Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd July 1777.
Reference Number: 17770702
Reference Number: f17770702-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 2d of July 1777, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART I.

LONDON

PRINTED BY WILLIAM RICHARDSON ; AND SOLD BY S. BLADON, in PATER-NOSTER ROW.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Hon. Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable EDWARD WILLES , Esquire, One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GEORGE NARES , Knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; THOMAS NUGENT , Esquire, Common Serjeant; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Samuel Howe ,

John Pallen ,

Daniel Ward ,

Patrick Hutton ,

John Foster ,

Stephen Pitty ,

William Walker ,

James Robinson ,

James Barrett ,

Thomas Russell ,

John Reynold ,

Samuel Barnes .

First Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Harman ,

William Richard ,

William Hawthorn ,

Timothy Byrchmore ,

William Greening ,

Thomas Gifford ,

Richard Edwin ,

John Storey ,

Joseph Tett ,

John Walker ,

William Obrian ,

Alexander Grant .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Henry Hosland ,

John Quick ,

Thomas George ,

William Cross ,

Joseph Simmonds ,

Richard Beesum ,

John Wooley ,

Robert Mawbey ,

Benjamin Vanhagan ,

Joseph Odell ,

George Jenks ,

William Pinnard .

Reference Number: t17770702-1

404. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing 60 pan-tiles, value 4 s. the property of Robert Smith , Simpson , and Bennett , May 1st .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was found NOT GUILTY .]

Reference Number: t17770702-2

405. SARAH CHAULK was indicted for stealing eight yards of lawn, value 3 l. three yards of other lawn, value 28 s. one yard of other lawn, value 8 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. seven yards of linen cloth, value 25 s. three yards and a half of thread lace, value 49 s. four yards of other thread lace, value 4 l. two

yards of other thread lace, value 18 s. eight yards of other thread lace, value 3 l. five yards of other thread lace, value 40 s. seven yards of other thread lace, value 2 l. 18 s. two yards and a half of other thread lace, value 15 s. five yards of other thread lace, value 27 s. six yards and a half of other thread lace, value 29 s. nine yards of other thread lace, value 22 s. four yards of other thread lace, value 12 s. five yards and a half of other thread lace, value 40 s. four yards of other thread lace, value 7 s. three quarters of a yard of other thread lace, value 6 s. fifty yards of other thread lace, value 3 l. twenty yards of other thread lace, value 3 l. three yards of other thread lace, value 3 l. eighteen yards of silk lace, value 18 s. nine yards of other silk lace, value 27 s. four yards of other silk lace, value 20 s. four yards of other silk lace, value 16 s. six yards and a half of other silk lace, value 26 s. four yards and a half of other silk lace, value 11 s. thirty-six yards of other silk lace, value 30 s. sixty yards of silk riband, value 30 s. fifteen yards of silk farcenet, value 48 s. one yard of black silk, value 7 s. one pair of cotton stockings, value 8 s. two pair of leather gloves, value 4 s. two metal pins with heads of pearls, value 42 s. one hundred pearls for a bracelet, value 7 l. eight rows of pearl necklace, value 13 l. and two silver thimbles, value 1 s. the property of Mary Pereira , widow , in the dwelling house of John Norton , June 4th .

MARY PEREIRA sworn.

I live in the house of Mr. Norton; the prisoner was my servant ; she had lived with me some years ago; the last time she came to live with me was on the third of April, she continued till the fifth of June, during which time I lost the several things mentioned in the indictment; they were stole out of Mr. Norton's house.

CHARLES DRIVER sworn.

I am a constable; I apprehended Hannah Chaulk , the prisoner's sister; I went to her lodgings and found she was gone into the country; I got the warrant backed and was going after her, just as I had got the warrant backed a messenger informed me she was returned to town; I found her at Berkeley-square, and she took me to the house of a Mr. Brown.

What day was this? - The 9th of June.

Did you receive any things at the house of Brown? - Yes, this parcel (producing a parcel of things) I have had it in my custody ever since; it was sealed up by Mr. Norton.

MARY PEREIRA . (Looks at a great number of pieces of thread lace produced by Driver) They have been cut off cards of lace, which I have in my possession, they tally exactly; I had all these things at the time the prisoner came to live with me; I counted them over by an inventory which I keep by me, and I am sure they were all there when the prisoner came; it is my general method to look over them once a month.

Did you compare them with the inventory before the prisoner? - No; I missed all the things during the time the prisoner was in my service: there were 15 rows of pearls in the necklace, seven rows were taken away; I know them by their being on cotton thread as they came over from India; they exactly correspond with the eight rows left behind.

Cross Examination of the Prosecutrix.

How long had the prisoner lived with you? - This last time.

No, all together. Whether when you was in France you did not send her to England to fetch some valuable things to you? - Yes.

Did she bring them faithfully to you? - Some she brought safe, some she did not.

You had a very good character with her from the place where she lived, after she left you, when you took her again? - I had; but afterwards the gentlewoman discovered she had lost some things, and was sorry she had given her a character.

HANNAH CHAULK sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Angus, a watch-maker, near Berkeley-square; my sister, the prisoner, brought a bundle of things to me, and desired me to take care of them; they were sewed up, I delivered them in the same manner to Mr. Brown, in Gilbert-street; Bloomsbury; when I was taken up I took the constable to Mr. Brown's, where the things were found.

Cross Examination.

Did your sister desire you to carry the bundle to Mr. Brown? - No; I did it of my own head.

Where was your sister then? - In service at Mr. Norton's.

What did she bid you do with it when she gave it you? - She said it was a parcel, and desired me to take care of it for her.

JURY. Did you live at Mr. Brown's? - No.

Was the bundle open or sewed up that was delivered to you? - Sewed up.

Did you ever see what was in it? - No.

To DRIVER. When you found the bundle, did you go to the prisoner? - Yes, at the request of Mr. Norton; she was then in Tothil-fields Bridewell; I asked how she could be so wicked as to say she knew nothing of the bundle; she protested she never did.

Counsel for the prisoner. I object to this evidence; a constable being sent to a woman in order to ask her questions is exceeding improper.

COURT. My objection arises from the words of the man,

"how could you be so wicked," it carries terror in the very manner of it.

MARY MALLARD sworn.

I am a laundress; the prisoner delivered to me about two yards of lawn to deliver to a Mrs. Tubman to be made up into aprons; I delivered it to Mrs. Tubman.

[The lawn shewn the witness.]

I am certain that this is the lawn.

ELIZABETH TUBMAN sworn.

I received this lawn from the last witness, in order to make into an apron.

MARY PEREIRA . Before I lost this piece of lawn I cut it from another piece which I have here.

[The indenting in the edges exactly tallied.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought that lawn; I put it into my trunk which was always kept open: I bought the gown the prosecutor has sworn to, and had it dyed.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-3

406. LAZARUS JACOBS was indicted for receiving a silk stomacher, parcel of goods whereof James Wright was convicted of stealing at the last sessions, well knowing them to have been stolen , Dec. 13th .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17770702-4

407. JAMES STRIDE , SAMUEL RUDD , and WILLIAM MILES , were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place called St. James's Park , near the king's highway, in and upon John Warren did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person 13 guineas and five shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said John , June 1st .

(The prisoner being a Frenchman, and not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.)

JOHN WARREN sworn.

On the 1st of June last, between 11 and 12 at night, as I was going to my lodgings at No. 11, in Castle Yard, I went through St. James's Park, I was rather intoxicated with liquor; I sat down on one of the benches and fell asleep; I felt somebody near me which waked me; I found a man had taken hold of my hand and put it into an indecent place in his breeches, I drew my hand away; there was only one person there at that time who was the prisoner Stride; it was not moon-light, but the stars shone bright; Stride said, you had better not sit here, you had better get up and walk with me; he said, he would shew me the way out at the Green Park; we went a little way together, Stride asked me for some money to drink a glass of gin; I said, I had got no halfpence; Stride said, I am sure you have got other money; I pulled out my purse, as soon as Stride saw the purse in my hand he struck me over the face with his fist, snatched the purse out of my hand, and ran away; I saw nobody present at that time but Stride; I believe there were about 13 guineas and about five shillings in my purse; I was frightened: Stride had a red great coat on with his regimentals under it, I ran after him and pushed him down, upon which two men came up and followed me, they rescued Stride from me and beat me; I cannot swear to those two men; the place where I overtook Stride and pushed him down was about ten yards from the place where he snatched the purse from my hand; I did not perceive the other two people till they fell upon me.

From STRIDE. Did you not say that the man that robbed you had thick lips? - I did *.

* Stride had thick lips.

From STRIDE. Did not you tell Sir John that you kissed me several times? - I did not.

FRANCIS sworn.

I am a serjeant in the guards; the prosecutor came to the guardhouse about 12 at night, he appeared to be much beat, he had lost his hat, the blood ran out of his ears; he said he had been robbed of 13 guineas and some silver, and thought it was somebody that belonged to the guard; upon which we shut the door and searched the guard, and found every body there but the prisoner Stride, who is a drummer; Stride came to the guard door about two minutes after, he was then in his drummer's dress, I immediately charged him with having robbed the prosecutor; the prosecutor was present, and said, he would take his oath it was him; he had given a description of him before that he had thick lips, and had a red great coat on, which I suppose he pulled off before he came to the guard, for when he came there he had not the red great coat on; but his regimentals; I went and acquainted colonel Duberg, and he sent for Stride up; Stride denied it positively; but the fact appeared so clear to the colonel, that he ordered him to be made a prisoner of; next morning Stride confessed that he had robbed the prosecutor, and had given the money to Miles; I think the prosecutor was something in liquor when he came to the guard, yet he was capable of remembering and knowing what he did.

EDWARD WATTON Sworn.

I am a serjeant in the guards; I was upon guard that night; Warren came to the guard room very bloody, he said, he had been robbed by a drummer with thick lips; we searched to see who was absent, Stride only was found absent; he came to the guard room in two or three minutes; the prosecutor directly charged him with robbing him; the next morning as they were going with Stride to Sir John Fielding's, Stride sent for me and said, he committed the robbery, that he snatched the purse out of the prosecutor's hand, and gave it to one Miles; he said two others were concerned with him; I asked Stride to go up to the colonel and acquaint him with this matter; the colonel said it was a weighty matter; then Stride went and shewed us Rudd in the Birdcage Walk; he was on duty as a drummer; he belongs to the Coldstream regiment; we took Rudd; he confessed he was with Stride when he robbed the foreigner, but said he had no part of the money; I went along with Stride, and by his direction to the two drummers in Burton-street, in order to seek for Miles; I asked the little girl who opened the door if Miles was there; she said, she believed he was, and in bed on the first floor; I went up; Stride followed me; we went into Miles's room; he said, this is the man that I gave the foreigner's money to; he was in a great surry; he denied it at first; I said, it would be very proper to return the money; Miles went into a back room; I followed him for fear he should attempt to get away; I saw him stoop down, and under an old chest he picked up some gold, which I guessed to be seven or eight guineas; while I was speaking to Miles, Stride came in and said, I think that is not all the money; Miles wrapped it up in a handkerchief, and put it in his waistcoat pocket; then I took them all three to the officer, one Gould, but Miles was not searched there, but was searched at Sir John Fielding 's by some of his men; there were five guineas taken out of his pocket: I cannot tell whether it was in a handkerchief or not; Miles said before the justice that that was all that he had received from Stride.

STRIDE's DEFENCE.

I stood at the guard door the same night; at about 12 o'clock that this affair happened, a young woman came up and asked me if I could shew her where her husband, a soldier, was; I asked her his name; she told me; I said, I believed he was a centinel in the Park; I went and shewed her the box he stood centinel at; I turned back; this man had a stick in his hand; he knocked it against my arm; I turned my head to look at him; he beckoned me; he sat down upon a chair; I looked at him again, and he beckoned me again; I returned back to him, and sat down upon the chair; he said, it was a fine night, and that there were not many people walking about; then he got hold of my hand and tickled it, and put it upon his thigh; then he asked me to take a walk with him; I asked him for what? he could not make me any answer; he got up, and got hold of my arm; I went with him as far as the gate that goes

out at the Green Park; the gate was not open; he took hold of my hand and pulled me the other way; we went round by the queen's house; there was a place to get underneath to the Green Park; I went under with him; he kissed me, and behaved very indecent; I asked him what he meant; I took hold of his collar; I said, you shall go to the watch-house along with me, and I halloed out a S - e, a S - e; he took out some money, and said he would give it me to let him go; he gave me five guineas to let him go.

COURT to WATTON and GENT. Did the prisoner Stride, when the prosecutor charged him with robbing him, say, that the prosecutor had behaved indecently to him?

Both. No not a word; he mentioned something of that sort the next morning, but the colonel did not think any thing of it.

FOR STRIDE.

MATTHEW THOMAS sworn.

I am a serjeant in the first regiment of guards; Stride came into the regiment the 21st of November 1776; I have known him ever since; I have never known any thing in prejudice to his character before; he has behaved very well in the capacity of a soldier; what his private character may be I cannot tell.

ANN PRICE sworn.

I have known Stride eight months; he has lodged with me; he has always behaved very honest and sober.

Are you a married woman? - Yes; I know him to be a very honest sober man; he always came home in good time; he was never out all night in his life, but when he was upon guard.

MILES's DEFENCE.

I was going home to my lodging that night; I met James Stride about half after 11; he desired me to take care of five guineas for him; he said a gentleman gave it him; I have been in London but a very little while: I travel the country and sell hardware.

RUDD's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the fact; I know nothing about it; we went into the Green Park, under the place where there was a paling; he wanted to shew me out that way.

COURT to PROSECUTOR. Were you guilty of any indecencies together? - Nothing more than what I said before, while I was sitting upon the bench.

How far was the place where you was robbed from the place where you first sat down together? - I am not sure.

ALL THREE GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-5

408. JAMES CHARLESWORTH was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 20 s. a silk waistcoat, value 10 s. a muslin apron, value 5 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a cotton petticoat, value 10 s. a pair of velvet breeches, value 10 s. a silk gown, value 20 s. a linen gown, value 10 s. the property of Matthew Liddle , June 4th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-6

409. WILLIAM BUXTON was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon Elizabeth the wife of Solomon Fell feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing a green purse, value 4 d. a guinea, a crown piece, and 6 s. in money, the property of the said Solomon, from the person of the said Elizabeth , June 29th .

Mrs. ELIZABETH FELL sworn.

On Sunday evening last, coming between Southgate and Hanwell , in my own coach, with my daughter and a lady, I believe it was about eight o'clock, a young man came up and asked very civilly for my money, he neither swore an oath nor put his pistol into the coach, but I saw a pistol in his hand, which he held at a distance from the coach; I gave him a guinea, six shillings, and a crown piece, in a silk purse; I cannot swear to his person; he was on horseback, and I believe on a roan coloured horse; it was rather dark; I was alarmed at his coming up; my daughter, in her fright, gave him her watch, though he asked for nothing but money; he then asked

the, Madam, is this all your money? I said, Yes. What, said he, have you none left to pay turnpikes? I said, No. He said, then I will give you some silver. While he was putting his hand in his pocket to get some silver, the footman got down from behind to take the silver, he seized his hand and wrenched the pistol out of it; the prisoner got away; the footman pursued him; the coachman drove as fast as he could after him, and they took him: the coachman brought the watch back.

Miss HARRIOTT PLEASANCE FELL, sworn.

I was in the coach with my mamma when it was robbed.

Did the prisoner ask for money? - Yes; I saw my mamma give him her purse; I do not know what was in it; I was frightened at the man's coming up.

