frock, value 4 d. a pair of child's stays, value 2 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 5 s. a child's stuff petticoat, value 3 d. a child's flannel petticoat, value 6 d. and a pair of child's leather shoes, value 3 d. the property of Jane Elders , widow , July 5th .

JANE ELDERS sworn.

I keep a school in Charles-street, Hatton Garden ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of the parlour; I undrest the child, and left the things on the table in the parlour, and when I went to put the child to bed they were taken away: I found the buckles at a neighbour's, Robert Needham 's.

ROBERT NEEDHAM sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live about one hundred yards from the prosecutrix; the prisoner pledged these buckles with me on the 5th July, about seven in the evening; she said they were her daughter's, that they were given her by her god-mother; she pawned them in the name of Sarah Shaw .

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

Prosecutrix. I lost them on the 5th July just at dusk.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met a woman in Fleet-market, who asked me to pawn the buckles; she said they were her daughter's.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-2

498. THOMAS JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jamima Sainthill on the 27th of August , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing nine linen table cloths, value 10 l. and seven linen glass cloths, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of the said Jamima; five linen shifts, value 7 s. seven linen caps, value 1 s. one linen apron, value 2 s. two pair of linen shift sleeves, value 2 s. one muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. one silk and linen handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of muslin ruffles, value 6 d. and one cotton stocking, value 1 s. the property of Ann Leake , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said Jamima Sainthill .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

ANN LEAKE sworn.

I live in the house of Mrs Sainthill, in Duke-street; Manchester-square ; I am servant to her; I was out at the time the house was broke open; the family was out of town; I was left to take care of the house; I went out between five and six o'clock on the 27th August; I locked the door, and fastened the shutters; I came home between eight and nine, then the prisoner was just taken, and was in the public house almost opposite: when I went out I folded all the linen that was fit to be mangled, and wetted it down in a basket; I left it in the landry; I threw a wet cloth over it, that it should not get dry; there were some small things I left in a brown pan on the ironing-board; when I came home a great many things that were in the basket were gone, and all the things out of the pan, but the handkerchief that covered them; I heard the prisoner was over at the public house; I went there and saw the things; I knew them to be what I washed; there were three gowns on the mangle, one of them was gone, I found that at the public house: I had been a servant about three months in the family.

Are you sure the things you saw in the public house were what you left in the landry? - Yes.

In what condition did you find the house? - I found two men in the landry, who had taken the prisoner; I found the landry window broke open above the shutter, the shutters go but half way up the window on the inside.

GEORGE SPYER sworn.

I was at Mr. Blackford's, the Devonshire Arms in Duke-street; about half after eight in the evening of the 27th of August, a gentleman came in and told Mr. Blackford that there were thieves in Mrs. Sainthill's house, the gentleman went out of the tap-room to her assistance; I followed them, when I came to the corner of the rails I heard the footsteps of somebody very swift in the area; I saw John Duke , a chairman, at the same time getting over the rails into the area; I heard somebody cry, Mind the door; I ran to the door, put my left hand on the rails and my right on the steps, and looked down into the area, and saw a man crouch'd up in a heap; I called out, Here he is, bring the pistols and blow his brains out; he got up and said, Gentlemen, don't hurt me, I will come over to

you; he came over the must, and I and another man took him to Mr. Blackford's house; the prisoner is the man I saw in the area; he had the same cloaths on he has now; we searched him, and then took him to the watch-house.

Did you see the young woman that night? - Yes, she came about nine; Blackford brought in the bundle.

Prisoner. In what part of the area was the property? - I did not see it in the area.

Was I taken in the area? - He was taken on a leaded place, about five feet below the curb.

COURT. You did not know who the man was till he came over the rails? - No.

Are you sure the prisoner is the man that came over the rails? - Yes.

What sort of light was it? - It was quite dark.

How deep is the area? - Four or five feet.

It was not so dark but you could discern him? - I saw something white, and called out, Here he is; then he got up.

ROBERT BLACKFORD sworn.

I keep a public house in Duke-street; somebody came in about nine o'clock on Wednesday the 27th August, and said, Mrs. Sainthill's house was broke open; I went and told two men of it in the tap-room; they immediately went out; I followed them; I saw this bundle lying in the area; a man went down into the area; then I went over the rails on a water cistern in the area, and John Duke gave up the bundle to me; I took it home, and came back again, then I heard Spyer say, Here he is; I ran to Spyer, and saw the man getting on the rails; Spyer and I took him, and he was conducted to my house; I believe that he was there and hour and half; then we conveyed him to the watch-house; the prisoner is the man; Ann Leake came to my house a little after the man was taken; I was in the house at the time.

Did she see the bundle? - Yes, I brought it to her.

Was it the same that you received from the chairman? - Yes.

Did she open it? - I don't know.

Prisoner. What part of the area was it taken from? - The north front in the square.

JOHN DUKE sworn.

I am a chairman; I went from Blackford's house, and let myself down into the area by my straps; in the area I found two bundles of wet linen; I did not see any man, but heard somebody say, Here he is; I threw up both the bundles to Blackford, but one fell back; I saw the landry window opposite Manchester-square broke open, the top sash was let down, and a pane of glass broken; I got in over the sash, expecting to find somebody in the house; but when I came in I could get no farther than the landry; the rest of the linen was thrown about the landry.

You have the linen? - Yes, I received it of Justice Gretton yesterday.

Who delivered it to the justice? - I took it to him.

Are you sure that bundle is the same you left with the justice? - Yes; he made me put my mark upon it.

[The things were produced in Court, and Ann Leake deposed that they were the prosecutor's property.]

THOMAS LOWE sworn.

I was at Mr. Blackford's, and went out; I saw Jones getting out of the area; I put up my hand and laid hold of him; there were two or three others present; Spyer was one; they took him directly over to the Devonshire Arms, and I went with him.

Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - I am.

Had you ever seen him before? - No, I had not to my knowledge.

Did you see his face when he came over the rails? - Yes, by the light of the lamp.

You are perfectly sure he is the man? - I am.

JOHN KNOWLES sworn.

I went from Mr. Blackford's to Mrs. Sainthill's house; I looked over the rails and saw the linen laying in the area; then John Duke and I got over the rails; Duke threw himself down into the area; I got over on a brick arch way, while he threw himself down; then I heard somebody cry, Here he is, Here he is; upon that I jumped over the rails again into the street and ran round the house; then I saw Jones the prisoner on a safe that is leaded over in the area; I heard him say, Don't hurt me, and I will come over: he got on

she rails, and Mr. Blackford and Spyer laid hold of him by the hand, and I laid hold of him by the collar and took him to the public house; I am sure the prisoner is the man: I asked him how he came into the area; he first said the wind blew his hat over, and he thought he had a right to go and fetch his own property back; he said afterwards, that he heard a cry, Here he is, here he is; that he hit his hat against the rails, and the rails catched it and pulled it over.

ANN FAIRBROTHER sworn.

I was coming along Manchester-square about nine o'clock, and a man jumped over the rails into Manchester-square out of the area.

Was there no other people there? - No; a gentleman that was passing by went to the public-house to alarm them; that is all I know; the man went out toward Mary-le-bone.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along Duke-street, I heard an alarm of thieves in a house; I could not tell where; just as I came by this area I heard a noise of people; I Jumped up to see if any body was in the area, and my hat sell over; I went and knocked at the door and found there was nobody at home; I thought I had a right to get my hat, and jumped over to get it; just as I had got my hat, Spyer called out, Here he is: I told him I was only getting my hat; he said I was a thief, and called out, Shoot him, shoot him.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17770910-3

499. JAMES HARRISON was indicted for stealing a cloth coat lined with sattin, value 30 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 8 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 6 s. another cloth coat, value 5 s. a quilted sattin waistcoat, value 30 s. and a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. the property of Richard Burn in his dwellinghouse , August 18th .

Mr. RICHARD BURN sworn.

I live in Duke-street, Westminster ; I went out of town in the month of July last, I returned about the 17th of August; I left of my family two clerks and a servant; on my return I missed the several things that are mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) they were mostly kept in drawers that were deposited in my bed chamber; I locked the drawers myself in which the things were left; I believe they were all there, I am sure the suit of ratteen and the grey cloth coat were; my maid servant said a smith (the prisoner) who I had employed to do some work in the house, had been frequently three or four times a day for three weeks or a month together; this created a suspicion in me that he was the offender; I had him apprehended and taken before a justice of peace, who committed him.

DAVID EMANUEL sworn.

I deal in old cloaths, and live near Whitechapel: I was going home one Thursday about three weeks ago, at five in the evening, the prisoner came up to me, and asked me if I would buy any cloaths, he said he had a suit of cloaths and a waistcoat to sell; I asked him where he lived: he took me home with him to a public-house in Orange-court, Leicester-fields; he had the key of the room in his pocket; when I saw the cloaths I told him I did not chuse to buy them of him, unless the landlady of the house would pass her word for him; I gave him two guineas for them, which is the full value; he went down and came up again and said that the landlady was not at home, but he brought up the man and the maid, who told me he was a very honest man; I afterwards sold the suit of cloaths for two guineas to Mr. Ridgeway, a shoopkeeper, (the suit of cloaths produced) I sold the waistcoat afterwards for eight shillings.

WILLIAM RIDGEWAY sworn.

I deal in cloaths, I have a shop in Middlerow, Holborn, and another in Rosemary-lane: I bought these cloaths of the last witness for two guineas.

COURT. Those cloaths apparently are of much more value than two guineas? - I marked them to sell at four shillings profit; I gave the full value for them.

JANE COTLU sworn.

The prisoner came into my mistress's, Mrs. Austin's, to buy a pair of shoes; she sells shoes

and cloaths; she lives in Broker's-cross, Westminster: about three weeks ago my mistress fetched down a pair; he took a coat out of his bundle and left that as a security for the shoes, the price of which were two shillings and nin e-pence; he came in about a quarter of an hour and paid the two shillings and nine-pence, and desired my mistress would let him leave the coat there; I had never seen the prisoner before; I believe he was not acquainted with my mistress.

FRANCES AUSTIN sworn.

The prisoner came to my shop about three weeks ago, and bought a pair of shoes for two shillings and nine-pence; he opened him bundle and desired I would let him leave the bundle for an hour; I looked at it and said I supposed it was worth the shoes; he took away the shoes; in ten days he called and paid for the shoes, and he then asked me to let him leave the coat for three or four days; when the hand-bills came round I then saw that the coat was the property of Mr. Burn; I sent my husband to inform Mr. Burn of it; the prisoner sent me a letter to send him the coat, which I refused to do, as I had then received the hand-bill.

PHILIP BACON sworn.

I am a smith, I work for a Mr. Fairbone, who the prisoner likewise worked for; my master was employed by Mr. Burn; better than three weeks ago it was when the work was done, it had been bespoke longer; the prisoner was employed in that work, and had frequent access to the house; when Mr. Burn had missed his cloaths he came down to the shop, he asked for my master, who was out of town; I told him the prisoner was the person that had done the work for him; Mr. Burn went backwards with the foreman, and left his clerk in the shop with the prisoner; the prisoner went down into the shop; it occured to us afterwards that probably he might have concealed something there; we searched and found concealed a pair of silk stockings and a neckcloth; the prisoner was secured and taken before a justice.

[They were produced in Court, the stockings were deposed to by Mr. Burn.]

The neckcloth was not in the indictment.

MARY EVANS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Fairbone; I found these stockings and this neckcloth in the necessary, of my master's house; the prisoner went down three times while Mr. Burn was backwards, which caused us to suspect that he had hid something there.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say; I leave myself to the mercy of the jury.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-4

500. JOHN BUSTIN was indicted for stealing, two live cocks, value 1 s. and nine live hens, value 5 s. the property of Doctor David Orme .

ROBERT JONES sworn.

I am a servant to Dr. Orme, who has a country-house at Highgate ; I saw these fowls feeding by the hen-house on Monday the 1st of September in the afternoon; there were two cocks and nine hens; I knew them well by their marks; the next morning I found the hen-house broke open, the lock was burst and all the fowls were gone; I saw all the fowls again at justice Blackborow's; I knew them to be my master's property; one of the cocks had a very remarkable leg.

MARY BRADSHAW sworn.

I am servant to Dr. Orme: I locked up the hen-house on the 1st of September at night; there were fourteen in the whole; the next morning we found the hen-house open, and two cocks and nine hens were missing; I afterwards saw them at justice Blackborow's; I knew them to be my master's.

WARWICK RANDAL sworn.

I am a watchman at Islington: I saw the prisoner coming through Islington on the 2d of September at half after one in the morning, he had a large bundle upon his head; I stopped him and found it contained two cocks and nine hens: they were all dead, but they could not have been killed long, for they were very warm; I asked him how he came by them? he said he had bought them as he was coming down Highgate-hill; I took him to the watch-house; the next morning I took him before

Mr. Blackborow; the fowls were cried, and by that means it was discovered that Dr. Orme had lost a parcel of fowls; the fowls were owned by Dr. Orme's servant.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My fellow servant White and I went to drink at Highgate; coming down Highgate-hill I met a higher with this poultry; I bought the whole parcel of him for seven shillings; my shopmate White lent me three shillings towards the purchase.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-5

501, 502, 503. JOHN GRAVES , JOHN COLLEY , and MARTHA ADDINGTON were indicted, the two first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Morris on the 25th of August , between the hours of eleven and three in the night, and stealing a pair of coach harness, value 4 l. a pair of coach harness bridles, value 20 s. a new saddle with a pair of iron stirrups plated with silver, value 30 s. two front coach glasses, value 20 s. a coach door glass, value 20 s. a fringed cloth hammer cloth, value 10 s. a coachman's cloth box coat, value 5 s. and a leather phaeton slap lined with cloth, value 10 s. the property of the said Henry in his dwelling-house , and the other for receiving a parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute .

Mr. HENRY MORRIS sworn.

I live at Hammersmith : my stable and coach-house were broke open about three weeks ago, on a Wednesday or Thursday about the 20th of August as near as I can recollect; we found all the doors broke open in the morning.

Do you yourself know whether they were fastened over night? - No; my footman called me about four or five in the morning, and told me I had been robbed; I came down and found all the doors broke open; the coach-house doors appeared to have been forced open.

Is your house in a street at Hammersmith? - No, it stands by itself in the center of a lane.

How far is the coach-house and stable from your dwelling-house? - About twice the length of this court; one end of the brick work of the stable communicates to the garden, but not to the dwelling-house; there is a garden between the dwelling-house and stable.

One of the JURY. My Lord, there is a wall from the dwelling-house to the stable; we all know the house? - Yes; there is a wall goes all the way from the house to the stable; I saw the things that were lost at the justice's.

Cross Examination.

You don't exactly know on what day of the month this burglary was committed? - I cannot charge my memory.

Was it in the month of August? - Yes.

What time in the night was it? - I cannot exactly say; I know nothing but by the information of my man.

Then it might be broke open the day before for what you know? - No; it could not, I came down that day with my carriage, and the harness of the carriage was taken away.

Pray is the butt end of the wall part of the stable or part of the mansion-house? - The butt end is part of the stable.

How far is the mansion-house from the stable? - Not quite twice the length of this court.

Did you ever see Graves before? - Not till I saw him before the justice.

RICHARD STEPTOE sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Morris: I went down with my master from London on the 25th of August about seven o'clock at night; I have the care of the coach-harness; I secured the stables that night, I locked the doors and bolted them; I went out of the stables about half after ten; I live in the house; there is a bolt at the top of the door that is apt to slip down; I tied that that night with a string; I came down before four in the morning and found all the doors open; there are four of them, three coachhouse doors and a stable door; the top bolt which I had tied was forced almost off; I

went to the coach, and the coach door stood open; I missed two front glasses and a door glass out of the coach, and a hammer cloth, and a box coat; there was a phaeton stood by the coach, they took the slap of that off, which was lined with cloth; I went to the stable and missed all my coach harness, as mentioned in the indictment.

What do you think is the value of all these things? - 8 l. or 9 l. glasses and all; I went in and called the footman up, and told him to call my master, and inform him of the matter; he went to London and advertised the things; Macdonald came down that evening, and said they had taken the man; I came to London and went with my master to Justice Welch's, where I saw the goods.

Did you know them to be your master's? - Yes; there was my master's crest on the harness.

How did you know the glasses? - They had cut the strings, and left them in the coach; I know the glasses by marks at the bottoms of them.

JURY. Whether the locks were forced? - No; when they got into the coach-house they could open the door that goes into the stable; all the doors were fastened at night.

Cross Examination.

You don't know any thing of the prisoner? - No.

MICHAEL SIMONS sworn.

I am a Jew, and live in Adam's Court, near Aldgate; I deal in old cloaths; I know the prisoner Graves; I have seen Colley once with Graves on last Tuesday was a fortnight.

That was the 26th of August I believe? - I believe it was, I can't tell; I bought this coat of Graves in a parlour at a public house in Goodman's-lane; he left the coat at the King's Head in Holborn, just by; he sent me to the King's Head for it, and I bought it of him for half a crown; the other prisoner Colley was in the yard playing at skittles with two or three more; after I paid Graves the money he called the other in, and said to me, I will give him his share of the money while you are here, or he will think I had more of you; before we parted we had a pint of beer; then both of them said, if I would meet them on the morrow, they would bring a saddle, a pair of harness, and three glasses; they told me I should meet them the same night at eleven o'clock at Grave's room; he shewed me his room; I was there once before; it was in a court just by.

Did you go that night? - No, we have a society near where I live from seven to nine, where our people learn the law; Graves came to me next morning before I was up (when they sold me the coat they said they had buried the things in two places, that if they lost one, they might have the other); Graves called next morning before I was up, and left word for me to come to his lodging at ten o'clock; I went between ten and eleven, there were two hampers; Graves only was there; he opened the hampers; I said here is but two glasses? he said he broke one in burying it; he took-all the things that are here out of the hampers; he said I need not be afraid to sell them, they came from Hammersmith; I agreed to give him twenty-eight shillings for them; he would not let me go without giving him some money; I gave him half a guinea; I bought them with a view for the owner to have them again; I was told by one Lewis in Crutched-friars a week before, that there had been some harness stole, and he bid me stop it if I met with it; I had a bag with me, in which we put the hammer cloth and some of the things; I told him I would go and fetch the rest of the money; I went across Holborn that he might not suspect me, and then went to justice Welch's in Litchfield-street, there I met with M'Donald; I asked him to go with me to stop the men; we went directly and took Graves and carried him and all the things to justice Welch's.

Was you there when Mr. Morris and the coachman came? - Yes.

How long was that after you carried the goods to justice Welch's? - I believe the same day.

Were the things you bought of Graves seen by Mr. Morris and the coachman? - Yes, the same things.

Do you know any thing of Addington? - I have seen her with Graves.

Do you know whether she had any of these goods? - I cannot tell that.

Cross Examination.

What is your profession? - I deal in coach

glasses, and cloaths, and every thing that is honest.

How long have you known Graves? - Not three months.

Is this the first transaction you had had together? - Yes.

You are sure of that? - Yes.

When you bought the coat, how came you not to apply to the constable immediately without waiting till next day? - When I bought the coat I brought it home; my wife asked when I was going to the fair, why I did not take it; I am a poor man, what I buy in the morning I sell in the afternoon at Rag-fair; I said it was not mine, I had a reason for it.

When Graves sold you the great coat he told you he had other things to sell? - Yes.

You had no suspicion that he got the coat improperly? - I knew the coat was stole.

Why did not you give information of the coat without staying till next day? - Because if I had given information of the coat, we should have lost all the property that was buried.

What did you agree to give to him for the property that was buried? - Twenty-eight shillings.

It was worth 28 l. I believe? - That is the reason I bought it.

[The goods were produced in Court, and Steptoe deposed that they were the property of Mr. Morris.]

DENNIS MACDONALD sworn.

I am a constable of St. Giles's parish: Symonds the Jew came to me about a fortnight ago or better, on the 25th or 26th of August to Mr. Welch's, and said he had bought some glasses, and agreed for something else, and had given half a guinea in hand; I went with him to Graves's lodging; I told Symonds to go up before me, and we took Graves; I found this harness in his room; I took him and the harness to Mr. Welch's; Mr. Morris and the coachman came the same night; I went to Hammersmith for the coachman, Mr. Morris was in town; the harness was produced to them: I found in the room two picklock keys and a chissel; the coachman swore to the harness before the justice.

When did you apprehend Colley? - Hyde took Colley; I suspected Colley because I had seen him with Graves, and bid Hyde take him.

You had no reason to suspect Colley only you had seen him in company with him? - No, only Symonds told me Graves sold him a great coat and they shared the money at a public house; he told me that the same day that I took Graves.

Who is Hyde? - He attends the office at times.

Cross Examination.

Is Symonds of the same profession of taking thieves? - He has taken two or three before I believe.

When Symonds took you to the lodgings, did not he tell you it was not Graves's lodging? - No, I knew better myself; I had seen him in bed in the lodging before.

Was there any talk of the goods belonging to one Jones? - No.

- HYDE sworn.

I took Colley by the information of Macdonald last Friday about three in the afternoon at the corner of Cow-lane; I know nothing against him.

GRAVES's DEFENCE.

Mrs. Wood, the landlady of the house, will prove I never took a room of her in my life.

COLLEY's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of the matter.

FOR GRAVES.

ANN WOOD sworn.

I get my bread by charing; I know nothing of John Graves ; I appear for Addington.

From GRAVES. Whether the room ever belonged to me? - I am the landlady of the house; I let the room to Martha Addington , she took it as a single woman; I never saw a man in the room in my life.

COURT. Did you never see Graves there? - No; I am hardly a day in the week at home.

If he had come to the house, you must have seen him? - No, I should not; I don't live in the house, I live next door.

FOR COLLEY.

HARRY STONE sworn.

I am a gentleman of no profession; I have known Colley from his infancy; I believe he is about sixteen now; he bore a good character; I came yesterday to get my father off the jury, and to my surprize saw Colley arraigned; I am a relation of his; I thought in point of humanity I ought to appear to his character; I never heard any thing amiss of him.

