Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th September 1774.
Reference Number: 17740907
Reference Number: f17740907-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol-Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Wednesday the 7th, Thursday the 8th, Friday the 9th, Saturday the 10th, Monday the 12th, and Tuesday the 13th of SEPTEMBER, 1774.

In the Fourteenth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign. Being the Seventh SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honourable Frederick Bull , LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

Taken down in SHORT-HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY .

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for J. WILLIAMS, No. 39, in Fleet Street.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery, held for the City of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable FREDERICK BULL , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable Sir HENRY GOULD , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas *; the Honourable GEORGE PERROTT , Esq; one of the Barons of his Majesty Court of Exchequer +; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM HENRY ASHHURST, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench ||; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder ++; THOMAS NUGENT , Esq; Common Serjeant ~; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

The *, +, ||, ++, and ~, refer to the Judges by whom the Prisoners were tried.

(L.) London Jury.

(M.) First Middlesex Jury.

(2d M.) Second Middlesex Jury.

London Jury.

Thomas Lawrence

Thomas Nicholson

John Barnes

Richard Walker

Patrick Andrews

Robert Purvis

James Lamb

John Nicholls

William Aldrad

Edward Barnard

Benjamin Pawley

William Beake

Thomas West served part of the time in the stead of John Barnes , and John Archer in the stead of Benjamin Pawley .

First Middlesex Jury.

Henry Russell

John Jackson

James Fisher

John Boyton

James Williams

William Ovens

John Edmondson

Thomas Lee

George Martin

John Turner

Joseph Watson

Peter Ruffsage

John Keightly and John Whitaker served part of the time in the stead of James Fisher and Joseph Watson , James Wilchin in the stead of James Williams , George Ayres in the stead of John Jackson , and James Showell in the stead of Henry Russell .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Showell

Thomas Vardy

William King

William Dickins

William Nicols

John Stone

James Box

John Stevens

James Lacey

Joseph Seager

Philip Tipper

James Ivory

Reference Number: t17740907-1

551, 552. (M.) WILLIAM NORBURY and JOHN VINER were indicted, the first for stealing two engraved plates of copper, value 30 s. and thirty-nine engraved plates of pewter, value 8 l. 10 s. the property of Thomas Harper , in the dwelling house of the said Thomas ; and the other for receiving the said plates well knowing them to have been stolen , May 27th . +

Thomas Harper . I am a copper-plate musick printer ; I live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane ; on Friday the 26th or 27th of May I lost thirty-nine musick plates and two copper-plates belonging to this work (producing a book of musick). I have the two copper-plates here; one cost three guineas the other one guinea engraving; they were found by the intelligence of Graves; Viner had been apprentice to me; I know nothing more of it but what I heard from the evidence.

John Graves . I have known the prisoner two years; I was brought up to a glasier; I followed my business till within these two months; in Whitsun holidays the prisoners and I were playing at skittles at the Cheshire Cheese in Parker's-lane, and were talking of the robbery of one Check a carpenter in Drury-lane, for which a man had been hanged; I said I should like to read the sessions paper about it; Viner said if we would go to his master he would lend it us for nothing.

Q. Who did he mean by his master?

Graves. Mr. Harper; we all three went to this man's house for it; Viner and I staid at the top of Brownlow-street, and Norbury went in to borrow the paper; he staid about five minutes and then he brought out something in his apron very heavy; I did not know what it was at that time; he bid me lay hold of it; I did and took it across Drury-lane down King-street and through the Two Sugar Loaves a publick house, into Parker's-lane to my own lodgings; Norbury went with me; Viner left us when he saw Norbury come out of his master's house; he said he would have nothing to do with it, and ran away directly; when I came to my lodgings I opened them and found they were musical plates; there were forty-one or forty-two of them, and there were these two copper-plates on the top; I took notice of them and know them again by the figures; Norbury and I staid in my room all day and melted down the pewter plates, and then we took the pewter to one Edward Parker 's room and asked him to sell them for us; there Viner met us; Parker said he would, and took them to several shops, but could not get rid of them; I took them to my lodgings that night; we went to Parker's in the morning, and he said he would get a woman to sell them for us; we went with her to St. Andrew's steps; she took one parcel and sold it, and then came and took the other parcel; there was about seventy pound weight of it; she sold it for half a guinea; I gave Norbury half a crown; he gave the woman a shilling and I gave her sixpence; Parker cheated us out of a good deal of the money, so I would not give him any thing; Viner came the next day to my lodgings and I paid him half a crown, which was a debt I owed him, but not on account of the pewter; Norbury had the two copper plates in his room in Long acre; he came to me and said he was going from his room and wanted to get rid of these things; he asked me to go with him to throw them in a pond; I did not chuse it; he went up into Parker's room and got him to go with him; he left him and went about two fields from him and hid them; afterwards Norbury was taken up for a highway robbery, and he got these plates out of the ground himself; Parker was taken for a highway robbery, and was an evidence against me for bringing some things to him, but the things not being produced I was discharged.

Dennis Macdonald . I am a constable; I had Norbury in custody for something else; Parker was an evidence in the Borough; he mentioned these plates; I asked Norbury about them and he told me where they were; I went and found them according to his direction.

Norbury's Defence.

I know nothing of the robbery; I went with the evidence into the field and he gave me the slip, and went away from me; I afterwards found these things in the field; I know nothing at all of it.

NORBURY guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s. T .

VINER acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-2

553. (M.) SUSANNA BRISTOW , otherwise BURY , was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 1 d. and fifty-three guineas, a half guinea, two thirty-six shilling pieces and four pounds five shillings in money, numbered, the property of Jane Still , in the dwelling house of Elias Barber , January the 12th . *

Acquitted .

SUSANNA BRISTOW otherwise BURY was indicted for stealing a silk gown, value 8 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of James Thompson , January 9th . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-3

554, 555. (M.) ELIZABETH the wife of Samuel PRICE and JOHN EDWARDS were indicted for stealing a silver watch, a pocket book, value 4 d. a French crown, value 4 s. eighteen shillings in money, numbered, a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. and a pair of silver knee buckles, value 5 s. the property of John Webb , May 4th . +

John Webb . I was coming down Holborn in my way home on the 11th of May last, I think it was a Wednesday; a woman met me and said sir, where are you going? I said my dear I am going home; said she, you had better go home with me; I said no, I objected to it, but I consented at last to go to some tavert with her; from thence she persuaded me to go home with her; we went to bed, and by and by the prisoner Price came up stairs; she called her sister and asked who she had got with her; the other said a gentleman; the prisoner said then I shall be deprived of my bed; I said no my girl you shall not, I will get up and go somewhere else; I offered to get up; she said no if I would give her something to drink she would sit up; I gave her a shilling; she brought some shrub, I drank some of it; I saw her sit in the chair before I went to sleep; when I waked I missed my watch, a French crown piece, about eighteen shillings in silver, my shoe and knee buckles, and a pocket book which contained notes to the amount of between four and five hundred pounds; and I lost a ticket of an annuity for eight pound a year for my life; I have since discovered that they destroyed them going to Gravesend; when I waked there was no one in the room; I stopped till the watchman came round at half past three o'clock I believe.

Q. Was your bedfellow gone too?

Webb. Yes; I called the watchman, and he called the woman up that rents the house and she lent me a shilling; I went into Gray's-inn-lane and sent for a gentleman to lend me ten guineas, and then I went and gave information at Sir John Fielding 's; there is nothing to be produced but my watch.

Henry Wilde . I am servant to Mr. Harrington a pawnbroker the corner of Benjamin-street; I took in this watch (producing it) of a man on the 13th of May last.

Q. What man?

Wilde. I do not remember the man again.

Prosecutor. Did not the prisoner himself tell you that he did pawn the watch?

Wilde. No.

Q. Look at him?

Wilde. I do not know the man.

Q. Upon your oath?

Wilde. I do not know that I remember taking the watch of him; I have seen the man since he has been in custody, not before.

Q. I suppose it is a part of your business not to know the thieves that come to pawn things with you, it would spoil your trade if you knew them again?

Wilde. It is no interest in the world to me not to swear to the man.

Court. But it helps the trade very much, exceedingly so.

Wilde. No person is to foreswear himself; it was a youngish man.

Q. Do you believe that to be the man or not?

Wilde. It was a young man somewhat like him.

Q. In what part does he resemble the man?

Wilde. He does not resemble him in dress; the man I had the watch of was dressed well.

Q. to the prosecutor. Is that your watch?

Webb. I believe I can swear positively to this watch; the watch-maker is here I bought it of.

Q. Do you or not swear to it?

Webb. I swear this is my property.

Mary Poldon . I was out of lodgings; Mary Price asked me to be with her till I could get one; that was about a month before this affair happened; I went there; I staid with her till this affair was over, then I went down to Chatham with her.

Q. Do you remember this affair happening?

Poldon. Yes.

Q. Was you in the house?

Poldon. I happened to be out that night; this gentleman was a-bed when I came home.

Q. What room was he a-bed in?

Poldon. A one pair of stairs room that this woman used to lie in; John Edwards and Thomas Edwards are two brothers; Elizabeth

Price lived with the other brother, and the other girl with the prisoner, Edwards; John Edwards and Martha Edwards lay on the other side of the court, but they came up that night; they were there when I came home; the gentleman was a-bed, and they were consulting to rob him when I came in; John Edwards was there when I came home.

Q. And Martha Edwards ?

Polden. Yes; Martha Edwards was the woman that was a-bed with the prosecutor; Price and she agreed to rob him; I desired they would not rob him, but they would. I saw the watch, the money, the two pair of silver buckles, and the pocket book after they came down stairs: they were all in the room together.

Q. Is that the watch?

Polden. I cannot say.

Q. Did you see that gentleman in bed?

Polden. Yes.

Q. Are you sure it was that person?

Polden. I am sure it was that same person?

Q. Did you go up with them?

Polden. I was in the room when they all came up stairs; I was with Elizabeth Price ; the others were down stairs; they came up afterwards; when I found they would be obstinate and rob the gentleman, I went down stairs; after they had robbed him, they persuaded me to go down to Chatham with them.

Q. What was their business to go there?

Polden. No further business than to be out of the way; they went directly down to Dark-house-lane; we staid at Chatham one night; then we came up to London; they left me at Darkhouse-lane, and I never saw them after till they were taken. John Edwards , the prisoner, sat at the top of the Gravesend boat, and tore the notes and threw them into the Thames.

Q. from Price. Did you see me rob the gentleman?

Polden. No, I did not.

Q. Was she in the room when the gentleman was robbed?

Polden. Yes.

Q. from Price. Did you see the goods upon me?

Polden. John Edwards had them.

Edwards. I am certain I never took any of the property; she said before Sir John Fielding she was out at the door, and saw me take the property through the key hole.

Court. Did you say that?

Polden. No, I did not see him; I was down stairs.

Edward Russell . I took the last witness first in Clerkenwell; she mentioned to another person that she went off with the prisoners and things down to Chatham; she said she was concerned in the robbery; upon that I took her to Sir John Fielding 's.

Q. Did you hear her say she was concerned in the robbery?

Russell. She said she was in the house when the robbery was done; she was taken before the Justice, and admitted an evidence. I took John Edwards afterwards at the end of Field-lane; the witness told me he was one that was concerned in it.

Q. Did you find any thing upon either of them?

Russell. No; both the prisoners owned to the fact.

Price's Defence.

That gentleman brought Martha Edwards home to bed; they went together; he gave me a shilling to fetch some liquor. I saw nothing of the property. Edwards asked me to go down with him to Chatham for some fishing rods.

Edwards's Defence.

I know nothing at all about it.

Russell. When I took John Edwards he made his escape; I took him three different times; he owned he was the person that pawned the watch; he said the young man did not dispute taking it of him, because he knew him and was a neighbour to his father.