WILLIAM WALKER sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Fell; I saw a man pass another coach, and drive past ours; I saw a pistol in his hand; Mrs. Fell thought he was a drunken man; I said, he might be a little in liquor, but he was a highwayman; he turned back, and called to me, and bid me stop twice; I stopped; he came up to the coach and asked for money, and my mistress gave him her purse.

What became of him after he quitted the coach? - He turned round, and while he was feeling for some money to give my mistress to pay turnpikes, my fellow servant wrenched the pistol out of his hand, and told him he was a dead man; he replied, he had another pistol, but immediately rode off; we pursued him as fast as we could; my fellow servant got hold of his horse's bridle; I jumped off the coach-box, and pulled him backwards on the ground.

Had he another pistol? - We found no other upon him; we found a green purse and three watches upon him.

RICHARD WRIGHT sworn.

I am footman to Mr. Fell: I wrenched the pistol out of the prisoner's hand, and my fellow servant and I took him and carried him to a public house; we found upon him a green purse and three watches.

Did you find any other pistol upon him? - No.

Was the pistol loaded? - No; when I said he was a dead man I snapped it at him, but it was not loaded.

[ Daniel Abbot , the constable, produced the purse, with the money in it, and the watch.]

Mrs. FELL. I believe the purse to be mine; the money in it tallies exactly with the money I lost.

SOLOMON FELL , Esq; sworn.

I had quitted my coach and got on horseback; I got home just before the coach; I was surprized to see the horses come galloping, and my servants informed me that they had got a highwayman at the Coach and Horses, and they asked me what should be done; I went to the Coach and Horses and saw the prisoner; I ordered the constable to search him; they had not searched him then: we found on him two silk purses, and my daughter's watch; one purse contained the money my wife lost, the other contained a piece of foreign silver, four guineas and a half in gold, and some silver; I ordered them to go to Mr. Chithero's a justice of the peace.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say; I leave myself to the jury and to your lordship; I hope you will have mercy upon me, as it is the first offences I am under instructions in the excise-office,

GUILTY . Death .

Recommended by Mr. Fell, the prosecutor, to his Majesty's mercy.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-7

410. MARGARET FENNEY was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. a looking glass in a mahogany frame, value 2 s. a woollen cloth coat, value 3 s. and a silk bonnet, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Northam , June 21st .

SUSANNAH NORTHAM sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Northam ; I live in Bedfordbury ; last Saturday was week, at seven in the evening, I was going to call my servant; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs; I do not know that I ever saw her before; I asked her where she had been; she made me

no answer; in my surprize I had not power to stop her; my husband was in the shop with a Mr. Davidson; I went and acquainted him of it, and they immediately went after her; the prisoner was brought back, with all the things mentioned in the indictment upon her; I saw them taken out of her apron; I saw the swing glass in her apron as she came down stairs.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix ]

ROBERT DAVIDSON sworn.

I was standing at the door with Mr. Northam; Mrs. Northam came out and said, a woman had just come down stairs that had robbed them, and was gone out; I went after her, but did not see her; I called at a pawnbroker's the corner of Cecil-court, and found the prisoner there, and brought her back with the things upon her; she had them in her apron.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was never in the prosecutrix's house in my life; I met a woman, who deals in Ragfair; in Cecil-court; she asked me to carry these things for her, and said, she would give me 6 d. I was willing to earn 6 d. and took them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-8

411. JOHN LAMB was indicted for stealing an oak plank 16 feet in length, value 4 s. the property of Edward Layton , June 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-9

412. THOMAS NASH and WILLIAM HURSENT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Seabrook on the 16th of June , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 8 s. a pair of plated knee buckles, value 6 d. the property of the said Thomas; a piece of woollen cloth containing 12 yards, value 24 s. five yards of camblet, value 4 s. ten silk handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and another silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Robert Corbett , in the dwelling house of the said Thomas .

SARAH SEABROOK sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Seabrook ; my husband keeps the Two Swans Inn, Bishopsgate-street ; on the night our house was broke open I was the last that went to bed; I made all the doors and windows fast when I went to bed.

What time did you go to bed? - Rather before half after eleven o'clock; two young men, that lodge in the house, John Harper and James Watson , who have a key, came in afterwards; between two and three o'clock I was alarmed by the watchmen; I heard a great noise in the yard; I got out of bed and heard the watchman say, there were thieves in the house; I believe they had taken the men, for they had got into the house.

How do you think the house was broke open? - I think the lock was picked of the street door; I locked it when I went to bed.

Is that the door Harper and Watson came in at? - Yes; when I came down stairs I found my bar window open.

Could any body have got in through the bar window? - Not without undoing the screw; it was screwed down when I went to bed: the things mentioned in the indictment were missing from the bar; there was a paper parcel, I do not know what was in it; the shoe buckles and knee buckles were in the desk.

You say the watchman alarmed you by telling you there were two men in the house, were those two men taken? - Yes; I did not see them till after they were taken, then I saw them going up under the gateway; the prisoners are the two men.

Cross Examination.

How many people lodge at your house? - Only these two men constantly: keeping an inn many people lodge there at times.

The lodgers have keys? - None but those two men: the window of the bar looks part into the parlour and part into the tap-room.

ROBERT CORBETT sworn.

I am a countryman: being in town, I left a parcel in the prosecutor's house, under their care.

[The parcel was produced in Court, and deposed to by the witness.]

THOMAS HILL sworn.

I have an apartment in this inn, up one pair of stairs: on the 16th of June between two and three o'clock I was alarmed by the cry of thieves, thieves; I ran down stairs, and in the tap-room kicked against a parcel; I took it up into my room and struck a light to see if there was any direction upon it; being book-keeper to the inn I thought I might have left it out; finding it was not mine, I called to the watchmen not to let the men go, for they had certainly robbed the house; and seeing some papers of tobacco on the ground; I thought the bar had been broke open; I went to the bar and saw the bowls and things about the floor and the window open; on which I went out into the yard, and called Mr. Seabrook up; his window looks into the yard; I saw the prisoners in the yard.

JAMES RANKIN sworn.

I am a watchman: Parsons, a private watchman, called me, and told me there was something going on in Mr. Seabrook's house that was not right; I called Martin and we went down to Mr. Seabrook's house; Martin got upon the step of the door; he looked over the shutters and saw Nash with a bundle; I saw them both come out of the house; one ran towards Bishopsgate-street, and the other down the coach-yard; they were both taken; I lost sight of Nash when he ran down the coach-yard; but when he was taken and brought back, I knew him again-directly: I laid hold of Harsent and secured him.

Cross Examination.

You did not know the men before? - No, I never saw them before to my knowledge; I took them to the watch-house and searched them, but found nothing upon them.

JAMES MARTIN sworn.

I am a watchman: upon the 16th of June I was called by Rankin on suspicion that there were some people committing a robbery; I got up on the seat by Mr. Seabrook's window and looked in; I saw the bundle under Nash's arm, and a lighted candle in the hand of the other man at the bottom of the stairs.

Are you sure the prisoners are the men? - I am; I saw Harsent come out first.

He did not come out with the candle? - When we alarmed him, I saw him put it out; the other man came out after him.

What became of the bundle? - It was found at the door; I attempted to lay hold of him; he rushed through us; the first ran towards Bishopsgate-street, Nash ran down the coach-yard; we took Harsent in the yard, but I was obliged to knock him down first; I took care of him while the other two watchmen went and took Nash; I am positive they are the men I saw in the house; when I went to the door it was fast; they opened the door and rushed out; we took them to the watch-house.

VINCENT PARSONS sworn.

I am a watchman: I was upon private duty, employed by Mr. Wood, a cheesemonger; I saw the two prisoners go down the alley side by side just after two in the morning.

That is the passage from Bishopsgate-street to the house? - Yes: in about ten minutes they came up the passage again, and were whispering; I thought then they had no good design; they went away and returned in about five minutes with a lighted candle, and went down the passage again; they opened the door and went in and shut the door after them; I had strong reason to suspect they had opened the door before.

Are you sure the prisoners are the men? - I am: I then called Rankin and told him what I saw; he called his partner and we all three went down together; the prisoners hearing an alarm opened the door and rushed out.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I am a lodger in the house: I came home after Mrs. Seabrook was in bed, about half after eleven; I am sure I locked the door after me.

JAMES WATSON sworn.

I am a lodger in the house: I came in just before the last witness; I saw the last witness fasten the door about half after eleven o'clock.

Cross Examination of HARPER.

You was the last that came in? - Yes.

Is it a spring lock? - Yes, and a very good lock; the other witness saw me lock it.

Is there any other lodgers in your house? - No.

COURT. Did you try afterwards whether you had locked it? - I did; it was as fast as it could be.

Counsel. You are a coachman? - Yes.

You love what is good? - Yes.

Was you quite sober that night? - Very sober as ever I was in my life.

How came you not to bolt the door as well as lock it? - I seldom do; I know it is a good lock.

You had not been a little merry that night had you? - Not at all.

You was perfectly sober? - Yes.

Recollect - half and half? - No.

Is it always your practice to examine the door after you shut it to see that it is fast? - Yes; I know it was fast.

GEORGE MALLISON sworn.

I live at the next door: I heard an alarm of thieves; I got out of bed and saw the prisoners in the custody of the watch-men; I helped to take them to the watch-house.

[ John Goffroy produced a pair of buckles which were found in the yard by a man who did not appear, and the bundle which he received from Hill.]

NASH's DEFENCE.

I had been drinking at the Rose and Crown in Shoreditch till near two o'clock; I thought it too late to go home, and went to Mr. Seabrook's to lodge; I knocked at the door with the heel of my shoe, and the door opened; these watchmen came and took me; I never was in the room.

HARSENT's DEFENCE.

What my friend has said is the truth; I cannot say any more.

From Nash to the Prosecutor. Did you ever see me in any bad company? - No: I have seen him before; he has not lodged at my house lately.

FOR HARSENT.

SAMUEL DUGGIN sworn.

I keep a public-house in Shoreditch: I have known Harsent eleven years; I have found him a sober, honest man; he has paid me what he called for in my house.

JUDITH TROVERS sworn.

I am a house-keeper in Ratcliff Highway: Harsent lodged with me; he went away about eight months ago; I never knew any harm of him while in my house: his wife being with child, he went away because I had not room for her to lie-in.

FOR NASH.

- HILL sworn.

I have worked with Nash: I never knew any dishonesty of him in my life-time.

JOHN PLATT sworn.

I have known Nash eighteen years: he bears a good character; I worked with him four or five years; he always behaved very well.

BOTH GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER;

Reference Number: t17770702-10

413. JOHN COOK was indicted for stealing 500 lb. wt. of printed paper, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Becket , June 23d .

THOMAS BECKETT sworn.

I am a bookseller ; the prisoner lived with me as a servant for about nine months.

Did he live in the house with you? - No: a friend of mine, Mr. James Noys , having seen the prisoner come out of my warehouse repeatedly with bundles of books in sheets, at last suspected something wrong, and on Monday the 23d of June he watched him carrying out some books.

COURT. I believe we had better examine Mr. Noys first.

JAMES NOYS sworn.

I am a printer: Mr. Becket rents a warehouse of me, the staircase of which is fronting my parlour window; I had an opportunity

of course of seeing people go, up and down the warehouse stairs; I saw the prisoner bring down a very large load of books upon his shoulder at about half after ten in the morning last Monday week, the 23d; I believe I had left Mr. Becket at his own house not ten minutes before; seeing him turn a contrary way to his master's house with the bundle, I suspected he had robbed his master; I followed the prisoner to a Cheesemonger's shop in Blackmore-street; when he went into the shop I passed by the door; I did not take any notice then for fear he should see me dodge him, might take the books up, and pretend he was going to his master; I watched at the door and saw him weighing the books off in the Cheesemonger's shop; then I went into the shop and asked him whether his master gave him those books to sell for waste paper; he was confounded and could not give me an answer; I brought him back, after telling the master of the cheesemonger's shop, that I knew he had robbed his master of that property; I brought him to my house and sent for Mr. Becket; Mr. Becket was not at home, his son came; I went back with him to the cheesemonger's shop; the son owned the property.

What said the prisoner? - He said nothing, but begged that I would let him go.

Mr. BECKET. When I returned home I found the prisoner in my house in custody of my son; I went to the cheesemonger's that afternoon; I saw the paper there; the bundle was tied up, and there was marked upon it 102 pound.

Was it printed paper? - Yes: it contained part of the numbers of the Monthly Review, which I publish; I believe there were near 600 numbers; they were books I printed which I am accountable to the proprietors for every number at nine-pence each, which comes to upwards of 20 l. and in another shop I found equally the same.

JOHN BAKEWELL sworn.

I am a cheesemonger in Drury-lane: I did not buy those they are speaking of; I have bought printed paper of the prisoner.

JAMES WARD sworn.

I am a cheesemonger in Blackmore-street, Clare-market: I was below in the warehouse selling some goods; my servant weighed that paper in order to buy it; I had frequently bought paper of the prisoner.

What was the weight of it? - 102 lb. as I received the weight from the man; we were to pay 2 d. a pound for it.

I suppose the reason you did not pay for it was Mr. Noys coming? - I certainly should have paid for it if Mr. Noys had not come in; I have bought of the prisoner before, and never had any suspicion of him.

Was you by when he brought it? - No: I was in the warehouse.

Did you see the prisoner in your shop? - I did not see him that morning he brought the paper.

To Mr. NOYS. Did you see the paper? - I did.

Can you swear to that paper? - Yes: that is part of the paper; I know it by a mark which I put myself upon it at the time I detected the man, and at the same time I told Mr. Ward that was the property of Mr. Becket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am quite unprovided with either attorney or counsel; I hope to find lenity from the court: I have not any thing to say.

COURT to Mr. BECKET. How did he behave during the time he lived with you? - Very well.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-11

414. ANN MALAMPE was indicted for stealing a guinea and 5 s. and 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of Timothy Dunn , June 7th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-12

415. LUCIUS HUGHES was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of John Malone , June 8th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-13

416. WILLIAM CATO was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 50 s. the property of William Denner , May the 18th .

WILLIAM DENNER sworn.

I am a journeyman baker at Poplar: on the 18th of May I lay at the sign of the Crown in Covent-garden ; the prisoner lay in the same room; I saw him before I went to bed, but cannot swear to him; he had been hired to the house that day to draw beef; I lay with the waiter, Edwards, and the prisoner lay with a soldier; I waked about half after six in the morning; the watch was then under my pillow; I went to sleep again and waked about nine, and it was gone; when I came down I was told by the landlord that the prisoner had ran away; I saw my watch again on the 20th of May before justice King.

LEWIS HAMILTON sworn.

Upon Sunday the 19th of May I was drinking at a public house opposite justice King's; seeing a crowd at the justice's, I went over; I searched the prisoner and found the watch upon him.

[The watch was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I believe somebody put it in my pocket.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-14

417, 418. ISRAEL MOSES and ELIZABETH HOWE were indicted, the first for stealing sixteen Cheshire cheeses, value 10 l. the property of Robert Haden , and the other for feloniously receiving one of the above cheeses, well knowing it to have been stolen, again the statute , June 6th .

There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-15

419, 420. ISABELLA HAYES and MARY STRETTON were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel seal, value 3 d. a metal seal, value 3 d. and two linen handkerchiefs, value 18 d. the property of David Kineaid , privately from the person of the said David , May 31st .

DAVID KINEAID sworn.

On the 31st of May about eleven in the evening, I was going out of Shoreditch into Magpye-alley ; there were four or five people stood at the entrance of the alley; I suspected them; I clapped my hand to my fob and missed my watch; I saw the two prisoners turn the corner and run as fast as they could; I then put my hand to my pocket and missed two handkerchiefs; upon which I followed them, they crossed over into Spital-square; I seized them both in Spital-fields, and called the watch; when the watchman came up he told them they had better deliver me my watch if they had it; upon which the watch was dropped between the two prisoners; I took it up and looked at it by the watchman's light and saw it was my watch; there was no other person near but the prisoners when it was dropped; when I pursued them, I did not cry stop thief, left I should alarm them, but ran till I took them.