GRAVES GUILTY . Death .

COLLEY NOT GUILTY .

ADDINGTON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17770910-6

504. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Jonathan Errington on the king's highway, with intention to steal the monies of the said Jonathan , August 20th .

JONATHAN ERRINGTON sworn.

Last night was three weeks I was on the road between Barrington and Kilburn in a postchaise with James Allison and John Allison ; Edwards was the postboy; we heard these men on the road; we went out on purpose to catch them; we were going towards London; two ladies had been robbed in a chaise coming from town; they did not call at our house, we keep the Kilburn Wells; we were stopped near the Wells by two men; the prisoner was one, he laid hold of the reins; he put a pistol to Edwards's breast and bid him stand, or he would blow his brains out; the other was coming round to me; I jumped out and presented a gun which missed fire; upon that my brother came up; the man bid me get into the chaise, or I was a dead man; he had a horse pistol and blunderbuss; my brother coming up, he took to his feet and ran away; I pursued him, but he got off.

Did Allison get out? - Yes, when he ran away; when the other ran away he dropt his pistol, and bid the prisoner follow him, which he did; we pursued him; I never lost sight of him till I took him; I delivered him to Allison: they did not demand any thing, they had not time.

Did the other man say any thing more when he bid you get into the chaise? - No, only that if I did not get in I was a dead man.

STEPHEN ALLISON sworn.

I was in the postchaise with Errington on Wednesday was three weeks, we went on purpose to take some thieves that we heard were on the road; we were stopped by the prisoner and another man who got away; before this I was going home from work at London to Kilburn behind a chaise, in which there were some ladies going to Stanmore; they were stopped and robbed by the prisoner and the other man; I jumped from behind and ran and told Errington; I ran by them and they did not see me; the prisoner stopped the chaise; then we went into the chaise to take them, and they stopped us; my partner jumped out and snapped a pistol, upon which they ran off; we pursued them, and took the prisoner; he was never out of my sight; he dropped a pistol, which we took up; my brother has it.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I drove this postchaise; we were attacked by the prisoner, he laid hold of the reins, and said, Stop, or I will blow your brains out; one of the men jumped out, and two gentlemen coming up on saddle horses they ran off.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This man ran after that man and took and knocked the man down in the brown cloaths, and said he was the person; afterwards they took hold of me; they let me go and went after some others; then they came again and took me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-7

505. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for feloniously forging, &c. on 1st of July last, in the parish of St. Edmund the King and Martyr , Ward Langbourn , a certain receipt for money, purporting to be a receipt given on the 16th

of June 1777, by John Clifford , who then and long before was and still is a clerk of the governor and company of the bank of England, intrusted and employed by the said governor and company to give receipts on their behalf for such sums of money, notes, bills, or other securities for payment of money as he might or may receive for the said governor and company, for and on behalf of the said governor and company, to a certain corporation called The London Assurance for 3210 l. received by him from the said corporation called The London Assurance, for the said governor and company, which said receipt for money so falsely made, &c. is in the words, &c. following.

"1777, June 16, Bank Notes - Clifford - 3210" which said receipt for money then did and still doth import, signify, and express, that the said John Clifford , as clerk of the said governor and company of the bank of England, had on the 16th of June 1777, received of the said corporation called The London Assurance, the sum of 3210 l. with intention to defraud the said corporation called The London Assurance , against the statute.

2d Count. For feloniously uttering same on same day (with same description of Clifford, &c.) with same intention, knowing, &c.

3d Count. For that he on same day, &c. having in his custody and possession a certain accountable receipt for bank notes for payment of money, given on the said 16 June 1777, by the said John Clifford , as such clerk of the said governor and company of the bank of England as aforesaid, for and on behalf of the said governor and company to the said corporation called The London Assurance, for divers bank notes then received by him from the said corporation for the said governor and company (the said last mentioned bank notes being notes for payment of money, to wit, 210 l.) which said accountable receipt for bank notes for payment of money, was then in the words, &c. following.

1777, June 16, Bank Notes - Clifford - 210.

he then and there feloniously did falsely alter the principal sum of the said accountable receipt, to wit, 210 l. by feloniously and falsely making, forging, counterfeiting, and prefixing the figure 3 to the said figures and cypher 210. whereby the words, &c.

"1777, June 16, Bank notes, Clifford, 210 l." together with the figure 3 so falsely made, forged, counterfeited, and prefixed, did and still do import, signify, and express that the said John Clifford , as clerk of the said governor and company had, on said 16 June 1777, received of the said corporation bank notes for payment of money to the amount of the sum of 3210 l. with intention to defraud the said corporation called The London Assurance, against the statute.

4th Count. For feloniously uttering the said false, altered, and forged accountable receipt for bank notes for payment of money, to defraud the said corporation called The London Assurance.

5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Counts same as 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th, only laid to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England.

9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th Counts same as 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th, only laid to defraud the corporation called The London Assurance, and the corporation called The London Assurance of Houses and Goods from Fire, and when the corporation called The London Assurance is named the corporation called The London Assurance of houses and goods from fire, is also named and joined with it.

13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, and 24th

Counts are the same as the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th counts, with only this difference, that where the receipt is set forth in the words and figures, the year 1777 is omitted.

ALEXANDER AUBERT , Esq; sworn.

You are Deputy-governor of the London Assurance, I believe? - I am.

Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Harrison? - I do.

He was an officer in that Company in the month of July last? - He was.

What office did he bear? - He was the accomptant.

I believe the Company have at all times kept a cash account with the Bank? - Yes, they have.

In what manner was that account kept? - It belonged to both Charters, and was the mixed cash of both Charters, in the name of The London Assurance.

Have you the book in which that account was kept? - I have it here (producing it) this is the book in which the account was kept between the joint Companies and the Bank of England.

Do you remember the circumstance of a committee of the Company meeting any day in July last? - On Wednesday the ninth of July.

Will you please to take the book into your hand, and explain in what manner the account is kept between the Company and the Bank of England? - The title of the book is, Debtor; the Bank of England with the London Assurance, Creditor; on the debtor's side, the clerk of the Bank, when any money is sent to him or bank-note, enters the date, and what it is, such as June 16th, bank-note; then he signs his name Clifford, and afterwards writes the sum; and if it is the sum of a hundred only, he puts a bar or dash before the figure in order to prevent a figure of a thousand being subjoined; when a thousand is put down the dash is not added: when we send for money, we send an order to the cashier of the Bank to write off so much from our bankbook; one of the confidential clerks of the office is sent by the accomptant with this book to write off, and upon producing it to the cashiers at the Bank, they give him the money, and write off the sum of money.

JURY. It is not a common rule to make a bar to all the sums, I see here are some where there are no bars? - I imagine that is where there are bills of exchange.

Counsel for the Prosecution. Where the line is not carried home to the sum in the last column, the sum is entered in a former column, as not received immediately at the time, as when bills are paid in that have some time to run.

Who had that book in general in charge in the office? - The prisoner.

Had the prisoner, from the nature of his office, from time to time money of the Companies in his hands? - Yes.

Do you remember the prisoner being called upon on the 9th of July last to produce the book? - Yes, at about 11 o'clock.

I believe it was a Wednesday? - Yes; to produce it to the committee of the treasury who were about to sit.

Did he deliver in the book? - He had compared the book with the other cash-books in the court-room where we hold a committee of treasury, and it was left there ready for inspection.

Did he attend the committee that day? - He was in the room, we waited for him to open the committee, but he disappeared, he did not come.

When did you see any thing of him afterwards? - I saw him in the evening, I believe it was about six o'clock; I had been informed that he was at one Mr. Richardson's at Wapping; I went there in the evening, and there I found him.

In what situation did you find him? - In great agitation of mind.

Did you tell him the reason of your coming to him there? - I told him we had perceived three alterations in the bank-book, amounting to 7000 l. and I desired him to inform me if that was all his guilt with the Company; I was very uncasy in order to find out how far the Company might be injured; I assured him I would do every thing for him that could be done with consistency, if he would come back to the house of the Company, and I prevailed upon him to come back to the house of the Company.

For what? - In order that he might explain matters, and give us a true and just account of every thing: he did return with me and one of the persons that had been security for him, a Mr. Richardson.

When he came back was the book adverted to? - The next morning it was: I desired the secretary and the book-keeper, who were in the house, to take care of him, not to suffer him to do any mischief to himself, and likewise not to suffer him to go; he continued all night in the office under the custody and care of these two officers.

Counsel for the Prisoner. On the day that you saw him at Mr. Richardson's you went in company with Mr. Richardson's son there? - Mr. Richardson himself.

You would therefore not have known where the prisoner was, had it not been for his friend Mr. Richardson, who came to the office to you? - I should not.

When you came there you behaved very kindly to him, and gave him every assurance that you would do all that was in your power to have matters set to rights? - With propriety and consistency, these were my expressions.

At that time I believe you yourself produced a bond? - I did, of Mr. Angus Mackey .

Did you or not write on the back of that bond an assignment of it to yourself? - No; I had consulted previously with our solicitor before I went to Mr. Richardson, and he advised me to get Mr. Harrison to assign the bond to me the first thing, and he did do that to me as deputy-governor.

What was the amount of that bond? - 7550 l.

Then that bond was assigned to you as a security for the Company? - I meant it should be, in order to recover as much as we could, by that bond, of the sum of 7550 l.

In consequence of your having done that, and your assurances to him, he returned with you as his friend to the office? - He did.

Counsel for the Prosecution. Can you give us an account of what this bond was from Mr. Mackey to the prisoner, what Mr. Harrison said about it? - Mr. Harrison said, that he had at several times lent money to Angus Mackey ; that he began by small sums, and they increased afterwards to very large ones; that he had been used very ill by Mackey, who had promised faithfully to return the money, and kept him in the greatest distress, telling him he must stop payment if he did not let him have more money still; he told me he acquainted Mackey with the manner in which he could only raise these sums by alterations in the Bank book, and he should be obliged to do so again, if he lent him more money; he did demand more money of him, and it went to the amount, I suppose, of that bond; whether interest was included in it or not I cannot tell.

This was the account that Mr. Harrison gave you of the nature of the bond from Mackey to him? - Yes.

And then you procured an assignment of the bond to indemnify the Company as far as might be from the deficiency in Mr. Harrison's account? - Yes.

Counsel for the Prisoner. You have been intimately acquainted with Mr. Harrison, and a friend to him? - He has been in the office 19 years and an half; I have been acquainted with him as our officer, but in no other manner.

He was at that time under no restraint, but in the house of his own friend? - No, certainly under no other restraint.

And was conversing with you upon this subject as an acquaintance? - As the governor of the Company.

Do you mean that you were sent by the Company to him that evening? - I mean that it was my duty, as the deputy governor of the London Assurance, to find him.

Therefore what you did was of your own free will? - Entirely.

You was not sent as a particular officer of the Company by the directors of it? - No.

But going with the friend of Mr. Harrison, at whose house he was, to his Mr. Richardson's house? - When Mr. Richardson was there, we consulted with the other directors that were present, and they advised me to go.

Counsel for the Prosecution. When you found Mr. Harrison at Wapping, and that passed between you which you have related, did you make him any promises of safety, or that he should not be prosecuted, or any thing of the sort? - Nothing like it.

And you used no kind of threats? - No, I only said, you had better come to the London Assurance with me, I will do every thing in my power for you that is consistent with propriety; he was in such a state of mind I was afraid he would attempt to make away with himself.

This was all you said to him by way of inducement? - To the best of my knowledge.

Have you any doubt about it upon your own mind; did you ever desire him to confess? - I did ask him if there was any thing more beside the 7000 l. that we had discovered in the Bank book.

But did you use any other means than you have given an account of to prevail upon him to say what he did say? - No.

Counsel for the Prisoner. There was no prosecution then set on foot, nor any threatened? - None at all.

COURT. Do you think he would have returned with you to the office, provided he imagined he should have been prosecuted? - I imagined he did not apprehend then any more than I did that it was a capital offence, I believe he thought it a breach of trust only.

Counsel for the Prisoner. Did not you enquire of him the responsibility of Mackey to pay that bond when it became due? - I don't remember my doing it that evening, but I did afterwards; I believe he might tell me without my asking it, that it was a very good bond, it would be all well paid; I believe he might say that, indeed.

COURT. Whether you took it that the prisoner understood by what passed between you and him that he should not be prosecuted for any fort of offence? - I should imagine he could never think that; I believe he imagined that I would be of service to him in what I could with propriety; but I believe he must imagine that the offence was so great that I could not palliate or screen him, or help him off.

Counsel for the Prisoner. And you at that time conceived that in point of law this was no capital offence? - I mean not a forgery.

You could have no reason for supposing that any prosecution would be commenced against him? - There are prosecutions for many offences that are not forgery; why not for a breach of trust?

Counsel for the Crown. If the Court have a difficulty about the confession, we don't press it.

COURT. The prisoner should know the situation he is in at the time he makes a declaration that shall affect his life.

Counsel for the Crown. Then I will only ask you a general question, Can you inform the Court what deficiency there was in the prisoner's account with the Company of cash that ought to have been in his hands? - The whole deficiency.

Yes, the whole deficiency? - 7570 l. and upwards.

Counsel for the Prisoner. Which was the amount of that bond? - More than that in money and cash; but if other goods that belong to the prisoner, that are in our house, are to be supposed to be set off against the sum, it will not be quite so much; Mr. Mackey's bond is 7550 l.

There is another bond, is there not, to the Company? - Yes.

The corporation is now in possession of a bond from Mr. Mackey for the whole deficiency? - For the amount of his bond to Harrison, as we did not know what the consequence might be when we took Mr. Mackey and Harrison both up to Sir John Fielding 's the next day.

What was the amount of the second bond? - 7581 l.

When was that given? - We were advised by our solicitor that we should have a bond of Mackey directly to me, for we had Mackey's bond to Mr. Harrison assigned; it was thought proper to add the sum of 301. that would be the amount of the interest of that bond of 7550 l. to that, and that he should make his bond for 7581 l. that it might appear that the second bond was different from the sum of the first.

Counsel for the Prosecution. Then in truth they were for one and the same sum? - In satisfaction of the former bond they are not one and the same sum, nor do they in fact cover the deficiency.

Counsel for the Prisoner. All this was done, I believe, before you went with the prisoner to Sir John Fielding 's? - Yes.

Counsel for the Crown. Did you see any letter, or have you any letter that the prisoner

wrote when he left the book and went away on the 9th? - Yes; about ten minutes after his disappearance our secretary Mr. George Hall received this letter (producing it).

Are you acquainted with Mr. Harrison's hand-writing? - Very well.

Do you believe that letter to be his handwriting? - Yes.

(The letter was read in Court as followeth)

Directed to Mr. George Hall, signed J. H. Wednesday 9th July 1777.

"Dear Sir,

"I am distressed beyond expression, having

"forfeited every thing that is dear to me,

"by an act of kindness to a friend who has

"deceived me: inclosed is a state of my account

"with the Company, which tortures

"my soul whenever I think of it; I know

"the treasury will not forgive me, therefore

"I don't care what becomes of me, as I dare

"not see them any more; God Almighty

"knows what will become of me, or where

"I shall fly for succour; indeed Mr. Hall I

"am one of the most miserable wretches living,

"but I have betrayed my trust, for which

"I never can forgive myself; when I parted

"with the money it was but for a few days,

"or I would sooner have died than have

"parted with it; but alas, I shall now severely

"pay by suffering myself to be drawn

"in to serve a friend, who knew it was not

"my own, and saw the distress of mind it

"cost me when I did it: please to present my

"humble duty to the gentlemen, tell them I

"can meet any death after this sooner than I

"can see them again, and am determined not

"to survive the shame: I am, dear sir, a lost

"unhappy being; I am so bewildered that I

"scarce know what I am doing, but believe

"the inclosed account is not right, as I

"don't recollect that I am any way short of

"cash; but in truth I am not myself."

Mr. AUBERT. This is the account which I believe came inclosed, the secretary gave it me (producing a paper.)

Counsel for the Prosecution. This letter was brought immediately I presume to the committee? - About five or ten minutes after Mr. Harrison's disappearance, Mr. Hall brought it into the committee; a very little after that I went to the Bank in order to see how our balance stood there.

Counsel for the Prisoner. This book was left open, so that all the clerks in the office had recourse to it? - Not all; it was in the accomptant's or treasurer's office, as it is called, when that office was opened, the press in which the book laid, behind the prisoner, was to be sure open, and the secretary might as well look at it as himself.

Therefore it was not a book absolutely in his custody from the rest of the people in the office; but any body in the office that chose it might go and look at it? - No; the accomptant is always charged to keep things to himself about the Company's affairs. He has the care of the book. People might take it against his will from him, and the secretary might look at it; but it is none of his business.

It lay there open to people's view? - If people chose to look at it forcibly they might; he alone had the care of it.

COURT. And if he chose it nobody else could have looked at it? - No; unless a governor or director had ordered him to, produce it.

Counsel for the Prisoner. Was it his business to go backwards and forwards with this book to the Bank, or did he send it by other clerks? - He had the cash; he used in general to send a confidential clerk, the book-keeper, Mr. Austin, and deliver to him the Bank book.

GEORGE HALL sworn.

You are secretary, I believe, to the London assurance? - Yes.

You know Mr. Harrison? - Very well.

He was accomptant to the Company? - Yes.

Who produced the book on the 9th July, when the treasurers met? - Mr. Austin produced the book to Mr. Aubert.

Who is Mr. Austin? - A clerk in the office.

Did Austin produce it first, or was it produced by any body else to him? - He brought it from the Bank, and produced it to Mr. Aubert.

Did any thing happen that made it necessary to send the book to the Bank? - Yes; the corporation had occasion for 4000 l. and Mr. Austin, the clerk, who generally went upon that business, took the book, and had the money wrote off at the Bank, and brought

the book back again. In the time of Mr. Austin's going to the Bank Mr. Harrison decamped.

How soon was it after Mr. Harrison decamped that you received a letter from him? - To the best of my recollection, six or seven or ten minutes.

Look at that letter; is that Mr. Harrison's hand-writing. (The witness inspects it.) - Yes, that it is.

Was any thing inclosed in that letter? - He sent me the key of the office: there was an account inclosed in the letter.

You know Mr. Harrison's hand-writing you say? - I do.

You have been a long while familiar with Mr. Harrison's hand-writing? - I have been in the same office with him six or seven years.

Take that book into your hand (the Bank book) look at the sum 3210 l. and tell the Court whether any part of that is the prisoner's writing. - To the best of my belief, there is.

Which figure do you believe to be the handwriting of the prisoner? - The figure 3.

Do you form that judgment upon your knowledge of his hand-writing? - I do.

COURT. Do look at that again, and look upon the account delivered in by Harrison, in the second article in that account there is the sum of 336 l. look at those figures of three, and see if they are like that you have now mentioned? - I do; I think they are wrote by the same hand.

Look at the figure 3 just immediately over that in the Bank book, and see if it is not more like that? - They seem all to be wrote by him.

All four? - Yes.

COURT. That is the sum brought over? - Yes.

Is that brought over by the accomptant, or by the clerks of the Bank? - By the accomptant.

- AUSTIN sworn.

You are a clerk to the London Assurance? - I am.

Do you remember on the 9th July, when the Bank book was necessary to be shewn to the committee? - I was not present when the book was asked for.

How did the Bank book come into your possession? - The prisoner at the bar delivered it to me with a write-off for 4000 l. which I went for.

You were the clerk intrusted to carry this write off, with the Bank book, to the Bank of England? - I was.

To what clerk of the Bank did you apply? - I believe to Mr. Clifford; he delivered the book back to me.

Was any discovery made of any alteration in that book, either by you or the clerk of the Bank? - When the book was delivered back to me, I happened to turn over the blotting paper which was in the middle of the book, and I immediately observed that the money of the 16th of June, which I carried, 210 l. to the Bank, then stood 3210 l.

Counsel for the Prisoner. You carried Bank notes for 210 l.? - Yes.

Counsel for the Prosecution. To whom did you pay this money? - Mr. Clifford.

Did you see Mr. Clifford make an entry of that? - I did not see him write it in the book, because the compter is above my head; he wrote them in, as I suppose, and gave me the book back again.

When Mr. Clifford re-delivered the book was that sum entered? - Yes, 210 l. was entered in the book.

Did you see Mr. Clifford's name opposite to this sum in the Bank book? - Yes.

Look at the book, and say whether you know Mr. Clifford's hand-writing. You remember when this book was re-delivered to you by the clerk of the Bank, whether there was any bar carried up to the figure? - To the best of my recollection there was to the figure 2.

Are you acquainted with Mr. Harrison's mode of making figures? - Yes; I have been so these ten years.

Can you take upon you to say, whether that 3, according to the best of your belief, is the figure of Mr. Harrison? - It is.

JOHN CLIFFORD sworn.

You are a clerk at the Bank? - I am.

You was in the month of June last in that character? - Yes.

Did it happen to you in the course of your business to enter into the account, between the

Bank of England and the London Assurance, the cash or notes received into the Bank on the account of the London Assurance? - I did.

Look at the entry of the article 1777, June the 16th. - I see it.

What money did you receive that day on account of the London Assurance? - 210 l.

And no more? - Not more.

Did you make an entry corresponding with the receipt in that book? - I did.

What was the entry you made? - The word June, the figures 16, the words Bank notes, and the word Clifford.

Between the word Clifford and the last figures, which are 210, did you draw any thing, or leave a space? - I generally draw a bar line.

Did you draw a bar line there then? - I believe I did.

Is that figure of 3 your writing? - It is not.

Do you recollect how the sum was paid that day? - It was brought to me by Mr. Austin, their book-keeper, in bank notes.

When bank notes are brought in, do you enter, them as notes or cash? - As notes, expressing what they are; they are from that placed to the credit of the several accounts, and persons that keep cash with us are at liberty to take up either notes or money.

And to the amount of those notes you consider the Bank as chargeable? - Certainly.

When you have made the entry of 210 l. or any other sum, do you deliver the book over to any other person, to have a further entry made? - No; I return the book to the person that brings it: I returned that book, having made that entry, to Mr. Austin; and he saw it, and, I believe, was satisfied.