Prosecutor. The father of this woman as he called himself offered me a hundred pounds to make it up.

Russell. The father lives but about seven or eight doors from the pawnbroker's.

Court to Wilde. Do you know John Edwards , the father?

Wilde. Not before this happened.

Q. He lives but seven doors from you?

Wilde. I have lived there but half a year.

Court. I have seen you here upon some occasion before.

Wilde. I did not live in that part of the town; I never saw him to my knowledge in my life before.

Russell. The pawnbroker said he had taken

several good things of him, and made no dispute of taking it in of him.

Prosecutor. I heard him say I did not think at first that you are the man; he said, yes, I am the man; said he, why you are not so well cloathed as you was before, I think you look very thin.

Russell. The pawnbroker at the Rotation office said he was the man that pawned the watch.

Edwards. Russell came up to my father and said if you will give me one, meaning one guinea, he would clear me; here is a person in Court will answer to the sum; he came three or four times; at last when he found my father would give him nothing, he said if you would give me fifty guineas I would not take it, but he would do his endeavour to hang me if it was possible.

Court to Wilde. This man, according to the evidence, said he had pawned several good things to you before?

Wilde. I never took any of him, it was before I came to the shop then.

For the Prisoner.

Mary Godfrey . I am a widow; I am housekeeper to Mr. Edwards, the prisoner's father; he is a lamp-lighter and tin man; I have seen Price twice or thrice; that is all the knowledge I have of her; I have heard she is a very honest young woman: I have heard several say so.

Mary Newton .

Q. What business are you?

Newton. None at all.

Q. Are you a housekeeper?

Newton. No, I work to get my bread.

Q. How do you work?

Newton. I wait upon a gentleman.

Q. Are you in service?

Newton. It is like a service.

Q. Do you wait sometimes upon one gentleman and sometimes upon another?

Newton. No; I wait upon a gentleman: I know Elizabeth Price ; I know her father very well; his name is Andrew Jones ; I don't know a great deal of her; I can say but little of her character, but this man offered to save the girl if they would but pay them.

Q. Which man?

Newton. Russell.

Q. What was you to give?

Newton. A guinea.

Q. A guinea!

Newton. I was to give them something; I did not understand their phrase.

George Downes . I have known Edwards about five years; he has bore a very honest character as far as ever I knew.

Q. Was you often with him?

Downes. No great matters, no otherwise than I used the house where the father uses.

Q. Then you know the father better than him?

Downes. He is a very honest man; the prisoner lodged at my house within these eight months: I live on Saffron-hill.

Q. How long did he lodge in your house?

Downes. About three months; it might he more.

Court. Did you hear of this robbery?

Downes. I never heard a word of it till this morning: he behaved honest and kept good hours in my house.

Jonathan Faulkner . I keep a publick house in Clerkenwell: the prisoner, Edwards, used to light the lamp at my door by his father's order, and always behaved honest and well. I make shoes; I have entrusted him with work. He was apprentice with one Mr. Welch, in Cornhill; I let him have work to do several times; I never saw any thing but that he was a well behaved man.

Nicholas Phillips . I am a master shoemaker; I live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell-green; I have known John Edwards a twelve-months; he has worked for me; he always brought his work home according to his time; I never knew any bad character of him; I have left him in my shop; I never found any thing deficient.

Q. to Wilde. What name was the watch pawned in?

Wilde. In the name of John Edwards .

Court. Why did not you mention that before, Sir?

Edwards. There were two Edwards of us; the other might pawn it as well as me; he is gone abroad; he is the person I believe that is more guilty than I am.

Both guilty . T .

Henry Wilde received a very severs reprimand from the Court for the impropriety of his conduct.

Reference Number: t17740907-4

556. (L.) MARK OLDBURY (a black) was indicted for stealing two hams, weighing 23 lb. value 10 s. and 49 lb. of bacon, value 18 s. the property of John Fox and Isaac Ismay , July 20th .

- Griffiths. I am servant to Mr. Fox and Mr. Ismay, who keep the Provision Warehouse in Salisbury Court . On the 20th of July, in the morning, about seven o'clock, I went to the warehouse; I found the door locked as usual; when I got in I found the writing desk chipped and cut as with a chissel or knife, and I missed twenty-five or twenty-six shillings that were left there the night before. I was amazed at first how any body could get into the warehouse, but recollected there was a hole in the floor where hay had used to be put down into a hay wrick for a horse: the buildings had been formerly in the possession of the prisoner's master; I had seen him the day before about the place, and suspected from his knowing the house it must be him that had got in; Snell and I met with him next morning; we laid hold of him, and charged him with the robbery, and he owned he took a side of bacon, two hams, the money out of the drawer of the desk and a great coat; he said he gave the bacon and hams to one Luke Leicester ; that he carried them to him to Wych-street, Drury-lane, and that Leicester carried part of it to his lodging at Hampstead.

Robert Snell . I am servant to Mr. Fox; I was at the warehouse with the last witness; he said he suspected the prisoner; I was at the taking the prisoner next morning on Black-Friars-bridge; he and another person were together in one of the arches; we took them to a publick house; there the prisoner confessed he took the side of bacon and the two hams, and carried them to a public house in Wych-street; I found thirty-six pounds and a half of bacon at one White's at a publick house in Wych-street; the constable found one of the hams at the One Bell in the Strand. I found the other ham and twelve pounds and a half of bacon in one Hopwood's yard at Hampstead; the prisoner confessed he gave both to Leicester, and I went to see after them by the direction of my master. Leicester is indicted for receiving them in Middlesex; (the hams produced); there is no particular mark by which I know them to be my master's.

Matthew Busby . I am a constable: I was present when the bacon was found at the publick house in Wych-street; Luke Leicester was there; when we had taken the bacon, he hesitated a little, and then said there was a ham at his lodgings, at the One Bell in the Strand; I went with him and fetched it.

John White . On the 20th of July, about a quarter after eleven o'clock, the prisoner brought some bacon to my house to sell: I keep the King of Prussia in Wych-street; my servants came backwards to me, and asked if I would suffer a flitch of bacon to be left in my house; I refused, but on the prisoner's coming to me, and mentioning Leicester's name, who is a coachman that uses my house, I agreed to let it be left; he said the coachman was to call for it the next day; the coachman and the prisoner came together; they cut the bacon in two and had some eggs dressed with some of it; they took part of it away with them, and the rest remained in my house.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never took any thing out of the gentleman's house.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-5

557. (L.) WILLIAM POLLETT was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of William Sandall , August 13th . ~

William Sandall . On Saturday the 13th of August, about eleven in the morning, going through Newgate , I felt a sudden tug at my right hand coat pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner with his hands under a smock frock; I pursued him into the place where they are rebuilding Newgate; I secured him and charged him with picking my pocket; he denied it; two or three gentlemen came up and advised me to take him to a constable; as I was taking him to a constable he threw the handkerchief down a cellar by St. Sepulchre's church.

John Johnson deposed that he saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief down the cellar.

William Hall. I saw the prosecutor have the prisoner by the collar; I saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief down the brushmaker's cellar; I told the gentlewoman and she brought it up.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-6

558. (L.) WILLIAM KENNATY was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Payne , August 16th . ||

John Payne . On Tuesday the 16th of August about one o'clock I stopped at the corner of Fenchurch-street while some carts passed; I felt something at my right hand pocket; I looked over my shoulder and saw the prisoner with my pocket handkerchief in his hand; I laid hold of him and charged him with it, he denied it; I took him before my Lord Mayor. (The handkerchief produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

- Griffin deposed, that he was with Mr. Payne, saw him seize the prisoner and take the handkerchief upon him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-7

559. (L.) JOHN GUN was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Stafford Greenway , August 1st . ~

Stafford Greenway. On the first of August about eleven in the forenoon as I was going up Holborn-hill, a person clapped me upon the shoulder and told me I had lost my handkerchief, and pointed to the prisoner who then was running; I immediately missed my handkerchief; I pursued the boy and cried stop thief! several other people ran after him; I saw a gentleman stop him in Hatton Garden; I saw the prisoner make a motion with his hand, but I did not see him throw any thing out of his hand, being some distance from him; afterwards the handkerchief was handed up to me out of an area in Hatton Garden. (The handkerchief produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Alexander Scott . I was standing by St. Andrew's church; I saw the prisoner pick the prosecutor's pocket; I ran after him and cried stop thief; I was very near him till he was stopped; I saw him throw the handkerchief down an area in Hatton Garden, next door to Mr. Taylor's, the oculist; there being no one in the house, a person went over the rails and got the handkerchief, which he delivered to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was standing by the church; I saw a mob run; I ran to see what was the matter and was falsely charged with being the person that stole the handkerchief.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-8

560, 561, 562. (2d M.) SUSANNAH BAILISS , otherwise BOWDEN , SARAH KING , otherwise WILLIAMS , and BRYAN SMITH were indicted, the two first for stealing a silk purse, value 4 d. five guineas and a half guinea, the property of William Nelson , privately from his person ; and the other for receiving, harbouring, and maintaining them, knowing them to have committed the said felony , July 26th .

William Nelson . On the 26th of July, about two o'clock in the morning, on the other side Temple Bar I saw fourteen or sixteen girls of the town on a fish stall; Bailiss and King came up to me and desired me to give them a glass of wine; I told them it was too late for wine or any thing else, and desired they would let me go about my business; they told me they had had but a glass of gin each of them for the night and were almost ready to faint, and again entreated me to give them a glass of wine, and they would carry me to a reputable house; I went with them to the Ship and Dolphin tavern, which has been since christened the King's Head tavern; one of the girls knocked at the door; the waiter opened it, and we were shewn into a room on the left hand; I called for a pint of red port, the waiter brought it and went out of the room immediately; they used some indecencies which I resisted; then Bailiss clapped her hand on my thigh and said here is money; they were feeling about my waistcoat and breeches; upon that I took my purse, containing the money, out of my breeches pocket and put it in my side coat pocket; they then drew their chairs nearer to me and clapped their hands round me, and Bailiss got the purse out of my pocket; as she drew it out I heard the money chink, and saw her give it to the other girl; I wrenched myself from them and said this is the most barefaced robbery I ever saw, and called the waiter and told him I had been robbed, and desired him to call his master; the waiter said it was a house of reputation and that he would not call his master for any such fellow as I was; I said I was robbed of five guineas and a half, and desired him again to call his master or the watchman, or somebody; he said d - n you, you scoundrel, you do not look as if you was worth five guineas and a half in the world, and he would not go to call his master; the girls then said if I made a noise they would murder me; upon which the girls made up to the waiter and seemed to give him the money, but I did not actually see them give him the money;

as soon as they had so done he called them whoring bitches and said he would get a constable; he went out and I saw no more of him till he came in with the constable; then one of the girls asked me where my purse was, I said in my side pocket; she said where, I said here, shewing her my pocket; she said it is not there now; I said no, and pulled out some books, and said on the table for her to feel; she put her hand in, as my hand was in my pocket, and put the empty purse into my hand; I said if she would give me the contents I would make her a present of the purse; when the constable came the girls were searched, but no money was found upon them.

Q. from Bailiss. Did not you say when we went into the house that you had no money, and that if you called for any more than a pint of wine you should have nothing left to give the waiter, and when the constable came in you believed you said the waiter was an honest fellow, and you would reward him next day; but the constable said he was a blackguard and it was necessary to take him to the watch-house?

Nelson. It is totally false.

Q. from King. Did not you say if I would give you my company, you had no more money now, but would give me half a guinea if I called at the Union coffee house next day?

Nelson. No.

Q. from Smith: Did not I fetch a constable when you told me you had been robbed?

Nelson. No, not at first.

Court. Does the same man keep that house now?

Nelson. Yes.