JOHN LARRIMON sworn.

I am a watchman: I was crying half past eleven o'clock; the prisoners ran past me first and the prosecutor after; I thought they were playing the rogue till he laid hold of them and said they had got his watch; then I laid hold of them and saw the watch drop between them; it touched one of their aprons.

HAYES's DEFENCE.

We are sisters by the mother's side: the prosecutor met us in Magpye-alley and asked us to go with him; we would not; he wanted to force us to go with him, and ran after us and dropped his watch, and then said we took it.

BOTH GUILTY of stealing the goods; but not privily from the person .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-16

421. ALEXANDER PECKHAM was indicted for stealing a bird cage, value 2 s. and a black bird, value 1 s. the property of William Rose , May 24th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-17

422. EVAN DAVIS was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 5 l. the property of George Bywater in his dwelling-house , June 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-18

423. ABIGAIL HOWLS was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 1 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 1 s. and a linen neckcloth, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Adams , May 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-19

424. JOSEPH TYCON otherwise TYSON was indicted for stealing a pair of stays, value 18 s. the property of George Shoe , June 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-20

425. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing a linen bag, value 2 d. and 62 s. and 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of Michael Hutchins , June 23d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-21

426. DAVID JAMES was indicted for stealing a silver table spoon, value 5 s. the property of Claudius Smith , June 22d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-22

427. MARY WALKER was indicted for stealing a bed quilt, value 5 s. three blankets, value 10 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 6 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a bolster, value 3 s. two linen cheque curtains, value 6 s. a copper tea kettle, value 3 s. and two linen pillow cases, value 18 d. the property of Hannah Dore , widow , the said goods being in a ready-furnished lodging let by contract by the said Hannah to the said Mary, against the statute , April 10th .

HANNAH DORE sworn.

I live in Dean-street, Holborn : the prisoner lodged at my house two or three months; I cannot exactly tell when she came nor when she left the lodging; she went away and took the key, but not returning in about a week, I had the door broke open and then missed the things mentioned in the indictment.

ELEANOR LLOYD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Holborn: on the 31st of January the prisoner pledged a tea kettle with me in the name of Walker.

ROBERT HARES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Drury-lane: on the 29th of January the prisoner pawned a curtain with me in the name of Walker.

JAMES EVERITT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I have known the prisoner some years: in the months of January and February she brought me two pillows, three blankets, and two sheets; she pledged them all in the name of Walker.

[The things were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did it out of necessity; I intended to bring them back again.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-23

428. ELEANOR the wife of William BLAKE was indicted for stealing four linen shifts, value 24 s. three linen shirts, value 9 s. two linen table cloths, value 2 s. two muslin children's robes, value 2 s. two dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a linen quilted petticoat, value 2 s. a muslin apron, value 1 s. a black cardinal cloak, value 2 s. and a muslin neck-cloth, value 6 d. the property of Edward Shugar , June 27th .

EDWARD SHUGAR sworn.

The prisoner was my servant : she had lived with me about five weeks; last Friday my wife was looking up the linen to wash, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was then in the house.

Do you know any thing of her husband? - No.

ELIZABETH SHUGAR sworn.

The prisoner was my servant: on Friday last I was looking up the cloaths to wash; I missed four shifts, three shirts, two table cloths, two robes, two dimity table cloths, two petticoats, a black mode cloak, a muslin neckcloth, and a muslin apron; I had seen some of them a fortnight before; I had the misfortune to fall down stairs and put my knee out; I suppose while I was unable to go about she took the things: I missed nothing till last Friday.

John Brooks produced a shift and tablecloth, having delivered the rest of the things to the prosecutrix at Sir John Fielding's, which he deposed were pledged with him by the prisoner.

[The shift and table cloth were deposed to by the prosecutrix]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor told me if I would tell where the things were, he would not hurt me.

Prosecutor. I said if she would tell me where the things were, I would be favorable to her, but she would not confess half till she was before Sir John Fielding .

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-24

429. JOSEPH GREEN was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 6 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 d. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. and a cheque linen apron, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Danaly ; and a surtout coat, value 2 s. the property of William Smith , June the 6th .

THOMAS DANALY sworn.

I keep the Coach and Horses public-house at Temple-bar ; William Smith is my son-in-law: on the Saturday night before Whit-sunday the prisoner was found in my cellar, and some of the things mentioned in the indictment thrown behind the butts; I never saw him in my life before to the best of my knowledge.

JAMES ATTERBURY sworn.

I am waterman to the hackney coaches, and lodge in Danaly's house at Temple-bar: I heard an outcry that the house was robbed about a quarter after one in the morning.

Who made the outcry? - William Smith : I looked through the cellar window and saw the prisoner coming along the cellar with a shirt and coat in his hand; he threw the shirt down, and threw the coat behind the butts; there was a lamp burning in the cellar; I left my pails and ran down stairs and caught hold of him; I took up the shirt, and told one Godfrey he had thrown the coat behind the butts, where he found it; he pulled a pair of stockings and a flannel waistcoat out of his pocket in the tap-room; we took him to the watch-house that night.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am son-in-law to Mr. Danaly: on Saturday night before Whitsunday I was going down into the cellar to draw a pint of beer; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs, and thought it was my brother; he had something under his great coat; upon seeing it was not my brother, I called out thieves! upon which he went down into the cellar; I saw him brought up out of the cellar.

Had he been drinking in the house? - No; he came in and wanted to breed a quarrel with my daddy, and then went to the bar and had a glass of brandy.

You saw him come down the chamber stairs?

- Yes; I lost a coat that night; I don't know where it was found.

[The coat and shirt were produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

ANN FRANCIS . I live next door to the watch-house in Portugal-street; on the 17th of May, opening a window that looks into the yard of the watch-house, I saw a coat; I thought it might belong to a young man that lodged in my house, and went to take it up; I found another coat under it, with two keys that belong to a hackney coach, this handkerchief, and a pair of gloves, in the pocket (producing them).

SMITH. That is my coat.

HENRY CROSDELL . When the prisoner was brought to the watch-house he had that coat on under his great coat; the next morning the coat was missing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was so drunk I could not stand; I called in to have a pint of beer; Danaly would not draw me any more liquor; then I had a glass of brandy, and over the glass of brandy I asked the way to the necessary; I had not been gone two minutes before Danaly and another man came down and collared me; these things were in the cellar; I told them I had nothing, and desired them to search me; they did, and found nothing upon me.

ATTERBURY. I found a stick of his up stairs, and a rose which he had in his mouth, it has a particular mark on it; I saw him with it at the bar (producing it).

PRISONER. That man that is swearing against me has been a pick-pocket all his life.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-25

430. CHARLES MARSHALL and NATHANIEL HARVEY were indicted for stealing a box cloth coat, value 10 s. a livery waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of shag breeches, value 5 s. and a livery hat, value 5 s. the property of Leonard Tresilian , June 12th .

Mr. LEONARD TRESILIAN sworn.

My coachman, John Mansfield , lost the things mentioned in the indictment in the night of the 12th of June; we have recovered all but the hat.

JOHN MANSFIELD sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Tresilian in Chandos-street, Covent-garden ; I lost a box-coat off the chariot box in the coach-house, and a livery coat, waistcoat, and breeches, and a hat from behind the door in the stable, in the night between the 12th and 13th of June; the stable door was locked, and the coach-house door bolted; the bolt was drawed back of the coach-house door; the lock of the stable door was not touched; there is another door goes out of the coach-house into the stable, behind which my cloaths hung; I missed them when I went into the stable before 6 in the morning; I never saw them again till the 17th of June; I have seen Harvey about the stable; I had no acquaintance with him.

BARNARD BARNARD sworn.

I apprehended the prisoners; they offered the cloaths to me to sell on the 17th of June between three and four in the afternoon, at a public house; they said, they had a lot of cloaths to sell; I asked them where the cloaths were; they said, they would not shew them to me in the day-time; they would come to me by night: when they were gone I went and gave information at Justice Wilmot's that they were to come to my house between ten and eleven o'clock at night: I had given them a direction to my house; they came and brought the cloaths; they had taken off the lace; they were apprehended immediately.

THOMAS MANWARING sworn.

I am one of Justice Wilmot's men; I was present when Barnard Barnard gave the information at the Justice's, in consequence of which I went at night to the place where he had appointed the prisoners to meet him, and staid till they came; they came some time after 10 o'clock; Marshall had the bundle; I apprehended them both: the things have been in my possession ever since.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Marshall said nothing in his defence.

HARVEY's DEFENCE.

I was not taken in the house with Marshall as the witness says, I was at the door.

The prisoners called several witnesses, who gave them a good character.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-26

431. ELEANOR the wife of THOMAS DIGNAM was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. a linen shift, value 3 s. a flower'd muslin apron, value 3 s. two white linen aprons, value 6 s. and a cheque linen apron, value 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Gill , Spinster , May 8th .

ELIZABETH GILL sworn.

I am an unfortunate girl; on Thursday night the 14th or 15th of May, I cannot tell which, I came to the prisoner's house as a lodger; the next morning the prisoner charged me with stealing a sheet; afterwards she insisted I should shew what I had in my box; I unlocked my box, and the prisoner took out the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating all of them except the gown) being thus charged, I sent a person with the things to pawn; she likewise stripp'd a gown off my back, and said, if I made any disturbance about them she would hang me without judge or jury; when she had taken my cloaths, she told me to charge Ann Appleby with it; I was in a passion, and refused so to do; I was going away, and offered 18 d. for my lodging; the next day I went to Justice Welch, he directed me to take a summons out, and bring the prisoner before him; when I came away, though she had taken these things out, she would not let my box be taken away; I never saw my box afterwards till it was produced before Sir John Fielding ; then it was broke open, and I missed out of it a cap, a shirt, and some cheque aprons: I have been out of place ever since Christmas.

Did you bring any body with you to lodge at the prisoner's? - Yes, a man; he went up into the room with me, and staid till 11 o'clock; then I lay all night with Ann Appleby .

On her Cross Examination she said, That was the only night she lodged there; that Ann Appleby and the prisoner were present when the things were sent to pawn, but no one else; that Mary Millar was a servant there, but she was not in the apartment; that the prisoner said she would have 9 s. 6 d. for the sheet; that Mary Millar was sent to pawn the things, and brought in the whole 8 s. 6 d. which was paid to the prisoner, in whose name the things were pawn'd; that this was about one o'clock at noon, she thought on a Friday; she said, she went to the prisoner in New Prison, because she had sent for her, and did not go of her own accord; that the prisoner then said, she would give any thing to make it up; that she gave her a note of hand for 1 l. 3 s. 6 d. the value of her cloaths; but that note she sent back to the prisoner by order of the justice; that then Lyon the constable came from the prisoner, and offered her two guineas to make it up.

ANN APPLEBY sworn.

I lodged at the prisoner's; Gill came and lodged with me; she came in the afternoon, and brought her box; she lay with me from 11 o'clock at night; we were to pay 3 s. a week between us; I got up before Gill, and went into the prisoner's apartment; the prisoner said, so Betty was up stairs last night, and has lost a sheet; I said, a young man was with her, but the young man did not stop any time; said she, she is a thief, she has stolen my sheet; I said, she is in bed, and that if she had it she must have it about her; I would have had the prisoner search her: I mentioned this to Gill; she said, she found two sheets there, and left two there; the prisoner said one was gone: after this the prisoner followed me into Gill's apartment, and desired we would both unlock our boxes, which we did; the prisoner took all the things out one by one and threw them on the ground; she said, the sheet was worth 9 s. 6 d. she rolled up a clean shift and four aprons, belonging to Gill, and took them into her own apartment, and then sent her servant to pawn them; her servant brought a duplicate and laid on the table, and Gill snatched it up and read it; it was in the prisoner's name; I cannot tell what the money was, but the prisoner insisted upon having Gill's gown, and the servant took it and pawn'd it for 4 s. Gill told me, in the prisoner's presence, that after this the prisoner wanted her

to charge me with the sheet; I had lodged there two nights; I never saw Gill there but that night.

Cross Examination.

Whether Gill did not charge the man with taking it? - No, she never charged the man; I think Sarah Edgar was not there that day; I think she was in the round-house at the time the man went away, about 11 o'clock.

[ Robert Hinxman produced a gown that was pledged with him in the prisoner's name by Millar.]

JOSEPH HARRISON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker (produces some of the things pawned by Millar); I have been acquainted with Dignam some time; I lent 4 s. 6 d. on these things, and gave a duplicate in her name; they were first brought by Edgar and Barlow in the prisoner's name; I thought it not proper to take them in without knowing she was privy to it, and then the prisoner's servant brought them, and I gave a duplicate in her name.

SARAH BRADSHAW sworn.

I went up into the same room where Gill and the man had been about half after 11 o'clock, the bed was tumbled, and one sheet rumpled; I thought there was but one sheet, and told the maid so; afterwards I found two; I got up at six in the morning, and as I was coming through the prisoner's apartment she called out to know who it was; I said, it was me; she said, where is Poll White; I said, here; I then bad her go and take care of the sheets, for I said that at first I thought there was but one; but afterwards I found there were two; I am sure it was the next morning, because Gill came crying to me about the sheets, and I told her there were two sheets; she said, Mrs. Dignam charged her with stealing one of them.

ANN APPLEBY . It was the next morning that we had this conversation.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Sophia was the first that missed the sheet, and came down and told me there was no more than one sheet; I took a sheet off another bed and put it on that bed.

FOR THE PRISONER.

SARAH EDGAR sworn.

I lodged at the prisoner's several months Gill came to me over night and asked for a lodging for her and her husband; she brought a man with her; I shewed them up to the room, and they went to bed; in the morning I got up sooner than ordinary, and heard my mistress say, she had lost a sheet; she said, the new people that came to the house had taken a sheet away; she charged Gill with the sheet; Gill cried, and said, O then if it is gone I must pay for it; and asked me if I would carry some things to pawn for her; I told her I would; she gave me a worked muslin apron with some tucks in it, a white linen apron and a cheque apron, one shift, and a ring, and desired me to get 9 s. 4 d. I asked Mrs. Dignam where I should take them to? she said, she did not know, she generally used to send to Mr. Gee's in Denmark-street.

To HARRISON. Do you live with Mr. Gee? - Yes.

EDGAR. I took them to Gee's, and asked 9 s. 4 d. the pawnbroker looked them over, and asked whose they were; I said, a young man and woman came to lodge at Mrs. Dignam's, and had stole a sheet, and before she would confess she would pawn these things; he said, if they belonged to Mrs. Dignam he would lend her 8 s. on them; I said, they were not Mrs. Dignam's, they were a young woman's there; when I went again he had examined the ring, and said it was not gold.

HARRISON. She told me when she came first that she brought them from Mrs. Dignam's; that they belonged to a young woman there; that the young woman had stolen a sheet, and that was to pay for it; Mrs. Dignam deals with me; she often sends people to our house, but I never take any thing in her name without a note from her.

To GILL. Was that woman there when you came in over night? - I never saw her till the Saturday night after Mrs. Dignam was committed to prison; she was in the round-house, and Mrs. Dignam said, the woman that took my cloaths was in the round house.

Upon your oath tell us the truth: Did you see that woman over night? - I never saw her before in my life.

Did not you say the man was your husband? - No; I could not say he was my husband; there was a little woman took the candle and lit us up stairs, who I never saw here.

Mrs. Dignam did not desire her to take the goods to pawn? - I never saw her till the Saturday; I asked her if she lodged with Mrs. Dignam; she said, Mrs. Dignam was in the round-house; she said, she had not lodged there for three or four nights.