There is an entry made in the Bank cashbook, I believe? - There is a box: Mr. Foster, who was at the second cash-book, came to the boxes, that is usual, and entered these notes to the account of the Governor and Company of the London Assurance; he placed them to the credit of their account.

COURT. When you make up the page of your account, who carries it over, you or the person with whom you keep the account? - It is never carried over by us, we never settle the books.

Is the carrying it over your hand-writing, or the clerks of the Bank? - I cannot positively say whose it is; some gentlemen choose to do that themselves, if not the clerks at the Bank do it.

COURT to Mr. AUSTIN. I observe in the beginning of the page the words brought over, and then a very large sum opposite it, whose hand-writing is that? - Both the words brought over, the date, and the sum is Mr. Harrison's hand-writing.

HENRY FOSTER sworn.

You are an entring clerk in the Bank? - I am.

Did you make any entrance in the Bank books respecting the London Assurance on the 16th of June? - I did.

Is it your business to enter the cash of notes received? - Yes.

See if you entered any that day. ( Inspects the bank books.) - London Assurance Company 210 l. I have entered it to their credit; I entered it immediately; the notes are laid in a box by Mr. Clifford; I took them out immediately and entered them; another person entered them in another book, and circumflexed them.

The Charters of the Company were produced, and the corporate names, as expressed in the indictment, were found right.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I refer my defence to my counsel.

FOR THE PRISONER.

ROBERT WESTON , Esq; sworn.

Do you know Mr. Harrison? - Yes; very well.

How long have you known him? - From the year 1757.

What character does Mr. Harrison bear? - I know him as the person who was employed for me under our agent, Mr. Smithen, in building of the Eddiston light-house; upon that occasion it was necessary that Mr. Smithen should have a clerk: I lived with him for near a month, and from what I observed from his general conduct and behaviour there, I looked upon him to be as honest a man as ever I knew in my life. In the experience we had of him we found him extremely assiduous, diligent in his business, punctual, and thoroughly honest.

He was trusted with the management of our monies, which were very considerable, under the direction of Mr. Smithen.

Counsel for the Prisoner to Mr. Aubert.

When Mr. Harrison went from the office, I believe, he left 2000 l. in his desk? - About 1900 l.

Mr. RANDALL sworn.

I have known Mr. Harrison about five years; he always bore an exceeding good character; he has had a great many money affairs on the part of my family; he always discharged his trust with the greatest fidelity to my entire satisfaction.

Counsel for the Prosecution. There is no occasion to examine to Mr. Harrison's character, his having been employed nineteen years and an half in such an office of trust as this, shews very plainly that he had a good character.

BENJAMIN ADAMS sworn.

I have known Mr. Harrison almost twenty years; I have always looked upon him as a worthy honest man; he has always bore that character in my estimation, and that was his general character.

GUILTY upon the 3d, 4th, 7th, 8th, 11th, 12th, 15th, 16th, 19th, 20th, 23d, and 24th Counts , Death .

NOT GUILTY upon all the rest of the Counts.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-8

506, 507, 508. WRIGHT STAGG , SAMUEL MARKS , and ANN BERWICK otherwise ANN KELLY were indicted, the two first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Read , widow , on the 6th of August about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a yellow silk damask gown, value 20 s. a white silk tabby gown, value 20 s. one black silk paduasoy gown lined with white sarsenet, value 20 s. one cotton gown, value 6 s. a black sattin cloak, value 10 s. a flowered cotton window curtain, value 3 s. a pair of trimmed cotton cuffs, value 2 s. a flowered lawn apron, value 6 d. two plain lawn aprons, value 2 s. one linen shift, value 1 s. seven linen sheets, value 30 s. three damask table cloths, value 10 s. four linen napkins, value 4 s. and a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. the property of the said Margaret Read in the same dwelling-house , and the other for feloniously receiving the above goods well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute , &c.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17770910-9

509. JOHN HUDDLE was indicted for stealing a watch with the inside case made of metal and the outside case of shagreen, the property of Elizabeth Pally , widow ; a pair of black prince's stuff breeches, value 10 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Robert Pally ; and another silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of George Rogers , August 5th .

GEORGE ROGERS sworn.

I lost a watch, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of breeches; I live in Whitecross-street, and am a tin plate worker : on the 6th of August one of my men, a lamp-lighter, informed me that the pawnbroker in Old-street had stopped a pair of breeches brought by the prisoner; I went in the morning of the 17th and saw the breeches; they were my nephew's, Robert Pally 's; the other things I found at other pawnbrokers.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: the prisoner offered the breeches to my master on the 6th of August, I was present; my master asked me who he brought them for? he said his mother, that her name was Cole; my master stopped the breeches.

[The breeches were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

EDWARD CLEGG sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took in pawn a silk handkerchief of the prisoner for two shillings.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Prosecutor. It is my nephew's, it is marked with his name.

JOHN POTTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took in a handkerchief of the prisoner (it is produced).

Prosecutor. That is mine; my face bled and I had it in my pocket several days; I can swear to it.

'The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-10

510. WILLIAM GIBSON was indicted for the wilful murder of John Collier , by striking him with a certain case knife, which he held in his right hand, on the left side of the belly, thereby giving him a mortal wound of the length of one inch and of the depth of five inches, of which he instantly died , September the 8th .

[The first witness, - Downes, was called, but not appearing the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

ANN GRENNELL sworn.

I live at Mr. Turner's, a grocer, at the corner of King-street, Seven-dials .

Did you know the deceased John Collier ? - No, I did not.

Do you know the prisoner? - Yes; he lodged at my house in the two pair of stairs room.

Do you remember any thing happening on Monday night? - Yes; Mr. Gibson and I were standing at the door between seven and eight in the evening; Collier asked if Mr. Gibson was at home; I told him that was Mr. Gibson; he went and fetched a tall man from the public-house; Gibson in the mean time went up stairs.

Did he know the man? - No.

Who was the tall man? - Downes; they came into the house and went into the parlour; I told them that was not Mr. Gibson's room, that his room was up two pair of stairs; they went up, I followed them up one pair of stairs and stood on the landing place; Mrs. Gibson stood in the passage at the head of the stairs.

Mrs. Gibson is the wife of the prisoner? - Yes; Downes went up and asked if Mr. Gibson was at home? she answered, yes, and asked him his business, he said he wanted Mr. Gibson; she asked his name; he said it was Downes; Gibson answered from the inside he did not know the name of Downes, and nobody should enter his room till he knew his business; after that I heard a great noise, and Mrs. Gibson called out murder.

You don't know whether the door was locked? - No, that was the time they went in.

The two men got into the room? - Yes, I believe, by Mr. Gibson's voice, that the door was shut; I heard no more; I went down stairs and called my master; he went up stairs, but did not stay two minutes, his business called him into the shop; I went up stairs again then, and Mr. Atterbury and Mr. Mountain went up with me; Downes had got Gibson on the top of the stairs in the passage, holding him fast by the collar at the bottom of the garret stairs; the gentlemen asked Downes what he wanted with the gentleman; he said he had a warrant against Mr. Gibson, and we all went into the room; the deceased then lay on the floor.

What did you see when you first came into the room? - I saw the short man, Collier, lying on the ground.

Was he living or dead? - He was living, but wounded; they asked for the warrant, and Downes produced it out of his pocketbook; Downes sat down in a chair by Collier, and asked if he was hurt; he answered very faintly, Yes; then I came down stairs.

Did it appear from any thing that passed in conversation then who he had been hurt by? - No.

Mr. KELSON sworn.

I am a surgeon to the Middlesex Hospital.

Do you remember the deceased being brought into your house? - At the time he was brought in I was not at home; he was upon the point of expiring when he was brought in.

You know nothing from him of the manner in which he received his death wound? - Nothing.

He was wounded in a manner that was fatal? - Yes, he had received a mortal wound.

There being no other evidence attending for the crown the prisoner was not put upon his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-11

511. GEORGE SWEATMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Holyland , on the 1st of July , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a silver tankard, value 10 l. three silver candlesticks, value 10 l. a silver butter-boat, value 40 s. a silver pepper-castor, value 20 s. a silver sugar-castor, value 30 s. two silver waiters, value 7 l. a silver tea-pot, value 4 l. a silver punch-ladle, value 10 s. a silver milk-pot, value 10 s. a silver sugar-basket, value 20 s. ten silver tea-spoons, value 20 s. a silver pint mug, value 4 l. a silver salt, value 10 s. and a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of the said William in his dwellinghouse .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-12

512. BARNABY BRYNE was indicted for stealing 50 lb. weight of lend, value 5 s. the property of John Salter , September 3d .

JOHN SALTER sworn.

I am a plumber in Thames-street: I know nothing of the affair; I can only speak to the property of the lead.

HENRY SUMMERS sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Salter: last Wednesday we were at work at Mr. Ravencamp's in Martin's-lane; Thames-street ; between five and six o'clock we weighed this lead, there was about 1214 lb. of it; we threw it out of the warehouse into Martin's-lane; we suspected this man, who was lurking about; as we were fetching it away, I saw him with a piece on his shoulder; I seized him, upon which he dropped the lead, and attempted to make his escape; it was at a house we were repairing.

[The lead was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

' James Pollard , a servant to the prosecutor,

'confirmed the evidence of Summers.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was drunk; they took me to the Compter; I did not know where I was.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-13

513. ELIZABETH WILTSHIRE , widow , was indicted for stealing two linen sheets, value 2 s. and a woollen blanket, value 10 d. the property of Lewis Banfield , being in a certain room let by the said Lewis to Jonathan Abby, to be used by the said Jonathan and the said Elizabeth, against the statute. April the 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-14

514, 515. ROBERT PARSONS and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for stealing ten gold rings set with diamonds, value 100 l. twelve other gold rings set with diamonds and other precious stones, value 100 l. the: property of Henry Morris , May the 13th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-15

516. RICHARD TURWOOD was indicted for stealing eleven guineas and one shilling, the property of Samuel Wildman , in the dwelling house of the said Samuel , Sept. 7th .

SAMUEL WILDMAN sworn.

I am a goldsmith in Cheapside ; I have within these two months lost something considerable; on last Sunday I lost eleven guineas and a gilt shilling out of a drawer; I must refer the Court to my servant for the particulars; I had reason to suspect the prisoner, because he used to come often of a Sunday, when only the maid-servants were in the way.

JOHN MARDELL sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wildman; I lost eleven guineas and a gilt shilling out of the drawer in the shop; there were in it nineteen guineas and six shillings; I locked it up at half after eleven; six guineas were marked; as I expected the prisoner to come I got some friends to stay with me; about 5 o'clock the bell rang; the maid let him in; he asked if her master was within; she said he was in the country; he asked where I was; she said I was out; he then asked if Nanny was at home, and said he would go up stairs and see her; I heard him come down and go into the cellar; he came up, and I heard something crack; I looked and saw him on his knee, opening the lock of the drawer; he left the door on the jar and went away; I thought he had heard something that alarmed him; presently he came in with a lighted candle; he put to the door, and unlocked the drawer; he then went into the back shop and I heard no more of him; as I looked through the crack I saw something pass by it, and thought I heard the lock of the door go; on which I rushed out, and found the prisoner at the door; he was going out; I called my friends; we secured him, and sent for constable I found the eleven guineas and a gilt shilling upon him; I examined the till, and there was just that sum missing; there were among them six guineas, marked with a small punch; the money was sealed up and delivered to the constable.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the witness.]

BORRIDGE DEVENPORT sworn.

I am a silversmith: on Saturday evening last Mr. Mardell informed me, he was very uneasy in his mind about the loss of some money, and if I was not engaged he would be obliged to me to spend the afternoon on Sunday with him at Mr. Wildman's house, as he thought he could detect the person; I went, with a friend; he shewed me the manner in which the person must perpetrate the fact, and where he himself was to be concealed; he desired we would conceal ourselves in the chamber, and when he gave a hem we were to come out; at about five o'clock the bell rung; the maid

said that was Richard by the ring, meaning the person they suspected; I went into Mr. Wildman's chamber, and I believe Mr. Mardell went into the shop; I heard somebody go down stairs, and soon after I heard Mr. Mardell give two or three loud halloas; I thought he was engaged with the prisoner, and ran immediately down stairs with my friend and secured him; we called in a soldier and another man to our assistance; we sent for a constable, who searched him, and found the money upon him; I saw some of the marked money as it was taken out of his pocket; the money was then sealed up and delivered to the constable Ranking.

DAVID RANKING sworn.

I saw the money sealed up in the Poultry Compter; I produced it as I received it; it was afterwards opened before the Lord Mayor, and sealed up again.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The money I had was my brother's; I received a sum of money from my brother; Mr. Mardell could not see me, he was behind some shutters.

To MARDELL. What situation was you in when you saw the prisoner open the drawer? - We have shutters to secure the compters, and a couple of doors that lock up; I was within the shutters, on the right hand side; the cash was kept on the left hand side; I made an opening between the shutters, so as to have a little crack; I saw him go in and open the drawer.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-16

517. JAMES COOMES was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon Maria Spencer , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a gauze cap, value 1 s. a woman's black silk hat, value 5 s. the property of the said Maria , July 2d .

MARIA SPENCER sworn.

I was robbed by the dead-wall of the Privy-gardens, in Parliament-street , at about a quarter before ten at night, of the 2d of July; the prisoner came up to me -

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - I can swear to him.

Was there any body with you? - There was another lady walking with me; he came up to me, and said, stop, and snatched my hat and cap off.

What sort of a hat was it? - A black hat and a gauze cap.

Did he say any more than, stop? - I could not remember that he said any thing else in my fright.

Had he a pistol? - I did not see any; when he had snatched my hat and cap he ran off as fast as he could; he dropped my hat; he was stopped by two gentlemen about 100 yards from me; I came up to them, and the gentlemen that laid hold of him gave me my cap again.

As this was so suddenly done, could you possibly distinguish the man so as to swear to him? - No; but I never lost sight of him till the gentlemen took him.

Did you see the gentlemen take your cap from the prisoner? - No.

PRISONER. Did I bid you stop? - Yes.

CHARLES KING sworn.

I was returning from a house where I generally spend the evening; at Sir Jeffery Amherst's corner I heard a female voice cry out, stop thief; I turned and saw a lady, and saw the prisoner run by me as swift as lightning; I followed him, and he was stopped about the middle of Parliament-street; a gentleman or two came off the pavement into the highway and stopped him; I took hold of him; the gentlemen asked, what he had done? I said he had robbed somebody of a hat and dropped it; upon which he threw down a cap; I took it up, and gave it to some one; the prosecutrix had then fainted away; when she came to herself she related what he had done to her, and I delivered the cap to the lady; by the assistance of Spragg we took him to the round-house.

PRISONER. Had not the lady her cap before you came up? - No.

JAMES SPRAGG sworn.

I know the prisoner; I was going along Parliament-street on the 2d of July; I heard the cry of Stop thief; the prisoner ran by me very fast; I pursued him and caught hold of him; he asked me what I wanted with him? I said nothing, but to know where he was going; he immediately dropped the cap; Mr. King asked what was the matter? I said, I did not know; upon that the prosecutrix came up and said, she had been robbed of a hat and cap, and the prisoner had left the hat in the road; I said, I supposed that was the cap: on his making use of some horrid expressions to her, she fainted away.

What expressions did he make use of? - Very horrid ones; he said, he was going on the scamp; he blasted her for a b - h; and said, she assaulted him first.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met these ladies, one of them asked me where I was going to; I said, home; the words were hardly out of my mouth before two men came up to me and pushed me down, and my hat fell off; I went to look for my hat, and three or four men came up and said, I had robbed the woman.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but NOT GUILTY of the robbery .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-17

518. JOSEPH NAILOR was indicted for stealing seven pounds weight of sugar, value 7 s. and five pounds of pepper, value 7 s. the property of Percival North , William Hoard , William Nanson , and Thomas Simpson , Aug. 23d .

PERCIVAL NORTH sworn.

I am a grocer , and am in co-partnership with William Hoar , Thomas Simpson , and William Nanson ; on Saturday the 23d Aug. a lump of sugar was stolen from us; a man received it at the door; I did not see it myself; I saw the sugar when it was brought back; the man confessed he stole a lump of sugar, but said he had taken nothing else; we sent for a constable, and he was taken to the Compter; he went without his coat; he said, he had left it at home; we searched for his coat after he was gone, and found it behind a cask, and the pepper in the pocket of it.

RICHARD RYAN sworn.

I am a bookseller; I do business at Ludgate-hill; as I was going home I saw the prisoner bring a loaf of sugar out of Mr. North's shop, at the corner of Chancery-lane , and put it into a person's apron; he went towards Temple-bar, crossed the way, and went down towards Fleet-market; I followed him; he went into an alehouse in a narrow lane in Fleet street, and put the sugar behind a woman in the bar; then I went and informed Mr. North of it, and they went and got the sugar.

JOHN LONG sworn.

I was servant to Mr. North at the time the sugar was lost; I was sweeping the door; the prisoner brought me the loaf of sugar, and desired me to take it; I refused it at first; he insisted on my having it, and carrying it to a public-house, the Ship in White Friars I took it and carried it there.

You were at Mr. North's house when the sugar was brought to you? - Yes.

Do you know where he brought the sugar from? - He brought it out of the shop, and gave it me out of his breeches; it was about ten in the evening; we were both porters at Mr. North's; he asked me if I would have any such thing, that he could get it at any time; I made no answer to it; he brought it to me in the street, and I took it, and carried it to the public-house.

Was you waiting at the corner of Chancery-lane? - I was sweeping the door at the corner of Chancery-lane.

RYAN. That is the man I followed, I am certain of it.

JOHN WILLIS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. North; I know this sugar to be Mr. North's property; Mr. Ryan told me the sugar was at a public-house in Lombard-street, White Friars; I went there; they denied it; I looked about, and found it under the compter; I am sure it is my master's by a private mark that is upon it.

WILLIAM EDWARD sworn.

I found the prisoner's coat behind the cask

in Mr. North's shop, and some pepper in the pocket of it.

Mr. NORTH. I believe nobody can swear to the pepper: after Ryan had seen the transaction he came and informed us of it; when the loaf of sugar was brought in, Long ran away.

Did you make any promise to him when he made the confession? - No; I told him if he would confess all he had robbed us of, and his accomplices, I would shew him all the mercy I could.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Law said he wanted the sugar for his father in the country.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-18

519. CHARLES THOMAS FEATLEY was indicted for stealing a cloth tambour waistcoat, value 3 l. the property of Robert Munday , in the dwelling-house of Jane M'Intosh , July 25th .

ROBERT MUNDAY sworn.

There is higher value put upon the waistcoat than I could wish.

COURT. The Court cannot do any thing with that now.

MUNDAY. I have lost a tambour waistcoat; it was taken from a drawer in the parlour; I saw it there the 24th of July; I missed it on the 25th; the prisoner called twice on me on the 25th for a little money; I was not at home, but I found a letter left dated the 25th July; I had no suspicion of the prisoner; the maid was suspected and turned away: on the 26th of August I was out of town, I returned on the 28th, and saw an advertisement in the paper of a spoon the prisoner had stolen, which a little surprized me; I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and saw the prisoner searched; there was a duplicate found upon him which directed us to Mr. Rowney's, where I saw the waistcoat, my waistcoat, which had been stolen; I am taylor; I had made it for a gentleman.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

RICHARD ROWNEY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; that waistcoat was pawned at my shop on the 25th July, it was rather duskish; I believe it was brought by the prisoner; I cannot positively swear to him; the shop was full of people.

MOSES MORANT sworn.

I searched the prisoner and found this duplicate, which directed to a discovery of the waistcoat, it is dated July 25, 10 s. 6 d. for a waistcoat.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury, as this is the first time I ever unfortunately stood as a criminal in a court of judicature, I am so overwhelmed that I am almost deprived of my reason; I leave the evidence to your lordship's remarks; I believe I should not have been followed with the degree of severity I have, but from the conduct of Morant, he promised me that no injury should arise to me from the duplicate, and without him I believe it would not have been produced against me; I have been very unfortunate, depressed with poverty and want: I will not trouble the Court longer than to say, I trust my case to the justice of the Court and the humanity of the Jury.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-19

520. JEREMIAH FOGG was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon John Hughes did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, a nd stealing from his person and against his will a man's hat, value 2 s. and a post horn, value 3 s. the property of the said John , July 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

He was a second time indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Henry Bridger in the king's highway, and in a forcible manner demanding the money of the said Henry, with intent to rob him, against the statute , July 5th .

HENRY BRIDGER sworn.

On the 5th of July I was in a one-horse chaise with Mr. Atkins, a surgeon of a man of war: between Hampstead and the Adam and Eve at Pancras the prisoner came into the middle of the road, and bid me stop; I refused and kept beating the house; upon which the prisoner seized the reins and pulled the chaise round; he then slip'd his hand along and came up to the chaise and demanded my money; Mr. Briscoe came up and struck at him.

Had he demanded the money of you before? - Yes, he insisted on the money; he swore and made use of bad expressions; I am sure the prisoner was the person; it was not so dark but I could discern him; after Briscoe struck at him, he staggered backwards and ran into a field; I got out and pursued him along with Briscoe, who encouraged me to pursue him; he made a little stumble and I gave him a blow; he then begged for God's sake that we would forgive him; we brought him into the road and gave him to a constable; he said he was very sorry for what he had done, and did not make any resistance, nor offer to get away.

PETER BRISCOE sworn.

As soon as I heard the prisoner cry out stop with a violent oath or two, I came out of a place where I had concealed myself in the road, and ran up to the chaise; I asked the post boy if he had any stick and took his horn out of his hand, and told the gentlemen in the chaise I would prevent their being robbed; I heard the prisoner demand their money; I said, gentlemen don't be robbed, I will come round to your assistance; he looked round to see where the voice came from, and the horn hit him over the nose, and almost knocked him down; he then ran away, we pursued and took him, and delivered him to a constable.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have a wife and two children; it is the first fact I was ever guilty of; I did not think of any robbery on the gentlemen; I hope you will take it into consideration; I had no fire arms nor any thing to defend myself, much less to rob people.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-20

521. WILLIAM RIDGWAY was indicted for stealing nine crown pieces, two dollars, and 9 s. the monies of John Moore , in the dwelling house of the said John , July 17th .