- Swift. I am a constable; I was sent for to the Ship and Dolphin on the 26th of July, about half after two in the morning; the watchman called me; the prosecutor said he had been robbed by the girls of five guineas and a half; I believe Smith let me in; I searched the girls but found nothing upon them; I asked if any body else had been in the room; he said nobody but the waiter; I said I dare say if the waiter has been in the room the money is not now in the room; I stripped the girls to their shifts and searched the chairs and round the room, but could not find the money; I rung for the waiter and searched him, but I found nothing but some silver on him.

Bailiss's Defence.

I was standing by Temple Bar; the prosecutor came and took King by the hand and said he would give her a glass of wine, and bid her bring me with her; we went to the Ship and Dolphin; he said he would only call for a pint of wine, because he had no more money; that if he called for a bottle he should have nothing to give the waiter; when we had drank the wine he called the waiter and said he was robbed of five guineas, and bid him call the watch; I never saw any more money than what paid for the wine.

King's Defence.

He said he had no money, but if I would give him my company, if I came to the Union coffee house next day, he would give me half a guinea.

Smith's Defence.

This gentleman came in between two and three in the morning with the women, and called for a pint of wine; in about five minutes he called me and said he was robbed of five guineas; I went out and brought in three watchmen; he said before the watchmen I was an honest fellow, and he would reward me next day.

Smith called two women who gave him a good character.

BAILISS and KING guilty of stealing, but not privately from the person . T .

SMITH acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-9

563. (2d M.) THOMAS HYANSON was indicted for stealing six yards of Irish linen cloth, value 6 s. four yards of dimity, value 4 s. and a yard and a half of muslin, value 2 s. the property of William Mackey , July 26th . ||

William Mackey . I live in Crown-court, Soho; the prisoner was my servant ; my porter and he quarreled, and from some things that dropped I suspected the prisoner had robbed me; I charged him with it, and told him if he would confess what he had taken, I would forgive him, but he would not confess to any thing; then I discharged him; I went to the master he lived with before; he came to me and he directed me to a young woman he kept company with, who produced a dimity petticoat, and about six yards of Irish cloth, with my mark upon it, upon which I took him up.

Q. from the prisoner. If I did not tell you before that I wanted a piece of dimity?

Markey. He asked me if I had a remnant of quilting, that he could get a customer for it.

Sarah Carrington . The prisoner brought me four yards of dimity and two yards and a half of muslin; the dimity was to make me a coat; he told me he bought it of his master and paid for it; he never brought me any Irish cloth.

Prosecutor. It was her sister had the Irish cloth.

Prisoner's Defence.

I bought the goods of my master; I mentioned it to him before I took them away.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: t17740907-10

564. (L.) HENRY FENLY was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of a person unknown, July 20th . ++

Benjamin Grey . On the 20th of July going along Upper Thames-street , I looked over my shoulder and saw the prisoner pick a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and clap it under his coat; I laid hold of him and charged him with it; I took him into a shop and went to see after the gentleman, but could not find him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: t17740907-11

565. (L.) ARABELLA HART , spinster , was indicted for stealing a pair of stone sleeve buttons set in silver, value 1 s. and a sixpence , the property of Samuel Upham , Aug. 15 . ++

Samuel Upham . I was going down Gravel-lane, Houndsditch : I met the prisoner and another girl; they laid hold of me and dragged me into a room by main force; the other held me and the prisoner picked my pocket of the six pence, and took the buttons out of my sleeve; the prisoner was taken in about half an hour after, and the constable found the buttons upon her in my presence.

Thomas Bull , the constable, produced the buttons which he found on the prisoner, and they were deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

The young man gave me the sixpence and buttons for lying with me, and promised to bring me another six-pence for the buttons.

Q. Did any thing of that kind pass?

Upham. No, I never spoke a word to her.

George Upham . I am father to the prosecutor: I happened by accident to be going that way and met him; he told me he had been dragged into a house and robbed; I got a constable and took the prisoner; she was taken to a public house and searched and the money found upon her.

The prosecutor called two women, Martha Winter and - Williams, who deposed that they saw him dragged into the house; that he laid hold of a post, but they pulled him in by force. The prisoner said the two women swore false; that Williams was an old bawd, and swore against her because she would not live with her. The two women called a Mr. Mackey, who deposed that he knew both of them, and they were as honest women as any in the place.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-12

566. (L.) JOHN AYRES was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Hill , July 12th . ++

Thomas Hill. On the 12th of July last, as I was going up Holborn, just by Field-lane , I felt my handkerchief taken out of my pocket; I turned round and laid hold of the prisoner and found the handkerchief upon him.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never saw the man's handkerchief in my life.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-13

567. (L.) BENJAMIN FLATHERS was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of a person unknown, Sept. 2d . ++

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-14

568. (L.) WILLIAM ALSOM was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of a person unknown, Aug. 17 . ++

William Payne . On the 17th of August, as I was going up Fleet-street, by St. Dunstan's church , I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief ( producing it) out of a porter's pocket, who had a load on his back; I crossed the way, laid hold of the prisoner, and sent after the

porter; he came back and said it was his handkerchief, and appointed to meet me at the Compter but did not.

The prisoner, in his defence, said he picked the handkerchief up.

He called his father, and a publican with whom be lodged in Theobald's-row, who gave him a good character.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-15

569 (L.) THOMAS ATKINSON was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Daniel Pinder , Aug. 31st . ~

Daniel Pinder . On the 31st of August, about twelve at noon, as I was going along Fleet-street , to Mr. Child's, the banker, just by St. Dunstan's church, a lad told me I had lost my handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner putting it in his breeches; the young man that told me had hold of him; I had the handkerchief in my hand not above a minute before; I can swear to the handkerchief; I had a piece of them.

John Sharpe . I was coming down Fleet-street on the 31st of August; I saw the prisoner follow the prosecutor about ten yards; when he came up to St. Dunstan's church I saw him take the handkerchief out of his pocket; I tapped the prosecutor on the shoulder, and told him his pocket had been picked; he turned round and laid hold of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence.

I drive a jack-ass; I sent a boy out with a bushel of plumbs; I was going to see after him; just as I came by St. Dunstan's church something came against my lap; I laid hold of it, and found it to be a handkerchief; this gentleman was twenty yards from me; I never was nigh the gentleman till he came and laid hold of me.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-16

570. (L.) WILLIAM BEEM was indicted for stealing four shillings and eleven pence in money, numbered , the property of John Spencer , July 9th . ~

Ann Spencer . I am the wife of John Spencer : I work for Alderman Kirkman in the silk-winding-way. On the 9th of July I went to carry home my work; as I returned I stopped at the corner of Bishopsgate church yard for a peck of pease; I set down my basket with my work and money in it; a lad informed me the prisoner had taken my money; I missed it, and the lad and I pursued him through Bishopsgate church yard; he was taken at the further end of Moorfields, and the money found upon him; it was all halfpence, wrapped up in brown paper; I never lost fight of him till he was taken.

[ Samuel Taylor .]

Q. How old are you?

Taylor. Thirteen the 29th of March.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath?

Taylor. Yes.

Q. Do you know what would become of you if you come into a Court of Justice and take a false oath?

Taylor. Yes, I shall go to hell; on the 9th of July I saw Mrs. Spencer put her basket down at a pea cart the corner of Bishopsgate church yard, about eleven o'clock; there was a paper of halfpence in the basket; the paper was not tied up but was open.

Prosecutrix. It lay on the top of the cloth the work was in; any body might see it.

Taylor. I saw the prisoner stoop down and take the money out of the basket, and run down Bishopsgate church yard; I told the woman directly, and she and I ran after him till he was taken.

Joseph Tyler . I am a constable; I met the prisoner in Bishopsgate church yard, running as fast as he could; just after I met the prosecutrix running, who said she was robbed of her all by a man in a brown coat; I pursued him; he was stopped in Moorfields before I came up to him.

John Barber . As I was coming a-cross Moorfields, I heard the cry of - stop thief; I stopped the prisoner and asked him what he had stole; he said two or three halfpence; he produced a paper of halfpence; he had them in his hand; in taking of them some dropped.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the halfpence by the wheel of the pea cart; as I picked them up a man come by and asked what I had got; I said a paper, and went away; a man stopped me, and said I had stole the halfpence; the woman came up and said they were her's; I bid her if they were her property to take them; I had given them to Barber.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-17

571; 572. (M.) MARY CARN and ANN HINCHLEY were indicted for stealing twelve yards of Scotch linen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Lawrence , Sept. 2 . +

William Jones . I am servant to Mr. John Lawrence , a linen draper , in Hanway-yard, Tottenham-court-road . On the 2d of this month the two prisoners came into my master's shop, and asked to see some printed linens; I handed down one piece; they did not like that; I shewed them two or three pieces more; they asked me the price; I told them two shillings a yard was the lowest; they bid me twenty-one pence; I told them I could not take any less; as they were going out I saw Hinchley hold her left leg on one side, which gave me a suspicion she had stole something; I jumped over the compter, and called them back; they came back; I asked Hinchley what she had got; she said nothing; I put my hand to her apron, and a piece of Scotch cloth fell down; there were thirteen yards and a half; she said she knew nothing about it; that it was lying on the ground before; but I am certain it was not on the floor when I called them back.

John Warrener . I was coming through Hanway-yard on the 2d of September; I heard this young man call the prisoners back, and said they should have it: I supposed they had bid for something; as they returned back I saw a piece of linen fall. Hinchley took it off the ground; as soon as she came into the shop I saw the young man take it from her.

Hinchley's Defence.

It dropped in the shop, it did not drop from me.

Hinchley called four witnesses to her character.

There being no evidence to affect Mary Carn , she was not put upon her defence.

CARN acquitted .

HINCHLEY guilty . B .

Reference Number: t17740907-18

573. (2d M.) JANE HART was indicted for stealing a cloth riding habit with the waistcoat trimmed with gold fragments, value 3 l. a pair of laced ruffles, value 30 s. and a linen gown, value 10 s. the property of Mary Seymour in the dwelling house of Samuel Ashford , Feb. 12th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-19

574, 575. (M.) JANE CLARKE and BRIDGET DAILEY were indicted for stealing a guinea and three half guineas, the property of Joseph Brooks , privately from his person , July 26th . +

Both acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-20

576. (M.) DAVID HOPKINS was indicted for stealing three ounces of silk, value 6 s. the property of John Ham , Aug. 22 . +

John Ham . I am a silk dyer : the prisoner was my servant . On the 24th of August I was informed he had two knots of silk in his pocket; when he was going home at night I stopped him and charged him with it; he denied it; I bid him feel; he then pulled out a piece of bread, and a piece of paper; I desired him to feel in his other pocket; he pulled out a handkerchief wrapped up, and said there was nothing else in his pocket; I asked him the contents of the handkerchief; he then said there was a bit of silk in it, and said he hoped I would not punish him; I told him the law should take its course; he said he was to have told it that night at eight o'clock to one Gawthorn.

Prisoner's Defence.

My jacket hangs up all day; the men go to my pocket when they want a chaw of tobacco; I suppose they put it in my pocket to get me into a hobble.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: t17740907-21

577. (M.) DAVID JONES was indicted for stealing sixteen guineas, a half guinea, a quarter guinea, nine hundred and sixty half-pence, and twenty shillings in money, numbered, the property of Martin Vanberg , in his dwelling house , July 16th . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-22

578. (2d M.) JOSEPH BROWN (a negro) otherwise BLACK JOE , was indicted for that

he in the king's highway, in and upon Christopher Fernando , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a clasp knife, value 6 d. and one hundred and ninety-two halfpence , the property of the said Christopher, Aug. 20 . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-23

579. (M.) ELIZABETH JACKSON , spinster , was indicted for stealing a linen shift, value 2 s. a linen bed gown, value 1 s. two check aprons, value 2 s. a brass candlestick, value 1 s. a pair of womens pattens, value 1 s. a linen pocket, value 6 d. three pounds of plum pudding, value 1 s. and a quart earthen pan filled with alamode beef, value 6 d. the property of Stockdell Anne Ellis , widow , July 13th . ++

Stockdell Anne Ellis . The prisoner was my servant ; she lived with me two days; I saw the several things mentioned in the indictment just before the prisoner left my service, which the about nine o'clock; I missed them soon after she was gone; I found them at several pawnbrokers.