MARY BARLOW sworn.

I was in the prisoner's room, I was not in Gill's room; Gill brought the things into the prisoner's room, and gave them to her to pawn.

ANN DREW sworn.

I was in the prisoner's room; Gill brought the things out of her own room into the prisoner's, and gave them her to pawn: I have known the prisoner 10 years; she is a good honest woman.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlelesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-27

432. THOMAS HAMILTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Perry on the 21st of June , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing two cloth coats, value 10 s. two men's hats, value 2 s. two cheque linen aprons, value 3 s. a white linen apron, value 6 d. a linen shirt, value 18 d. a woman's black beaver hat, value 2 s. a silver tea spoon, value 18 d. a flannel petticoat, value 18 d. two pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. a pair of linen window curtains, value 6 d. three linen caps, value 1 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and 3 s. and 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of the said Thomas in his dwelling-house .

SARAH PERRY sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Perry ; my husband and I live at Enfield Chace ; my husband was a day-labourer , but is old and past his labour; last Saturday was se'ennight we went to bed about eight at night; I saw that every thing was fast; I was last up; we had been in bed a good while; I waked and thought I heard somebody padding through the yard; I looked up at the window and saw a man looking through the window; I asked him what he did there? he said, he wanted to come in; I said, what do you want here, here is nothing but an old man and woman that cannot get out of bed? he said, he would soon let us know what he wanted; he dashed the window and the glass came all over the bed, and the prisoner and two more came in.

Was it light then? - No; there was no day light; they rifled all my boxes, and took the money out of my pocket; they took all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) some of the things were found on the Chace; I cannot swear to either of the men.

CATHERINE DAVIS sworn.

I live in Chick-lane; I bought two old sheets, two aprons, and a cap on Thursday was se'ennight of the prisoner; I gave him 6 s. for them; being of little consequence I did not ask him how he came by them; I keep a cloaths shop.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

FRANCIS RYDER sworn.

I found the things produced at Davis's; she gave me the same account then that she has given now.

GEORGE CAWTHORNE sworn.

On Saturday night as soon as I left work, I went to a public house and had a pint of beer; I staid a little longer than ordinary; Bumpstead came to me and asked me to go and take a walk with him; we came to this woman's house; Bumpstead asked me to go in; we went and called Hamilton up who lived just by; Bumpstead opened the window of this house and we all went in; we took the things mentioned in the indictment, and hid them in the Chace; I never saw any thing more of them; I never enquired; I went to my work and thought no more of it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it; I never did any such thing in my life.

' The prisoner called one witness, who gave ' him a very good character.'

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-28

433. CATHARINE RUBURY was indicted for stealing two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of William Piggot , June 7th .

WILLIAM PIGGOT sworn.

I keep the Red Cross in Barbican : on the 7th of June the prisoner came into my house about ten minutes after eight o'clock; I went down into the cellar for a pint of beer, and as I was coming up she asked for a glass of gin, and as I came out of the cellar I saw her putting a quart pot in her pocket; she went away, I followed her and brought her back, and found the pots upon her.

Isabella Parker, the prosecutor's servant, confirmed his testimony.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I only took a pot to get a draught of water.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-29

434. MICHAEL CARNEY was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 20 s. the property of Edward Cooper , June 9th .

JEREMIAH BURKWOOD sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Cooper, who is a proctor in Doctors-commons : I was in the kitchen; the prisoner came down stairs; I asked what he wanted; he said a pennyworth of beer; I went and took him by the collar, and Wakeling came and we secured him and sent for a constable; when I laid hold of him by the collar I saw he had a scarlet coat of my master's under his; it was taken off the bannister of the stairs.

[The coat was produced in Court, and deposed to.]

William Wakeling , who was with Burkwood, confirmed his testimony.

JOHN HAWKINS sworn.

I am a constable: I was charged with the prisoner; he had this coat on, I have kept it ever since.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very drunk; I know nothing about putting the coat on; I was passing by the door; I don't know whether they pushed me in.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-30

435. GEORGE HANLEY was indicted for stealing six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a silver milk ewer, value 5 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5 s. a silver table spoon, value 5 s. and a silver punch ladle, value 2 s. the property of George Doctor Milton , May 27th .

GEORGE DOCTOR MILTON sworn.

I know nothing of the things being stole, I was out at the time.

ANN MILTON sworn.

I was coming up out of the kitchen and saw the prisoner coming out of the parlour with something wrapped up in an apron; I went to lay hold of him, but he got from me; I pursued him and cried stop thief, and he was brought back with the things mentioned in the indictment upon him; I charged a constable with him.

JOHN WHITTLE sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner run I stopped him and the things upon him, and took him back to Mr. Milton's.

[ John Williams the constable produced the things, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in the house; a person gave me the things to carry to the Magpye in Fetter-lane for him; and I put them in my apron.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-31

436. JOHN ROBERTS otherwise JONES was indicted for stealing a wicker basket, value 1 s. and 55 lb. of butter, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Winter , May 24th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-32

437. SUSANNAH COLE was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. the property of William Wrangle , May 22d .

WILLIAM WRANGLE sworn.

I live in Cheapside : I lost a quart pot on the 22d of May; the prisoner was in my house; she had a large red cloak on and a man's coat under it; I saw her fumbling under her cloak; I went to stir the fire and saw the handle of the pot; she had the bottom in her pocket, but could not get the handle in; I charged her with stealing it, she offered to go down on her knees.

[The pot was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The pot was not in my pocket; some gentlemen had given me some beer, and being afraid the prosecutor would not let me drink it, I put my cloak over the pot.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-33

438. ANN DAWES was indicted for stealing eight yards of coloured silk, value 40 s. the property of Samuel Bass , May 22d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-34

439. ANN the wife of William ATHILL was indicted for stealing twenty seven yards of white thread lace, value 33 s. the property of John Carter , June 16th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-35

440. THOMAS HAYWARD was indicted for stealing a guinea , the property of William Henshaw , June 14th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-36

441, 442. JOSEPH MARCHANT and JOHN EADES were indicted for stealing a copper , the property of William Ford , May 14th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-37

443. JOHN COLLETT was indicted for stealing three linen sheets, value 1 s. the property of Stephen Harding , June 21st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-38

444. ELIZABETH LLOYD was indicted for stealing a copper tea kettle, value 3 s. the property of William Parry , June 28th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-39

445. WILLIAM GRACE was indicted for stealing a flitch of bacon, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Wensley , May 17th .

BENJAMIN WENSLEY sworn.

I am a cheesemonger in the Strand : I only speak to the property.

JAMES BUBB sworn.

I am a tobacconist, I live opposite Mr. Wensley's: on the 17th of May, between nine and ten o'clock, when I was sitting at my door, I heard a man say, he has got the bacon; on which I looked out and saw a man with a flitch of bacon under his arm; the man ran and I ran, but M'Credy stopped him; I laid hold of him on the other side, and we brought him back to the prosecutor's; he dropped the bacon in the street; I lost sight of him after I saw him with the bacon; I am not sure the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS M'CREDY sworn.

I saw four or five men walking backwards and forwards; I suspected they were going to take something from the shop; I watched them; I saw the prisoner come down the prosecutor's steps with a flitch of bacon, and go towards the Adelphi; I followed him; he was not more than twelve yards before me; he dropped the bacon in the street; I never lost sight of him; I seized him, and Mr. Bubb came up, and we brought him back; he had the bacon under his arm when he came down the steps; when he had ran a little way he threw it over his shoulder; when we had taken him, he said he was not the man: a waterman took up the bacon.

Did you never lose sight of the prisoner? - I never did.

JOHN EVANS sworn.

I am waterman to the hackney coaches: as I was watering the horses I saw the prisoner come down the prosecutor's steps with the bacon under his arm, and run away; I pursued him, I never lost sight of him; he dropped the bacon from under his arm; I did not see him throw it on his shoulder: Bubb and the last witness laid hold of the prisoner, and I took up the bacon.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent; there were several people in the street running; they laid hold of me, and said I was the man; I know nothing of it.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-40

446. ABRAHAM WOOLLER was indicted for stealing a coach box cloth coat,

value 30 s. the property of James Coulthard , May 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-41

447. ELIZABETH IRON otherwise FRASIER was indicted for stealing five ounces of black silk, value 16 s. the property of Edmund Bateman , January 7th .

ANN BATEMAN sworn.

I live in Spicer-street, Brick-lane; I am a four-swift engine windster: last twelfth day the prisoner worked with me; on the next day, while I was gone to the warehouse, she went away, and I missed five ounces of silk.

SARAH STILWELL sworn.

I was going down stairs; Mrs. Bateman called to me to bring her some silk; I left the prisoner in the shop, and went and fetched it; the prisoner afterwards said she had a pain in her bowels, and went into the yard, and then went away; I did not see her take the silk.

SARAH STONE sworn.

The prisoner and I were in the shop together; she said she had a pain in her bowels; I saw her stoop down and take four full bobbins of silk out of a drawer; I thought she was going to take them to my mistress; she went out and never returned.

Prosecutrix. I never heard of her till last Whitsun Monday.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The girl never saw me take any thing away; it was very hard weather; I had a shilling a week allowed me from the parish, I went that morning to receive it; I was almost naked, the churchwardens would not give me any more money, but took me into the house; I was there five months.

Prosecutrix. I heard she was in New Prison, and went and found her there.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-42

448. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing thirty pair of leather shoes, value 30 s. the property of John Ashfield , June 17th.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-43

449. EDWARD GAMMAGE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ayres on the 11th of June , between the hours of three and four in the afternoon (no person being in the said dwelling-house) and stealing a black callimanco petticoat, value 7 s. a blue sattin petticoat, value 9 s. a chip hat, value 6 d. a pair of thread stockings, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 3 d. a pair of worsted stockings, value 6 d. a penknife, value 6 d. a green silk purse, value 1 d. two pair of stone sleeve buttons, value 2 d. and a silver pocket piece, value 1 s. the property of the said Mary Ayres in her dwelling-house .

MARY AYRES sworn.

I live at Haggerston : last Wednesday was se'nnight my daughter and I went to work at about six in the morning; we left no one in the house; I locked the door after me; I returned about three or four in the afternoon, having had notice that my house was broke open; I found the padlock was taken off, the table draw below stairs was open, which I left shut in the morning; my drawers up stairs were open, and the things mentioned in the indictment taken out, and were on the floor.

[The things were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

ANN LEWIS sworn.

I am about fifteen years of age; I live near Mrs. Ayres: coming by Mrs. Ayres's door I saw two men, the one was a lusty man, the other was the prisoner; they came by the house afterwards; they went up to the house, and the prisoner pulled the padlock off the door, drew the staple, and went in and shut the door after him; the other man went as fast as he could to a pond in a field just by with a bag under his arm; I

went to Mrs. Stife and told her there was somebody in Mrs. Ayres's house; she said, perhaps he had business there; I went to her again and told her he had drawn the staple of the door; then she went and called out Mrs. Ayres several times; the prisoner looked out at window up stairs, and she asked him what business he had there? he said,

"G - d d - n your eyes, I have more business here than you;" he then ran down stairs and ran away, and as he ran by Mr. Crockwell's, a chandler's shop, he stopped him.

PRISCILLA STIFE sworn.

Ann Lewis came and called me and told me there were two men about Mrs. Ayres's house; I said, perhaps they had business; then she came again and told me they had drawn the staple and gone in; I went and found the door shut; it was not fastened, for I pushed it open; I called the woman several times; she not answering, and hearing somebody above stairs, I called out there was a thief in the house; he looked out of the window up one pair of stairs; I asked what business he had there, and he called me a bitch, and said he had more business there than I; I halloa'd out and said there was a thief in the house; upon that he ran down stairs; I had a child in my arms; he ran against me, and nearly pushed me down; he ran off, I called stop thief, and as he ran by the chandler's shop he was stopped; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

MARY BEVERSTOCK sworn.

I was washing at the next door; I heard the last witness call out there was a thief in the house; I went out and saw the prisoner come out of the house; I said, you dog, you are a thief, you have no business in the house; he said, you lie, you bitch, and pushed by the last witness, and almost pushed her down; I pushed against him, and when he saw the coast was clear he ran off; he was afterwards taken by Mr. Crockwell; I had described him to Crockwell, and he saw him going by and stopped him.

DANIEL CROCKWELL sworn.

The last witness described the man that had been in the house to me; I saw him going by and stopped him; he behaved very civily, and surrendered himself quietly; I went to the house and saw the boxes and drawers open and the things taken out and laid on the floor: the door had been forced open by somebody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The man laid hold of me; I asked what was the matter? he said, I had broke the house open; I know nothing of it; I never was in the house in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of four shillings and six-pence .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-44

450. DAVID GUESS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Pollard , widow , on the 4th of April about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a garnet stone ring set in gold, value 21 s. a silver table spoon, value 8 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3 s. a silver strainer, value 2 s. four silver tea spoons, value 4 s. and 4 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Elizabeth; and a silver watch, value 3 l. five guineas, and 11 s. and 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Linstead Reeves , in the dwelling-house of the said Elizabeth .

ELIZABETH POLLARD sworn.

Upon Friday the 4th of April my house was broke open.

Was the house fast over night? - I am always last up at night and first up in the morning; I fastened it that night; I went to bed about half after nine, at about two in the morning I heard the parlour door crack, then I heard the stair foot door crack; that door was fastened with a tibber, and I heard the tibber tumble down; then I jumped out of bed and called to Mr. Reeves; he jumped out of bed and threw open the window, and cried out thieves; I saw an uncommon light on the staircase, and heard a great many footsteps; I was then so frightened I had no power to move; they broke open Mr. Reeves chamber door in an instant; they threw me down, and I tumbled over a close-stool; I

got up again, I believe without any assistance; they trod upon my naked foot; I began to grow very sick; the prisoner came and put one hand over my eyes, and with the other laid hold of the back part of my head, and led me to the foot of Mr. Reeves's bed, and bid me lie down there, and no hurt should come to me.

How came you to know the prisoner? - He came three times on the 4th of April to ask Mr. Reeves to employ him to work in the brick-fields; when he came the first time he had on a remarkable hairy cap that frightened the dog, and almost frightened me; I asked why he came in such a frightful cap? he said he had no other to come in; he threw stones at the dog; what he did to the dog I don't know, but it never barked when they broke the house open; he came the last time at four o'clock with another man, and asked if Mr. Reeves was at home.

Had he that cap on when he put his hand over your eyes? - Yes, and I knew his voice; I knew him very well, I had a glimpse of his face before he put his hand over my eyes; Mr. Reeves made his way to my room, in order to get out of the window and get on the top of the house to hide himself from them; they immediately followed him, but stopped of a sudden, I believe the candle went out; afterwards I think I heard them strike a light, then they followed Mr. Reeves; I heard one of them say,

"D - n your eyes, shew us where the money is;" and another said, Let him alone, he is going to shew us where the money is; they then brought Mr. Reeves back and made him lie down on the bed, and a man stood over him with a cutlass and a pistol, I believe, but am not positive, and made him lie still while the rest broke open every box they could; Mr. Reeves shewed them where his breeches were, and the next morning I saw the pockets were turned inside out: the man that stood over us was a tall man; they took away the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them): when I came down in the morning I found they had got in at the kitchen window; they broke the glass and opened the casement; I am sure it was fast over night.

Was the prisoner there all the time? - Yes, he was very busy helping them to break open the things, and lighting them with a dark lanthorn; they found a blunderbuss in the house, and cried out with a loud voice,

"You old Reeves, you heep blunderbusses in your house;" he told them there was nothing in it but powder; they broke the slint to pieces and took the blunderbuss and set it on the outside of the house.