JOHN MOORE sworn.

I am a victualler in King-street, St. Martin's in the Fields ; the prisoner, who is a soldier , was quartered upon me: on the 17th of July I missed nine crown pieces, two dollars, and nine shillings out of a drawer in the two-pair of stairs room where I lie; the prisoner lay up three pair of stairs; we always lock the door when we are not in the room; I cannot give any account how the money was taken; I suspected the prisoner from his being out and getting drunk four or five days before I missed the money; I went to Sir John Fielding 's and gave information, and he sent two of his men in search of the prisoner, but they could not find him; I took him myself about twelve o'clock that night, and found a crown piece and half a crown upon him; he said he had them from a young man that came from sea.

ANN MOORE sworn.

I am the wife of John Moore ; the crown pieces, dollars, and half crowns were taken out of my drawer.

[The crown piece was produced, and deposed to by Mrs. Moore from a cross and straight scratch upon it.]

JOHN CLEVERLY sworn.

I live at Chelsea: I know the prisoner by sight; I took this dollar (producing it) of a soldier who was with Quin; I believe the prisoner to be the man.

JAMES QUIN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Moore; I went with the prisoner and another young man to Chelsea about three or four days before he was taken up, I don't recollect the day of the

month; we took a walk in the garden; the prisoner changed a dollar unknown to me; Cleverly shewed it me, and said he never took one before.

GEORGE PERKS sworn.

I am a soldier in the same regiment with the prisoner; he came to my quarters and shewed me five crown pieces and two dollars about four or five days before he was taken up; he said his father sent them to him out of the country.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in Mr. Moore's room; I had the money of a brother who is gone to sea; he desired me to keep it till he came back.

GUILTY of stealing the monies, but NOT GUILTY of stealing it in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-21

522. RALPH CUTLER was indicted for feloniously ravishing and carnally knowing Mary the wife of Thomas Bradley , against the statute , July 16th .

2d Count. The same as the first for ravishing the said Mary a second time.

MARY BRADLEY sworn.

You are the wife of Thomas Bradley ? - Yes; my husband is an auctioneer and appraiser.

Relate what passed upon the 15th of July last: where do you live? - Red Lion-alley, Cow-cross.

Relate to the Court where you first saw Cutler on the 15th of July? - At Merlin's Cave.

Who were in company? - Mrs. Bates and her brother and Mrs. Boutflower; we were together by ourselves and supped in the garden on some cold lamb; I saw Cutler in the ground playing at skittles, he was not of our company; he came to fetch us into the house to hear some women sing.

What did he say when he came to you? - About ten o'clock he came down to the bottom of the ground where we were, and invited me and the two ladies to go into the house to hear some women sing.

Did you go into the house? - Yes; Mrs. Boutflower, Mr. Bates, and I went in.

How long did you stay in the house? - About two hours and a half; we did not stay all the time in one room.

Then you went home? - Yes.

Who were the company that went home together? - Mrs. Boutflower, Mr. and Mrs. Bates, and I, the prisoner, and a gentleman and gentlewoman I don't know.

Where did you part with the company? - At the Cold Bath, Cold-bath-fields; Mr. and Mrs. Bates live facing the Cold Bath; the other gentleman and lady left us at Cold-bath-fields likewise.

When did you part with Mrs. Boutflower? - We went as far as the Three Tuns, Brook-street, Holborn; there we parted with Mrs. Boutflower.

Then there remained only you and the prisoner? - No; I turned out of Brook's-street into Holborn, and I desired Mr. Cutler there to go home; we made a sort of a shop, he asked me to go in to drink a glass of wine or something; I said I would do no such thing; he said it was not prudent for a woman to walk along the streets at that time of night; then I went home to my own house, and he went with me.

Was there any body in the house when you came home? - Yes, a woman that I had left in care of the house.

How far is it from where you live to the Three Tuns in Brook-street? - I cannot tell exactly the distance; a great way.

How far do you suppose that your house, Red Lion-alley , might be from the Three Tuns? - I cannot tell; the prisoner went to my house with me.

What time do you suppose that might be in the morning? - I fancy near half an hour after one, as near as I can guess.

When you came to your house you say there was a woman in the house? - Yes, she opened the door.

Did she remain in the house or did she go? - She had her bonnet and cloak on; I desired her to stay; she went out of the house immediately; she said if she did not go home she should be turned out of her lodgings and

never be admitted more, that if it were ever so late she must go home; she went out and shut the door immediately.

What became of Mr. Cutler? - He went into the kitchen.

Who shut the door? - That Mrs. Bradley.

JURY. Did the prisoner offer to take his. leave of you when you came to the door? - No.

COURT. Was you got into the house before the woman went out? - Yes.

Where was Cutler? - He walked into the kitchen before me; the kitchen is near the door.

When the woman was gone had you any conversation with Mr. Cutler? - After the woman was gone I desired him to go home, that it was not a proper time for him to stay; he went to the far end of the kitchen next the fire place, and there he pulled me on his knees.

How long might that be after the woman was gone? - Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, ten minutes I fancy; I struggled and altercated with him a good deal.

Did you endeavour to get away from him? - Yes, I did get away from him from there; he overtook me at the kitchen door as I was going to the street door to call for assistance; he caught me in his arms and threw me down on the floor; after that with a good deal of struggling, I got loose from him once more.

You got away from him again? - Not away, I only got up upon my feet; he took me up in his arms again and carried me to the kitchen fire place to the far end of the kitchen; he threw me down there; then he effected his purpose there; he threw me down upon my back and fell a top of me.

What did he do to you there? - He effected his purpose, and did what he intended to do to me.

You must describe what he did to you? - In what manner.

You must tell what he did, whether he lay with you or what? - He lay with me.

Did he lie with you as your husband does? - Yes.

Did he or not enter your body? - He did by force and violence, not by my consent.

When he had entered your body, did you feel any thing particular? - Yes, I did.

What did you feel? - It is a very disagreeable circumstance to mention; I found something come from him.

You are a married woman; had he complete carnal knowledge of your body? - He had.

What passed after he had done this? - He lifted me up again; I told him that he had used me extremely ill; that he had the wrong person to deal with; that I would certainly acquaint Mr. Bradley of it, and I insisted upon his going out of the house immediately; during this scuffle two little children of mine were crying in bed, I in a flurry went up stairs.

COURT. You have two small children? - Yes.

How old is the eldest? - Three years old.

How old is the youngest? - Fifteen months; I just looked into the room and went down stairs again immediately.

Counsel for the Prisoner. So you went down again immediately to the object of your affection?

Where was the prisoner during the time you went up stairs? - In the kitchen; when I came down I desired him a second time to go out of the house; I was exceedingly flurried and frightened; I told him he had terrified and frightened me so I did not know what to do, and begged he would out of the house; he said if I would take the children up some drink which they wanted, he would go out of the house the moment I came down again; I carried the drink up, a cup I believe it was of liquor, to the children; he followed me close up stairs; I went into the room first; he came in, locked the door upon me, and locked me and himself into the room; he took me up in his arms then, and threw me upon the foot of the bed; there he committed the same fact as he had done in the kitchen before.

Had he complete knowledge of you? - Yes.

JURY. Were the two children in the bed? - Yes, in the same bed.

What did you say to him when he took you in his arms? - I struggled with him all I could, and repeated the same words as in

the kitchen, that he certainly would suffer for using me in the manner that he did.

JURY. Was it not possible for you to have locked yourself in the room from him when you first went up? - I did not go into the room.

JURY. It was possible for you to have got into the room, and locked the door? - To be sure it was, but I had not a thought to do it when I went up the first time, I was so exceedingly frightened.

COURT. You know you left Cutler below stairs in the kitchen when you went up to the door? - Yes, I did.

COURT. So then you had complete time to have gone into the room and locked the door? - I was so frightened that I had not the thought to do it; I only peep'd in to see what was the matter with the children.

What passed after that? - He then insisted upon my going into my bed; he swore d - n his body he would do for me if I did not undress and go to bed immediately.

Did he oblige you to go into bed or not? - He did.

What became of him? - He undressed himself and came in after me.

COURT. Did you undress yourself? - He helped to undress me, and frightened me exceedingly.

With the two children? - Yes, the two little children were in bed.

How long did he remain there? - About an hour, or an hour and half.

Nothing passed in bed, I believe? - No, only my altercation with him; he went down stairs, I thought he was going out of the house, but I did not hear the house door shut.

How long was it before you came down? - Two hours after that, I dare say.

When you came down, where did you find Cutler? - In the kitchen, sitting upon a chair; I asked him the reason he was not gone out of the house all that while, for that I should certainly acquaint Mr. Bradley of my ill treatment; he said, he hoped I would not acquaint my husband of it; he opened the street door and went out, and I saw no more of him till I saw him before Sir John Fielding : the first person I saw that morning was Mr. Hamley, a relation of my husband's; I appeared much frightened and flurried; I did not look in my countenance as usual; he asked me what was the matter with me; I told him I had been to Merlin's Cave the night before, and a gentleman had seen me home, and had grossly affronted me and used me ill.

Counsel. Did you tell him the same story that you have done now? - Not all; he said he was going to Mr. Fowler's in Dean-street, and he would call again in his return home; he called again about 12; he asked me then about it, and I related him some part of the story again; but was very cautious what I said to him.

COURT. What did you tell him? - I told him of the prisoner's using me ill in the kitchen, and throwing me down twice in the same manner that I have related to you: he said, he could wish to have some further conversation with me, and he invited me to take, a walk with him that afternoon.

Did you tell him that he lay with you? - No, I did not repeat the same as I have done to you now; he wished to take a walk with me in the afternoon, to have some more discourse with me upon the matter; we took a walk as far as John o'Grote's in St. George's Fields; I then related the whole of the matter that had happened to me; I imagined that was his reason for inviting me to take a walk.

When did you inform your husband of it? - The next morning, the Thursday morning; Mr. Hamley advised me to acquaint my husband as soon as possible, which I did the next morning.

Is the house you live in adjoining to any dwelling-house? - No, there is never a house adjoining, nor dwelling-room.

Cross Examination.

I think this acquaintance of yours with Mr. Cutler began at Merlin's Cave, did it not? - I never had no particular acquaintance with Mr. Cutler; I only knew him by sight.

Had you never been in his company before? - Never by myself.

Have you been in company with him with other people? - I have seen him playing at skittles there.

You said no acquaintance with him? - No farther than his saying, how do you do Mrs. Bradley.

Did you say how do you do Mr. Cutler, in answer to it? - No farther than very well, thank you.

You knew each other by sight, and to speak to each other? - Yes.

What time in the evening was it that you went to this Merlin's Cave? - Between seven and eight o'clock.

What diversion was going on there; what amusement; what a sort of a place is it? - A public-house.

Did you play at skittles? - The gentlemen were playing at skittles.

Did you play at skittles? - No.

You have never played at skittles? - Yes, I have before now.

How many times a week in general do you think you go to play at skittles at Merlin's Cave? - I don't know; I have been once or twice with a lady or so.

But you have been there three times a week, have not you? - I have been often, sometimes with my husband.

Never without your husband? - Yes, I have.

You was invited into a room by Cutler at half after ten, to hear some ladies sing? - There was a great deal of company there.

You had supped there? - Some cold lamb and cucumbers and some ale.

I suppose when Mr. Cutler got you in he got better liquor for you? - He did not ask me to drink.

So you drank nothing but that mug of ale that evening? - There were other people as well as me to drink it.

You drank nothing else but ale? - I saw nothing else but ale.

At about what time did you set off from Merlin's Cave to go home? - Between twelve and one.

You told us you parted with your company in Cold Bath Fields? - Yes.

Whereabouts did Mr. Cutler propose to give you a glass of wine? - About Holborn.

You refused that? - Yes.

You thought it I suppose a very impudent application of Mr. Cutler to you? - Yes, I thought it rude.

How did it happen afterwards that you suffered Mr. Cutler to walk home with you after this? - He politely asked me to let him see me home.

Then his politeness had cured this insult in asking you before to go in and drink a pint of wine: when he came to your house there was a woman in the house? - There was.

How many children? - Four.

I suppose you took your leave of Mr. Cutler at the door? - No, I did not, he followed me in.

I should have thought now that it would have been full as prudent, considering the insult he had offered you in the street, not to suffer him to come into the house; a man that had asked a married woman about one in the morning to go into a house and drink pint of wine with him, how came you to firsser him to come-in? - I had no apprehension that he meant to do me any mischief.

Well, you did suffer him to come into the house; then how came you to let this woman go out of the house, before he was gone out of the house? - I had several times desired had to stay.

You did not walk out of the house with her, and call the watch for fear of accidents? - No, I expected Mr. Cutler would have gone out.

Then Mr. Cutler continued ten or fifteen minutes before he began to be what you call rude; then he began to be very rude, threw you twice on the floor, and then got his will of you; you forgot to tell us that you cried out murder, and help, and so on? - I was never asked the question.

You did cry out? - Yes.

As loud as ever you could? - Yes.

After he had lain with you the first time, then you went up stairs? - Yes, and looked into the room.

One of the Jury asked you a very sensible question just now; it never entered your head to lock yourself into the room, and cry out for help? - I was so frightened and intimidated I did not know what to do.

So frightened, that instead of locking yourself into the room, to prevent further danger, you ran down into the kitchen again to the person that had frightened you: how many yards is the watchman and his box from your

house; is he within 20 or 30 yards from you? - He is within sight.

If you had but put your head out of the window and called the watchman, you would have prevented the second mischief? - I wish I had, and prevented it all.

How long was it from the first time that you say he lay with you in the kitchen, before you went up stairs with the drink for the children? - Immediately as soon as he lifted me up.

Within five or ten minutes then? - Yes, the children screaming all the time.

Then within five or ten minutes he had thrown you down, and repeated this thing? - No, it was some time; it might be ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour between the two acts: how many beds are there in this room in which you looked in? - Only one.

How many children were in the bed? - Two.

Where were the other two? - In another room, up another pair of stairs.

How old is the eldest child that was up above stairs? - About seven or eight.

He did what you have told us; and you undressed yourself at his threats and went to bed; and he to you; he got up in an hour; nothing happened but altercation there? - Yes.

Did you go to sleep? - No, I lay awake all the time.

Did it never enter your head to get up, and cry out at the window, to apprehend this villain that had done you so much mischief? - I did not chuse to make any nordtion there; I thought I could take him afterwards.

You let him stay till between six and seven in the morning? - Five or six.

Was not you afraid that people would all be up; people are all up at six or seven in the morning; was not you apprehensive of having a strange man seen coming out of your house? - I gave you my reason, I intended to acquaint my husband.

On the morning after this happened, the first person you saw was Mr. Hamley, who is a relation of your husband's? - By marriage.

And a particular friend of your's? - He has known me and my family a great many years.

Are you very intimate with him, or nothing more than a common acquaintance with him? - Nothing more than a common acquaintance.

Had you no woman of your acquaintance; do you know no good motherly woman that you could have gone and told this to? - You see he came into the house while I was at breakfast.

But there you did not tell him what had happened? - I related to him part of the story.

You had not told him that he had lain with you? - I told him that he threw me down in the kitchen and used me ill.

Not that he had lain with you? - Yes, I told him that he had thrown me down in the kitchen, and lay with me.

Then for God's sake what was the walk to John o'Grote's house in the evening for? for you had told him all you knew, that the man had lain with you; what was this scheme that was to be cooked up in the evening? - Mr. Hamley did not tell me his reasons for inviting me out.

Then neither he nor you thought of going then before a justice, and taking out a warrant? - I did not know that I should do that.

Had you never heard that to commit such an outrage upon a woman was an offence punishable? Had you never heard that people usually applied to justices upon such an occasion? - I never had any conversation about the matter.

When was it for the first time that you went before a justice of peace? - On the Thursday afterwards.

Was it the Thursday or Friday? - I think it was the Thursday.

You did not go till the Thursday? - No.

Had you been at this Merlin's Cave on the Wednesday? - No.

That you swear, positively? - Wednesday was the day I was at John o'Grote's house; it happened on the Wednesday morning

Was you at Merlin's Cave of the evening of Wednesday? - No, I was at John o'Grote's with Mr. Hamley then.

Was you or not at Merlin's Cave on Wednesday? - No.

Were you there on the Thursday? - I was there one day in the week afterwards, but cannot tell.

But had you been there before you had been at the justices, the evening before you had been at the justices? - I don't know, I believe I had.

Did you play at skittles then? - No.

Did you say any thing about Mr. Cutler? - I never mentioned his name at all.

Was any body with you in your walk to John o'Grote's house; did any company go with you? - Nobody but Mr. Hamley and I.

Was Mr. Hyde out with you that evening? - I never walked out with that gentleman in my life.

You know such a person? - I know he was in possession in the same house that my husband was.

Where was your husband on the Tuesday or Wednesday? - He was in possession as a man under the messenger in Lamb's Conduit-street.

That is close by; it may be half a mile, it is not more? - More than that.

Well, no matter, three quarters of a mile; when did you see your husband first? - Thursday morning.

Did not you see your husband on the Wednesday at all? - I did not.

On Thursday you saw him? - Yes.

Did you see Hyde in his company? - I saw Hyde at the house.

Had you any conversation with your husband before Hyde? - Not on this matter.

Had you any conversation with Hyde? - No; the man was quite a stranger to me.

Did you say any thing to Hyde about your husband's having a fine opportunity of making 70 or 80 l.? - I mentioned to my husband, that there was an advertisement for a rider's place, and thought he had better accept of that, it would be 70 or 80 l. a year; that it would be better than being a servant to a messenger to bankruptcies.

You were blaming your husband for being a fool about not accepting this profitable place; do you know a Mrs. Mary Bates ? - I know a Mrs. Bates.

She was one of the persons in your company? - Yes; and she supped with me.

She is a married woman, and one of your acquaintance? - I believe so.

When did you see her? Did you see her on the Thursday? - Not till the Saturday.

You did not call upon her on Thursday to go to Merlin's Cave? - No.

That you swear? - That I swear.

You did not see her till the Saturday? - No; I did not see her till the Saturday.

Did you mention to her this transaction? - I told her Mr. Cutler was taken up for using me ill.

Counsel for the Prosecution. You say when you got into Holborn with Mr. Cutler, that he asked you to drink a glass of wine with him? - He did.

You considered that as an insult? - I told him, I did not chuse to do any such thing; it was not prudent for me to go into taverns and places.

COURT. What did you understand was his drift by that invitation? - I did not think he meant me any ill.

Then it did not strike you that he meant to have any intimacy with you, if you had gone to a tavern with him? - If it had been in the middle of noon-day I should not have gone into any tavern with a man.

Did not you understand, by that invitation, that he meant to take you into a tavern and be familiar with you? - I did not know that he meant to take me into a tavern.

Upon your oath, did not you understand that he meant by that question of his to get you into some place and to lie with you? - I had no ill opinion of him till he began to use me ill.

Did not you at that time imagine that that was his drift? - I would not have gone if it had been in the day, much more by night.

Why do you think it improper to go by night more than by day? - I would not have gone in the day with any man.

Did not you understand that Cutler, when he asked you that question, wanted to have you into some house to be familiar with you? - I had no suspicion that he intended any such thing, I had not indeed.

OBERTUS HAMLEY sworn.

What are you? - A watchmaker.

Are you any relation to Mr. and Mrs. Bradley? - Some distant relation.

Did you see Mrs. Bradley on Wednesday the 16th of July? - Yes; being out about business on Wednesday the 16th I came into St. John's-street, Clerkenwell, from thence coming into

Cow-cross, before Mrs. Bradley's door, I called in to ask how the family did; it was about 9 o'clock; seeing some alteration in her countenance to what I usually before did, I asked her, what ailed her? she said, she was not well; I immediately bid her a good morning; she said, Mr. Hamley, if you will be so obliging as to wait a few minutes I have something particular to acquaint you with; about ten minutes after I withdrew into another room; she then said, that the evening before, the 15th, she spent the evening at Merlin's Cave, together with Mr. and Mrs. Bates, and Mrs. Boutflower, the wife of an attorney's clerk; in her way from her own house she called at Mrs. Bates's in Cold Bath Fields; Mrs. Bates's brother being there, went with Mrs. Bradley, as Mrs. Bates, it did not suit her immediately to go, she would follow them in a few minutes after; when they came to Merlin's Cave they went into a skittle-ground; seeing some gentlemen at skittles they sat at the farther end of the garden, this Mr. Bates the brother, and Mrs. Bradley; soon after which Mrs. Bates came to them and joined their company, and there they remained till about nine or between nine and ten o'clock; after which they adjourned into the house, by the intreaties of some of the gentlemen that came to them, I don't know whether it was Mr. Bates or not, or the prisoner; as soon as they came into the house they joined in one of the rooms, and sat altogether; after which there were two women that came into their company that had formerly sung at Sadler's Wells; Mr. Cutler knowing them desired them to sing a song, and I believe it was repeated by some others in the company; they sang till about twelve or between twelve and one; she then went home with Mr. Cutler, Mrs. Boutflower, and Mr. and Mrs. Bates into Cold Bath Fields, to their lodging, where they parted from Mr. and Mrs. Bates; from thence they went to Brook-street, Holborn, to a public house, where Mr. Boutflower was spending the evening; the wife of Mr. Boutflower, when she came to the door, seeing the waiter, enquired whether her husband was gone home or not; she there took leave of Mrs. Bradley, and, Mr. Cutler going down Holborn, Mrs. Bradley desired Mr. Cutler not to trouble himself in going home with her, as she was very capable of taking care of herself; he then entreated her to go with her to see her home; as soon as they came to her door they saw a woman that was occasionally hired by this Mrs. Bradley to look after the children in her absence; she, in opening the door, had her cloak and hat ready to go home to her lodgings; Mrs. Bradley then entreated her to stay there for the might, or the remaining part of the morning; she answered, that the people would wait up all the morning, in expectation of her coming home; the woman then going, Mrs. Bradley shutting the door after her, went into the kitchen, where the prisoner was; he then began with some familiarities, and Mrs. Bradley then had some altercation with him; she desired him to quit the house, or otherwise she would acquaint her husband of it; saying, Mr. Cutler, you have the wrong person to deal with. you may depend upon it, and if you proceed to any ill treatment you may be assured that you will suffer for it; he then threw her down on the floor, and in struggling she got from him, ran to the street-door to make her escape; but Mr. Cutler immediately ran to her, took her in his arms, carried her to the farther part of the kitchen, near the chimney, there threw her down, and then carnally knew her: she did not mention immediately the word carnally, but it implied the same; then he lifted her up from the floor; she desired him to go out of the house, which he refused, repeating the same words as before, that she would acquaint her husband of it; he said, he hoped she would not be guilty of informing her husband; with that the children were crying up stairs, she ran up as far as the door; the children calling for liquor, tea, or something, she went back into the kitchen, where the prisoner was, and then taking up the liquor to give the children, desiring of him then to quit the house; the prisoner said, if she would carry up the liquor he would go; upon which she went up stairs, and the prisoner followed her; that as soon as she entered the room they both entered the room; he locked the door on the inside; she then turned round and asked the prisoner, how he dared presume to come into her bed-chamber? that then the prisoner laid hold of her, threw her on the bed, and carnally knew her a second time; after which the prisoner bid her to take off her cloaths to go to bed, for he would sleep with her the remainder of the morning; she then undressing herself, or he partly undressed her, she could not recollect which, she went then to bed, and the prisoner undressed himself and went to bed also; in the morning about five or six I believe the prisoner got up, and she supposed he was gone out of the house; but on her coming down some time after, an hour or the like, she found the prisoner sleeping on a chair; she desiring him to go about his business, he soon after withdrew, entreating her not to inform Mr. Bradley, her husband of it; to which she said, he might certainly depend upon it that she would acquaint her husband of the whole transaction: after she had told me this, I went out of the house, and told her, that if she would defer going to her husband till the afternoon I should be glad to meet her on Black-friars Bridge, and take a walk into St. George's Fields: my motive was to see, if possible, whether there had been any intimacy before: I asked her if they had ever been together before? whether there had been any intimacy, any liberties granted whatever? and she declared, that she was innocent from first to last: I did it on purpose to evade it, before the information should come to the husband's ear; she met me about four or a little after in the afternoon; she declared her innocence from first to last: In coming home I went into Hatton-garden, and told her I should call on my return home at her house, as she expected that the prisoner would call that night; he had told her so the foregoing day.