A pawnbroker produced a linen bed gown, which he said he received of the prisoner, he deposed that the prisoner was thirteen years old, and was often employed to pawn things by her mother; that she behaved honestly. Another pawnbroker produced a parcel of things mentioned in the indictment, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was drawn in by two bad girls. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: t17740907-24

580. (M.) ELEANOR DIXON , spinster , was indicted for stealing a stuff gown, value 6 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. a linen sheet, value 2 s. a linen pillowbier, value 6 d. a linen apron, value 6 d. and two linen napkins, value 1 s. the property of Winifred Gibson , widow , July 9 . ++

Winifred Gibson . I take in linen to wash : all the things mentioned in the indictment were my own except the shirt and stockings; they were in a one-pair-of-stairs room; some were upon the chamber horse in the room; there was an alaram of my chimney being on fire; I went out and staid about half an hour; they were all safe in my apartment when I went out, and gone when I returned.

John Miller . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner brought me this parcel of linen to pawn (produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

The constable deposed that he had a warrant to search the prisoner's apartments; that he found same linen, which was produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence.

I did not steal the things.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-25

581. (M.) PETER HARCOURT was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 2 s. a man's hat, value 1 s. 6 d. and two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Charles Cox , July 25 . ++

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-26

582. (M.) ANN AMBROSE , spinster , was indicted for stealing twelve silk and cotton handkerchiefs, value 28 s. the property of John Barry , Aug. 23 . ++

John Barry . I am a weaver : the prisoner was my servant ; she was with me but one day. On the 23d of August, about six in the evening, my wife went up stairs and missed the handkerchiefs; the prisoner was then gone; we found her the next day at Peckham with seven of the handkerchiefs upon her. (They are produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-27

583. (M.) SARAH CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing a silver sallad dish, value 30 s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King , July 28th . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-28

584. (M.) THOMAS EDWARD STANTON was indicted for stealing two yards of black silk mode, value 2 s. a black silk Barcelona handkerchief, value 2 s. a moreen coloured silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of silk mitts, value 1 s. a pair of jam cloth mitts, value 1 s. a pair of white worsted stockings, value 1 s. two yards of blond lace, value 8 s. a pair of beaver gloves,

value 6 d. two yards of black silk gauze, value 8 d. an India fan, value 6 d. six yards of black silk lace, value 6 d. and twelve yards of white tape, value 3 d. the property of Harvey Berrow , July 30th . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-29

585. (M.) WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for that he in the King's highway, on John Mailey , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of copper shoe buckles, plated with silver, value 2 s. and fourteen shillings in money, numbered , Aug 29th .

The Prosecutor was called, but did not appear, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-30

586. (M.) EDWARD BICKLEY was indicted for stealing two woollen waistcoats, value 5 s. a linen shirt, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a pair of woollen stockings, value 1 s. a pair of base metal shoe buckles, value 1 s. a pair of men's leather shoes, value 2 s. and a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of Owen Cosgrave ; a woollen waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of men's leather shoes, value 1 s. a pair of base metal shoe buckles, value 1 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of David Marshall , July 27th . *

Owen Cosgrave . I am a bricklayer , and lodge in Dyer-street . On the 7th of July last, about three in the morning, I missed two bundles; the prisoner was brought up by the landlord with two bundles in which all my things were, except the watch and some of the other prosecutor (Marshall's) goods.

David Marshall I lay in the same bed with Mr. Cosgrave; the prisoner lay in the same room; being awake about three in the morning I saw him go out of the room with two bundles under his left arm; I awaked Cosgrave and rose myself; I presently missed my shirt; I ran down stairs, and stopped the prisoner at the door; I saw the prisoner drop two bundles down the kitchen stairs; they were brought up in these bundles; they were my goods. (They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-31

587, 588, 589, 590, 591. (M.) JAMES PERKINS , LAWRENCE FLOOD , SAMUEL NEWSOM , EDWARD FOSSETT , and WILLIAM HIGGINS , were indicted for stealing two live pigs, value 10 s. the property of Frederick Cummins , Aug. 4th . ||

Frederick Cummins . I live in Castle-street, Whitechapel . When I came down in the morning of the 4th of August, at a little after six o'clock, I missed all my men out of the brewhouse; I went to the back door; there I saw them about a house where the prisoner lived; I went up to them; the men told me the people in that house had got some of my pigs; we waited till a constable came; as soon as he came we went into the house; there we found the two pigs dead in the cellar: I am certain they are my pigs; I keep about six or seven. The inhabitants of the house do not bear the best of characters; we could not tell which were the thieves; so we took up all the men in the house; it is a lodging house; Perkins appeared to be the master of it; they were all in the house in different apartments; they all said they did not know any thing about the matter.

Andrew Hatch . I live near Mr. Cummins's, at the back of the house these people were in. I was getting up about six in the morning; I heard the crying of two pigs; I looked out and saw them drive the pigs out of the road way from the brewhouse wall into their own yard; Fossett was the chief man in it; he threw something to the gateway, by which means the pigs followed; Samuel Newsom helped the same as the rest, and Higgins helped to drive them in; I did not see either Perkins or Flood; upon this I gave intelligence to Mr. Cummins's people.

Joseph Williams . I live with Mr. Cummins; Hatch gave me information that he had seen what he has now said; upon which I took several of Mr. Cummins's men out of the brewhouse, and went up to the house; I believe one or two of his men looked down into an open cellar window, and said they saw some pigs there; I went down into the cellar, and found two hogs stuck; one hung up and the other was on the floor.

Samuel Downes . I was present at the search; I found the hogs in the cellar, and a pointer, a fox hound, and a spaniel; the pointer was hanged.

Newsom's Defence.

I keep fowls in this young fellow's yard; in the morning when I got up the pigs were got

into the yard, and broke nine of the eggs; I drove them about the yard and they fell down into the cellar; I asked my master what I should do with the hogs; he said stick them and give them to the poor of the parish, which I should have done if they had not been taken away.

Perkin's Defence.

I was asleep at the time.

Higgins called two witnesses, who said they had seen him drive the pigs out of the yard several times.

Newsom called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

They called another witness who said he saw the pigs go into the yard that morning of their own accord, and that bearing the prisoners were taken up made him take account of the day.

PERKINS, FLOOD, and NEWSOM acquitted .

FOSSETT and HIGGINS guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17740907-32

592. (L.) JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Hall , August 9th . ~

John Hall. I drive a post chaise for Mr. Richmond in Wood-street; on the 8th or 9th of August at night I was out with my fellow servant; we had a few pots of beer, and staying longer than we ought, I was locked out; it was eleven o'clock when I came to the door; I expected one of my master's coaches to come in; I went and sat down on a bench opposite the watch box to wait for it; being tired, I laid down on the box and fell a sleep, and lay about an hour; I had the watch chain in my hand before I fell a sleep; the handkerchief was about my neck; I was waked about two in the morning by somebody pulling the watch out of my pocket; I looked up and saw the prisoner; missing my watch I made up to him and he knocked me down before I could well tell where I was; I got up immediately and went after him, and he knocked me down again; he struck me three or four times first; I made up to him again and laid hold of his collar with my left hand and called watch as loud as possible; he seemed resolute; I held him, and in the struggle we both fell in the kennel; as soon as we fell I called out watch again, but no watch came; I again called, and the watch came, but before the watch came he threw the watch with his right hand over his left shoulder about a foot from his head; we both lay in the kennel together when the watchman came up; I saw both the watch and handkerchief in his hand while we were down on the ground. (The watch produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Charles Vernon . I am a watchman; I stand at the corner of Silver-street; on the 9th of August, about two in the morning I heard watch called twice; on the second call I went, and about five doors down Wood-street, saw Hall and the prisoner both down together, by the side of the kennel; Hall said the prisoner had robbed him of his watch and handkerchief, and throwed it over on the pavement; when I came up they were struggling to get up; I found the watch about a foot from him on the pavement, and the handkerchief about half a yard from the watch.

Q. from the prisoner. Whether the prosecutor was not asleep on a bench near his stand?

Vernon. I had not seen him before; the watchman who was on the stand before me who went off at two o'clock told me there was a man asleep there.

Prisoner. He swore before my Lord Mayor he was on the stand, and saw the man asleep on the bench.

Vernon. I never said such a word.

James Archer . I am a watchman in Silver-street; I asked the last witness who was asleep on the bench; he said a post boy belonging to the Little Axe, in Wood-street, as the watchman told him that was gone off the stand, and bid me let him alone, that he would take no hurt; I saw him lying there with his left leg on the bench, and his right on the ground; I went up Silver-street to my box; I had not been there above a quarter of an hour before I heard the cry of watch, two or three different times, pretty loud; I looked down Silver street, and missing my partner's lanthorn I thought there was something amiss; I went down to Wood-street and saw the prisoner, prosecutor and watchman standing together; the prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch and handkerchief; I advised taking the prisoner to the watch-house to be examined; when we came to the watch-house the prosecutor said he looked like a poor fellow, and if he would give the watchmen half a crown to drink and he had his goods, he would give himself no further trouble about it; I said it was a capital offence, and he should do no such thing.

The prisoner is his defence said he worked at the main shoring in the city; that he was going to work at, three in the morning; that the prosecutor followed him and struck him; that the struck him again, and they both fell; that he then made a noise and said he had taken his watch, but that he knew nothing of it.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-33

593. (M.) JOSEPH BAILEY was indicted, for that he in the king's highway, in and upon Ann Williams , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person, one woman's cane hat, value 8 s. the property of the said Ann, July 30th . *

Ann Williams . I have been a servant , but am now out of place: on the 30th of July, about half after eleven in the evening, I was coming from Lambeth; I went about seven o'clock to visit an acquaintance and was returning from thence; I met the prisoner and another man at the bottom of Westminster Bridge, on the Surry side ; I was alone, the men followed me over the bridge; at last they crossed over before me, just by the tavern at the corner where the watermen ply; I observed they were looking out as if to see whether any body was coming; there were some coaches going over the bridge, but no passengers; the prisoner took hold of my throat; he said nothing at all to me, neither before nor after he squeezed my throat, and snatched my hat which was a cane one with a ribbon about it and immediately ran away with it; the other man did not attack me at all; the prisoner ran into Parliament-street; I pursued him, crying stop thief; he was never out of my sight; he was taken to the watch-house; I heard him say there that he dropped the hat; before Sir John Fielding he owned he took my hat off, but said he was drunk.

John Noakes . I was constable of the night; on the 30th of July between eleven and twelve at night the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by a watchman, two gentlemen and prosecutrix; the gentlemen said he had robbed the woman of a hat, and they had pursued him; this being Saturday night I did not chuse to let him stay in the watch-house on Sunday; I took him out in order to carry him to Bridewell about two in the morning, just before we got to Bridewell he made his escape, but was taken again by another watchman.

John Clarke . I am a watchman; I took the prisoner in Parliament-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was running and the prosecutrix following about fifty yards behind, and two gentlemen were pursuing him; I seized him and immediately the woman came up and said he had robbed her of an hat; the prisoner said nothing at all; I took him to the watch-house.