LINSTEAD REEVES sworn.

I had purchased an estate, which I intended to let out on a building lease, but being informed there was good brick earth, I was advised to make use of it in the brick way; I was awaked in the middle of the night by the tibber falling down; then I heard Mrs. Pollard call out thieves; I jumped up and went to the window and called out thieves; they immediately broke open my room door; I rushed out and went into Mrs. Pollard's room; one of them followed me; I believe the light went out; he did not catch me immediately, but he got a fresh light, and then took me by the nape of the neck, and threw me down, and said,

"Blast' you, why did you cry out?" I said, I waked out of my sleep and did not know what I did; he then asked for my money; the prisoner came with a cutlass and held it to my throat, and swore he would cut my throat; the other said, Hold, he is going to shew us where the money is; the prisoner struck me over the shoulders with the flat part of the cutlass, and they took hold of the collar of my shirt behind, and led me into my own room; then they laid me on the bed and stood over Mrs. Pollard and me with a cutlass in one hand and a pistol in the other; they broke open and rifled all our drawers; every time any light were brought in, if we turned our heads the man that stood over us said,

"Blast you, who do you look at? blast you, if you look I will chop your heads off:" then one of them below cried out, Holloa, and the man that stood over us said that they were going down to drink, and if we stirred he would come up and chop our heads off: they went down, I lay about five minutes; then hearing all quiet below, and finding it very cold, the window being open upon me, I crept from the bed to shut it, and saw them going over my land with a dark lanthorn: they took out of my breeches my watch, five guineas, and eleven or twelve shillings.

How do you know the prisoner was one of them? - When he came with the dark lanthorn and threatened to cut my throat, I looked wishfully at him; I am sure he is the man; he had the hairy cap on at the time; my men came in the morning and found the house broke open and the blunderbuss at the door; I described the prisoner, and heard he was sometimes in the brick-fields in Kingsland, at Mr. Brown's; I went and enquired after him and took him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am as innocent as the child unborn.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-45

451. JOSEPH GEOFFROY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. and a guinea , the property of John Homewood , May 25th .

The prisoner being a foreigner, and not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.

JOHN HOMEWOOD sworn.

On the 24th of May I came to the Black Bull in Leadenhall street ; I went to bed between ten and eleven; when I got up in the morning I missed my watch and money; they were in my breeches, which I put under my pillow when I went to bed; I found my watch on the Wednesday following upon the prisoner at the King's Head in the Borough; it was on the Sunday I lost it; the prisoner lay that night at the inn; when I found it, it had another chain and seals to it; the prisoner had sold my silver seal.

JOHN NICHOLSON sworn.

I am a constable in the Borough: the prosecutor came to me on Wednesday the 28th, between eleven and twelve at night, and said he had been robbed, and the person that had robbed him was at the King's Head; I went with him and found the prisoner sitting in a chair; I went to search him, and he directly pulled the watch out of his pocket: the prosecutor told me before the watch was produced, that there were the initials of his name upon it; when it was produced I saw it was so.

[The watch was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN FISICK sworn.

I am hostler at the Black Bull, Leadenhall-street: on Sunday morning the 25th of May in the morning, I heard the dogs bark; I got up and saw the prisoner standing in the yard; he made motions to be let out; I went and enquired of my master if he had paid his reckoning; I found he had, and let him out.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor promised not to prosecute me; the hostler was present.

The prosecutor and bostler both denied that there was any promise made to him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-46

452, 453. EDWARD LYNCH and JOHN WHITAKER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sims on the 16th of June , about the hour of two in the morning, and stealing a watch with the inside case made of metal, and the outside cover'd with shagreen, value 40 s. six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 6 s. and a silver table spoon, value 5 s. the property of the said William; and 250 pieces of thread lace, containing 4000 yards, value 250 l. the property of Mary Anderson , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said William Sims .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

WILLIAM SIMS sworn.

I live in Whitegate-alley : Mrs. Anderson has a shop and lodging in my house, there are wine-vaults under the shop: upon the 17th of June, between three and four in the morning my bell rang, I got out of bed; I opened the window and asked what was the matter;

the watchman said my door was ajar; I went down stairs and saw half a dozen people at the door, and one Mary Wright said she saw three men come out of my house; that the one went towards Spitalfields, and the other towards Bishopsgate; I went down into the kitchen and found my dresser drawer and a spice locker broke open: as I came down stairs, Mrs. Anderson came up in a great flurry, and said she had undergone a great deal of misery for an hour; that she had been robbed by a man who had been in her room with a dark lanthorn; they got into the wine-vaults under the shop, and broke through a partition into the cellar, and came up the cellar stairs; I lost a metal watch, six silver tea-spoons, a pair of sugar tongs, and a silver table spoon; the watch hang up in Mrs. Anderson's shop in a wooden case; her shop belongs to the house, it was a parlour formerly; she has a separate door, but at night, if she goes into the shop, she always comes in at my door.

MARY ANDERSON sworn.

I lodge in Mr. Sims's house, I make use of his parlour as a shop: on Monday night the 16th of June, about a quarter before two o'clock, I was waked by the rustling of my curtains; I thought it was the servant of the house come down, as Mr. Sims had been ill; I called out, who is there, nobody answered; I lay still a little; I saw a glimmer of light; I heard them turn the lanthorn, it was a dark lanthorn, and then I saw a man creep to the table and take something, but I could not see what; then he went out of the room, he had a round hat on, he never came in afterwards; I cannot swear to the person: I lost between two and three hundred pounds worth of thread lace; I lay till about three o'clock, and then went up stairs to Mr. Sims.

JAMES JONES sworn.

I am a watchman: on the night Mr. Sims's house as broke open, about a quarter before twelve I saw the two prisoners turn out of Whitegate-alley, I knew them before; they walked past me and went down Petticoat-lane; about a quarter after three I was going by Mr. Sims's, and saw the door ajar; I put my stick against it, and pushed it open; I saw three empty boxes in the shop; upon which I came out and rang the bell, and told Mr. Sims that his house was broke open; I put my hand against the cellar door, and found the lock was almost off; I went down and saw the partition broke: I have seen the prisoners together backwards and forwards; I never knew any thing of the kind of them before

MARY WRIGHT sworn.

I am a char-woman; my husband is a brass wire-drawer; I have known the prisoner five or six years: on the 17th of June in the morning after three o'clock, I saw the prisoners come out of Mr. Sims's shop, and pull the door to after them; they had bags upon their backs; Lynch went towards Spitalfields and Whitaker towards Bishopsgate; I was going to a public-house in Bishopsgate-street for a dram for my husband; Whitaker went into the house before me, and had a dram and came out before I was served; I had him in my eye all the way; I looked in his face, he had a round hat on and a brown coat; when I came back I saw Jones at Mr. Sims's door, and I saw the empty boxes in the shop; I told him what I saw, that one went towards Spitalfields, and the other towards Bishopsgate; when I saw them come out of the house, it was as light as it is now, save only the sun shining.

GEORGE FORRESTER sworn.

I belong to justice Sherwood; I was at the taking of the prisoner Whitaker at his lodgings in Arrow-alley; I know nothing of the taking of the other; Jones described him to me, and I went and took him; he had the key of the room and opened the door; I found only some chissels there, one of them fits the marks where the drawer was broke open at Mr. Sims's.

Mr. SIMS. I have compared one of the chissels with the impression on a drawer and the spice cupboard that were broke open, and it answers to a hair's breadth.

FORRESTER. They were taken at different public-houses; Lynch was shelling pease at the Virginia Planter ; as soon as Mary Wright saw him, she pitched upon him directly, and when we took her to Whitaker with Lynch, Lynch ran up to Whitaker, and

said,

"D - n your eyes, keep your own counsel, and nothing can affect you."

JONES. I heard one say, keep your own counsel, but which it was I cannot say.

WHITAKER's DEFENCE.

This man was not at the taking of me; one George Lee took me, and brought me to a public-house in Arrow-alley; I said as they had taken me, I supposed they wanted to search my lodging, and went with them to my lodging; they searched and found nothing; the tools produced are the tools I worked with.

LYNCH's DEFENCE.

I have witnesses to shew where I was that night; Wright came to me and said she was sorry she had sworn against me; that she thought it was one Wright or Ward, and said she would not take my life away, but she would take the other's, for the sake of the 20 l reward.

'Lynch called Moles Martin, Harris, and

' Levi Solomon , who all deposed, that on

'the night Sims's house was broke open, he

'was sitting up all night with Harris's husband,

'who was sick, and John Morgan ,

'clerk to Mr. Clement's, an attorney, who

'deposed that he was at Newgate; that he

'saw Mary Wright was there, and that he

'heard Wright say that she did not know

'the men that came out of Sims's house;

'that she thought they were dyer's men,

'carrying silk to be dyed; that she knew

'Lynch perfectly well, but it was not Lynch,

'it was one Buller, a plaisterer, who was

'the man that was dressed in brown cloaths.'

'Whitaker called Samuel Carpenter , who

'deposed, that Whitaker lodged in the same

'house with him; that in the night of the

'16th of June he was at home all night, and

'heard him and his wife quarrelling in the

'night; that they lay in the room over him;

'that he remembered the night, because when

'he was taken up his wife came crying,

'and asked if he remembered their quarreling

'on the Monday night; that he had

'known him some time, and gave him a good

'character.'

'He called one other witness, who gave him

'a good character.'

BOTH GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-47

454, 455. ROBERT MARKHAM and RICHARD COATS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Metcalfe on the 17th of May , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a wooden cag, value 1 s. two gallons of shrub, value 16 s. nine pounds of candles, value 5 s. five pounds of tobacco, value 5 s. two brass cocks, value 2 s. and a gimlet, value 2 d. the property of the said Henry in his dwelling-house .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

HENRY METCALFE sworn.

I keep a public house : a cellar which joins to my house was broke open on the 17th of May in the morning; I went to bed about eleven at night, and got up about five next morning, it was day-light; they broke the door that belongs to a skittle ground, and then got to the cellar door that was bolted; they broke a part of the boarding, just enough to get at the bolt; then they went to a lock-up cellar at the upper end of the cellar, and broke that door open; from thence they took two gallons of shrub and a parcel of candles; Coats was taken the next morning, and confessed he broke the cellar open at about two o'clock; there is a passage from the house to the wash-house, and from the wash-house to the cellar; they are all joined by a penthouse.

THOMAS HOLLIDAY sworn.

About nine in the morning on the 18th of May, I saw the two prisoners coming together; they seemed to be very much in liquor, which made me take notice of them; I saw some brass cocks in Markham's pocket; Coats pockets seemed very much loaded; I saw one Clarke and told him I thought they had been doing something wrong; they went into a house in Spitalfields; Markham ran up stairs; Clarke left me below with Coats while he

went after Markham and brought him down; Clarke took two brass cocks out of Markham's pocket; as we were coming along with them, Coats threw away one of the keys of the cocks out of his pocket; I took it up, I bid him not throw any thing else away, for I should see him.

[The two cocks, and the keys which belonged to a cock that was not stole, were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Francis Clarke , who was with the last witness, confirmed his testimony, and deposed that he found a large quantity of papers of tobacco in Coats's pocket, and a snuff-box full of tinder.

ROBERT LEWIN sworn.

The morning the prisoners were taken, Coats confessed that he broke the prosecutor's house open, but did not tell me at what time: that confession was made at Metcalfe's house; Metcalfe was by at the time he said they had hid a barrel of shrub in a field at Fryer's mount; we went with him, and found it there.

[The barrel of shrub was produced in Court.]

THOMAS MANWARING sworn.

Upon the 17th of May, Clark and Holliday brought the prisoners to me, and gave me charge of them; they made their escape from me, but were taken again; then Coats told me they had broke open the dyer's cellar, and had taken a quantity of tobacco, some candles, and a small eag, which they had hid at Fryer's mount; we went to Markham's room and found half a dozen or eight pounds of candles; then we went to look where they broke in; Coats was with us; in the cellar I found a tinder-box and flint (producing them); Coats shewed me where they broke in.

FRANCIS RYDER sworn.

I retook Coats in a stable-yard: I pulled him from under a manger, and found some gimlets, papers of tobacco, and other things in his pockets.

[They were produced in Court, and a gimlet was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

COATS's DEFENCE.

I had been out drinking in the evening till it was late; then I went and laid at Markham's; I got up in the morning and took a walk, and I found these things in a matted basket.

MARKHAM's DEFENCE.

When we were taken before the justice I told them we found the things, and being willing to let the owner have the property, we told where it was.

BOTH GUILTY of stealing the goods; but NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-48

456. MARY GRANT was indicted for stealing a half, crown piece, the property of Bernard Isaac privily and secretly from his person , May 26th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

Reference Number: t17770702-49

457. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 5 l. the property of John Robinson in his dwelling-house , April 22d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-50

458. MARY BICKERSTAFF was indicted for stealing three guineas, the property of Joseph Starling in the dwelling-house of the said Joseph , June 30th .

JOSEPH STARLING sworn.

I am a stationer in Whitechapel : on Sunday afternoon the 20th of May I put eleven guineas in my bureau; I had occasion to go to the bureau on Monday evening, and then I missed two; I told my wife of it, and

suspecting it must be some of my servants, and that they would come again, I directed my wife to mark eleven guineas and put them in; they remained there till the Sunday following, I saw them in the afternoon; we went out, and when I returned in the evening there were three missing; I called all my servants into the dining-room, and told them I had lost three guineas and was certain one in the room must have it; they all denied it; I sent for a constable and made the prisoner shew her money; she emptied one pocket, there was a great deal of silver, but no gold; she was more cautious in emptying her other pocket; there was nothing in that pocket, but she dropped something out of her hand, which I thought by the found was a guinea; I took it up, it was one of the marked ones; she seemed to want to conceal something in her hand, I laid hold of it and found the other two guineas in it.

ELIZABETH STARLING sworn.

I am the wife of Joseph Starling : I marked eleven guineas and delivered them to my husband, and he put them into the bureau; the mark was a cross with an iron bodkin at the mouth on the head side of the guinea.

CHARLES BUNYAN sworn.

I lodge in Mr. Starling's house; I saw him put the eleven guineas in a bag, and put it in the bureau, after Mrs. Starling had marked them; I came home with him on the Sunday evening; we went to the bureau and missed three guineas; he called the servants into the dining-room and sent for a constable, and when the prisoner had emptied her pockets, she dropt a guinea, and her hand was searched and the other two found in it.

JOHN TANN sworn.

I was sent for to the prosecutor's house to search his servants; he had lost three guineas, they were found upon the prisoner.

[The three guineas were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Jury to the Prosecutor. Was the bureau locked? - Yes, I found it locked when we came home; she was entrusted with her mistress's keys, I suspect she opened it with one of them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The three guineas were my own property; I have been servant there four or five years, I never was under any suspicion in my life.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-51

459. ABRAHAM DANSON was indicted for stealing three guineas, the property of Charles Harrimont , in the dwelling-house of John Hughes , June 30th .

CHARLES HARRIMONT sworn.

On the 30th of June I took a lodging at the Bull and Gate in Holborn ; I asked the waiter for the key of the bed room; he said there was never a one, but I was safe without; I went to bed and was awaked by a man in the room; I had three guineas in one pocket and some silver in the other; I put my breeches under my head when I went to bed, when I awaked the candle was burning in the room; I saw the waiter going out; I got up and ran to the door, but could not get it open; I then rang the bell, upon which a man called out, and said, that if I made such a noise he would come and cut my throat; I put my cloaths on, got the door open, and went down, and said I had been robbed of three guineas; he bid me go to bed and be quiet or he would turn me out of the house; upon which I went to the watch-house and told the watchmen my case, and the beadle of the parish of St. Giles's came down with me to the house; the beadle spoke to the waiter, what he said I cannot tell; he went again to the watch-house, and the beadle and some of the watchmen went and fetched the waiter to the watch-house, and we proceeded to the justice.