When did he tell her so? - The Wednesday evening I was told of it.

COURT. When did he say, that he would call? - On the Tuesday, I believe, the former evening; I went in the evening, but Mr. Cutler was not there.

COURT. When was it did she say, that Cutler said he would call again? - I suppose it might be in the evening, before they parted; said he, Mrs. Bradley, I will call and see you to-morrow; Mrs. Bradley replied, she should have some company to-morrow evening; therefore whether she desired him or not I cannot particularly tell; she said, she did not desire to see him, did not desire his company not the ensuing evening.

COURT. That is what she told you; but what did she say to him, that she excused herself from seeing him because she should have some company? Can you recollect when it was that Mrs. Bradley said, Mr. Cutler made this proposal of calling to see her in the evening? - On the foregoing night, Tuesday the 15th to the morning of the 16th.

COURT. At her house? - I cannot immediately say it was in the evening.

COURT. Whether it was when Mr. Cutler parted from her in the morning, or when? - I did not remark that, I cannot recollect.

Cross Examination.

You are a watchmaker you tell us? - Yes.

Do you ever act as an attorney? - No.

I thought you had; because the precision with which this lady told the story to you was more like giving instruction for drawing a brief than telling a tale to a friend; she desired you to stay a few minutes, and then you retired into a back room with her? - Yes.

Did she tell you the story in the same words afterwards? - There might be some part of it repeated then.

Not since then? - Yes; in the presence of her husband I heard it.

Only those times? - No.

You have a fine memory indeed! so you, as a friend to the family, called in to pay a morning visit, and enquire how the family did; when had you seen the family before? - Very likely the Sunday before.

Do you visit often at Mrs. Bradley's? - Very often.

How many times in a week? - Sometimes two or three times in a week.

You are intimate there? - Very intimate with Mrs. Bradley, and her husband, and family and all.

So intimate that in a wet stormy night perhaps you take a bed there? - No; far from it.

I ask you upon your oath, did you never sleep in that house? - No, never

Never a night in your life? - No, never.

Do you ever happen to stay late in an afternoon? - Till twelve or one o'clock in a morning I might be there.

You deny that you did ever sleep there all night? - I never slept with her.

Never slept with her, and always in the kitchen; never in the bed-chamber, upon your oath? - I have been in the bed-chamber many

a time; not any criminal connection we never had together in our lives; I have been when the children have been ill.

Then you have been a kind tender nurse when the children have been ill, and, anxious for their health, you have been perhaps in the bed chamber; sometimes when Mr. Bradley, who is pretty much from home, is absent, you are so kind as to keep the wife company till one or two in the morning; sit up and tell her some very pleasant stories? - I have been there very often.

Now by this walk that you took you suspected her a little I find, because this walk to John o'Grote's house was to sift her, to know whether she had been guilty of any imprudencies? - Certainly my motive was to evade a prosecution if there had been any intimacy, but she declared there had not.

Then from the knowledge that you have of your relation's character, you suspected there might have been something of that f ort? - No, I wanted an altercation to discover if there had been any thing of intimacy.

Then you were a little jealous of her? - No, not jealous.

Neither jealous nor suspicious, but for the purpose of preventing this getting to the ears of her husband, the only ear it should have got to, you took a walk to John o'Grote's house for the purpose of sifting her to evade a prosecution; did you see her any more that night? - Yes, I called at the house, and the woman that was there the night before was there.

You was in hopes that you should catch Mr. Cutler in a trap then, you thought that he would be there? - I did not know but he might.

You was in hopes of meeting him there? - I had no engagement with him.

But you thought you might meet with him there? - Probably that might be the reason.

You found Mrs. Bradley at home, and she told you that Mr. Cutler had not been there? - Yes.

Did she tell you she had been to look for him at Merlin's Cave? - She did not say that; she had never been to Merlin's Cave till the Thursday.

She could not tell you that then? - No.

She might be there on the Wednesday? - I don't know that.

Counsel for the Prisoner. We shall prove that she walked there after she had been at John o'Grote's house.

Court to the Prosecutrix. Was there any mention made of Cutler's being to be at your house on Wednesday evening? - I believe he did say he would come on the Wednesday evening, and I told him that I did not desire to see him any more.

When did he tell you he intended to come on Wednesday evening? - When he was going out of the house, I believe, in the morning; I said I did not desire to see him any more; I should certainly acquaint my husband with the affair.

That is all the answer you made him? - Yes.

You said nothing to him about having company? - I don't believe I did, I did not desire his company.

The question is, whether you told him not to come on Wednesday evening, for you should have company? - I told him I did not desire to see him any more.

Did you give that reason for it, that you should have company? - I cannot say upon my word whether I did or no.

Did you tell Mr. Hamley that you told the prisoner when he proposed calling upon you that evening, that you should have company? - I don't remember saying so.

Court to HAMLEY. You hear this woman says she cannot recollect telling you that she made that excuse with the prisoner that she should have company that evening? - The words were mentioned to me, that some acquaintance or company would be there, and therefore she desired he might not come.

Court to the Prosecutrix. Did you or did you not expect he would come that evening? - I did not expect that he would.

Did not you appoint Mr. Hamley to come to your house, after you had parted with him in Hatton-garden, in expectation that he would meet Cutler there? - No, I did not.

COURT. What say you to that Hamley?

HAMLEY. I recollect the circumstance well that she did recollect something of his saying he would call in the evening, and she desired him not; I told her I would be near her house about nine, and would drop in.

Why? - Because I expected Mr. Cutler would come again.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

FOR THE PRISONER.

CAROLINE TAYLOR sworn.

Do you know the prosecutrix, Mrs. Bradley? - Yes.

You have formerly been employed to take care of her children? - I was her nurse when her child was ill, much about last Christmas.

I believe now at this time, in summer, you get your bread by selling fruit? - I go up to Merlin's Cave of an evening.

Do you remember the week in which Mr. Cutler was taken up for this matter? - I remember the time that I was up there, the 15th and the 16th, that was the Tuesday and the Wednesday.

Did you see Mrs. Bradley there on the Tuesday? - Yes.

Did you see her there on the Wednesday? - Yes, I did, and spoke to her.

About what o'clock in the evening on the Wednesday was it that you spoke to her? - I believe between six and seven.

What conversation passed between you and her on Wednesday? - I had an acquaintance laid in, who had caught a violent cold; I knew one time when Mrs. Bradley was bad with her face, that she had an old woman with her; I asked her if she could tell me whether that old woman was at leisure, I wanted to get her a nurse's place; she said she was afraid she was not at leisure; she asked me after that if I had seen Mr. Cutler.

Did you know Mr. Cutler? - Yes.

Did she know that you knew him? - Yes, very well she knew it.

Did you see them playing together at skittles there? - Yes.

Have they often been in company together there? - Yes, frequently, both him and others.

She was a very good skittle player? - Yes, she would challenge any body to play at skittles.

Counsel. What, Bradley against all England - you said you had not seen Mr. Cutler? - Yes; she said she had expected to see him that day at her house; I replied, very possible he might come; she said she had provided a shoulder of lamb and green pease for his dinner; I said very likely he might come up there that evening, but I had not seen him; possibly his business might have prevented him; that was all that passed that night.

Did Mr. Cutler come up to the Cave that evening? - I did not see him that night at all.

Do you know this Mr. Hamley, this kind relation? - Mr. Hamley, yes, he is a watchmaker.

And a relation of hers? - He is no relation I believe.

You nursed her, did not you? - Yes, I did.

He used to come and visit sometimes? - He was there on Sunday night as the child was bled with leeches, and they both went as they told me to go to meeting; they came home about eleven at night; I made an observation that I thought the parson had made a long sermon; it was a methodist meeting-house in Jewin-street, they told me they were going there.

They do preach long sometimes I believe? - Never longer than about eight I believe; I have been there myself.

Do you ever remember Mr. Hamley's sleeping in the house all night? - No, I cannot say I do; I can tell a person that I remember sleeping there one night, a Mr. Robinson.

You knew her sometime, and was in her house and have reason to know her character; is she, from the knowledge you have of her character, a modest or a lewd, immodest woman? - I told you my opinion; she cannot be very modest, when at all times she would go out and come home at all hours when I was there, and sometimes very much in liquor.

Have you seen her with other men besides her husband? - Yes, that I have divers of times when the husband was not at home at all, and men have laid in the house when he was not at home.

Then with you she bears the character of being an immodest woman? - I don't know what you can call a modest woman, if you call that one.

Cross Examination.

You attend this garden? - Yes.

Mr. Cutler you are well aquainted with? - I never saw any misbehaviour in him.

How came you to recollect to positively the day of the month? - I had, as I told you

before, an acquaintance that lay-in who had a cold; the child was put out to nurse about that time; I was obliged to get a nurse that night, and we paid a month's money upon that day of the month again.

As to Cutler, you cannot say whether he was there or not? - I did not see him on the Wednesday; on the Tuesday I saw him there.

Court to the Prosecutrix. Have you heard the evidence that this woman has given? - I have.

She says that between six and seven in the evening of the Wednesday, that you came to Merlin's Cave and had a discourse with her; that you asked after this Mr. Cutler, and said that you had provided a shoulder of lamb and some pease for his dinner? - That could not be, I don't dine at that time of the day, I generally dine about one; I did not see her, nor I never was near Merlin's Cave on the Wednesday.

Did you tell this woman that you expected Cutler to dine with you, and had got a shoulder of lamb and pease for his dinner? - No such thing; I never saw this woman.

SARAH COOKE sworn.

You are a servant at Merlin's Cave I believe? - I was at that time.

Do you remember seeing Mrs. Bradley on the Tuesday evening in the week that this rape was talked of? - Yes.

Do you remember the evening following, the Wednesday evening? - Yes, she was there and had a pennyworth of beer; I drew it myself for her, and gave her the change.

What time was that? - Between six and seven o'clock.

Did she ask you any questions whether any particular person had been there? - She asked me whether Mr. Cutler was there, I told her no; she said that he had promised to meet her there.

Court to the Prosecutrix. This woman swears that she saw you there on the Tuesday, and the Wednesday night between six and seven; that you had a pennyworth of beer; that she drew it for you and gave you the change, and that you asked for Mr. Cutler, and said he promised to meet you there? - I was not there on Wednesday; I said before I was on Thursday, and had a pennyworth of ale; I asked for nobody.

Counsel for the Prisoner to SARAH COOKE . You remember Mrs. Bradley being there on Tuesday in company with Mr. Cutler and others drinking? - Yes.

Do you remember when you went into the room with drink or any thing, hearing Mrs. Bradley lay any wager? - Yes.

Don't be afraid to speak it out? - She laid six-pence that Mr. Cutler could not do any thing.

I believe Mr. Cutler asked you to hold stakes? - Yes, he did, and I went out of the room directly.

Court to the Prosecutrix. What do you say to that? - I deny it entirely; I know nothing about the matter.

You never said any thing of that kind? - Not a word.

Was you in company with Cutler that evening in that room? - Yes, on Tuesday evening with the rest of the company.

JOHN BATES sworn.

Was you in company with Mrs. Bradley and Mr. Cutler on Tuesday evening any part of it? - I was.

Do you remember any time in the evening, when you was in the room, Mrs. Bradley laying a wager about any thing? - No, but I remember another circumstance which is rather more singular, that was, Cutler was asked to sing a song, which he frequently did, so he begins and sings a bit, By G - d, says he, I can neither sing nor do any thing else; she took notice of it, she goes out and takes him with her into the passage between the two rooms, and she comes in again, this was on that Tuesday evening; she comes in again, and said that Mr. Cutler was fineable for what he had said.

She went out to form her judgment, and came in and said that Mr. Cutler was fineable for what he had said? - Yes; upon which we desired that the ladies would withdraw to bring in their verdict upon it; they went out into the other room.

How many of them? - Four, and when they came in again we fixed a foreman; we asked them what was their verdict, the verdict was given by Mrs. Bradley; they resolved

that he was fineable a bottle of ale; the bottle of ale was had in, and he paid the six-pence because he was not incapable.

COURT. Gentlemen of the Jury, you have heard this evidence so far, if you desire it I shall sum up the evidence.

JURY. We will not trouble your lordship, we are very well satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17770910-22

523. THOMAS HAWLEY was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 10 l. a silver half pint cup, value 3 l. a silver table spoon, value 20 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 10 s. a silver salver, value 5 l. and one black silk full trimmed woman's sacque and petticoat, value 9 l. the property of Sarah Addison , widow , in the dwelling-house of John Dowding , March 25th .

SARAH ADDISON sworn.

I live now in Rosamond's-row; I lived on the 25th of March in Blue Anchor-alley, Bunhill-row , in the house of Mr. John Dowding ; I lived there seven months.

You are a single woman? - Yes: I lost a silver tankard, a silver half pint, and eight silver table spoons, there is but one in the indictment, a pair of silver tea tongs, a silver salver, and a black silk sacque and petticoat; they were locked up in a trunk in my lodging in Dowding's house; I had the one-pair of stairs fore-room.

Where did the trunk stand? - By my bedside in the corner on one of the boxes; I had the key in my pocket at the time I missed the things; I saw it safe on Sunday morning the 23d; I found it broke open about nine at night; I did not lie in the house between the 23d and 25th; I was at the prisoner's house, the prisoner's wife had been my servant; I trusted him in my house; I was involved in trouble.

Was she your servant at that time? - No; I had been to my attorney, and he ordered me to look at my evidence; she was my only evidence; I went and found her up and she was married to this man; she had been from me some months; she asked me to come to his house; the prisoner lay at my house at the time; when I found them out they were in great distress.

COURT. Did you ever give him authority to pawn any thing for you? - Only a pint mug when I wanted money.

That was the only article you gave him authority to pawn? - Yes, that was the only piece of plate I ever gave him to pawn.

Do you know Mr. Bruin, a pawnbroker? - Yes; instead of carrying it to Mr. Johnson's, as I told him, he went to Mr. Bruin's, and Mr. Bruin sent for me, and stopped him, and asked me if I had that left, having lost so much before.

Were not you both taken before Sir John Fielding ? - Yes.

Did not you say that at Sir John's? - I had no suspicion of his robbing me at that time, though it was lost before; the pint mug had nothing to do with this.

Do you know Mr. Rutland, a pawnbroker? - No.

Did not Mr. Rutland send to you about his pawning a petticoat? - That has nothing to do with this.

JOHN DOWDING sworn.

The prosecutrix lodged at my house; I did not know she was possessed of such property.

Mrs. DOWDING sworn.

I am the wife of John Dowding ; when Mrs. Addison came first into my house, I saw some plate, a tankard, a half pint, a salver, some spoons, and other things; on the 23d I heard a noise over my head in the morning; I imagined the prisoner was making the bed, having no suspicion, I went to sleep again; on the 25th he came home and called me up stairs; he had a candle; he said, it was blown out through the key-hole; he said, the room was stripped, and shewed me this large iron hook, it lay by a bundle on the chair: I saw the drawers were all broke open; he ran to the bundle and said, here is a bundle; I said, don't you know of it; I suspected he had tied it up; he ran to the trunk, and said, he supposed all the plate was gone; I looked in and saw it almost empty; I said, perhaps

the plate was in the bundle; he said, no, it was not.

Had he examined it? - Not before me; some of the things were stopped by a pawnbroker.

SAMUEL RODBARD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in the Broadway Black Friars; the prisoner pawned several articles of plate with me.

[Producing the whole of the plate mentioned in the indictment.]

Was any apparel pawned with you? - Yes, a silk sacque and petticoat; he pawned them all at different times, the 7th of April was one day, they had been in and out several times, some were in March; he pawned them in his own name; he said, he brought them from his wife's aun: Sarah Addison .

Did you ever see Mrs. Addison? - No.

[They were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

To Prosecutrix. Whether upon your oath you ever gave him authority to pawn any thing but the mug? - I never did.

Cross Examination of Rodbard.

Do you recollect when the first things were pledged? - Some time about the end of March, I don't know the day.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had these things to pledge from her; she was to enter into partnership with me; she gave me the key to get the plate to pawn, and bid me say it was my wife's aunt's.

FOR THE PRISONER.

FRANCIS RUTLAND sworn.

The prisoner pawned a sacque and petticoat with me; he said, he brought it from his aunt; I went to his aunt, the prosecutrix, and asked her, if they were her things; she said, they were; that she lent them to him to pawn; that he married her neice; and that it was a pity he should be hurt in business for want of money; that she had helped him, and would help him again; and if he brought any thing, I might take it in.

JAMES BRUIN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker on Snow-hill; the prisoner brought me a pint silver mug the 27th or 28th of March; I had before seen the plate advertised; I asked him whose it was; he said, it was his own property, and then said it was his aunt's; I told him there was an advertisement of a good deal of plate that was lost; he said, yes, but this was left; I went and fetched his aunt; she said, it was her plate; that she had given him liberty to pawn it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-23

524. SAMUEL DITNUTT was indicted for stealing a gelding, value 40 s. the property of Isaac Drinkwater , September 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-24

525. ELIZABETH MAXFIELD was indicted for feloniously taking away with intent to embezzle and purloin a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. two blankets, value 2 s. two cheque bed curtains, value 3 s. one cheque head cloth for a bed. value 3 s. a cheque tester cloth, value 3 s. and a looking glass, value 20 s. the property of Daniel Blake , being in a ready-furnished lodging let by contract by the said Daniel to the said Elizabeth, against the statute , August 4th .

THEODOSIA BLAKE sworn.

I am the wife of Daniel Blake , we live in Little Portman-street ; I let a one-pair of stairs fore-room furnished to the prisoner at four shillings a week; I went into the room and found the things mentioned in the indictment taken away; I charged the prisoner with taking them; she said she was in distress, and would get them me again as soon as she could.

[The goods were produced by Thomas Parker , a pawnbroker, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. and Mrs. Blake promised to wait for my replacing the things.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-25

526. WILLIAM COLTON was indicted for stealing a steel saw with a wooden handle, value 3 s. a smoothing plane, value 1 s. 6 d. an iron chissel with a wooden handle, value 1 s. an iron axe with a wooden handle, value 2 s. 6 d an iron hammer with a wooden handle, value 6 d. and a wooden mallet, value 6 d. the property of John Batchelor ; a rabbit plane, value 1 s. and an iron chissel with a wooden handle, value 6 d. the property of William Smith , July 14th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-26

527. WILLIAM HENLEY was indicted for stealing a cloth livery frock, value 10 s. a cloth livery waistcoat, value 3 s. and two pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Sommers Cox , Esq ; July 14th .

THOMAS HEBBERT sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Sommers Cox: as I was sitting in a little room next the hall I heard Martha Tucker cry out, Mr. Hebbert, stop that boy; I saw the prisoner, I pursued him and stopped him.

[The cloaths were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

MARTHA TUCKER sworn.

I was in the kitchen; I heard somebody come down the area steps, I looked out and saw the prisoner in the passage; he had a black cloth about him; I ran to the door, he ran up the steps; I called out and he was taken.

HEBBERT. He had a black cloth about him; he threw it from him as he ran away.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Before the justice she said she did not know me again.

TUCKER. I said no such thing.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-27

528. THOMAS DUBLIN was indicted for stealing a stone plate, value 2 d. three case handle knives, value 6 d. three case handle forks, value 6 d. a glass tumbler, value 2 d. a tin pepper box, value 1 d. three quarters of an ounce of pepper, value 1 d. a pewter spoon, value 1 d. and a wooden spoon, value 1/2 d. the property of Thomas Purney , July 29th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-28

529. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing 100 lb. wt. of fat, called kitchen stuff, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Langford ; two canvas aprons, value 6 d. the property of James Saltell ; and a canvas apron, value 1 d. the property of Matthew Paul , July 25th .