William Birch . I took the prisoner near two in the morning by Lady Dacre's Alm's-houses; he was running as fast as he could; I asked him what was the matter, he said nothing at all and ran off; I said I can run as fast you; I did so and seized him; the prisoner said God bless you let me go, it is only for taking a woman's hat, and he offered to give me three-pence, which was all the money he had; I took him to St. Margaret's round house, and on Monday to Sir John Fielding 's, where the woman swore to him; Sir John not being present at that time the man was remanded for further examination.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am a lighterman by business: I am obliged to be out all hours of the night, and liable to be insulted by these common prostitutes; this night I had been with a barge of corn; I was obliged to work hard to get it up; I went on shore and drank some beer; having no victuals all day, it got rather in my head; coming over Westminster-bridge, I saw this woman standing on the foot of Westminster Bridge; I heard her speak; I thought it had been somebody that I knew; I walked up along side her to see if I knew her; I did not; I walked along directly and she called out stop thief; I walked aside her till we got to Parliament-street; I never offered to run at all; I was much terrified; I had never been in the hands of any constable before.

The prisoner called three gentlemen he had worked for, who gave him an exceeding good character.

Q. to the prosecutrix. Did he make any marks in your throat by this squeeze?

Williams. No, my throat was very sore.

Q. Did you complain of it?

Williams. No.

Q. Did you take notice of the other man that was with the prisoner?

Williams. I did not, I only kept him in fight.

Guilty of stealing the hat, but not guilty of putting her in corporal fear . B . and Imp. 6 Months .

Reference Number: t17740907-34

594. (M.) ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for committing a rape on the body of Ann Fry , spinster , July 10th . ++

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

Ann Fry . I worked for farmer Brooks at Isleworth : my master gave me leave to lie in his barn.

Q. What countrywoman are you?

Fry. Hampshire.

Q. Had you no other lodging than that in the barn?

Fry. No; a man and his wife and I lay there.

Q. What business do you do?

Fry. Gather pease; the prisoner Robert Taylor came into the barn to me.

Q. What is he?

Fry. A bargeman ; he began to be very rude with me; I begged of him to let me alone; he said he would not, he would do so and so; I cried out all I could; while the man was gone to call his sister the prisoner laid hold upon me; my handkerchief was tucked in my bosom; he pulled the corner of it out of my bosom, and in the corner of it I had three-pence, and he snatched it out; after that he swore if I made such a noise he would take my gown off, and my shoes; I said I did not care, he should not use me so: finding assistance coming he drew his knife upon me.

Q. What time of night was this?

Fry. Between two and three o'clock in the morning.

Q. How far from the dwelling house?

Fry. As far as to the yard; he heard assistance just coming; the gentlemen took his knife from him; when they came in he got from me, and pretended to be asleep; instead of taking him first, they took a young man.

Q. What was there another young man in the barn at the time?

Fry. Yes.

Q. At the time you say that he lay with you?

Fry. Yes.

Q. You must tell me what he did with you?

Fry. He lay with me.

Q. You must tell me how: you have been told that I dare say.

Fry. He lay with me.

Q. How?

Fry. The same as all men.

Q. How?

Fry. He entered my body.

Q. With what?

Fry. With what he was made of.

Q. What did he do first?

Fry. He began pulling me about; afterwards he took his breeches down and pulled by my coats.

Q. How long was he about it?

Fry. He was with me about half an hour.

Q. With you about half an hour?

Fry. Yes.

Q. How long before he ravished you?

Fry. A quarter may be.

Q. Was the young man you speak of in the barn all this while?

Fry. Yes.

Q. Did you call out to him?

Fry. I called out murder ever so many times.

Q. You resisted and struggled all you could?

Fry. Yes, while I had breath.

Q. Was it through mere weakness he got the better of you?

Fry. Yes.

Q. Did any thing come from him when he entered you?

Fry. Yes, there did.

Q. What?

Fry. His nature.

Q. All this while there was another man in the barn?

Fry. Yes.

Q. Did you know this man before?

Fry. I never saw him before.

Questions from the prisoner.

Q. How many other people were in the barn at the same time?

Fry. Four.

Q. Was it a barn or hay loft?

Fry. It was in the end of the barn, you know very well.

Q. How many people were in the place at the same time?

Fry. Four when you came in first; two went out; one was left there.

Q. Who came in with me or before me?

Fry. Nobody.

Court. Were there four people in the barn at the time he lay with you?

Fry. As soon as they heard a noise two women went away.

Q. Who were the four people in the barn?

Fry. They were strangers to me; Watson and his wife I knew.

Q. What young man left his hat behind with a handkerchief bound round it?

Fry. Nobody.

Q. Upon your oath?

Fry. Yes, upon my oath.

Q. Was I laid down by you when they took me?

Fry. Yes, a little way off.

Q. Was you laid down when they took me?

Fry. Yes.

Q. You do not remember the young man that left his hat and handkerchief by you?

Fry. No.

Q. Whose hat was that they could not find the owner of?

Fry. Nobody's as I know of.

Court. Was you standing when he went into the place?

Fry. No, lying down.

William Watson . She cried out for assistance; she begged and prayed of him to be easy and quiet, and leave her alone; with that I got up to her assistance, and there were others went out and called for assistance.

Q. Did you go to her assistance?

Watson. I was afraid unless somebody came to assist me.

Q. What did she say he was doing to her?

Watson. She begged he would be quiet; she said she was never served so before.

Q. Who was the other man?

Watson. A Mr. Fielder.

Q. What is Mr. Fielder?

Watson. A waterman.

Q. Was he there before?

Watson. No, when they came to take him they took me first; they went out to the light to see who I was; then they let me go; they went back and found the prisoner, and they took him.

Q. What became of the two other people that were there when she cried out?

Watson. They went to call more assistance.

Q. You were three to one, why did not you go to her assistance?

Watson. Because he had a knife drawn in his hand; we were afraid.

Q. How do you know that?

Watson. She said take care do not come nigh, he has got a drawn knife in his hand.

Q. Then she desired you not to come nigh?

Watson. Yes.

Q. So she herself told you that he had a knife and that you should not come?

Watson. Yes.

Q. from the prisoner. How many were there of you?

Watson. There were my wife; Ann Fry , and woman they call Peggy.

Thomas Fielder . About two in the morning two women came to the London Apprentice; they called for the constable, and said, two vile fellows were in the barn; Clements set them to call the constable and beadle; I got up, knocked at the door, and waked Lewis; the women said Mr. Clements sent them to call them up, for there were two thieves in the barn; Lewis went up to the barn with me; Clements and his wife came down stairs; as soon as they saw Lewis, they said two vile fellows had been there a long while, they were afraid of coming down stairs for fear of being killed; I went into the barn with a key of what they keep the cart down with; I felt round the barn; I felt Watson first; I dragged him out; he said, Fielder, you know me, I am not the man; the other two men are in the barn now; there were two at first, but one got away; there was one man along with the prisoner feeling? round the barn again I found the prisoner lying among some straw; I shook him; hollow, get up, said I, why do you sleep here; so I took him by the collar, and pulled him outside the barn door; Lewis standing by, said, you rascal, if you offer to stir I will blow your brains out; I searched him to see if he had any fire arms; I found a knife in his pocket; I took it from him; the girl before that said he was going to cut her throat without he would give her the money and let him do what he would with her; the girl said before that it was a white handle knife; I took this knife out of his pocket (producing a white handle knife.)

Questions from the prisoner.

Q. Were there many people in the barn besides me?

Fielder. I took William Watson out before you; I felt none but William Watson and you there.

Q. Did you find any clothes there?

Fielder. No.

Q. Did you find any man's hat there?

Fielder. Yes, which you said belonged to the other man.

Q. Was I then asleep or awake upon your oath to the best of your knowledge?

Fielder. I do not think you was asleep.

Court. What was the girls, first complaint?

Fielder. She said he had snatched three-pence from the corner of her handkerchief, and had ravished her.

Thomas Cronch . Between two and three in the morning of the 10th of July, I was called down; there was an alarm at the door; two or three persons had seized the prisoner; they told me they took him in a barn; I asked the man why when the girl cried out, as he said, he did not go to assist her; he said because the man swore if there came any body to assist her he would rip him up, and he had a drawn knife in his hand; I asked him how he knew that; he said because the girl mentioned something of it in her crying out.

Prisoner's Defence.

I went into this place to lie down an hour for rest till the tide served, and the other young fellow, Alexander Harris , he got up into the hay lost, and said there was some straw to lie upon; he said come up here and lie down; I got up; I was feeling about upon my hands and knees; I could not see where he lay; I was afraid to feel upon my legs for fear of hurting myself; I clapped my hands upon a woman's gown; I said here is a woman; she made answer and said if I lie down with one man, I will not with two or three; I lay down at some distance from them; the girl made answer and said no man shall be concerned with me except he pay me for it; he said what do you want; said she sixpence, and whether he gave her sixpence or threepence that she said she lost I cannot tell; I never spoke another word till they took me.

Q. to Watson. It comes out now, there were five; there was your wife, the woman you call Peggy, Ann Fry , the prisoner; and another man.

Watson. I never heard the other man nor saw him.

Q. Do you know he was there?

Watson. No, I don't know he was.

Q. to Fielder. Who told you that there was another man?

Fielder. The two witnesses that came to call the beadle up.

Q. Who were they?

Fielder. I never saw them before nor since; they were two country girls that go gathering pease in the summer time for farmers; we found a hat there that nobody owned.

Q. to the prosecutrix. Did you ever see the prisoner before?

Fry. No.

Q. You never saw him till after this matter was over?

Fry. No, it was dark.

Q. What business are you of?

Fry. I work in the gardens gathering pease.

Q. How long had you been there?

Fry. Ten or eleven weeks.

Q. Where do your relations live?

Fry. In Hampshire.

Q. Have you sent to them upon this occasion?

Fry. I have only one sister in Hampshire.

Q. Does any body appear here to give any account of you?

Fry. No.

Q. from the Jury. As this was done in the dark and you could not see this man, how do you know it was this man as there were two of them?

Fry. Because the man was at the end of the barn with me all the time; when he heard the people coming he got from me, it was then peep of day.

Q. Can you venture to swear it was not another man?

Fry. No.

Q. I asked you just now and you said you never saw the man till this matter was over?

Fry. Not till they brought him into the yard; I am sure there was none but him.

Q. Well but who did the hat belong to?

Fry. I did not see the hat.

Prisoner. I never wronged man, woman, nor child of a pin or pins point in my life; I was asked if the man was gone off; I said yes, I dare say he committed the affair, I must suffer for; she knew the man was in the place, before I came; in he was a broad side of her.

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-35

595, 596, 597. (M.) CHARLES SHAW , ANN LIDDYMAN , and ELIZABETH WIGLEY were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 4 l. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. and three shillings and sixpence in money numbered, the property of Robert Marshall , in the dwelling house of William Hussey , August 15th . ||

Robert Marshall . I met the three prisoners in company with three men, on the: 5th of August, at the Green Man in Bow-street ; they asked me what o'clock it was; I pulled out my watch, Shaw laid hold of it immediately; I held by the chain till the chain broke; then Wigley took hold of my handkerchief that was round my neck, and almost choaked me with it; she took my handkerchief and three and sixpence; the other girl (Liddyman) was in the box, but I did not see that she did any thing.

Q. Was you sober?

Marshall. I was, but almost senseless by the blows I received; when I came to myself they were gone out of the house; I went out at the door, there I saw Shaw; he stuck me behind the ear which brought me to the ground; when I went into the house I was so stunned with bruises, I do not know how long I might be before I came out again; I met a watchman, I told him I had been robbed of the things mentioned in the indictment; I went with the watchman in search of Shaw; first I found him in Russell-street with some women; before I could get the watchman to him, he got away; we met him afterwards coming out of King's Head court and secured him; I am certain it is the man that robbed me.