Cross Examination.

What are you? - I am a taylor .

What time did you come to this house? - Between ten and eleven at night.

What time did you go to bed? - Not

long after; as soon as I had drank a pint of wine.

Was you alone? - Yes.

You are sure you had no woman in your company? - I had not.

Had you any watch in your pocket? - Yes.

Did this waiter bring you the wine? - Yes.

Did he light you to bed? - Yes.

Did you put the candle out? - No, I left it burning, being a little apprehensive; having no key, I left it burning.

JOHN COLEMAN sworn.

The prosecutor came to the watch-house, and the beadle went down with him; he came back again and insisted on the constable going to apprehend the man; I went and apprehended him, and brought him to the round house.

Did you search him? - No.

What did the prosecutor charge him with? - Taking three guineas out of his pocket.

WILLIAM BARRY sworn.

I went to assist the officer to take the man up; wh en we came to the door the prisoner opened the door, and the prosecutor said, that was the man that robbed him, and we took him to the watch-house, and found a guinea and some silver and half-pence in his pocket.

SOLOMON BRANFORD sworn.

I am the beadle of the parish: the prosecutor came to me about two in the morning, and said he had been robbed of three guineas; I went with him to the house, the prisoner opened the door; he said that was the man that had robbed him; I went back and got the constable and took him.

FOR THE PRISONER.

MARY SIMPSON sworn.

I am servant at the Bull and Gate.

Do you remember Harrimont coming to your house? - Yes, that is the man (pointing to the prosecutor).

Did he bring any body with him? - Yes, he brought a lady with him he said was his wife.

Were they shewn into a room? - Yes.

Who shewed them into the room? - Me.

What did he call for? - A pint of wine; he asked for a bed for him and his wife; I lit him to bed.

Was the waiter at home at that time? - No, he was at home with his wife.

The waiter generally gets up about twelve at night and comes to his duty? - Yes.

Was he come at this time? - No.

Did the taylor's wife elope from him in the night? - Yes.

Did he ring the bell and say he was robbed? - No, he thumped on the floor; I went up, and he said he was robbed.

Had the waiter been at home then? - No, he was just coming then.

JOHN HUGHES sworn.

I am the master of the Bull and Gate: I was at the bar window when Harrimont came in; I called the servant to shew him a room, and she shewed him one; he paid me for his wine and bed an hour before the waiter came home.

Did he come alone? - He brought a woman with him; I saw the woman and he go up together into the room.

At that time the man at the bar was not at your house? - No, he was at home and a bed with his wife; we have night coaches, we call him up as we want him; we did not send for him that night till more than half past ten.

NOT GUILTY .

The prosecutor was committed by the Court for wilful and corrupt perjury.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-52

460, 461. ROBERT CLOD and EDWARD CLOD were indicted, the first for stealing two pounds weight of tobacco, value 3 s. and one pound weight of candles, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Lucy , and the other for receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute , &c. May 17th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-53

462. THOMAS CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing two pair of linen shift sleeves, value 4 d. a cotton gown, value 1 s. a linen gown, value 1 s. a black mode silk cloak, value 1 s. one lawn apron, value 6 d. three linen cloth aprons, value 1 s. one linen shirt, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 3 d. and two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 d. the property of John Clark , May 28th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-54

463. ROBERT HAYNES was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 3 d. two-boys hats, value 6 d. four cloth coats, value 40 s. four cloth waistcoats, value 20 s. three pair of cloth breeches, value 10 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 1 s. seven linen shirts, value 7 s. six pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. and two pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. the property of William Hardwick , June 18th .

WILLIAM HARDWICK sworn.

I am a dealer in coals : I sent a man with a box of wearing apparel to Highgate for my child, who is at school there; the box contained all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) the prisoner was taken and some of the things upon him.

THOMAS CHALKLEY sworn.

I received the box of Mr. Hardwick to carry to Highgate; I had it in a coal carts, I stopped at Holloway to have a pint of beer, when I returned to the cart it was gone; as I was going back to look for the box I saw the prisoner coming under a hedge with a bundle in his hand; I jumped over the hedge and laid hold him by the collar, and asked him what he had done with the box he took out of my cart? he said he took no box, I said I was sure he had, because he had got the things: he said he had only his own things.

[The things were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

CHALKLEY. I had a chaldron of coals; the box was on the coals under the cords; I saw it at Holloway.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked up the box in the road at Holloway near Highgate-hill.

JURY to CHALKLEY. Was there a probability of the box falling out? - No.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-55

464. DANIEL REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing a wicker basket, value 6 d. eighteen wooden bobbins, value 6 d. and three pounds eight ounces of silk shoot, value 6 l. 10 s. the property of John Dadford , June 30th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-56

465, 466, 467, 468, 469. JOHN COX , THOMAS HORNER , THOMAS BRADY otherwise BREARY , ELIZABETH PEGRIM , and LAZARUS JACOBS were indicted, the three first for stealing a buff-coloured silk gown and coat, value 5 s. a muslin shawl, value 10 s. a remnant of grey clouded silk, value 2 s. a white Marcella quilted bed gown, value 2 s. a white linen jacket trimmed, value 1 s. two towels, value 6 d. three lace hoods, value 20 s. a wainscot box and iron lock, value 2 s. 6 d. a gold watch, value 7 l. a steel chain, value 2 l. one cornelian seal set in gold, value 1 l. one yellow cornelian seal set in gold, value 1 l. one egg trinket, value 1 s. one brilliant cluster ring with a hair mocoa, value 6 l. a gold basket with a brilliant knot, value 6 l. a rose diamond cluster ring, value 3 l. a brilliant ring set round with rubies, value 4 l. a garnet cluster ring with hair platted, value 10 s. a plain gold ring with light hair, value 5 s. a ring set with amethysts, roses, and garnets, value 3 l. a pair of paste ear-rings, value 10 s. a pair of single drop coque de pearl ear-rings set with marquisates, value 1 l. three pair of paste shoe buckles, value 3 l. four five guinea pieces, a piece of

foreign gold coin, value 2 l. eighty-eight pieces of silver of this realm, value 3 l. a silver box, value 5 s. a silk purse containing thirty pieces of old copper coin, value 5 s. a pair of ostrich eggs mounted for cups in silver gilt, value 3 l. one ostrich egg with a cover, silver gilt, value 2 l. a miniature picture set in gold for a bracelet, value 20 s. a miniature picture set in metal gilt, value 5 s. a miniature picture, value 2 s. 6 d. a miniature picture of a lady, unset, value 2 s. 6 d. a mourning chain ring, value 5 s. a pearl breast buckle, value 5 s. a pair of garnet, ear-rings and drops, value 10 s. a hair portmanteau travelling trunk with an iron lock, value 2 s. one striped and flowered sattin sacque and coat, value 5 l. one crimson sattin sacque and coat, value 40 s. one silk Polonese trimmed with orange coloured silk, value 40 s. one white flowered silk sacque and coat trimmed with blond lace, value 5 l. a black and white clouded silk sacque and coat trimmed with black lace, value 5 l. one black silk sacque and coat, value 6 l. one orange coloured silk Polonese, value 5 l. a striped ash coloured silk gown, value 40 s. one Irish stuff gown, value 20 s. one striped callico flowered sacque and coat, value 40 s. a printed muslin gown and petticoat, value 20 s. one decker work gown and coat trimmed with lace edging, value 5 l. a printed muslin short sacque and coat, value 20 s. one Gingham linen gown, value 5 s. one chintz jacket and petticoat, value 15 s. one blue and white striped sattin gown and coat, value 5 s. one buff-coloured cotton gown, value 18 s. a white flowered muslin gown trimmed with lace, value 10 s. an Irish stuff checque short sacque and coat, value 20 s. one red and white flowered linen gown, value 5 s. a white linen gown yellow stamped flowers, value 2 s. one green and scarlet striped and flowered silk gown in pieces, value 20 s. a grey silk night gown, value 5 s. two black silk sacque petticoats, and two breadths of black silk, value 10 s. one black bombazeen sacque and coat, value 20 s. one pink sattin petticoat fringed, value 10 s. one white sattin petticoat, value 10 s. one dimity fringed coat for a hoop, value 5 s. one fringed Marcella callico coat, value 10 s. one pink silk fly coat, value 5 s. two linen petticoats, value 10 s. two white cotton petticoats, value 5 s. a black laced lappet and handkerchief, value 20 s. a black cloak laced with net lace, value 3 l. a pink sattin cloak trimmed with squirrel skin, value 10 s. a black mode cloak lined with white silk, value 5 s. one black sattin cloak, value 5 s. a black ceresa trimmed with lace, value 5 s. a pair of treble net ruffles with Brussels lace, value 20 l. one pair of treble net ruffles trimmed with Mechlin-lace, value 5 l. one pair of treble net ruffles trimmed with net lace, value 4 l. a pair of double muslin ruffles trimmed with Brussels lace, value 2 l. a pair of double muslin ruffles trimmed with English, value 1 l. one pair of double muslin ruffles trimmed with Valencienne lace; value 10 s. one pair of double muslin ruffles trimmed with Valencienne lace, value 10 s. three pair of worked muslin ruffles, value 10 s. two sets of childbed linen trimmed with Brussels lace, value 40 s. two pair of Brussels lace men's ruffles, value 3 l. one pair of fringed net ruffles, value 5 l. six pair of silk stockings, value 30 s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. one pair of pink sattin shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. one silver tissue masquerade jacket and petticoat flounced, value 10 s. ten linen shirts, value 5 l. six linen shifts, value 3 l. three flowered and one spotted muslin aprons, value 20 s. three mourning aprons, value 10 s. three mourning handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two pair of mourning ruffles, value 5 s. one lady's rideing shirt, value 5 s. one Marcella jacket trimmed with lawn, value 2 s. one dimity jacket, value 2 s. one Marcella bed gown, value 2 s. three flowered cotton window curtains lined with linen, value 3 l. six cotton covers for chairs and two for stools, value 5 s. three pair of sheets, value 3 l. three cotton counterpanes, value 40 s. one callico quilt with yellow silk, value 20 s. one dimity cradle quilt, value 5 s. three pillow cases worked with coloured worsted, value 2 s. one remnant of red and yellow silk handkerchiefs, value 20 s. ten red and white pullicat handkerchiefs, value 20 s. one remnant of spotted muslin, value 5 s. one remnant of plain muslin, value 5 s. eleven damask napkins, value 20 s. twelve damask napkins, running pattern, value 20 s. a reading glass mounted in tortoishel and silver, value 5 s. one pair of spectacles, value 2 s. a spectacle case, value 1 d. a pair of steel scissars inlaid with gold, value 5 s. one scissar sheath, value 1 d. a pair of stays, value 2 s. a pair of Marcella quilted stays and stomacher, value 1 s. four remnants of green baize, value 4 s. one lace hood, value 5 s. four pink and white silk handkerchiefs, value 10 s. three muslin worked handkerchiefs, value 2 s. one pair of men's worked ruffles, value 2 s. one pair of men's mourning ruffles, value 2 s. one yard of lawn, value 2 s. one marcella quilted stomacher, value 6 d. three pair of white leather gloves, value 1 s. four rows of French beads, value 6 d. three-quarters of a yard of black silk, value 2 s. and two pair of mourning buckles, value 6 d. the property of Mary Wadham , spinster , in her dwelling-house , May 21st ; the other two for feloniously receiving parcels of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

SUSANNAH HARRISON sworn.

I live with Mrs. Wadham, who has a house in Berner's-street, Oxford-road ; I left the house about five o'clock on Friday the 16th of May, at which time we went out of town: I am sure I fastened all the doors, and double-locked the street-door.

JOHN LAMBERT sworn.

On Wednesday the 21st of May, I came to town (being in expectation of a parcel) I brought the key with me; when I came to the door I found it only fastened with the spring-lock; I imputed it at first to the carelessness of the servant, and thought she had not locked it when she came away; I then went into the house, and I opened a back-door, and I saw the door at the bottom of the stairs was open; I went into the kitchen, the furniture, the pewter, and things of that sort, I perceived were all as they might have been left, though the drawers in the kitchen had been taken out, and the wine-cellar lock was forced open; I went up stairs; I observed the back room there had been attempted to be forced open, but they had not completed that, for though I saw marks of a chissel, and an attempt upon it, they had not carried that into execution; in the fore-room, all the drawers were pulled out, and the things were about the room; there were some curtains left in a chair, and some few little bits of riband; every room was stripped that they had been in.

Mrs. MARY WADHAM sworn.

There were things taken away I think to the value of one thousand pounds; there were four five guinea-pieces, diamond rings and other things; there were nine shirts, six pair of white silk stockings, some gowns, and things of that sort.

JAMES HENDERSON sworn.

I am a constable; on the 22d of May, at ten o'clock in the morning, that was the Thursday in the Whitson-week, one Isaac Callender brought a woman to me, who had offered some things that he suspected were stolen, for there had been advertisements relative to this robbery; I examined the goods I found on the woman, and they answered the advertisements; as soon as they had charged the woman, I said, tell me where you had these things? she readily said, I had them of Hannah Josephs , who lives at No 7, in Petticoat-lane, and she readily went with me there; I made use of this caution, I kept back to prevent a suspicion, but when she was gone into Joseph's house I immediately followed; when I got into the house I had with me Isaac Callender , Joseph Nathan , and one Chivers; Lazarus Jacobs was there at that time; the woman immediately pointed to Lazarus Jacobs as the man that sold them, and said, how could you serve me so? for you told me when I bought them, that they were goods that you brought with you from France: he denied immediately the selling her any thing; then I desired Mrs. Aarons to go with me to another house in Petticoat-lane, that was a mantua-maker's, and where some of the goods were; I enquired of the woman, if she had any thing from this person; she said, yes; (pointing to the room) she said there are the things, take what you think proper; she was ready to shew me all over the house; I found a cotton gown and some Irish linen, which were to be made into gowns, according to a pattern gown.

' Isaac Callender and John Chivers deposed,

'that those things were found at Mary

'Aarons.'

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix, that they were left in the house when she went into the country.]

MARY AARONS sworn.

I deal in old cloaths; I bought these things of Josephs; there were six gowns, twenty-one yards of chintz, and twenty-one yards of Irish linen, that was to line the chintz: I bought them together; when I delivered these things in they were not in the state of curtains, for they were separated; I go about the street to sell things; the money I was to give for them was 7 l. 12 s.

HANNAH JOSEPHS sworn.

I buy old cloaths of pawnbrokers and sell them again; I sold these goods to Aarons; I bought them them of Lazarus Jacobs; Jane Asher was present at the time; the chintz were made up when they came to me, as far as to have the linings to them; he said he had brought them from France; he had been there two years, his family and his son are there now; I gave seven guineas for them, and when I had bought them (as Mrs. Aarons sometimes buys things and lets me have them at a small profit) I told Mrs. Aarons she should have those if she would give me 5 s. for the purchase, she agreed to that, so she was to have them at 7 l. 12 s.; it was on Wednesday the 21st, because I had a duplicate of other things that I had pawned to raise money in order to pay this debt, that duplicate bears date the 21st of May.

JANE ASHER sworn.

I deal in linens and muslins; I was not present when the goods were bought, but I was there when she paid Jacobs for them, and it was to be seven guineas; they were chintz curtains and gowns, and the lining was in the curtains at that time; I cannot tell whether they were completely made up or no, for they lay folded upon the bed, and I did not examine them; I don't believe I staid there three minutes (looks at the things) but I am certain these are the things.

GEORGE STURTON sworn.