SAMUEL LANGFORD sworn.

On the 25th of July last I lost 100 lb. wt. of kitchen stuff; I am a tallow-chandler ; my workshop is situated near a meuse in Mary-la-bone parish; it was lost out of the workshop, and also two canvas aprons; I have frequently had my property stole from me for some time past; the aprons belong to persons employed in my business; the fat was afterwards found in three aprons; I saw the fat and aprons at the watch-house; I am positive that this fat which is now found is my property; my fat was part melted and part unmelted; this fat was in that condition; the prisoner was charged when in custody with taking it; he said he purchased it for three shillings; he was taken before a justice and committed; the prisoner was formerly employed

by me; I discharged him about five months before this fact was perpetrated.

From the Prisoner. Whether you did not give me the aprons? - I understand my wife bought him some aprons.

ISAAC NICHOLS sworn.

I have known the prisoner two months, within the course of that time I have frequently observed him at an early hour with fat on his head; I saw him of this night come out of the Cross Keys meuse yard, which adjoins to the workshop of the prosecutor; I suspected him, that place not being a thoroughfare; it was about four o'clock in the morning, there was another man with him, they had bundles on their heads; they ran off, I attempted to stop them; not being able to do that, I pursued them and called to another watchman to stop them, upon which the prisoner threw the bundle off his head; I pursued the prisoner immediately and never lost sight of him; I apprehended him; I afterwards gave notice to the prosecutor that the man was in custody, because I suspected the fat we found belonged to him, as his workshop adjoined.

From the Prisoner. Whether I did not surrender voluntarily? - No, he attempted to make his escape; he did not surrender voluntarily.

ROBERT MACKLEN sworn.

I am a watchman in Welbeck-street: I have seen the prisoner frequently at an early hour with fat upon his head; one instance I remember, he had so much fat in this cloth that it ran out at the corner; I was desired by Nichols to stop the prisoner and the other person that was with him; I attempted to do it, the prisoner said it was only a joke and wanted to pass; I insisted upon their stopping, they said they must lighten their loads; the other ran away; the prisoner attempted to do the same; I seized him by the collar, and then he readily submitted.

[The cloths were produced, and one of them was deposed to by Saltell, and the other by Matthew Paul .]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have made it my business for two months past, having bad legs, to walk about to buy kitchen stuff; a person that goes about gathering hog-wash, said he had a parcel, if I would go for it; I said I would the next morning, and accordingly I went.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-29

530. CLAVERING REDMIRE was indicted for stealing a metal watch, value 40 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. two steel seals, value 5 s. a seal set in metal, value 2 d. two watch keys, value 2 d. and two iron keys, value 2 d. the property of Samuel Johnstone August 12th .

SAMUEL JOHNSTONE sworn.

I was at the playhouse in the Haymarket on the 12th of August; going in at the door I had my watch taken out of my pocket; it was a metal watch; I did not feel it go from me, I soon missed it; I applied to the constable, John Slade , he went and brought the prisoner to me on the top of the stairs out of the upper gallery; the constable went into the gallery, I stood at the door; I myself had no suspicion of any person when they brought him out; I searched him at the top of the stairs, and found my watch upon him; this was in less than a quarter of an hour after I missed it.

JOHN SLADE sworn.

Mr. Johnstone told me his pocket had been picked; in consequence of that I went up to the one shilling gallery, as soon as the door opened I turned into the passage of the two shilling gallery, they are both in one turning; I met the prisoner, the moment he saw me he turned round and ran into the one shilling gallery, from that circumstance I thought he had been doing something wrong; I followed him up stairs; I found him sitting in the first row; I searched him there; I found this watch between the inside of his breeches and his thigh.

[The watch was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along Covent Garden, I met

with an acquaintance, who asked me to go and see the play, I said, yes; just as we were in the entry, the young man made answer, I have lost my watch, and gave me that watch in my hand; I slipped it into my breeches, there was no fob to my breeches, and I put it into my breeches; it was a young man I had a very slight acquaintance with; I don't know what he gave me the watch for; I have lived five years with Dr. Harris, in Doctors Commons, with great reputation.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-30

531. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 5 s. a silver stock buckle, value 3 s. two pair of silver sleeve buttons, value 2 s. one hundred pieces of foreign coin called Rupees, value 9 l. nine guineas, and a half guinea , the property of Patrick Clareg , August 5th .

PATRICK CLAREG sworn.

I was a soldier in the East Indies; I lately came home in the Company's service; I lived at the White Swan, Leadenhall-street ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) I came on shore on the 5th of August; I missed them the next morning, they were in a box that was taken from the White Swan; I saw the box about seven at night, it was locked, and my things were in it; I never saw the prisoner till she was brought before the justice; Mr. Moore stopped the foreign money: my box was found broke open; there were two locks broke.

WILLIAM MOORE sworn.

I am a goldsmith: I stopped seventy rupees upon one Mary Allen ; she told me she had them of Ann Brown ; I searched her and found one upon her; I went to Ann Brown 's apartment and found this box (producing it) broke in this manner, and the buckles and buttons in it; I asked her how she came by it, she cried, and told me she was at the Swan Inn, Leadenhall-street, and stole this box out of the house, more shame she said for her, for the woman had been a good friend to her; she said that voluntarily, I made her no promises.

[The goods and monies were produced in Court by John Clear , the officer who had the custody of them, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am guilty of taking them; it is my first crime.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-31

532. ROBERT SIMPKINS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s a steel chain, value 6 d. and two steel seals, value 4 d. the property of Richard Minifra , September 5th .

RICHARD MINIFRA sworn.

I came out of the country and went to Bartholomew-fair with a friend; I had not been long in the fair before two men laid hold of my arm; I called to my friend, who was before, and said, Don't leave me, and the fellows said, No, d - n it, let us keep all together, and then I felt the watch go out of my pocket; I said to the prisoner, you have taken my watch; he wanted to get away, and when he could not he dropped the watch on the ground; a gentleman picked it up, and gave it me; I did not see him drop it; I am sure the prisoner is the person that took it; I saw it in his hand; I never let him go till he had dropped the watch.

EDWARD TOWSOR sworn.

I went with the prosecutor to Smithfield; as I was a little before I turned and saw him in a bustle; I bid him come on; he said he had lost his watch.

JONAS PARKER sworn.

I was in Smithfield; I saw a struggle between two people, I ran between them; the prisoner tried to get away; the prosecutor said he had taken his watch, and dropped it, but a gentleman had returned it to him: we secured

the prisoner and searched him, and found a pack of cards and gold weights in his pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There is a person outside the door who lent me some money on my watch, which I had in my hand: I thought he was going to take it from me.

The prisoner did not call any witnesses.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-32

533. CHARLES DISHERMAN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. a seal set in base metal, value 2 s. and a base metal watch key, value 1 d. the property of John Bell , August 11th .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-33

534. WILLIAM GRAY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a base metal chain gilt with gold, value 5 s. and a metal watch key, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Combes , July 21st

THOMAS COMBES sworn.

On the 21st July last I was at the Hay-market theatre with my wife; coming out of the two shilling gallery, in order to avoid the crowd, rather before the entertainment was finished, I saw the prisoner standing in the street, close to the pallisades of the next house to the theatre; we wanted to pass by him, he stood in the way; I said civilly to him, by your leave; he made no answer, but gave me a hard shove on the breast, and at the same time I felt my watch taken out of my pocket; it was pulled out with some violence; I immediately seized him, and charged him with having taken my watch; several people stood near him, but he had not at that time conveyed the watch away, but I saw the chain, which was of metal gilt, in his hand; I saw him convey it to his right-hand neighbour; I then with my other hand seized the man to whom the watch was given, and called for assistance; some gentlemen stepped up and asked what was the matter; I said my watch was gone, and begged they would take care of my wife, who was far advanced in her pregnancy, while I secured the prisoner: I desired leave of Messrs. Viner and Cummings to bring the prisoner into their shop, which was consented to; one of the gentlemen there went to St. Martin's watch house, and fetched four watchmen, who conducted them to the round-house; the next morning the prisoner was committed: they were both searched, but nothing found upon either of them; I am positive the prisoner is the person who struck me on the breast, and was opposite to me when my watch was pulled out, and there was no other person so near me, nay no person near enough to be able to reach my pocket but the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor said, You rogue, you have taken my watch, and given it to that man; he laid hold of me; I said I had not; I was taken into a shop, and searched; there was no watch found upon me.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-34

535. JOHN RICE was indicted for stealing a watch, with an inside case made of metal, and an out-side case covered with green shagreen, value 40 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. two seals set in metal, value 10 s. and a brass watch key, value 1 d. the property of Christopher Fenton , July 13th .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-35

536. ANN WATTS was indicted for stealing a piece of false money made of base metal, and coloured with a certain wash producing

the colour of gold, to the likeness of half a guinea, of no value, and seven shillings in monies numbered , the property of George Foulston , July 10th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-36

537. MARY MITCHEL was indicted for stealing a guinea , the property of James Nicholson , July 19th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-37

538. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for stealing three hand-saws, value 7 s. and a cloth coat, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Walker , July 26th .

WILLIAM WALKER sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live in Oxford-road : on the 26th July last I lost three saws, and the coat I have on my back; it was the day of the last execution; I went to see the execution, and when I returned found my partner Richard Chapman had detected the prisoner with the things; they were in a shop on the back-side of Adam-street, joining to Seymour-street, just by Tyburn.

RICHARD CHAPMAN sworn.

I work with the prosecutor: on the 26th July, which was the last execution-day, we both went out of the shop to see the execution; I staid about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then returned, and went into a house from which we ascend by a ladder to the shop; I went on the top of the house to see the criminals pass, and I saw the prisoner go up the ladder into the shop; I went down, and when I came to the shop I found the prisoner with a green cloth spread on the bench, and the prosecutor's coat and three saws in it; I imagine he brought the green cloth, it was not in the shop before; as I was going up the ladder he was going to put something else in, but I made haste and secured him; I asked him what business he had there; he paused a bit, and then said, he came to enquire for some man, and mentioned a name I don't remember; I called to a person going by to assist me, and he was sent to prison.

[The things were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went up to enquire for one Burkes that I thought worked there; he came up and knocked me down two or three times.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-38

539. MARTHA MAREBANK was indicted for stealing a guinea , the property of Samuel Hatton , July 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-39

540. MATTHEW M'QUIRE was indicted for stealing a pair of stays, value 5 s. the property of Mary King , spinster , July 22d .

MARY KING sworn.

I live at the Horse and Groom, King's-street, Seven Dials : the prisoner came to our house and called for a pint of beer; he went backwards into the yard; just after that I heard him come down stairs; I went up and missed my stays; he was stopped, and the stays taken upon him.

[The stays were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

SAMUEL ARCHIBALD sworn.

I am master of the house: I saw the prisoner come down stairs; I followed him and found the stays between his shirt and skin.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was no such thing.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-40

541. MARY PIKE was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 8 s. the property of Israel Levy , July 31st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-41

542. SAMUEL GOLDING was indicted for stealing three iron bars, value 3 s. a pair of iron stilliards, value 1 s. four iron hooks, value 4 s. and four iron collars, value 1 s. the property of Marmaduke Jones , August 5th .

MARMADUKE JONES sworn.

I am a rope-maker ; I live in Holborn : on the 5th of August, in the morning, I found my shed broke open, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was stopped with them in Bishopsgate-street by two watchmen.

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I was the officer of the night; that night the prisoner and the things were brought to me by two watchmen: I put a mark on them.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN GEORGE sworn.

About half after eleven o'clock I met the prisoner with a load on his back; when he came near me he crossed the road; I suspected his load was not honestly come by, and looked after him; when he came in sight of my partner James Martin he was going to cross the road again, and I called to Martin to stop him; he did, and we took him to the watch-house.

James Martin confirmed the testimony of the last witness.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the things.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-42

543. WILLIAM BOWDEN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 4 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. and a silver cypher seal, value 5 s. the property of David Coles , August 31st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-43

544. ELIZABETH CLUMPITT , otherwise FARMER , was indicted for stealing a half guinea , the property of William Miller , August 2d .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-44

545. HANNAH ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing a duffil coat, value 4 s. and a woman's silk hat, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Bland , widow , August 14th .

ELIZABETH BLAND sworn.

I live in Mutton-lane, Clerkenwell : on the 14th of August, about eight in the morning, I went out of an errand, and left the prisoner in my room; when I returned she was gone, and my hat and cloak, which hung on a nail; I found them about an hour and half after at a pawnbroker's.

[ Robert Careless , a pawnbroker, produced the things, which he deposed were pawned by the prisoner in her own name; and they were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I hope your Lordship will be merciful to me; it is the first offence I ever committed.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-45

546. ANN HART was indicted for stealing a pair of leather shoes, value 2 s. a pair of base metal buckles plated with silver, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a man's hat, value 6 d. and 2 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Owen M'Carthy , privily from his person , August 3d .

OWEN M'CARTHY sworn.

On the 3d of last month I happened to be very much in liquor; the things mentioned in the indictment were taken from me as I lay in the street; I was so drunk I did not know what was done.

BARNABY DOBSON sworn.

I am a watchman: as I was crying the hour two another watchman told me, that there was a man lying in the street, and a woman with him; we went to him, and found him without his shoes and hat; the woman came up to us, and enquired the way to Rosemary-lane; the other watchman said, that was the woman he had seen with the man, and that she pretended he was her husband; I had known M'Carthy seven years, and said I knew he was not; she then said, nobody had a better right to take his things than she; that he was her brother: she had the things in her lap, and called him by the name of Jack; I told her then that I had found her out, for that was not his name, and I took the things from her.

William Southern , the other watchman, confirmed the testimony of Dobson.

[The things were produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was walking along the street, and found a pair of shoes and buckles, a hat and handkerchief; I walked a little further and found a man, fast asleep, lying on his back; up came a watchman; I had the shoes in one hand and the hat in the other; he asked me, if I knew the man, pushing him with his cane; the man was lying on his back; whose shoes, says he, are they? I said I did not know, I found them in the street; he said, he supposed I had robbed that man; he searched me, and took me to the watch-house; and said, he would transport me unless I gave him some money to drink, and then he would make it up with me: I have a husband, who was pressed three weeks ago to New York; I was born in Ireland, and bred up in the West Indies.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17770910-46

547. MARTHA ROGERS was indicted for stealing two half guineas and 7 s. in monies numbered , the property of Francis Glen , July 28th .

FRANCIS GLEN sworn.

I have known the prisoner about twelve months: in July last I had two half guineas, and 7 s. in silver, in a canvas bag, in my waistcoat pocket; as I was going with Mr. Ricketts, whose books I keep (he being just set up in business and cannot read nor write) to a public house in Turnmill-street, the prisoner asked me to give her a quartern of gin; I consented to it, and we went together to a public house, the Cart and Horses in Turnmill-street ; I gave her the gin, then she desired to say something to me in private; I went with her into a backyard; she put one of her arms round my neck, and pretended to whisper, but she did not say any thing; but with the other hand snatched the bag out of my pocket and ran immediately away.

THOMAS RICKETTS sworn.

I was present; I looked through the window into the yard and saw the prisoner take this bag out of the waistcoat pocket of the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am as innocent as the child unborn; Ricketts passed me several times in the street, and took no notice of it till I fell out with the woman Glen lives with.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-47

548. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing a gold watch, value 10 l. two cornelian seals set in gold, value 40 s a gold locket, value 5 s. a gold key, value 1 s. and a metal watch chain, value 4 d. the property of John Elmes , Esq ; Sept. 3d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-48

549, 550. ROBERT WILKINSON and HUGH COLLINS were indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 5 s. and a reading glass, value 6 d. the property of William Gresham , July 26th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-49

551. CHARLOTTE ANDREWS was indicted for stealing a watch, with an inside case made of gold, and an outside shagreen case, value 6 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. a stone seal set in gold, value 12 s. and a gold ring with a stone seal, value 10 s. the property of Robert Selby , Sept. 3d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-50

552, 553. THOMAS LEE and EDWARD CLAXTON were indicted, the first for stealing three pair of worstead stockings, value 8 s. the property of Robert Thorpe ; and the other for receiving one pair of worstead stockings, parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute , July 19th .

There was a mistake in the indictment, the property was laid wrong.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-51

554. JAMES HARWOOD was indicted for stealing a mahogany tea-board, value 2 s. a bed-quilt, value 10 s. a blanket, value 3 s. a feather bolster, value 3 s. a feather pillow, value 3 s. a mahogany tea-chest, value 4 s. a looking-glass in a mahogany frame, value 1 s. three knives, value 6 d. and two forks, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Swain , July 27th .

Mr. SAMUEL SWAIN sworn.

I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker in Moorfields: on the 2d of August I had an information that gave me a suspicion that the prisoner, who was my coachman , had robbed me; I went to his mother's, there I saw a tea-chest with my mark upon it; she took me to the prisoner's wife's house in Kingsland-road, there I saw a quilt, a blanket, a bolster, a looking-glass, and other things of my property; I did not know till then that he was a married man: as I was coming back I met the prisoner; I ordered him to pull off the livery he had on; he said he had no other cloaths, and I desired my porter to lend him some of his cloaths: I told him I could swear to the tea-chest, and would take him before a justice; he went down on his knees, and begged I would not hurt him, and confessed the whole.

PRISONER. My master promised me, if I would confess, that he would not hurt me.

Mr. SWAIN. I made him no promises.

THOMAS WATKINS sworn.

I know the tea-chest and the glass to be my master's property, there is his mark upon them; I saw the tea-chest at his mother's in Kingsland-road, and the officers and I found the glass and other things at his wife's house.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to.]

Mr. SWAIN. When we went before the justice he said, he would go down on his bare knees if I would forgive him; I said, I pitied him, but the crime was of such a nature that I could not forgive him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My master has trusted me with a great many things, he never knew any thing dishonest of me before; Did you, Sir?

Mr. SWAIN. No.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-52

555. JAMES ANDREWS was indicted for stealing a canvas bag, value 2 d. a half guinea,

three half crowns, and 10 s. in monies numbered , the property of Francis Henshaw , Sept. 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

Reference Number: t17770910-53

556. WILLIAM FROSTLEY was indicted for stealing two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Peters , spinster , Sept. 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-54

557. CHARLES ATKINS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of William Lawrence , July 27th .

WILLIAM LAWRENCE sworn.

I lost a linen handkerchief on the 27th July last, at the corner of King's-head-court, Fish-street-hill , at about a quarter past nine in the evening; I saw the prisoner take it with his right hand out of my right hand pocket, and clap it under his coat; he set off through the court into Pudding-lane; I followed him; he spoke to a little boy in another (I took it to be the Jews) language; I pursued him till he felt over a piece of timber, and then I took him; he was searched, but the handkerchief was not found upon him; I am sure the prisoner is the person I saw take it out of my pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was walking along, there was some timber lay, I kicked against it, and slipped over it, the prosecutor came up and charged me with stealing his handkerchief; I was searched, but no handkerchief was found upon me; he said before the alderman, he was not sure of me.

Did you say before the alderman, that you was not sure of him? - No; I never said any such thing.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-55

558. CHARLOTTE CLARKE was indicted for stealing a man's hat, value 1 s. the property of George Sparling , August 30th .

GEORGE SPARLING sworn.

The prisoner came into my shop to ask for a woman's coarse hat; I was at work, the hats lay by me on a joint stool; I said to her, you was here about a week ago, I told you then I kept no such hats; she said, you don't keep them ready-made; I said, no: as she was saying these words I saw her put her apron over the stool and take off the uppermost, which was a fine man's hat; I pursued her immediately, but she somehow got off; I went directly up Saffron-hill, and there I found her, but have not been able to discover my hat; I am positive the prisoner is the person that took the hat.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-56

559. SUSANNA COLE was indicted for stealing two pint pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of Michael Bates , July 21st .

MICHAEL BATES sworn.

I am a publican : on the 21st of July the prisoner came to my house for a pennyworth of beer; she had a basket in her right hand, which she put upon the table, and tumbled two pint pots that were on the table into it, I heard them jingle; I observed her put the two pint pots beside her; I could not see whether she put them in her pocket or no; she had her beer, was paying for it, and going away; I went to the seat where she sat, to be certain whether the pots were gone or not; I missed them; I immediately pursued her, and took her within three yards of the house; I found these pots in her right hand pocket (producing them) they have my name upon them; I am certain they are my property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-57

560. GEORGE TUCKER was indicted for stealing thirty-six pair of worsted stockings, value 3 l. the property of George Harrison , September 9th .

THOMAS SHUTER sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Whitchurch, at Brewer's Hall in Addle-street, Alderman bury; while I was sitting in my office I accidentally looked out of the office window, and saw a very suspicious fellow standing at the corner of the gateway, and then I saw the prisoner's heels come out of Mr. Harrison's window; Mr. Harrison lives in Addle-street , next door to Brewer's Hall, he is a stocking factor ; the prisoner jumped out backwards; the other man, who stood upon the watch, spread an apron that he had before him; then the prisoner took three paper parcels out at the window, and laid them down in the apron; I got out of my chair; the fellow who owned the apron threw up one corner of the apron, and walked away; I ran as fast as I could, the prisoner staying to gather the other three corners of the apron, and to carry it off; I got almost up to him, and he set off with the goods in his hands; finding that I was got rather too near him, he threw the goods down, and just as he had dropped them out of his hand I came up to him, shut the gate, and secured him; he said afterwards that he knew nothing of the goods nor the person that had made his escape; we took him to Mr. Harrison's, and sent for a constable; one of the parcels was opened before my Lord Mayor, and it contained worsted stockings.

THOMAS ADDISON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Harrison; these stockings (producing them) three parcels, containing a dozen in each, which were found in the possession of the prisoner, are Mr. Harrison's property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have no witnesses.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-58

561. MARY COLBY was indicted for stealing a paste ear-ring, value 5 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 d. and a guinea, the property of Elizabeth Saker , widow , in her dwelling-house , August 11th .