William Payne . The prosecutor came to me between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, and said he had been robbed, and that he would show me the man that robbed him; we went to Russel-street; we could not find him, and I left the prosecutor; soon after that he came to me again, and said the man was in King's Head court; I went with him to the Sun in King's Head court; I saw Shaw coming out of the house with a glass of gin; the prosecutor said that was the man; I took him to the round-house; the man who keeps the Sun came soon after and brought Liddyman and Wigley; they were both in liquor; Shaw said if we would let him out for half an hour he would find the man that had the watch.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober or otherwise?

Payne. I cannot say whether he was drunk or sober. I never saw him before that time; he seemed flustered; whether that was occasioned by the robbery and the blows I cannot say; I have no reason to say he was drunk from what I saw of him.

The prisoners in their defence denied the charge, but called no witnesses.

SHAW guilty . Death .

LIDDYMAN acquitted .

WIGLEY guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-36

598. (M.) MARY ANN SEARS was indicted for stealing a brown silk gown, value 5 s. a white silk gown, value 5 s. two dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a white muslin cloak, value 5 s. and a linen sheet , the property of Jane Wilkinson , spinster , Aug. 11th . ||

Jane Wilkinson . I live in Gerard-street . On the 11th of August I was out of my house from eleven till two; on my return I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I found the things at the pawnbrokers.

Robert Minns . The prisoner brought the sheet, muslin cloak and apron to pawn with me on the 11th of August.

John Priestman. I am pawnbroker; I received two gowns and petticoats of the prisoner. (The goods were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence.

A woman I never saw before met me at the top of the Haymarket, and sent me to pawn them.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-37

599. (L.) PETER KENELY was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Hopkins , Aug. 21st . ~

John Hopkins . On Sunday the 21st of August, as I was crossing Petticoat-lane , I felt a snatch at my pocket; I missed my handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner run; he went down Petticoat-lane; I pursued him with the cry of stop thief; he ran through several turnings; when I came up to him Edward Mason had hold of him; the handkerchief was found by Edward Adams . (The handkerchief produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Edward Mason . On the 21st of August, between nine and ten at night, I heard a cry of stop thief, in Petticoat-lane; I met the prisoner in Tripe-yard; I catched him in my arms and we both fell to the ground; I kept him till the prosecutor came up, who said the prisoner had robbed him of his handkerchief; I made him strip and the handkerchief dropped from him; Mr. Adams took it up.

Edward Adams . On the 21st of August I was present when the prisoner was stopped; as he stripped I saw something drop from him; I took it up and it proved to be the prosecutor's handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was going up Petticoat-lane; I heard a cry of stop thief; the prosecutor came up and said I had his handkerchief; I stripped off my clothes; somebody produced a handkerchief and said it fell from me; I never had it.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-38

600. (M.) DIANA MARIA COOPER was indicted for stealing a silk gown, value 3 l. a linen gown, value 15 s. a sattin cloak, value 10 s. four yards of muslin, value 2 s. a plain muslin apron, value 2 s. two yards and a half of lace, value 8 s. two pair of linen sheets, value 10 s. two pair of pillow biers, value 3 s. a linen tablecloth, value 1 s. a cotton counterpane, value 10 s. a blanket, value 2 s. two silver table spoons, value 20 s. four silver tea spoons, value 10 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of William Taylor , July 29th .

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-39

601. (2d M.) MARY MITCHELL , otherwise SANDERS , was indicted for stealing two linen sheets, value 5 s. and two check curtains, value 5 s. the property of John Hart , in a ready furnished lodging, let by the said John to the said Mary , Aug. 25th . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-40

602. (2d M.) JOHN PHYSICK was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 6 s. two Bath coats, value 2 s. and a velvet cap, value 6 s. the property of Benjamin Compton , Jun. Aug. 26th . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-41

603. (2d M.) ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. a black silk cloak, value 5 s. two white linen aprons, value 1 s. a black apron, value 4 d. a guinea, a half guinea, a quarter of a guinea, a piece of foreign silver coin, value 4 s. 6 d. and seven shillings in money, numbered, the property of Garrat Fennell , in the dwelling house of Charles Robinson , Oct. 27, 1772 . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-42

604. (2d M.) JOHN LARKHAM was indicted for stealing three guineas, a piece of base metal of the similitude of a sixpence, of no value, and five shillings in money, numbered , the property of John Buins , Aug. 30th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-43

605. (M.) JANE SMITH was indicted for stealing three linen sheets, value 12 s. two pair of thread stockings, value 2 s. a pair of leather pumps, value 1 s. and a pair of leather shoes, value 2 s. the property of William Looms , Aug. 31st . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-44

606. (M.) JOHN LADS was indicted for stealing a pair of silver buckles, value 5 s. the property of William Rigby , Aug. 17th . *

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-45

607. (M.) WILLIAM WARRINGTON was indicted for stealing two saws, value 6 s. the property of James Hacker , and a saw, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Wood , Aug. 20th . +

Thomas Wood . Hacker and I worked together at a house in Spring Gardens . On Saturday fortnight these three saws were carried up into a two pair of stairs room; on Monday morning they were missing; they were found in the hands of Thomas Ryder and William Shipley , two pawnbrokers.

Thomas Ryder . The saw that is sworn to by Wood was pawned with me by the prisoner.

William Shipley . The two saws taken from Hacker were pawned by the prisoner with me on the 20th of August.

The prisoner acknowledged his guilt, and begged the mercy of the Court.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: t17740907-46

608. (M.) WILLIAM WICKSTEAD was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon John Aldridge did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a watch with a metal case, value 40 s. and nine shillings and sixpence in money, numbered , the property of the said John, July 22 d .

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-47

609. (M) ELIZABETH BEWELL was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Hennings , July 30 .

The prosecutor was called, but did not appear; his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted

Reference Number: t17740907-48

610. (M.) JOHN HOLDEN was indicted for stealing a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. a pair of black velvet breeches, value 30 s. four linen shirts, value 16 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 5 s. a woollen apron, value 1 s. a steel clasp saw, value 2 s. a penknife, value 6 d. three canvas bags, value 3 d. three guineas, a half guinea, and eight pounds twelve shillings and fourpence in money, numbered, the property of Timothy Marshall , in the dwelling house of the said Timothy , Aug. 28th . ~

Timothy Marshall I am a gardener , and live in the parish of Drayton, near Uxbridge ; there is a stable that I made use of as my bed chamber; it has a chimney in it, and there are my cloaths, chairs, and tables in that room; I have lodged there ever since Lady-day; I lie there every night; it is my own freehold. I am a single man; the prisoner worked for me by the day; I locked up my outer door. I have a closet within my room which I usually leave open; in that were the velvet breeches, and all this money was locked up in a chest; as soon as I returned from church I found the box of the lock of the room door burst open, and lying in the middle of the room; several things that were in the outer room in the drawers were taken away; being surprized to see the door shut of the inner closet, which I always used to leave open, raised my suspicion, and upon enquiry I found that the box had been forced open with a chissel, which I found was my own chissel; I enquired after the prisoner and he was taken by Mr. Clack.

- Clack. I met with the prisoner in Berkshire; I passed by him at first; seeing him so fine with a pair of velvet breeches, I did not suspect him to be the man, because Marshall had not described him to be such a man; but afterwards I returned, as he otherwise answered to the description given me by Mr. Marshall; when I attempted to stop him he threatened that he would cut me down in case I offered to take him; that I had no right to molest him; but I was determined to secure him; he ran into a field, and afterwards a cross the road to another place; at last I did secure him, and brought him back to a house where he had a bundle, which he claimed as being his own; for the people of the house said there was a bundle; I asked the prisoner whether that bundle belonged to him; he said it did; that bundle and the prisoner I secured. (The bundle containing the breeches, three of the shirts, the cotton stockings, and a waistcoat, part of the things mentioned in the indictment, and about six pounds in money, was produced in Court.)

Prosecutor. All my guineas were of the year 1774; all the other things that are produced I am certain are my property.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was working in the garden; in the afternoon coming into the yard I saw the stable door open; that surprized me; I went into the stable, and behind the stable I saw a bundle; that surprised me; I went in to see if I could see any body; I did not look to see what was in the bundle; I did not dismolish any of the things.

Guilty. Death .

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t17740907-49

611, 612. (M.) CHARLES MILLS and JOHN PUGH were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon Lawrence Gilson did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a guinea, and six shillings in money, numbered , the property of the said Lawrence, Aug. 10th ++

Lawrence Gilson . On Wednesday the 10th of August last, between seven and eight in the afternoon, I was stopped in a foot path in the fields between Hampstead and Marybone: I was coming to town on foot; I met the prisoners on this side a place called Primrose Hill ; I suspected them from their appearance; they passed me; soon after a violent storm came on, and I ran under a hedge; I had not been above five minutes there before they returned; suspecting them to be disorderly people I chose to be sociable with them; I spoke about the rain; they stopped under the hedge a few minutes; they said they must have my money; I said sure you joke with me; they said d - n your joking, we must have your money directly; I gave them some shillings; Mills came up and seized me by the collar, and said he would search me,

which he did, and took out I believe a guinea that I had in the other pocket, and some shillings and halfpence; Pugh asked if I had a watch; I said I had not; he searched and found I had not any watch; while Mills was searching me, the other threatened me for looking at him.

Q. Look at the men, are you sure they are the persons?

Gilson. Yes.

Q. Which is Mills and which is Pugh?

Gilson. That is Mills and that is Pugh ( pointing them out); I saw them as I came down the hill.

Q. How long was it before they robbed you?

Gilson. Not ten minutes.

Q. What sort of light was it?

Gilson. It was about half after seven o'clock on the 10th of August; on the 20th of August I took a walk that way again, and near farmer Wellings' I sat down under a bush, and saw two men at a little distance; I knew them to be the men that robbed me; I followed them to farmer Wellings'; I told the story to the farmer's servant on horseback close by; there were several people had been walking that way; they urged my pursuing them; the farmer brought me a horse and sent the two men with me on horseback, and we pursued and took them.

Q. Are you sure the two men you took were the men?

Gilson. Yes, very sure; I knew them at the first fight, and communicated it to this gentleman, and they retired on seeing me.

Q. from Mills. What colour clothes had I on at the time?

Gilson. Brown colour clothes.

Mills. Was this the coat?

Gilson. I cannot speak positively; it was a coat nearly that colour.

Q. Had he it on both times?

Gilson. Yes.

Q. Did you observe the face of the men?

Gilson. Yes; I looked at him sharply while he was searching me, for which the other threatned me, but seeing him with the other in the same field and in the same dress that first caught my attention.

Q. Did his face make no impression upon you?

Gilson. It struck me as soon as I came up; I am satisfied he is the man.

Q. from Pugh. Had I these clothes on when the robbery was committed?

Gilson. He was in clothes very much resembling these.

Mills. We have witnesses to prove we had different coloured clothes then; but they are not here.

Edward Hall. I went to fetch a mare for Mr. Wellings; there was a hue and cry after these footpads; I saw the two prisoners going across the fields; this gentleman pointed at them, and said they had robbed him; we all three rode after them; I was the first that overtook them; I stopped Mills first; said he, what do you stop me for? I said I don't know; said he I will not be stopped by any body; I said I would blow his brains out if he did not stop directly; the gentleman came up and said these are the two men that robbed me.

William Spurr . I am servant to Mr. Wellings: I was watering my horses that night; the prosecutor came in a great hurry, and said there were two footpads, and it would be proper to take them; I said, you joke; he said, no; I bid him ask my master leave, which he did, and we took horse and pursued them; Hall took one, and I took the other.