I belong to Sir John Fielding ; I took all the three prisoners; these stockings (producing a pair) I took off Brady's legs; I seized him at the King's-arms, Bishopsgate-street.

Mrs. WADHAM. There are two pair of these stockings; there were six pair in the whole, four pair were foreign stockings; they were washed once, and but once; and laying them by (rolling them up) I was then matching them, and intended as well as I could to pair them, and did observe that in one pair I had laid out, the upper part of the stocking was of a different sort of silk, but that different sort of silk was not continued so far in one stocking as the other; these stockings have the same appearance; they are also marked B. 3. and the cloaks are the same as those I lost.

RICHARD MARDELL sworn.

Upon the 23d of May, I was sent from Sir John Fielding 's to wait at the place where they were taken, the King's-arms in Bishopsgate-street; after I had taken the three men as I was directed, I went to the lodgings of Brady; I found a pair of boots there, which I took away; those boots were sent for afterwards by the prisoner Brady; I returned them, but insisted upon having a receipt, for he was in custody w hen he claimed the boots:

[The prisoner's receipt for the boots was produced in court and authenticated.]

I found a shirt in that room stuffed in behind the bed.

MOSES DURANT sworn.

I went with Mardell; I took the shirt now produced from his back, the other shirt was found concealed behind the bed.

ELIZABETH PRICE sworn.

I made this shirt with others for Mrs. Wadham; they are made in a particular manner, with buttons and button-holes in the bosom, and I know the work.

- JACKSON sworn.

I live with Messrs. Jenkins and Blake, who are linen-drapers; I recommended Mrs. Price to Mrs. Wadham to make the shirts.

RICHARD BLANDY sworn.

I am a constable of St. Martin's; I took many of the things that have been produced from the prisoner Pegrim, in Hedge-lane; she was in a coach; Mr. Mattison, who is a neighbour, desired me to watch the coach as he suspected something wrong.

[A great quantity of the goods mentioned in the indictment, which were taken from Pegrim in the Coach, were produced and deposed to by Mrs. Wadham.]

'The evidence of - Jackson was corroborated

'by the evidence of John Mattison .'

BRADY's DEFENCE.

It is not my lodgings where the shirt and the other things were found; Mrs. Pegrim washes and mends for me; the things that were found in her room were sent to be washed, I happened also to leave my boots there; I had a lodging in St. Martin's-street, Leicesterfields, at one Mr. Crop's, a taylor; I am a carver and guilder.

COX's DEFENCE.

I can prove where I had that shirt; I know nothing at all of these.

JACOBS's DEFENCE.

That woman swears to clear herself; Mrs. Josephs offered Mrs. Aarons half a guinea to swear that she saw her buy the goods of me.

'BRADY called Mary Crop , who said she

'kept a house in St. Martin's, Leicester-fields;

'she said she had known Brady two

'years, that he lodged in her house three

'months. He likewise called four other witnesses,

'who gave him a good character.'

'JACOBS called Levi Moses , who said he

'heard Josephs offer Aarons half a guinea to

'swear that she saw her [Josephs] buy the

'goods of Lazarus Jacobs: he likewise called

' Robert Thorowgood , Jacob Hyam , and

' Josiah Moses , who all said they had known

'him many years, and they gave him a good

'character.'

PEGRIM's DEFENCE.

Mrs. Cox saw me pay for some things; I bought them of a Jew.

MARY COX (again)

'Deposed that she

'saw Pegrim buy a sattin petticoat (like that

'produced in court) of a Jew.'

There being no evidence to affect Horner he was not put on his defence.

COX GUILTY . Death .

HORNER ACQUITTED .

BRADY GUILTY . Death .

PEGRIM GUILTY .

JACOBS GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Pegrim:Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Jacobs:Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-57

470. JANE DUNN was indicted for stealing two woollen cloaks, value 10 s. one cotton gown, value 12 s. a cheque linen apron, value 1 s. and one woman's black silk hat trimmed with black silk lace, value 1 s. the property of Henry Johnson , May 30th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-58

471. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing one silver watch, value 20 s. the property of John Popham , June 10th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-59

472. WILLIAM MANSER was indicted for stealing a metal watch, value 20 s. a silver etwee case, value 2 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. and two silver tea spoons, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Whitford , May 26th .

SAMUEL WHITFORD sworn.

I am an optician on Ludgate-hill ; on the 26th of May soon after six in the morning, I was called up and told my bureau was broke open, and my papers and things thrown about in the kitchen, and that the tops of the castors and some other things were gone; I got up and found the bureau broke open, and several things were gone; I saw them in the bureau the preceding day to the best of my knowledge; the lock was forced, and all the things mentioned in the indictment were gone; the prisoner was stopped offering them to sale; he lived with his uncle, a pastry-cook, next door to me: he had a shirt of mine on when he was taken.

LEVI MOSES sworn.

On the 26th of May, between twelve and one, the prisoner and another man came to my house, the other man said the prisoner had a watch to sell; I desired to look at it; he produced a watch and the movement of another, and bid me give him what I thought they were worth; I asked him where he got them? he told me he belonged to a ship lying off the Tower; I insisted on his giving a better account of himself; he offered to leave the watches and bring somebody to his character; I told him that would not do; he must tell

me somebody he belonged to, and I would go with him; then he said he had an uncle on Ludgate-hill; that his mother died and left him the watches; I took him before the sitting aldermen, and there was Mr. Payne, and as Mr. Payne and I were taking him to his uncle's on Ludgate-hill, I heard something jingle, and we took the spoons and other things out of his side pocket.

[They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

' William Payne confirmed the evidence of

'the last witness.'

'Sampson Levi deposed to his being present

'at the finding of the things on the

'prisoner.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found these things in a handkerchief, in a passage near the house.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-60

473. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing a flag basket, value 6 d. and thirteen pounds of bees-wax, value 13 s. the property of William Rowlet and John Rowlet , July 2 d.

JOHN ROWLET sworn.

I am in partnership with William Rowlet ; the prisoner was our servant ; as I was returning from Change, I met the prisoner on Fish-street-hill: I observed he had something concealed in his apron, it struck me, it was something he ought not to have; I asked him where he was going; he said to the Bull in Bishopsgate-street; I looked into his apron and found it contained bees-wax; he said it belonged to a cobler in the neighbourhood; I was not satisfied; I brought him back, and sent for a constable, the constable took him to the Compter; he came back with the constable, and confessed he took it out of a sack in the shop, the confession was quite voluntary; I examined the wax, there was one cake broke, he had taken only part of it, the other part left in the sack fitted exactly with the piece the prisoner had, the same as a cheque.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

' William Brown the constable, and Samuel

'Sawyer, a servant to Mr. Rowlet, confirmed

'Mr. Rowlet's testimony.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to sell it for my master.

Prosecutor. I don't sell any retail; I never gave him authority to sell for me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-61

474. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing a printed cotton gown, value 18 s. the property of Elizabeth Edwards , widow , June 8th .

ELIZABETH EDWARDS sworn.

I had a gown to wash; it was taken out of my room; I did not miss it till the owner of it, seeing the prisoner coming out of the house, cried out

"Stop thief."

ANN HURFORD sworn.

The last witness had a gown to wash for me; I saw the prisoner take it off the line and come out of the house with it; I called out,

"Stop thief," and she was taken with the gown upon her.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

'Two other witnesses deposed to the taking

'the prisoner with gown upon her.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The gown is my own; I bought it at Canterbury.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-62

475, 476. SUSANNAH NEALE and JAMES HAYWOOD were indicted, the first for stealing four pieces of woollen cloth for a sailor's jacket, value 7 s. the property of William Bracewell , June 5th , and the other for receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute .

WILLIAM BRACEWELL sworn.

I am a taylor ; I lost a piece of cloth, I

cannot tell whether out of my new lodging or my old; I found it hanging at Mrs. Hayward's Fleet-lane; the woman was taken and was with me; as soon as I detected him he took the cloth and run up an alley; I went after him, he knocked me down and got off with the cloth; he was taken afterwards.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn.

I took Neale, and charged her with stealing the cloth; she confessed she took it, and said said she did it through want; she said she would shew me where she sold it; she took me to Fleet-lane, and when she came opposite Hayward's, she clapped her hands together and said,

"There it is;" it was hanging up; she said she sold it to him; we told Mr. Payne, and he got a warrant and took him.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I was informed by the two last witnesses that Hayward had bought some stolen goods, that they attempted to take him, but he was rescued from them; I went and took him to the Compter, and the next day before the sitting aldermen, and then the cloth was produced; he said he bought it for old rags.

JAMES JARVIS sworn.

The prisoner Neale brought a piece of cloth for a blue cloth jacket, and offered me to sale; I refused to buy it; it was cut out in this manner.

THOMAS CAIN sworn.

I saw the prisoner Hayward coming up a court with some cloth in his hand, the prosecutor was following him; he assaulted the prosecutor and beat him, and conveyed cloth to another man.

ELIZABETH BRACEWELL sworn.

Susannah Neale took the cloth away; there was nobody in my apartment but her (looks at the cloth) I don't believe this is the cloth.

The prisoners in their defence said they knew nothing of the cloth.

They called several witnesses, who gave them a good character.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-63

477. SIMON CANTER was indicted for stealing three metal outside watch-cases, value 6 s. three metal watch-boxes, value 3 s. two metal outside watch-cases covered with shagreen, value 5 s. and two brass watch-cocks, value 6 d. the property of William Smith , December 25th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17770702-64

478, 479. ANN SILK and EDWARD CLARKE were indicted, the first for stealing a watch-case made of gold, value 12 l. June 14th ; the other for receiving the same, well-knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17770702-65

480 JOHN BULL was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Earle , June 18th .

THOMAS EARLE sworn.

On the 18th of June, opposite Batson's coffee-house , I missed my handkerchief, and challenged the prisoner with having stolen it; upon searching him I found it upon him.

- COTTON sworn.

I saw the prosecutor take the handkerchief from the prisoner.

[The handkerchief was produced by Joseph Gates , and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I should be glad to go to sea; I am fifteen years old.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-66

481. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing three pewter pint pots, value 10 d. the property of John Ware , June 19th .

JOHN WARE sworn.

I keep a public-house , the Cock in Love-lane, Billingsgate ; I lost two pint pots; I found them upon the prisoner at Mr. Bates's the King's-head, Billingsgate.

- BATES sworn.

I detected the prisoner with the pots.

[ They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found them in the street.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17770702-67

482. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing six scrubbing brushes, value 3 s. the property of Robert Truelove , June 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-68

483. JOHN otherwise WILLIAM SHERROCK was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 14 s. the property of Charles Lewis , June 23d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-69

484, 485. SAMUEL WOODHAM and THOMAS AMBROSE were indicted for stealing a pair of silver salts, value 20 s. a silver table spoon, value 5 s. a silver pepper-castor, value 10 s. five silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. and a silver milk-pot, value 10 s. the property of John Simmons in his dwelling-house , May 19th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-70

486, 487, 488. MARY GRIFFITHS , WILLIAM SULLARD , and THOMAS TAYLOR were indicted for stealing sixteen guineas and sixty-three shillings in monies numbered, the property of Francis Lorrell privily from his person , July 1st .

FRANCIS LORRELL sworn.

I am servant to my mother, who is a farmer; on Tuesday last I received for her sixteen guineas in gold, and three guineas in silver; the silver was in my left hand pocket, the gold in my right, all loose; I came to the Two Blue Posts at about eight o'clock; I met with the coachman, and we drank a pint or two of beer each; the coachman went in the inside, and another man drove; when we came to the coach he let me in first, then a woman, then he came in himself; the man drove on for Hampstead, but stopped at the half-way-house, where the coachman got out, and went and got some liquor, we drank it amongst us; I did not go out; the other man drove on for Hampstead: I being in liquor fell asleep, when I awoke I found myself drove down a yard of Mr. Davis's at Hampstead; I heard somebody call at the door, I jumped out, and asked for the woman and the coachman that were inside; the man said he knew nothing of her, nor where she was gone; in about a minute, I put my hand in my pocket and said,

"I am robb'd, I am robb'd!" I asked the man if he knew the woman that was in the coach; he said he knew her, this was the man that drove me; he said he would go and find her if he could; we drove down the town, and back again; I saw two men standing at the door, I told them I had been robbed, they said they would go with me and seek after the woman and coachman; we searched the coaches and stables that were open, but we could not find either of them; then the man brought us to London to the houses where the prisoner used; we came to a public-house in Tottenham Court-road; somebody mentioning the misfortune that had happened to me the night before, a watchman who heard it said, he saw the woman come to town early in the morning with a man, arm in arm; he said he knew her well, and would soon find her.

CHARLES BOYDEN sworn.

I was at the Rose and Crown, Tottenham Court-road on the 2 d of June; the prosecutor came in and complained he had been robbed; Mr. Taylor came in with him; Lorrell described the woman to Taylor and me, and the watchman; by the description we knew her, she was a neighbour's child; we went

in search of her and the coachman; I went into many two-penny lodging-houses in St. Giles's, but could hear nothing of her; I came back again to Mr. Porter's, the Rose and Crown: Mr. Lorrell and Taylor were there; they said the coachman was at the Blue Posts, the corner of Hanover-yard; I went there and they gave me charge of him; I took him to the watch-house and confined him there; then we went in pursuit of the woman; we went different ways, and one of the watchmen took her and brought her to me; I took her to the Queen's Head in Charlotte-street and examined her closely about it; she desired to speak with me in another room; we went into another room; then she pulled out of her pocket twelve guineas and a half and sixteen shillings; we sent for the coachman over from the watch-house, and he acknowledged he received a guinea of the girl; she confessed that she had given him a guinea out of the money that she had taken out of Mr. Lorrell's pocket.

Did she say what she had done? - She declared she had taken the money out of Mr. Lorrell's pocket while he was asleep in the coach, and that she gave the coachman a guinea; the coachman, Sullard, acknowledged the same, and offered to put the money down again, which he did; but to the best of my remembrance I did not receive his money; he had changed the guinea; he paid half a guinea and the rest in silver at the office in Litchfield-street to me.

' Joseph Kirkman confirmed the evidence

'of the last witness.'

Griffiths said nothing in her defence.

SULLARD's DEFENCE.

I came from Holborn with the coach to Tottenham Court-road; I was a good deal in liquor; I asked this gentleman if he was going to Hampstead, he said, Yes; we drank two or three pints together, and I being very much in liquor, Taylor offered to drive; we stopped at the half-way house and had some more liquor; when we came to Hampstead and drove into the yard; being so very drunk, I forgot the gentleman was in the coach; the woman declared I was innocent of the robbery.

BOYDEN. She said she gave him a guinea, but he was innocent of the robbery.

Prisoner. I went to see if I could get in at my master's yard, I could not; she asked me to see her safe to town, and she would give me a guinea; she gave it me on the road; I did not ask her how she came by it; I never saw the prosecutor from the time I got out of the coach, till I was taken, which was the next morning.

He called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

MARY GRIFFITHS GUILTY of stealing, but not privily from the person .

THE OTHER TWO NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-71

489. WILLIAM IVES was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 2 s. two muslin aprons, value 6 d. a cotton bed-gown, value 4 d. and a quilted petticoat, value 1 d. the property of Ann Lawrence , spinster .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-72

490. JOHN STEWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Williams on the 11th of June , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing one hundred and fifty yards of mantua silk, value 6 l. one hundred and sixty-five yards of sattin, value 40 l. one hundred yards of silk mode, value 40 l. two hundred yards of silk riband, value 3 l. twenty-eight scarlet cloth cloaks, value 14 l. a black silk cloak, value 12 l. sixty yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. two hundred yards of silk lace, value 10 l. and a piece of Manchester cotton, value 18 s. the property of the said Thomas in his dwelling-house .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-73

491. JOHN GORSDEN was indicted for stealing a horse of a black roan colour, value 4 l. the property of Henry Rosewell , February 18th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-74

492. CATHERINE CONNER was indicted for stealing eight pounds weight of pork, value 2 s. the property of John Slater , June 7th .