NOT GUILTY

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-59

562. THOMAS JAMES CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Catherine Kelsall on the 25th of August , between the hours of three and four in the afternoon ( Susannah White , spinster, and others being in the same dwelling-house) and stealing a black silk cloak, value 12 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 8 s. two silver tea spoons, value 2 s. a linen pillowbier, value 6 d. one linen napkin, value 1 s. and two silk ribands, value 3 d. the property of the said Catherine in the said dwelling-house .

CATHERINE KELSALL sworn.

I live in St. Clement's-court, New Turnstile ; I go out a charing; I was out at work when the prisoner was taken; I was sent for home.

JAMES GUY sworn.

On the 25th of August between three and four in the afternoon I heard that Mrs. Kelsall had been robbed; that this Chambers and another had got in at the window; another person and I went after him as far as Turnmill-street; there a person saw him go into a pawnbroker's; we followed him, he was pledging a handkerchief; I took it from him and searched him, and found this key upon him.

DINAH KNIGHT sworn.

I was sitting in the window at work; I live in Holborn opposite the court; I saw the boy get in at the window of Mrs. Kelsall and saw him come out again; it was between three and four in the afternoon; I gave intelligence of it.

SARAH GUY sworn.

I was sitting in Mrs. Knight's room; I saw him go in at the window and saw him come out.

[The handkerchief was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix]

Prosecutrix. I was at work at Eagle-street at the time they fetched me from my work; I left the handkerchief in my drawer; when I came home the drawer was open and the window open, and the things thrown all about the room.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was not near the place that day; I bought the handkerchief in Rosemary-lane.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of ten-pence .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-60

563, 564. ROBERT BALDWIN and WILLIAM HILL were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place next the king's highway in and upon William Hunter did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a guinea , the property of the said William, July 18th .

WILLIAM HUNTER sworn.

I met Robert Baldwin , who is a butcher , he had a lamb on his back, near Islington, it was about twelve at night; I asked him where he was going, he said to Islington; I said I would take a walk with him; coming back we met Hill and two girls with him; they asked me to treat them, I told them I would not then, but I would on the morrow night; after the girls were gone they asked me to lie down in a haycock and go to sleep with them.

Who? - Joseph Jenks , who is not taken, and the evidence Scraggs; we laid down, Scraggs laid his hand upon me, and some of them took the money from me, I don't know which of them, for they were all there.

What did Scraggs say to you when he laid his hand on you? - Nothing; he laid his hand across my shoulder, and had hold of my waistcoat.

Who were there at the time? - Joseph Jenks , William Hill, Robert Baldwin, and Anthony Scraggs ; Hill was just by me, Baldwin a good bit off; we were all lying down, they took from me a guinea and nine shillings.

On his Cross Examination he said, he was not asleep, but that they were all in liquor; that he was intimate with Baldwin before; that they persuaded him to go with them; that he was a baker, and Hill a smith.

RICHARD GOSS sworn.

I gave the prosecutor a light guinea to change in the morning for a good one, and saw no more of him till two at night.

ANTHONY SCRAGGS sworn.

I met Jenks in Goswell-street about eight o'clock at night; he asked me to go to Islington to bathe; coming down after nine at night we met Hunter, Hill, and Baldwin, and two girls with them, by Old-street turnpike; Jenks told Hill that Hunter had five guineas in his pocket; they found I heard and then told me of it; we came down to a house facing Aylsbury-street, and Jenks and I and Baldwin agreed to take him up into the fields, and take the money from him; Jenks, Baldwin, and Hill lay on one side, and I on the other for about the space of twenty minutes, as soon as we laid down I laid my hand across his back.

Why did you lay your hand on him? - Because I knew this money was to be taken; Jenks and Baldwin took the money from him.

Why did you lay your hand over him? - I am used to lay my hand over any body when a-bed; Hill picked one pocket, and Jenks the other; Jenks took a guinea and eight shillings, and Hill a shilling; then they all got up and ran away, and left Hunter and me; Hunter snored, I take it he was between sleep and awake; when they ran away he started up; I believe they ran round the haystack and lost him.

On his Cross Examination he said, it might be later than half after nine, but he was sure it was not twelve when they met the prosecutor; that one of them reached over the prosecutor to pick his pocket on the side he lay on; that he was perfectly sober, but the others were not; that the reason of their going into the fields at that time of night was, that they said they knew where a great many girls inhabited, and Hunter agreed to go; that they rambled about from ten till between one and two, when this was done.

' The prisoners said nothing in their defence, but Hill called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.'

BOTH NOT GUILTY of the robbery, but GUILTY of stealing the money .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-61

565, 566. JOHN RILEY and JOHN BEALE were indicted for that they in a certain field and upon place near the king's highway in and upon William Smith did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. one silver seal, value 2 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 3 s. one pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of the said William , July 25th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-62

567. ELIZABETH DAVIES was indicted for stealing four cloth waistcoats, value 8 s. two pair of cloth breeches, value 6 s. nine linen shirts, value 40 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 6 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. a cup made of base metal plated with silver, value 20 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 8 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 4 s. a pair of spectacles mounted in silver, value 10 s. a shagreen spectacle case, value 4 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 3 s. and three guineas and sixteen shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Malcom in the dwelling-house of James Britiffe , July 25th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17770910-63

568. WILLIAM BRYANT was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. half a guinea, and half a crown , the property of James Pearce , May 25th .

JAMES PEARCE sworn.

I lodged in the house of Mr. Crouch at Fulham : I got up about five in the morning to go to work, and missed my handkerchief out of my waistcoat pocket, and my money out of my breeches pocket, which I had laid under my head; I suspected the prisoner, who went off at an unseasonable hour; I traced him to Turnham-green, there I had intelligence of him; then I went to Brentford and traced him to Baconsfield, in the county of Bucks; there I took him at the sign of the Angel with my handkerchief round his neck; he gave me the handkerchief off his neck, and I charged a constable with him.

Charles Major , who went with the prosecutor in pursuit of the prisoner, confirmed his evidence.

[The handkerchief was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the handkerchief; they took it off my neck and gave me a knock on the face.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-64

569. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing a tenant saw, value 4 s. a steel hand saw, value 4 s. and seven iron chissels, value 3 s. the property of John Bullock ; a steel pannel saw, value 4 s. a steel hand saw, value 2 s. and an iron chissel, value 6 d. the property of James Cole , August 25th .

JOHN BULLOCK sworn.

The other prosecutor is a shopmate of mine; we lost the tools mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of a new piece of building; I locked them up in my chest when I went away at night; I missed them the next morning when I came to work; my chest was broke open; they were taken upon the prisoner.

THOMAS NEWELL sworn.

I am a watchman in that building: I now and then look about the building in the night; passing through the building I heard the

shavings move on the other side; I went there but could see nothing; I went behind some boards that stood up, and putting my hand before me, I put it on the breast of the prisoner; I asked him what he did there? he said he was a carpenter; I asked him if he worked in the buildings? he said he did, and had got drunk and fell asleep among the shavings, and was locked in; I told him if he worked in the buildings, I had the key and could let him out; on his going out I suspected he had something; I gave him a blow upon the arm and he dropped a saw; upon which I took him to the constable, and he found the rest upon him.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn.

I am a constable: the last witness brought the prisoner to me; I searched him and found all these tools upon him.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutors.]

To BULLOCK. Do you know the prisoner? - No.

Was there any such man worked in the building? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met with a carpenter on Black-friars-bridge; he asked me to go in and drink; he said he worked in some buildings by the bridge; I went into the buildings, and being in liquor I fell asleep; when I waked I missed fourteen shillings; I was angry and took up these things; I don't know how I came by them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-65

570. SARAH SOUTHOUSE was indicted for stealing a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. the property of John Taylor , August 24th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-66

571. JOHN PETERS was indicted for stealing eleven gross of iron screws, value 15 s. the property of William Gibbs , August 14th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-67

572, 573. THOMAS LEE and EDWARD CLAXTON were indicted, the first for stealing three pair of worsted stockings, value 8 s. the property of Robert Clark , and the other for feloniously receiving one pair of worsted stockings, parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , July 19th .

RICHARD RYDER sworn.

I act as book-keeper to Mr. Clark; he carries goods from Sheffield to London ; on the 19th of July the waggoner told me he believed something had been taken out of the truss directed to Mr. Thorpe; I sent my son with the truss to Mr. Thorpe's, and desired they would open it and see that it was entire; Mr. Thorpe is a hosier; he sent word there were nine pair of stockings missing; the prisoner Lee came into the inn just after with a pair of new stockings on, and laid down on a truss and went to sleep; I fetched Mr. Thorpe to look at the stockings, and he said he believed they were his; we searched him, and he produced another pair which he had taken off; I desired him to let us know what became of the rest, he would not tell; we got a constable, and then he said he left part at Redburn, and gave a pair on the road to Claxton; I did not make him any promise, I only said it would be best to let us know where the property was.

RICHARD NIXON sworn.

Ryder's son brought the truss to Mr. Thorpe's; I opened it and found nine pair of stockings missing according to the bill of parcels.

GEORGE ADDING sworn.

I went to see Lee in Wood-street Compter; he told me that he cut a hole in the truss on the road, and took out nine or ten pair of stockings; that Claxton had one pair, which he gave him on Finchley Common; I took Claxton and found a pair of stockings upon him.

[The stockings were produced in Court.]

NIXON. The two pair found on Lee are our property; the pair found on Claxton are not.

Robert Wilton confirmed the evidence of Adding, as to the confession of Lee.

LEE's DEFENCE.

I found the stockings on the road.

LEE GUILTY .

CLAXTON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-68

574. WILLIAM WOOLNER was indicted for stealing a linen bag, value 2 d. and 21 lb. wt. of linen rags, value 4 s. the property of Thomas White , August 25th .

THOMAS WHITE sworn.

I live in Liquorpond-street; the prisoner was my servant ; I gave him orders to go down to East Smithfield for a load of rags; about five o'clock I met him at Cow-cross; I asked him why he was behind his time, he seemed confused and drove his cart very furiously by me, and began kicking some nets which he had in the cart over a bag of rags; I called after him, he would not hear me; I pursued him and got into the cart; I asked him where he was going with the rags, he said he was going to sell them; I drove him in the cart to justice Blackborrow's; there he confessed that he took them out of my warehouse at different times, and he produced a key that would open the warehouse; the bag and rags were both in my warehouse that day.

Are you sure you locked the door of the warehouse? - Yes, I locked the door myself and kept the key at my dwelling-house which is at a distance from the warehouse; he never had the key that day on any pretence whatever.

JANE SENIOR sworn.

I was at work at Mr. Clarke's house; Mr. White's cart stood in Clarke's yard; I saw the prisoner about half after four bring a bag into the yard, and put it in the cart.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am quite innocent of it; I took the bag up in a hurry and put it into the cart; being in liquor I did not know the rags were in the bag.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-69

575. ELIZABETH GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing a woollen bed quilt, value 1 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 2 s. a bolster, value 6 d. a tin kettle, value 6 d. a tin boiler, value 4 d. a wooden pail with an iron handle, value 6 d. a flat iron, value 4 d. a looking-glass, value 8 s. an iron fender, value 2 d. an iron poker, value 1 d. and an iron candlestick, value 3 d. the property of Benjamin Lagoe , July 18th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-70

576. MICHAEL CLARE was indicted for stealing a striped cotton waistcoat, value 1 s. six linen shirts, value 12 s. six linen stocks, value 6 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and a canvass bag, value 2 d. the property of Edward Cooper , August 26th .

EDWARD COOPER sworn.

I live in Chancery-lane: I carried the things mentioned in the indictment to the Swan with Two Necks in St. John's-street to be sent to South Mims to be washed; I left them in the tap-room tied up in a bag; they were afterwards missed, and the prisoner was taken with some part of the property on him.

ANN COLLINS sworn.

I live at the Swan with Two Necks: Cooper delivered the parcel into my care; the prisoner came in just after, he brought nothing in with him; the bag was in the bar; I went out of the room and when I returned the bag was gone, and one Taylor informed me he saw the prisoner go out with the bag under his arm.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn.

I was in the tap-room; I saw the prisoner go out with the bag under his arm; it was a canvass bag; not suspecting him I did not take particular notice of the size.

JOHN HEPTHORPE sworn.

I am a constable: I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; he exposed this waistcoat to sale in the open street, in Wood-street.

[It was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had the waistcoat given to me at Islington by an acquaintance of my son's, who lives in the Temple; I was sitting at an ale-house bench, a young man came up and had a pint beer; he said I think I know you? I said I did not know him; he said, is not your name so and so? I said, yes; he said he knew my son, and was sorry to see me in such a condition, and called for a pint of beer; he pulled this waistcoat out of a bundle and gave it me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-71

577. ROBERT STE HENSON was indicted for stealing 16 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of Robert Claridge , August 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-72

578. LEWIS CHARLES KEEN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 3 d. and a brass watch key, value 1 d. the property of William Bothwell , July 17th .

WILLIAM BOTHWELL sworn.

As I was going through Mary-la-bone fields towards Paddington, I sat myself down to rest me, and fell asleep; when I waked I missed my watch; there were some boys washing in a pond just by; I asked them if there had been any body nigh me; they said, yes, Lewis Keen ; I found out a boy that said he saw him take it; I never recovered my watch; I took the prisoner and had him before a justice, there he confessed that he took the watch.

JOHN CADMAN .

What age are you? - I shall be twelve years old the 3d of next March.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

Suppose you should say what is not true when you are sworn, what would become of you? - I should go to the devil.

[He is sworn.]

What did you see that day? - I saw the prosecutor asleep and the prisoner take the watch out of his pocket.

Did you see him do it? - Yes.

Did you wake the man upon it? - No, my mother fetched me away to school.

Did you tell your mother of it? - Yes.

Did not she endeavour to wake the prosecutor? - No.

What was become of the prisoner? - He had ran away.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

To the Prosecutor. What did he say he had done with the watch? - He said he met a boy the next day who wanted to drink; he told him he had no money, and pulled the watch out of his pocket.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-73

579. MARGARET TURNBULL was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 3 s. seven yards and an half of black silk lace, value 5 s. two silver stay hooks, value 2 d. and one hat pin, value 1 d. the property of James Taylor , April 30th .

JAMES TAYLOR sworn.

I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I employed the prisoner as a washerwoman ; I suspected the prisoner and had her taken before the justice, where she confessed taking the things, and gave up the pawnbroker's duplicate of them, and the constable was sent for; we went to the pawnbroker's and found the things.

[ Frederick Smith , the pawnbroker, produced the goods, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He gave the things to me to sleep with me, and because I would not do it, he would make me a thief; he came up to my bed and said, if I would not do as he would have me, he would make me our a thief.

Prosecutor. I never did any such thing.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of tenpence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-74

580, 581. MARY HUGHES and HANNAH MUNFORD were indicted for stealing half a guinea, eight half pence, a counterfeit sixpence, and 2 s. in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Blake , Sept. 7th .

THOMAS BLAKE sworn.

I am a labouring man : as I was passing by St. Giles's on Sunday the 17th of Sept. at about ten in the forenoon, I met the prisoners; they asked me to give them some gin; I pulled out a leather purse, with an intention to give them some, and one of them snatched the purse, and ran away with it; they were afterwards taken and brought to the watch-house, and the money found upon them.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a constable: I took the prisoners up; I found the counterfeit sixpence on Hughes; I took them to the watch-house; they acknowledged they took the money from him, and said one to another they wished they had taken all his money; when they were before the justice they said, he gave them the money.

[The counterfeit sixpence was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

The prisoners in their defence said, that the prosecutor picked them up, and gave them the money.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-75

582. JOHN KNUTT , otherwise COUNT , was indicted for the wilful murder of James Moody , by violently driving a cart with three geldings against the said James, and thereby throwing him to and upon the ground, and driving the off-wheel of the said cart over the left breast of the said James, whereby he received divers mortal wounds and bruises on the left breast, of which he instantly died , August 13th .

JAMES KIRK sworn.

Upon the 13th of August as I was coming down Fleet-street I heard a noise, and saw two coal carts coming towards me very fast, faster than loaded carts should do; I saw no drivers with them, but I saw a person between the shafts on horseback in great confusion; there were two carts abreast, the horse reared up and threw the rider backwards over the shafts of the cart; he fell down in the direction of the wheel, athwart the wheel, and the wheel went over his body; I saw the prisoner making all the effort he could to stop the horses, and put the cart off the body; I did not see him till the gentleman was in danger, I then ran up, and as the cart was put off the body, it made one convulsive fling, and then lay still; the populace behind pulled the cart off: they asked if he could speak; he could not then, I heard that he spoke afterwards, and gave a direction where he lived; he died in about 40 minutes afterwards: the people asked the prisoner, Why he did not take more care? To which he said, the man on horseback had no business between the coal carts.

Abraham Jeffery Harris confirmed the evidence of James Kirk .

WILLIAM BARNARD sworn.

I am assistant to Mr. Saddington, a surgeon and apothecary in Fleet-street: I saw the deceased receive the pressure by the cart; I attended him at the Bolt and Tun; the pressure he received was the immediate cause of his death.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was close by my thiller's head; I was obliged to get close under the chain, or I should have been run over myself; I stopped the horses as soon as I could.

The prisoner called William Clark , the driver of the other cart, who confirmed his defence; and several other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-76

583, 584. THOMAS KNOWLAND and JANE his wife were indicted for stealing 100 horse-whips, value 5 l. 30 gross of silk lashes for whips, value 7 l. 300 silver caps for whips, value 15 l. and 100 whip-handles, value 20 s. the property of John Ross , May 17th .

JOHN ROSS sworn.

I am a sadler and whip-maker : I missed at different times many of the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was my servant.

JOHN EARL sworn.

I am a whip-maker at Peterborough: I happened to be in town; the prisoner had worked with me; he came to me on the 31st of May, and told me he did not intend to work journeywork any more; that he had left Mr. Ross, and was going into the country to sell a parcel of goods he had made; he brought 30 gross of lashes for me to look at, and I bought one of them; he gave me a whip of his own making; he was afterwards taken in the country, and a bundle of lashes were found.

[The whip was produced in Court, and Alexander Thompson and Stephen Smith , servants to the prosecutor, deposed it was the prosecutor's property.]

' James Thomas Leslie was about to relate

'the confession of the prisoner, which, having

'been improperly obtained from him, was

'not permitted by the Court to be given in

'evidence.'

JAMES COLLINS sworn.

One Mary Duckerell brought 40 whip-handles, and then 60 more whip-handles, at different times; the latter 60 I carried to the house of the prisoner; I did not see the prisoner Thomas Knowland ; but I saw his wife, and she said, they were her husband's; that woman is not here.

LAZARUS PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a cloaths-man: I had some whips from Knowland's wife.

LEVY SYMONDS sworn.

I bought this whip of Thomas Knowland (producing it).

[It was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

The prisoners in their defence both denied the charge.

They called several witnesses, who gave them a good character; and said further, that he often made whips himself, and sold them.

THOMAS KNOWLAND GUILTY .

JANE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-77

585, 586. ABRAHAM CLACKSTON and ROBERT HUTTON were indicted for stealing a bank note, value 10 l. the property of John Myonnet , the same being due and unsatisfied to the said John, July 28th, against the statute .

2d Count. For stealing 10 l. in monies numbered, the property of the said John, in his dwelling-house, July 28th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-78

587. WILLIAM RODY was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon Sarah the wife of Robert Davis did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person three guineas in monies numbered, the property of the said Robert , July 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-79

588. JOSEPH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing 108 pair of silk stockings, value 24 l. the property of Benjamin Ashby .

2d Count. For stealing the same goods, the property of James Britt , April 22d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-80

589, 590. THOMAS SPENCER and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing four laced ruffle shirts, value 20 s. five pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. two child's linen shirts, value 1 s. three linen shirts, value 2 s. a child's linen frock, value 6 d. three linen caps, value 6 d. a white linen waistcoat, value 6 d. four pair of linen shift sleeves, value 2 s. a cotton gown, value 2 s. three cheque aprons, value 18 d. the property of Joseph Dickeson , August 28th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-81

591. MARY the wife of WILLIAM POTTEN was indicted for taking away with intent to steal a cotton counterpane, value 5 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. four cheque bed-curtains, value 4 s. three blankets, value 3 s. a linen pillow case, value 1 s. a pillow, value 1 s. a dressing-glass, value 2 s. seven pictures, value 7 s. six china jars, value 1 s. six china beakers, value 2 s. a china bowl, value 2 s. a china tea-pot, value 1 s. six china coffeecups, value 2 s. six china saucers, value 1 s. a china cream-pot, value 1 s. two cut glass salts, value 2 s. two brass branches, value 2 s. two brass candlesticks, value 2 s. and a copper teakettle, value 6 d. the property of Richard Brocksop , being in a ready-furnished lodging, against the statute , August 16th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17770910-82

592, 593. JOHN INGLEHART and JAMES SADGROVE were indicted for assaulting John Brown with a pistol, with intent to rob him, against the statute , Sept. 8th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

They were a second time indicted for assaulting Joseph Barwell with a pistol, with intent to rob him, against the statute , Sept. 8th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-83

594. MARY BARTLET was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 28 s. a steel watch chain, value 10 d. and two brass watch keys, value 2 d. the property of James Butter , August 5th .

JAMES BUTTER sworn.

I am a journey man carpenter : I went to see a country woman of mine at a private house in a court in St. Giles's , and the prisoner came into the room; we had a pot or two of ale; my acquaintance asked me to go and have a dish of tea with an acquaintance of her's; as I was going out I fell down; the prisoner came to help me up, and I felt the watch go out of my pocket; I saw the chain in her hand; I called out that she had my watch, and she ran off; she was taken two or three hours after, and then we found where she had pawned the watch.

Elizabeth Vallens , the prosecutor's acquaintance, confirmed his evidence.

Jeremiah Mangaar , a pawnbroker, produced the watch, which he took in pawn of one John Rice ; and it was deposed to by the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in a public house drinking a pint of beer; that woman came in and quarrelled with me a good while, and then charged me with having the man's watch.