Robert Mangine . I am an engraver: after I left off business I was taking a walk; I saw this gentleman before he spoke to me with a book in his hand; in about five minutes I saw the two prisoners walking as if they were coming towards me; a little after that this gentleman came to me, and said these two men had robbed him lately; I said if you think so you had better apprehend them; follow them; if they are guilty they will run away: as soon as we followed them they made off; then I went to this gentleman, and told him the case; we pursued them, and took them; these are the men the gentlemen mentioned to me.

Mills's Defence.

I met this young man the day we were taken; I knew him some years ago; he lived in the same street I did; he was out of place; I met him in Tottenham-court-road; he said he had been a hay-making; we agreed to go and have a pot of beer; we sat three or four hours, and drank five or six pots of beer; they followed us and took us into custody; I know nothing of it.

Pugh's Defence.

I had not seen this man three or four months before, We have some friends, but they are not

here; I did not expect the trial to come on so soon: my witnesses are in the country.

Both guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-50

613. (M.) JOSEPH DOGGETT was indicted for stealing a gelding, value 6 l. the property of William Stephens , Aug. 10th . ~

William Stephens . I am a publican and live at Stratford in Essex : in the night of the 9th of August I lost a horse out of the marsh close to Stratford turnpike; I saw it at five o'clock in the evening, and missed it next day at three in the afternoon; I made all the enquiry I could, and had hand bills dispersed in Smithfield, and about the country, but got no intelligence by them. On Thursday the 18th, Mr. Heley, one of Sir John Fielding 's men brought the horse down to me, and asked me if I owned that horse; I told him it was mine.

Q. Are you sure that was the horse you lost out of the field?

Stephens. Yes, I am positive of it; he told me he found it at Mr. Bever's livery stables. The prisoner was a journeyman farrier and smith in the neighbourhood many years; it was a nutmeg grey gelding fourteen hands high.

On his cross examination he said the marsh was fenced in by a ditch ten foot wide, that he thought it hardly possible for a horse to escape out; that he advertised, it with its marks, as stolen or strayed on Tuesday the 9th of August from Stratford turnpike.

William Vincent . I am servant to Mr. Bever, a horse-dealer, in Little St. Martin's lane; the prisoner brought the horse to our house this day month to sell; he led the horse into the yard and I put him in the stable; he brought it on a Wednesday, and wanted it sold the same day; I told him my master would never permit a horse to be taken in and sold the same day, he might leave it till the next Wednesday; about two hours or two hours and a half after he left it, by the order of Thomas Aldridge , the clerk, I took it to Mr. Smith's stables, in Castle-street, till we had more room in our stables; I asked the prisoner the price of it, he said six pound ten shillings; when we had room it was brought back again and I had it in my care; I saddled it for the clerk to ride out on one day; when he returned the horse had been thrown down and was sadly maimed.

Q. What became of it afterwards?

Vincent. Mr. Heley one of Sir John Fielding 's men took it away.

Q. How came he to take it away?

Vincent. I do not know.

On his cross examination he said the prisoner brought the horse to be sold at the public auction.

John Heley . I live in Russel-street; on the 18th of August James Aldridge , foreman of Mr. Bever's yard, came to me to the Brown Bear in Bow-street, and said there was a man to come to their house that morning to receive money for a horse that he left there a week before in the name of Elbourn; I went to Mr. Bever's and was informed the man was drinking at a public house opposite; I went to him; I said to him you must go with me to Mr. Bever's; he said ay, and went with me; I said what is your name? my name says he is Elbourn; where do you live? at Paddington; I said, Mr Elbourn you are wrong, because enquiry has been made of that; have not you got a horse here? he said yes; I desired to see it; I asked him how he came by it; he said he made a rap, that is changed another horse for it; I asked him where; he said at Hackney, on the road; I asked him if he knew the person; he said no; I said had you nothing to drink together at all; I told him he must go with me to Sir John Fielding 's, but he had better save a deal of trouble by telling us where the horse came from, for we were sure of finding an owner for it, by advertizing it.

Q. Did you say we or us?

Heley. Mr. Phillips was with me; I did not know who would go, and make the enquiry, he or me, I said us; he told me he was coming from Bow, and by Bow Bridge there was a drove of beasts going down into the country, and this horse followed the beasts.

Q. Did Phillips hear this as well as you?

Heley. Yes, I believe so; the prisoner was between us, we were close together; he said the drover said to him, I wish you would drive that horse back, for I do not want it to follow my beasts; he said that he saw a man going into a field to catch a horse or horses, I cannot say which, and he borrowed a halter of him to halter it and he brought him to town; he then said his name was Elbourn and he lived at one Mr. Curry's, a silk dyer near the Green Man in Stratford; as we were going a-cross the way, a little boy called him dady; I took the opportunity of asking the boy his name, he said it was Doggett; I said to the prisoner I understand your name is Doggett; he seemed confused and said nothing; I took the horse to Stratford

to see if I could find the owner, and likewise his lodging; I soon found him; the horse was known all the way upon the road; I had like to have been stopped two or three times.

Charles Liptrap . I drive a team for Mr. Cooper a stone mason; I saw Mr. Stephens's horse in the marsh, between eight and nine at night on the 9th of August; I put in two horses of my master's and shut the gate.

Q. Might not somebody else have turned a horse in afterwards and left the gate open?

Liptrap. There is no other horses put there but my master's and Mr. Stephens's; I went to the marsh about six o'clock the next morning I found the gate open and my master's horses in the lane; Mr. Stephens's horse was missing.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found this horse on the road about five in the morning this day month at Bow; I borrowed a halter to put on him, and led him away to Mr. Bever's repository in Little St. Martin's-lane; I led him into the yard and up to the stable door, and asked the hostler to take him in; he said he could not take him in for that day's sale, he must stay there till that day week; I went that day week to see the horse, and he was not to be seen: that is all I know about it.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who had known him for some years, and gave him a very good character.

Guilty. Death .

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t17740907-51

614, 615, 616. (M.) RICHARD CLARKE , EDWARD NICHOLLS , and JOHN SMITH were indicted, the first for stealing a gold watch, value 7 l. a watch with an enamelled gold box, and a green dogskin case, value 20 l. another watch with a gold case, value 13 l. a pair of small flated gold sleeve buttons, value 30 s. a gold ring with an antique oynx head, value 3 l. a sardonyx stone ring, value 40 s. a white cornelian ring set in gold, value 40 s, a locket set with marquisets, value 30 s. a turkey stone hoop ring. value 30 s. a pair of gold enamelled blue sleeve buttons, value 40 s. a single stone garnet ring, value 25 s. and one hoop marquiset ring, value 10 s. the property of William Prosser , in his dwelling house ; the other two for receiving different parcels of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , August 9th . *

William Prosser . I keep an oil shop in the Strand ; on the 9th of August about four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment ( repeating them); they were in a show glass on the compter; I was asleep in the back room facing the shop door; there was no one in the shop; a neighbour informed me she saw Clarke take the things out of the show glass and put them in his pocket; she is too far gone with child to bring her here; I went to Goldsmith's Hall to get some hand bills printed with the description of the person, but the prisoners were all taken that evening; there are goods in court that were found upon each of them; I was not present when either of the prisoners were searched; I saw the goods at Sir John Fielding 's the day following; the three prisoners were there; the goods are in the custody of Mr. Clarke and Mr. Heley.

Blanchfield Clarke. On the 9th of August Mr. Bond called me and said he was informed Clarke had stole some gold watches and asked if I knew him, I said I did; I went to Hedge-lane after him, there I took Smith; I brought him to the Nag's Head and found a watch upon him (producing it), and a bullet mould and a nutmeg grater with some tinder in his pocket; Heley took Nicholls; when they were in custody I went to Westminster after Clarke and took him; he was lying on a bed with his clothes on; he had this gold watch in his pocket, and this ring on his finger, (producing them); I brought him back to Hedge-lane; this was about nine o'clock at night.

John Heley . I took Nicholls; when I had taken him I saw him shuffling something out of his pocket within the flap of his breeches; I asked him what he was doing and immediately seized hold of his hand and took this watch (producing it) from within the flap of his breeches; upon his finger I found a marquiset hoop ring; after that I searched his breeches pocket and found a pair of gold sleeve buttons; he said he gave seven pence for them. (They were produced and all the articles were deposed to by the prosecutor.) We did not know where the goods were lost from till we took Clarke; when he was taken he asked if there was any evidence; I said I did not know; then he said he would tell where he took them; he said he took them from Mr. Frosser's show glass; his expression was that the Old Gorge was asleep when he went into the shop.

Clarke's Defence.

Nicholls and Smith and I were going along the Strand; I desired them to stop while I went up a passage to a necessary; I put up my hand to a place over the door to feel for a bit of paper, and found a handkerchief; I pulled it down; when I opened it I found these three watches and the other things in it; I came out and told them I had found something, I believed of some value, and agreed to share it; I gave Nicholls a watch, a pair of buttons, and a ring, and a watch and ring to Smith, and kept the rest myself.

The other two made the same defence.

CLARKE, guilty . Death .

SMITH guilty . T. 14 Years .

NICHOLLS guilty . T. 14 Years .

Reference Number: t17740907-52

617, 618. (2d M.) JOHN VICTOIRE DUCRET and JAMES MUSILA were indicted for stealing six cloth coats, value 3 l. three cloth waistcoats, value 15 s. a scarlet waistcoat, value 10 s. a silk stocking waistcoat, value 10 s. a nankeen waistcoat, value 7 s. a buff coloured waistcoat, value 10 s. a light coloured waistcoat, value 7 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 2 s. a cambrick waistcoat, value 10 s. two linen waistcoats, value 10 s. two flannel waistcoats, value 3 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. a pair of fustian breeches, value 2 s. a pair of buff coloured breeches, value 2 s. a pair of light coloured cloth breeches, value 2 s. two pair of black silk stocking breeches, value 12 s. two pair of nankeen breeches, value 10 d. sixteen linen shirts, value 8 l. twelve stocks, value 20 s. two cravats, value 3 s. two linen towels, value 1 s. three white handkerchiefs, value 3 s. five bordered handkerchiefs, value 5 s. six cotton night caps, value 3 s. ten pair of silk stockings, value 50 s. seven pair of cotton stockings, value 14 s. four pair of thread stockings, value 2 s. five pair of worsted stockings, value 10 s. twelve pair of muslin ruffles, value 12 s. three pair of French lace ruffles, value 3 l. twelve yards of lace, value 3 l. a yard of cambrick, value 6 s. two hats, value 6 s. six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of tea tongs, value 13 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. a silver stock buckle, value 3 s. two pair of black shoe buckles, value 1 s. a pair of steel buckles, value 6 d. a cutlass, mounted with silver, value 12 s. a pair of plated spurs, value 3 s. a French knife, value 3 s. a cutlass belt, value 3 s. a lancet case, value 1 s. four lancets, value 4 s. a bistoury, value 1 s. a tea cannister, value 6 d. a leather pocket book, value 2 s. a looking glass, value 1 s. a powder bag, value 6 d. a silk puff, value 6 d. a feather puff, value 6 d. a scraping knife, value 3 d. a shaving box, value 6 d. a brush, value 6 d. a rasor, value 1 s. a pair of scissars, value 1 s. a hone, value 1 s. a leather trunk, value 2 s. a leather portmanteau, value 5 s. and twenty eight guineas the property of Charles Rousseau De Guingand , in the dwelling house of Sarah Harris , spinster, May 30th . *

(The prisoners not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.)