JOHN SLATER sworn.

I keep a pork-shop in St. Paul's, Shadwell: the prisoner came to my house to buy something; when she went out I missed a piece of pork; I afterwards found it at Samuel Whiffin's, a publican.

SAMUEL WHIFFIN sworn.

The prisoner came to my house with that pork.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had it of a hay-maker that I had money to buy some victuals for.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-75

493. ANN GUY was indicted for stealing a pair of woman's stays, value 20 s. a cloth apron, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 6 d. and a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Jane Smith , Spinster , June 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17770702-76

494. SARAH THOMAS was indicted for the wilful murder of Randal Perry , by striking and thrusting with a certain knife of the value of 2 d. the said Randal in and upon the left side of his belly near his navel, thereby giving him one mortal wound of the length of one inch, and of the depth of three inches, of which he languished from the 27th; to the 29th of June, and then died .

She stood charged with the like murder on the coroner's inquisition.

PATRICK HOY sworn.

I am a chairman: the deceased, Randal Perry, was chairman to Lady Harriot Ongley: on the 27th of June he asked me to assist him to carry Lady Ongley to Lady Sidney's in Dean-street; he desired me to be in Park-lane by half after four; after we had carried my Lady, we returned to her house in Park-lane, and John Fenn with us; I fetched some porter, and the deceased brought up some meat and bread; when I returned with the porter I found the prisoner there.

She ate and drank with you, did not she? - Yes.

Did she and the deceased seem to be in friendship together at that time? - Yes; as far as I could understand, there were no words between them then as I heard.

Whereabouts did the deceased fit? - We were in the hall; the prisoner sat in the pop ter's chair, and the deceased on the edge of a table opposite to her; the two footmen, John Fenn and Richard Pearce , who went with that chair, were drinking with us; one of the footmen, Pearce, staid behind at the place we carried my Lady to, and came in just as d had done eating and drinking; the footman had and I went out and stood on the steps of the hall-door towards the street; when we had been out a little while we heard the prisoner speak loud; Richard Pearce went in and told them not to make a noise, that if she would make a noise, she should go somewhere else, for she should not make a noise there; he came out again, and then every thing was silent for a few minutes I believe.

Could you as you stood on the steps look into the hall without altering your situation? - No, I could not; soon after the prisoner: came out and called one of us by name, I cannot say which, Pearce went in and, we followed him; the deceased then sat on the table with his back against the wall, and

both his hands on his belley; Richard Pearce asked him what was the matter; he made no answer for a little time, but took his hands off and shewed him the wound; I perceived the wound; his waistcoat was cut; I did not perceive his shirt at that, I saw it afterwards.

Was there any body in the hall when you came in but Perry and the prisoner? - No; Pearce turned about when he saw the cut, and said, you blasted bitch, you have stabbed the man; she said, God forgive you, as far as I could understand, I don't know what she meant by it; she said, I have done it, I have done it, if I go to the gallows for it: she said she would die by the gallows sooner than that other woman should enjoy him; the deceased raised himself up in a little time after; Richard Pearce wanted to fetch a surgeon to him; he would not let him fetch one; he told him he thought he was not much damaged nor much hurt.

Which did he say? - I cannot be positive which, it was one or the other; he walked to a surgeon's in Piccadilly, he was not at home; then he went to St. George's hospital; he bled very much; the prisoner followed us all the way; she appeared to be concerned, she cried very much.

Did she make use of any expressions during the time she followed you? - I cannot recollect what she expressed.

To your knowledge was there any person besides the deceased and the prisoner in the when the wound was given? - No, not to my knowledge.

Did you find the instrument the wound was made with before you went to the hospital? - No.

Cross Examination.

Was you in company all the time the deceased and the prisoner were together? - No.

Did you or not hear several altercations between them? - No, I heard nothing of what passed between them.

Did you hear him abuse her or she abuse him relative to this woman? - No, they seemed to be quiet enough as far as I understood.

What passed between them previous to her doing of it, were there any words or riot? - I did not take notice of any; she spoke a little kind once, I cannot tell what it was about; I just on the outside of the door.

COURT. You heard the prisoner speak loud? - Yes.

Did you hear the deceased speak loud? - No.

When you came in I think she went on her knees, and said she would not go away from him? - Yes, she laid hold of the strap and would not go from him.

Did she go on her knees? - I believe she did, I cannot be positive.

RICHARD PEARCE sworn.

I am footman to Lady Ongley.

I believe you, Hoy, the deceased, and Fenn were all drinking together in Lady Ongley's hall? - I came in just at the end; I saw none of them eat or drink; there were some victuals on the table.

Who were in company? - Patrick Hoy , myself, John Fenn , the prisoner, and the deceased. The prisoner and the deceased seemed to be in good friendship; I went down stairs, and then Hoy and Fenn and I went and stood on the steps at the door.

Was there any body else in company any part of the time? - No, the valet de chambre came in to deliver a message, but did not stay. When we were on the steps the prisoner spoke something loud; but I could not comprehend what it was; I went into the hall, and desired her to be quiet; that, if she could not be quiet, she must go somewhere else to make a noise; she was then rather raised from her seat towards the deceased; she immediately sat down; the deceased sat on the table, she was in the porter's chair; the deceased's left side was rather to her.

When you went in to check her, did you see any instrument in her hand? - I did not see any at that time.

Were there any knives and forks? - There was a green-handled knife, which is here; when I went in and checked her, the deceased said to the prisoner, why don't you go? the prisoner said, will you come? upon which he answered, why don't you go? this passed while I was there; then I went out again: in about four or five minutes the prisoner came out and called somebody, I cannot say who it was.

Did you hear any noise after you had been in, till the time she came to call you? - Not the least.

Was you near enough, if he had given her

a blow, to have heard it? - I think I was; I was not three yards from the door. I went in first; they followed me in. I saw the deceased sitting in the position he was before, leaning against the wall, with both his hands on his betty; I asked him, what was the matter? he made no answer, but seemed to be in agony; he fetched two deep sight; he raised his hand higher on his belly, I then saw the cut in his waistcoat; I turned to the prisoner and said, you blasted bitch, you have stabbed the man; she answered, God forgive you; and immediately said, I have done it, I have done it; if I go to the gallows for it, I have done it; I will die by the gallows for him sooner than that other woman shall enjoy him. I looked for the knife, but could see only a green-handled fork; I had seen a knife there before; the deceased raised himself up a little, and said, take that woman away from me. I put my hand on her shoulder to force her away; she dropped on her knees and laid hold of his strap, and said, I will not leave him, or I will never leave him, I cannot be positive which of the words she used. I asked the deceased, if I should send for a surgeon; he answered, no; he then opened his upper waistcoat, and I saw some marks of blood on an under flannel-waistcoat faced with blue sattin; he unbuttoned that waistcoat, and I saw a large quantity of blood on his shirt. I requested him again to let me send for a surgeon, but he answered, no; don't make a noise, don't be frighted, I am not much hurt. He walked out into the street, the prisoner followed; she appeared to be troubled, and cried: I followed him about twenty yards; then I was called back by John Fenn or Patrick Hoy , I cannot say which: they desired me to mind the door, and they followed the deceased. John Fenn is my lady's footman, I am my master's. When I came back I searched after the knife; there was nobody then in the hall; I found the knife on the hall-table, just behind where the deceased sat, rather to his right side: it was bloody; the blood appeared to be very fresh upon it; it had not been wiped.

How came you not to see it before the deceased went out? - I believe the flap of his coat bid it from my sight.

Was the fork on the table too? - Yes; the knife and fork belonged to the steward's room.

[The knife was produced in Court.]

Did the cut appear to be made with a round or sharp pointed knife? - I cannot say; it was a slanting cut.

What was the prisoner? - Sometimes she sold nosegays and sometimes oysters, I believe.

Was there a connection between the prisoner and the deceased? - The deceased told me, he had a connection with her, but had left off.

He was not a married man, was he? - Not that I know of.

He never had a child by her, had he? - I recollect her lying-in, and heard him say, he had a child by her.

Do you know of his having any new connection? - I heard him say, since the child died, he never would have any more connection with her.

Did you know how long the child has been dead? - I cannot say with any degree of certainty.

Do you know of his keeping company with any woman at this time? - I have heard him say, that since he left this woman he went to see another, and that this woman was very jealous of him, and he could never have any peace wherever he was, she was always haunting him about.

Do you think this was the effect of her jealousy? - I do think it was such; for I have heard her threaten the deceased.

How long before this happened? - I think the space of two or three months; it was at the house of Martin Currin , in St. James's street, she said, she would be revenged of the deceased; that she would stab him to the heart, if she died at the gallows for it.

You did not say that before the coroner? - He did not ask me; I answered no questions but what I was asked.

Did she seem to be sober then? - Yes, she came in and called for a pint of beer; she knew me, and I knew her.

Did you hear her make use of any threats at any other time? - No.

' John Fenn confirmed the evidence of the

'last witness.'

To PEARCE. Was the prisoner a virtuous woman before the deceased debauched her? - I did not know her before.

To FENN and HOY. Do you know any thing of the connection between the prisoner and the deceased?

BOTH. No.

Mr. JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a surgeon at St. George's hospital: the deceased was brought to the hospital on Friday night; he was delivered to my cure; one of the apothecary's people saw him first; I saw Pearce in the ward afterwards; he came to enquire about him.

PEARCE. I went to see him; he was under that gentleman's care.

GRIFFITHS. I saw the deceased about seven or eight at night; he had a wound above the navel, it appeared to be made by a round pointed instrument; it was on the left side of the navel, about three inches deep; it passed obliquely downwards, I cannot say how broad, because a wound contracts, it was about an inch in length; I thought it mortal, as all wounds penetrating the cavity of the abdomen are generally mortal.

Did any other surgeons attend? - Yes.

Did the deceased appear to be a porter? - Yes, he had straps about him.

Did he answer to any name? - Yes, that of Randal Perry.

That was the man Pearce came to see? - Yes; the omentum or caul was obtruded about a handful; it was returned into the abdomen; which is frequently fatal.

How soon did you despair of his life? - On Sunday morning; he died on Sunday night; every thing was done for him that was proper.

Did he die of the wound? - I am certain of it; he said a woman gave him a stab with great force back handed; he said he had two children by her, and she was jealous.

Did he say there was any provocation given at the time? - No, that was all he said.

Cross Examination.

Was he in liquor when he was brought to the hospital? - He appeared to be so, but that appearance might be occasioned by the omentum obtruding the nerves, which is frequently the case.

Did you hear him say whether he had given her any provocation that day? - He said no, he had given her none; I asked particularly whether he had given her any provocation that day; he said he had given her none; that was the same night he came in.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The deceased used me very ill for a long time; when the man was gone out for the porter, there was nobody there but him and me; he gave me a kick on the hip; when the three men were on the steps, after Pearce had been in to tell me not to make a noise, he gave me a blow on the temples with his fist; I had a knife and bladebone of mutton in my hand, which I was picking; I threw the bone and knife out of my hand and said, D - n him, I would never eat with him any more; I did it without any intention to hurt him: there are the marks of his blows now.

'The surgeon examined her hip and temple,

'and said there was a confusion on her

'hip; that by its appearance the blow might

'have been given her that night; that it

'appeared to be a kick, and that there did

'appear to be a mark on her temple.'

FOR THE PRISONER.

CHARLOTTE HANWELL sworn.

I have known the prisoner nine years; I knew her before her connection with the deceased; we were servants together; she was always a very quiet decent woman.

FRANCIS DOWLEY sworn.

I have known the prisoner eight or nine years: I knew her before her connection with the deceased; I know him to have had connection with her several times off and on; she got her bread as well as she could in the street.

Was she a quarrelsome woman, apt to strike people? - Yes; she has struck myself.

ALICE FINCH sworn.

I have known the prisoner ten years: she kept a fruit-shop before she cohabited with the deceased; I never knew any thing bad of her; he greatly distressed her, and kicked and beat her several times when she was with child; he was very barbarous to her and drove her to such distress that she almost wanted necessaries; the child that was born was almost always black from the bruises

she had from him; he left her and took to another woman.

COURT. Did you look upon her to be a virtuous woman before he cohabited with her? - I cannot say, I never heard to the contrary; I went into the room once when he was beating her.

DOWLEY. I have seen the deceased beat her; he threw her down in the street, and she said, if she had a knife she would kill him.

FINCH. I believe she loved him too well; I believe she had no such thought; I believe if ever woman loved man, she loved him.

NOT GUILTY of murder, but GUILTY of manslaughter only . B . and Imp. three Months .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17770702-77

495. SAMUEL RILEY was indicted for stealing a livery cloth surtout coat, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Samuel , June 24th .

JOSEPH SAMUEL sworn.

On the 24th of June I was driving a cart; I bought an old livery surtout coat, and put it on the copse of the cart; I went from the cart about two minutes, upon my return the coat was gone.

JOHN CARPENTER sworn.

I am apprentice to a pawnbroker; the cart stopped opposite our shop; I saw the prisoner take the coat off the copse and run away; I followed and overtook him, and he said he belonged to the cart; he was taken about an hour after; I am certain to his person.

PHILIP CROCKFIELD sworn.

The coat was pawned with me by another person.

[The coat was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had the coat, but did not take it off the cart.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17770702-78

496. THOMAS COOK otherwise GRIFFITHS was indicted for making his escape from the river Thames, where he had been sentenced to hard labour for three years , April 15th .

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I know the prisoner; he was prosecuted and convicted for stealing things out of a waggon at Shepherd's-Bush; I took him at large the 21st of May at St. Giles's.

WILLIAM FRAZIER sworn.

I belong to the lighter under Mr. Campbell: the prisoner was delivered into our custody; one or two and twenty of them were sent up to Greenwich from Woolwich where the ship now lies; in coming down ten of them made their escape from the lighter a little above Woolwich .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing at all to say.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: s17770702-1

The trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment, as follows:

Received sentence of death, 13.

Sarah Chaulk , James Stride , Samuel Rudd , William Miles , William Buxton , Thomas Hamilton , David Guess , John Cox , Thomas Brady , Thomas Nash , William Harsent , Edward Lynch , and John Whitaker .

Whipped, 5.

Catherine Rubery , Susannah Cole , John Bull , Mary Johnson , and Catherine Conner .

Navigation for three years, 10.

Michael Carney , George Stanley , John Cook , William Cato , Joseph Green, Charles Marshall , Nathaniel Harvey , William Grace , Edward Gamage , and Robert Haynes .

Navigation for four years, 4.

James Hayward , Robert Markham , Richard Coats , and Lazarus Jacobs.

Navigation for six years, 1.

Thomas Cook otherwise Griffith

Branded, 1.

William Manser .

Branded and imprisoned six months, 8.

Joseph Geoffroy , Mary Smith , Susannah Neal , Mary Seretton, Elizabeth alias Mary Walker , Eleanor Blake , Elizabeth Jones, and Elizabeth West.

Branded and imprisoned three months, 1.

Eleanor Dignam .

Branded and imprisoned for one year, 1.

Mary Bickerstaff .

Imprisoned three years, 4.

Margaret Fenny , Elizabeth Pegrim , Mary Griffiths , and Samuel Riley .

Reference Number: a17770702-1

*** Trials at law, and arguments of counsel, taken in short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY ( writer of these proceedings) of Southampton Buildings, Chancery-lane.

Of whom may be had,

BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING made easy to the meanest capacity.


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