She called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Midlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-84

595. MARY the wife of JOSEPH ROBY was indicted for stealing three linen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a quarter of a yard of muslin, value 10 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. a pair of linen shift sleeves, value 2 s. three yards of damask, value 3 s. a pair of woman's leather gloves, value 6 d. a linen night-cap, value 6 d. a linen pillow-case, value 6 d. five damask napkins, value 5 s. five linen towels, value 2 s. and a pair of scissars, value 6 d. the property of Andrew Basilico , Sept. the 9th .

LYDIA BASILICO sworn.

I am the wife of Andrew Basilico . I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of my house about a fortnight ago; the prisoner is my washer-woman ; I gave them out to her to wash; I found a cap of mine on her head, and a number of other things in her apartment at Knight bridge; they are all marked with my mark.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

WILLIAM KNOTT sworn.

I had a warrant to search the prisoner's apartment after she was in custody; I found the things which have been produced.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The things are not all her's; the sleeves; the cap, and handkerchief are mine.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-85

596. ANN the wife of JOHN BELLAS was indicted for stealing a copper saucepan, value 2 s. two linen pillowbiers, value 10 d. two blankets, value 2 s. two pillows, value 2 s. and a copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. the property of Dennis Newman , being in a ready-furnished lodging, against the statute , Aug. 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-86

597. ANN MOLINEAUX was indicted for stealing a black silk cloak, value 10 s. the property of Abraham Benjamin , Dec. 14th .

ABRAHAM BENJAMIN sworn.

The prisoner was servant to me about week; she absconded on the Saturday night while I was out; when I came home I went up stairs, and missed the cloak and some other things; I did not hear of her for a long time; she was afterwards taken, and the cloak was found.

[ Mary Griffith produced the cloak, which she deposed she bought of the prisoner; it was deposed to by the prosecutor's wife.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the cloak at Ely in Cambridgeshire.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-87

598. CHARLES REMONT was indicted for stealing two silver table spoons, value 10 s. and a silver knife handle, value 2 s. the property of Stephen Jacobs and Thomas Cummings , August 20th .

STEPHEN JACOBS sworn.

I and Thomas Cummings are partners in the 's Arms tavern ; the prisoner was our porter ; he left our house, and the very next day a person brought these two defaced spoons to me (producing them); they are our property; though it is attempted to be defaced here are the words Corn hill upon it.

WILLIAM DELFER sworn.

The prisoner offered these spoons to pawn; I searched him and found a spoon in his waistcoat pocket.

JOHN FENTON sworn.

When the prisoner was brought to the rotation-office to be examined, I searched him and found a silver knife handle.

[They were produced, and deposed to by Mr. Jacobs.]

JOHN GRANLEY sworn.

I was present when the prisoner and the Jew were bargaining together for the purchase of this silver; it was proposed to be sold for 16 s. there were six ounces and three drams of it; this raised a suspicion in me that they were stolen; upon which the prisoner was taken into custody; he attempted to make his escape, but was secured.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

One Mary Bruin gave them me to sell: I have several witnesses to my character; they are not present.

Mr. JACOBS. He came to me with a good character.

The prisoner also called another, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-88

599. JOSHUA LEVI was indicted for stealing four wooden butter firkins, value 4 s. and 200 lb. wt. of butter, value 5 l. the property of Edward Gilham the elder and Edward Gilham the younger , April 16th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-89

600. HANNAH POLOCK was indicted for stealing two wooden butter firkins, value 2 s. and 100 lb. wt. of butter, value 50 s. the property of Edward Gilham the elder and Edward Gilham the younger , April 17th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770910-90

601. WILLIAM PIKE , otherwise JONES , was indicted for stealing a hair trunk, value

15 s. cloth coat, value 20 s. and a pair of cloth breeches, value 5 s. the property of Robert Macan , Esq ; Sept. 6th .

ROBERT MACAN , Esq; sworn.

I lost a hair trunk, containing a cloth coat and a pair of cloth breeches; it was cut from behand a phaeton, as I was coming down St. Martin's-lane ; a person who is in Court, who saw the trunk taken from behind, seized the prisoner.

HUGH MADAN sworn.

I saw Mr. Macan in a phaeton, and I saw the trunk in the prisoner's custody: I saw four or five people come down very busy about the chaise; it was between light and dark; the prisoner was one of them; I followed them down, and saw the trunk coming to the ground off the chaise; the prisoner took it up the instant it fell off the chaise; he had not gone above two or three yards from the chaise when I called out to Mr. Macan; he dropped it; the rest ran away, and I secured him.

[The trunk was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Mr. MACAN. The trunk was tied with a horse's halter, that was cut.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Going down St. Martin's-lane I stopped under a gateway to make water; a phaeton came by, I stood up to let it pass; four or five fellows came after it; they ran away; this man came and said, I had offered to steal the trunk: I know nothing of it; I have lost the use of my limbs almost, my arms have not grown these sixteen years, I cannot lift my hand to my head.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-91

602. ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing 14 lb. wt. of worsted , the property of Robert Price , July 22d .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-92

603. MARY COPSTIC was indicted for stealing a black silk cloak, value 10 s. a linen gown, value 15 s. and a muslin cap, value 6 d. the property of Hannah Perryman , July 19th .

The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-93

604. REBECCA the wife of STEPHEN CARNS was indicted for stealing a copper saucepan, value 1 s. a cotton night-gown, value 10 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. a black silk handkerchief, value 2 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a pair of base metal shoe-buckles plated with silver, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Spours , August 23d .

THOMAS SPOURS sworn.

The prisoner used to char for me; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, and found them pawned by the prisoner; I never gave her any commission to pawn them.

[The goods were produced in Court by Michael Druitt , a pawnbroker, who deposed, that they were pawned by the prisoner; they were deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The gown and shift I had to wash; I was there a scouring, and when I came away at night I took the saucepan in a mistake: the maid gave me the buckles to pawn; she said, they were a young man's she kept company with.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-94

605. ROBERT WOOLEY was indicted for stealing an axe, value 18 d. a hammer, value 6 d. and two chissels, value 8 d. the property of James Inkpen , August 19th .

JAMES INKPEN sworn.

I am a journeyman carpenter : I was at work at an empty house; I went to an opposite public house to dinner, when I returned I missed my tools.

GEORGE LOCKLEY sworn.

I am a fellow-workman with the prosecutor: I went to dinner at the same public house; I saw the prisoner come out of the place where we worked; I went out and secured him, and found the tools upon him.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Francis Hall, who was present at the time, confirmed the evidence of the last witness.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the tools.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-95

606, 607, 608. ELIZABETH THOMPSON , ANN BAKER , and DAVID MORGAN were indicted for stealing a metal watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 5 s. and a stock buckle, value 3 s. the property of George Pease , Sept. 3d .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770910-96

609. MARY SLUGG was indicted for stealing a cloth waistcoat, value 4 s. and a silver hatband, value 2 s. the property of John Moreton , August 10th .

JOHN MORETON (a Black ) sworn.

I came from High Wickham to see after a place; I was disappointed of the place, and did not know where to go for a lodging; I met a young man in the street, who took me to a public house, and asked the landlord if I could lodge there; he said, no, his house was full; the prisoner and another woman came in; she said she could lodge me; I went home with her, and went to bed; I told her I was not able to give her any money, I would give her my handkerchief I had on my neck; I pulled off my things and laid them by my bedside; when I waked in the morning I missed my waistcoat, my hatband, and also a knife out of my pocket; there were some women there in the morning; they laughed at me; I saw the prisoner at the door about two hours after, and took her up.

ELIZABETH WORTH sworn.

I lent two shillings on a waistcoat the prisoner brought to my house.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He gave me the waistcoat to pawn; I got two shillings on it, and gave it to him.

Prosecutor. I did not give it her to pawn; I never had a farthing of her.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-97

610. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing a silver pint mug, value 38 s. the property of Robert Richardson , September 2d .

ROBERT RICHARDSON sworn.

I keep the King's Arms at Fulham : on the 2d of September I had a considerable company dining at my house; the prisoner was eating cold fowl in the kitchen; the mug was in the kitchen; I drank out of it just before it was missed.

JOHN SAVORY sworn.

I saw the prisoner drop a mug in the street just by the prosecutor's door.

JOHN TATHAM sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; when the mug was missed I went and found the prisoner and charged him with stealing it; he denied knowing any thing of it at first; afterwards he confessed it was pawned at Samuel Renshaw 's.

[The mug was produced by Samuel Renshaw , and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the mug in the street by the prosecutor's door.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-98

611. DANIEL EAST was indicted for escaping from the place of his confinement, where he was sentenced to three years hard labour, for the improvement of the navigation, before the expiration of that term , May 17th .

To which he pleaded GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-99

612. STEPHEN BROADSTREET was indicted for escaping from the place of his confinement, where he had been sentenced to three years hard labour, for the improvement of the navigation, before the expiration of the said term , April 17th .

To which he pleaded GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-100

613. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing a silver quart mug, value 4 l. the property of Richard Hall , July 4th .

RICHARD HALL sworn.

The prisoner with several other gentlemen were drinking in a back room in my house; that the rest of the gentlemen went away, and the prisoner was left last in the room; the tankard stood before him; when the prisoner was gone I missed the tankard; the bottom of it was afterwards found at a silversmith's, where it was sold by a pawnbroker; it had on the bottom of it the initials of my brother's name, whose property it had been, and the number of ounces it weighed when it was entire.

MICHAEL WIGGINS sworn.

I was the last of the company that was in the room, except the prisoner; I saw the tankard stand before the prisoner when I left the room.

JOHN SCOTT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I bought a mug of the prisoner on the 11th of July, and sold it to one Mr. Stamp, a silversmith.

JAMES STAMP sworn.

I bought the mug of the last witness; I wanted some silver; I cut the bottom off and put it behind the counter; Mr. Millar came and found it; I marked I S upon it when I bought it of Mr. Scott, and I am sure that which has been produced is the same.

Mr. WILLIAM MILLAR sworn.

I am one of the city marshals; the prisoner was brought before my Lord Mayor; two memorandum books were found upon him; by a memorandum, which was only in initials, I found the tankard had been sold to John Scott , a pawnbroker, in Primrose-street, on the 11th of July; I went there and found that Mr. Scott had sold it to a Mr. Stamp, where I afterwards found the bottom of it.

JOHN DUNCASTLE sworn.

I am a constable: I found the memorandum books upon the prisoner, and they were delivered to Mr. Millar.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the fact; I am not the person that sold it to Mr. Scott.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770910-101

614. BARNARD CHRISTIAN DE NASSAU DEITZ was indicted for defrauding John Van Roy , by false pretences, of 116 pounds of human hair to the value of 90 l. July 23d .

JOHN VAN ROY sworn.

I am a hair-merchant : I advertized in the papers, that I had a quantity of hair to dispose of; the prisoner called upon me, with a man he called Prince, at my lodging, they came at one o'clock, I was just going to dinner; I desired them to call again; Deitz said he would call again about half after two o'clock; they asked it they could see the goods now; I said, yes, they went up into my lodging; they said I must not sell it too dear, and asked how much I had, I said about 100 lb. wt. they said it was for a merchant at Marlborough; that they did not know the hair properly well; I said you must bring a man that knows the hair, and call at nine to-morrow; they said they would do so; the next morning Deitz and Prince called at my house, and another hair-dresser, that he said knew the hair very well, and that he was the king's wig-maker, and made the first wig the king of England ever had; they saw the goods upon the table; they asked the price of them; the hair-dresser said the hair was good; I asked I believe about 17 s. 6 d. a pound; the hair-dresser said he thought 16 s. would do; we agreed for 17 s. a pound; the goods weighed 116 lb. wt. Deitz took a pen and ink and cast it up; he said it came to 90 l. 2 s. he said that was 90 l. payable, and we should drink a bottle of wine with the 2 s. when the goods were delivered; I agreed for ready money; they said I should have the money when I delivered the goods, but they would call at three o'clock and take away the goods; they came near five o'clock; we then went to Pemberton-row; they asked for a receipt; I asked the name, he said it was Prince; the prisoner Deitz wrote a direction, No 2, Pemberton-row, near Fleet-street; but there was a mistake, there was no number; we put the goods in a coach and went to Pemberton-row; I was to be paid when I brought the goods to Pemberton-row; we took the goods out of the coach, and Deitz said lay them down there, that was in the room below, you call it a parlour in England, I believe; there sat a clerk

at a table with a number of books and papers; they sat there to write; Mr. Prince and Mr. Deitz called me to go up stairs, we went up stairs, Prince took out a bottle of wine, set it on the table; I said, No, I don't like wine, I like better to have my money than wine; then what should I drink, O, I like a draught of porter; well they would send for it; they drank a draught of porter, and Prince took out his pocket book; and gave me a draught, I said it was two different hand-writings; I don't understand English, and I believe that the draught is not good; this is the draught (producing it) I sat close to the table, on the other side sat Prince and Deitz; when I said I believe the draught was not good, I gave it to Mr. Deitz, he took it in his hand, and said, O you be not afraid, this note is good, it is as good as the Bank of England; Deitz then said, now you must give us change, 9 l. 18 s. I said I have not so much in my pocket, I will go home and get change; Deitz said, O no, this merchant believes you an honest man, so give your own note to pay to-morrow after tomorrow; I said I did not like that, I would go home and get change; I went directly to Lombard-street; I asked for Mr. Smith upon whom that note was drawn; one person I met told me which was the house of Mr. Smith; I shewed the banker the paper, I said I did not come for money, I only wanted to know if it was good; the banker said, my name is not John Smith; I said, does there live any John Smith in this Lombard-street, they said, no; they asked me how I came by this note; I said, tell me whether it is a good note or not; they said, no, it was not worth a farthing; then I went to my friend in Fox-court, Gray's-inn-lane, and told my story; he went with me to the house in Pemberton-row; when we came into the house where I left the goods, the goods were gone; the maid said the merchants were gone, and the goods were gone.

That is the direction given you by Deitz in his hand writing? - He wrote it himself, but the goods were not delivered at that house, and besides there was no number.

From the Prisoner. Did I ever buy any chair of you? - You and your partner did.

You swear that that man is my partner? - I cannot swear that; I never saw either of you before.

What capacity did I pass in, did I pass as a hair-merchant to you; you are upon your oath, do you know the meaning of kissing the book in English? - I do.

Did I pass as a hair-merchant to you upon your oath? - You brought Mr. Prince, who you said had a commission; you said you did not know the hair.

Did I pass as a hair-merchant to you? - No, he said he had a commission to buy the hair, but he said he did not know the hair.

Did I buy any goods of you? - You and he came together.

Did I ever say that I had a commission, or that I was in partnership with Prince, or that I would pay you for it; did I make any promise to pay you? - You said Prince had a great quantity of commissions out of the country, and kept a fine house and kept his clerks.

On what day was it that I first came to your house? - The 23d of July.

You say I came twice with Mr. Prince? - You came three times.

Can you prove that man is not the king's barber? - You called him so; I never saw the king's barber nor this barber before.

You are sure it is not the king's barber? - I never saw the king's barber.

When you came to Pemberton-row, who received you? - You ordered the coach to bring us there; there we left the hair below in the parlour, you and Prince ordered us to go up stairs, I never saw the hair any more; you gave an order to Prince to lay the hair down there, and I never saw the hair any more.

Did I tell you that this Smith was a banker? - You said it was as good as the bank of England, that Mr. Smith lived in Lombard-street, and that was enough.

Was I at that time in any superior appearance than you have seen me before or after, or did you think that I came with an intent to cheat or defraud you, or did I insinuate to you that I was any thing which I was not? - You gave me a false draught and a false direction.

You found the house that I gave you the direction of in Pemberton-row? - Yes, but that is not the house of Mr. Prince.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty of a fraud, and it would be very hard for me to suffer for it; if I had had the least benefit by it, I must have received some remittances from it while I have been in prison six weeks; I have not heard of this Prince nor of the men who he says had connections in this parlour with Prince, and if I had any band in the fraud they would surely have bailed me out; it is my being innocently accused which makes me absolutely make these observations to your Lordship and the gentlemen of the Jury, who I hope will take the cross examination into further penetration; Mr. Van Roy swears hard where his property is concerned, where perhaps a man or conscience or an Englishman would not have sworn so severe as he has done, for I believe putting him to his oath upon an English bible has not put him to that severity as if he had been sworn in a foreign, in a more solemn manner; if I had given him the goods or the money, he would never have staid in England to put the laws in force against a High German; Mr. Prince and the king's barber are both strangers to me; Prince came to me at the Turk's Head bagnio, he said he was informed I understood several languages, did I understand Dutch? I said I did; he said he had a commission from Marlborough to buy hair, and he would make me amends; I having been but lately discharged from Mr. Akerman's academy, and having been detained there ten months, as your Lordship knows, I thought it as well for me to condescend to be Mr. Prince's interpreter, which formerly, when I was in prosperity and kept my own chariot, I should not have gone to do that for a guinea; I not being a judge of his commission, never asked the man about his goods; but Mr. Prince said I have got an order for hair for the length of so many inches; the Dutchman said he could suit him, but he had not so great a quantity as he wanted; Prince said, let me have what you have already; he said he would write to his friend, and get some more; one Kelly, I am informed, is the man that made the wig for his Majesty; he was was then foreman to the shop who served his Majesty, and was applied to to make a wig for the king when he had his hair cut off; Kelly said, he had made the king's wig: I know no more of Prince than as a bottle-friend, by his coming twice or three times to that tavern; the goods were never delivered to me nor my care; I drank part of a bottle with them up stairs; I was not very well, I retired home and left Mr. Prince and the hair-merchant there; I saw Mr. Prince in the evening at the Turk's-head tavern; the waiter said, some of Sir John's men had been after me; I said, I would go immediately up to Sir John's office; I went there; Sir John's office; I went there; Sir John's office was shut up then, because it was late in the evening; I went to a public house the next door to the office, and enjoyed myself with a few acquaintance; I enquired for Mr. Leigh, Sir John's clerk, one of Sir John's men went and asked Mr. Leigh, if he had any thing against me; he said, if the Count comes let him be derained for a fraud; one called me our very genteely, and said, he had an information that I had been concerned with one Prince in defrauding a Dutch merchant; I said I will clear up the matter with you at any time, or take my word till the morning; he took me to Covent-garden round-house; I staid in the watch-house till morning; I gave all the description to Mr. Wright, the magistrate, that Prince might have been brought to an account, and the servant who officiated as servant to Mr. Prince; but Mr. Wright being rather prejudiced against me for appearing like himself as a gentleman, it was his intention to commit me, right or wrong, which justice Addington would not the day before; I said to the justice, he might do the devil justice which he deserved, and discharge me; Prince, and Paterson, and Bailey, and those whom he has mentioned, the king's barber and Prince, I have not heard since about them, nor have they applied to me, nor assisted me, nor do I know what is become of them, nor the hair; if there has been a fraud committed I think it would be requisite to have them advertized, and he might get his hair from them, and not from me, a man that had it not in his possession; I went with these men as an interpreter; I don't know but he is a hair-merchant: I have suffered almost two months imprisonment; I hope

the gentlemen will take it into consideration that my liberty is at stake; he was fitter to have a concern in it than not; for if I had had a hundred pound in my hand I could have easily got bail; I hope you will consider me as an innocent man, and judge me accordingly.

COURT. Have you any witnesses to your character?

Prisoner. My character is perfectly well known; it is in vain to call any witnesses.

Court to the prosecutor. When you left the house, and went to Lombard-street, did you expect them to stay till you came back? - Yes, they were to stay for the change, the 9 l. 18 s.

From the Prisoner. Was not I in a dishabille; and did not I tell you, that I wanted to be shaved and dressed, and be gone? - Not at all.

You did not see that I was in a dishabille? - I never look to a man's dress.

Then you cannot tell that I am the same man? - O yes, I know you too well.

COURT. Did you ever find out whether that Prince was a hair-merchant? - I never could find out or hear any thing of him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: s17770910-1

The trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment as follows:

Received sentence of death, 4.

Richard Turwood , Thomas Jones , John Harrison , and John Graves .

Three years Navigation, 8.

Joseph Naylor , Thomas Roberts , Robert Simkins , James Harwood , Thomas Lee , Charles Redmont , Barnard Christian de Nassau Deitz , and Thomas Hawley .

Four years Navigation, 1.

William Gray .

Six years Navigation, 2.

Daniel East and Richard Broadstreet .

Seven years Navigation, 2.

Jeremiah Fogg and Thomas Phillips .

Branded and imprisoned 6 months, 11.

George Tucker , and Thomas Baker , John Bustin , William Ridgway, Robert Baldwin , William Hill, William Bryant , William Woolner , Michael Clare , Thomas Knowland , and Robert Woolley .

Branded and imprisoned 3 months, 14.

Barnaby Bryne , Ann Brown , Susannah Cole , Ann Molineaux , Sarah Shaw , William Lane, Matthew M'Quire, Martha Rogers, James Combes, Margaret Turnbull , Mary Hughes , Hannah Mumford, Rebecca Carns , and John Harrison .

Branded and imprisoned 1 month, 1.

Charlotte Clark .

Imprisoned three years, 1.

William Pike , otherwise Jones.

Publickly whipped, 1.

Charles Atkins .

Branded, 8.

William Henley , John Huddle , Thomas James Chambers , John Smith , Clavering Redmire, Samuel Golding , Lewis Charles Keen , Mary Roby .

Whipped, 5.

Ann Hart , Mary Slugg , Mary Bartlett, Elizabeth Maxfield, and Hannah Abrahams .

Judgment was respited on 2.

Charles Thomas Featley and John Harrison .

Reference Number: a17770910-1

*** Trials at Law and Arguments of Counsel taken in Short-hand, also the Art of Short Writing completely Taught, by JOSEPH GURNEY of Southampton-Buildings, Chancery-lane; Author of Brachygraphy or Short Writing made easy to the meanest Capacity.

Reference Number: a17770910-2

*** Trials at law, and arguments of counsel, taken in short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY (writer of these proceedings) of Southampton Buildings; Chancery-lane.

Of whom may be had,

BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING made easy to the meanest capacity.


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