Charles Rousseau De Guingand . I lodged at Mrs. Sarah Harris 's, in Stephens-street, Rathbone-place : on the 30th of May last, I lost the several things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them), out of my lodgings; I had seen them four days before; John Ducret lodged with me; we were both servants out of place; as to Musila I never saw him till the day he was taken; I left Ducret in my lodging when I went into the country; when I returned from the country, which was about seven weeks after, I missed the trunk and portmanteau, and all the things in them; I searched after Ducret and found him at the Nagg's Head in Swallow-street; I charged him with having taken my goods; he asked my pardon, and said he would give me all my goods again, and the money, that it was all above stairs in his trunk; Mrs. Harris and Sarah Dodd were with me at this time; they sent for James Johnson , a constable, who took Ducret to the round-house; he told me he would give me eighteen guineas, the remainder of the twenty eight guineas, if I would say before the Justice of peace that I had forgot to lock my trunk when I went into the country, and that there was no money in it; Johnston the constable had a warrant to go and seize the trunk, and portmanteau and there I saw almost all my things; a few of them were gone; Musila had a pair of my breeches on, and he had my hat and stick.

James Johnston . I am a constable; I took the two prisoners at the Nag's Head in Swallow-street; the prosecutor was with me, and so were Harris and Dodd; Ducret begged pardon of the prosecutor, and said he should have every thing again if he would forgive him, and not prosecute him; I told him it was now too late, he must go with me; I took both the prisoners to the watch house; the next morning at ten

o'clock the prosecutor came thither and took the prisoners before Justice Wright; Ducret had on a waistcoat, breeches, shirt, and a pair of stockings, which the prosecutor swore to before the Justice.

Prosecutor. I took notice of the other things that Ducret had on before the Justice, but the shirt I did not observe till I was carrying the prisoner to Bridewell.

Johnston. Musila had a pair of breeches, a hat, and stick; he said they were given him by Ducret, and that he thought they were his own property, as he knew nothing at all of the things; next day having a search warrant I went and examined the trunk; the prosecutor was with me; the lock of the trunk was broke; Ducret's things and the prosecutor's were mixed together in the trunk and portmanteau.

Sarah Harris . The prosecutor and Ducret lodged at my house in May last.

Q. It is your house, is it?

Harris. Yes, it is my house; the prosecutor went into the country; three or four days after that Ducret left my lodgings; when Ducret was about to depart, he said he was going to France; he took away a trunk and a portmanteau; I did not know whether they belonged to him or the prosecutor; Musila helped Ducret to remove them; I never saw Musila before; the prosecutor and Ducret had lodged at my house only a fortnight and three or four days; the prosecutor came back six or seven weeks after; Ducret had called at my house once in the mean time; I said to him, Mr. Ducret you surprize me, I thought you was gone to France; he said he did not go, he only went into the country sixty miles off, and came back again; I asked him where he lodged, he said in Holborn.

Sarah Dodd . I am servant to Mrs. Harris; Ducret and the prosecutor came together and lodged at my mistress's house a fortnight and three days; the prosecutor went from the house on a Thursday; Ducret left the house the Monday following, upon which day he and Musila had a coach and carried away a trunk and portmanteau, and Ducret told me he was going to Paris; I saw the prosecutor unlock a wooden trunk and lock it again, and put the key in his pocket; there was only one trunk and one portmanteau; Ducret came to the house the latter end of that week, and asked me if a young woman had called in his absence; I said no; I asked him where he lodged, he said in Holborn; Musila called three weeks or a month after to know if the prosecutor was come to town; and another time he made some enquiry, but he was not come to town.

Ducret's Defence.

I am innocent; I have lived with Mr. Butler in Park-lane; I had no friend to send with a letter for him.

Court. I shall not call upon Musila for his defence, as there is no evidence to affect him.

DUCRET guilty . Death .

MUSILA acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-53

619, 620. (2d M.) FABIUS LEWIS and LOUIS LEQUINT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Christopher Smith , on the 28th of August , about the hour of one in the night, with intent the money and effects of the said Christopher to steal . +

Christopher Smith . I keep a public house in a court in Wardour-street ; between one and two in the morning of the 28th of August I was alarmed by the watchmen that there were thieves in my cellar; I got up directly and went down stairs; I let in one of the watchmen and went down to the cellar with him; I found the cellar door open and saw the two prisoners run into the coal cellar; I ran after them; I got a piece of wood in my hand and told Lewis, who had his hand in his pocket, that if he did not immediately take his hand out of his pocket I would knock his brains out; we took them directly; I brought him up stairs and the watchman brought up the other prisoner.

Q. Had they taken any thing?

Smith. I believe they had drank some ale; Lequint seemed much in liquor.

Q. Had you examined whether your doors and windows, and every thing were fast?

Smith. I fastened the windows the night before myself, and the cellar door was double locked; I was the last up in the house, and saw that all my doors and windows were fast; one of the watchmen has a crow and a chissel, with which they wrenched off the catch of the cellar lock.

Q. Is there an area before the house?

Smith. No, the cellar is even with the ground.

Q. What did they say for themselves when you found them in the cellar?

Smith. Nothing; I found there a dark lanthorn, a tinder box, and steel (producing them.)

Christopher Langshaw . I am a watchman: Mr. Smith let me into his house; I went down into the cellar with him; there we found the two prisoners in a coal cellar.

Q. Did you find any tools there?

Langshaw. No, I did not see any till after we came to the watch-house; then Thomas Rogers brought a crow, a chissel, a dark lanthorn, and a steel.

Thomas Rogers . I was not in the cellar when the man said there were thieves; I went down to his assistance; I stood on the flap of the cellar window, and there I saw this chissel lie upon the pavement in the street at the edge of the window; the chissel and the crow were hanging in the cellar; I found these before the prisoners were taken.

Lequint's Defence.

I know no more than the child unborn of breaking in; when I came by there were some outlandish men in the street; the flap was open; I was much in liquor; I asked him what he was doing; he directly struck me down; it is a deep place; this young man was going on; he stepped back; I could hardly speak I was so much in liquor; he made an attempt to pull me up and fell down, and some outlandish men shut the flap of the door upon us; I never saw them things in my life.

Lewis's Defence.

I went to pull him up and he drew me in.

Both Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-54

621. (L.) WILLIAM RUFFHEAD was indicted for stealing forty guineas in money, numbered, the property of Felix Calvert , William Calvert , and Richard Ladbroke , Esqrs. in their dwelling house , July 24 . ~

George Davis . I am clerk to the prosecutors: they are partners. On Monday the 25th of July I was called up at four o'clock; I went to the compting house and found four desks and a box broke open; I suppose from the marks I saw that the prisoner came through a window that was broke.

John Furlonger . At the bottom of the yard is Mr. Calvert's dwelling house; against the west end is part of the brewhouse, part of which brewhouse adjoins to the dwelling house; the mill adjoins to the brewhouse; adjoining to the mill is the brewer's house, and next to that, under the same roof, is this compting-house which was broke open; it is the property of Mr. Calvert, but he does not himself inhabit it, bet it is for the use of his clerks. On Monday the 25th of July I was called up about seven o'clock; I went to the compting house; on examining a box where I kept my cash, I found I had lost forty guineas; I am certain I locked it on Saturday evening, and the money was safe, but I found it then broke open, and the money gone.

William Batlow . I am miller at Mr. Calvert's: the prisoner was my servant , and had been so about two years and a half; he lodged with me at my house in Tooley-street; in winter time, when I have full employment for them, I allow them ten shillings a week; but in summer time, when business is slack, but five shillings a week, and out of that he had a child to keep, that he had at nurse, at four shillings a week; I had some suspicion of him on being informed he had bought a watch and a pair of buckskin breeches which cost eighteen shillings; a neighbour of mine, who had lost her husband, gave me a watch to be raffled for; the name of the prisoner was set down as one of the persons that was to rae for it. Last Saturday se'ennight I went into the tap of the Faulcon alehouse in Thames-street, about eight or nine o'clock, that being the place where the raffle was to be, but there not being a sufficient number to raffle, I kept the watch in my pocket; the prisoner and his brother came in; his brother asked me if the watch had been raffled for; I told him it had not; I said I would give myself no further trouble about it; the brother of the prisoner asked if I would sell it; I said, yes; he said if I would sell it he would buy it; the prisoner then said to his brother, brother, if you a mind to have the watch, I will lend you the money, but desired to let it alone till Monday; on the Monday following I carried the watch to the brother, and he gave me forty-five shillings for it; but I do not know whether the prisoner lent him the money; I had likewise some suspicion of him, and therefore unlocked his chest with a key of my own, and in a little painted box, which was in a bag, there were thirteen guineas wrapped up in a piece of paper, and nine guineas loose, and in another little box there were six half crowns and two halfpence; I went immediately and told Mr. Furlonger, one of the clerks of the brewhouse, of it.

John Doncastle . I am a constable: I had directions to take the prisoner up; I took him about eleven o'clock in Mr. Calvert's yard, at his work; Mr. Squire was with me; we took him to the tap-house; Squire searched him in my presence, and took a guinea, a half crown, and some halfpence from one of his pockets; I went with him to his lodgings in Tooley-street; there he owned the box was his, and out of that I took that painted box with the money in it; we had left some beer at the Horse-shoe in Tooley-street; we returned there to drink it; I gave him a caution; I said young man this is a serious affair; I beg you will take care what words you make use of, for I doubt this affair is such that may affect your life; upon this the prisoner sat in the box, and Squire, and the others that were with him were at some little distance; then he told me that he had been guilty of it; that he had got over the stable or stables upon Sunday about one o'clock; that he got-over buildings till he got to the compting-house; that there is a window in the compting-house that looks into the back yard, and that after he had taken out a pane or two of glass, he opened the casement and got in at the window; that after he got in he found an old chissel or adze, and broke open three or four desks and a box, and that out of the several desks and boxes he had taken thirty-nine guineas.

Q. Were any promises made to him of favour?

Doncastle. No, none at all; so far from it I gave him all the caution it was possible before ever he said any thing to me; but after he had made this confession, I desired him to be explicit, though careful if he had any thing to say against himself, to take care in what manner he did say it, and then possibly Mr. Calvert might shew him some favour to impeach his accomplices if he had any.

John Squire . I heard the prisoner say he got over the stable, got to a window, took out some panes, opened the window, and went in; that there were four desks in the compting house, and a box, and that he took out of them thirtynine guineas; when he was searched he had a guinea and a half in his pocket, and the key of the box.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was put into a flurry, so did not well know what to say; at first in the tap-house they searched my pockets, and took from me two small keys, and a half crown; when they asked me to shew my lodgings, I went with them chearfully. I worked six years in the brewhouse; I did my work with honesty and industry and saved that money.

For the Prisoner.

William Parklow . I have known him two years and a half; he always bore a good character.

William Noble . I have known him eight years: he was always an honest sober man.

Guilty of stealing the money, but not guilty of stealing it in the dwelling house . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-55

622. (M.) THOMAS IVERS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Brown , on the 20th of July , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of the said James, in his dwelling house .

The prosecutor was called, but did not appear; his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-56

623. (M.) WILLIAM DRISKILL was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. a steel chain, value 1 s. a brass key, value 1 d. and a silver seal, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Lewis , Sept. 6th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-57

624. (M.) LUKE LISTER was indicted for receiving two hams, wt. 23 lb. value 10 s. and 49 lb. wt. of pork called bacon, value 18 s. the property of John Fox and Isaac Ismay , well knowing them to have been stolen by Mark Oldbury , July 21st . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-58

625, 626, 627. (M.) CHARLES WHITTLE , CHARLES REAGIN , and JAMES TUFFNELL , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Stansfield , on the 16th of July , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing five pair of worsted stockings, value 5 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a fusee handkerchief, value 1 s. a linen

shirt, value 1 s. a child's worsted jam, value 6 d. three pair of stays, value 2 s. and five pair of leather shoes, value 5 s. the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling house .

All three acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-59

628. (2d M.) THOMAS BURROWS was indicted for stealing 178 lb. wt. of fat, value 54 s. the property of William Webb , July 7 . +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-60

629. (L.) RALPH MACGRAY was indicted for stealing a canvas bag, value 2 d. an iron key, value 2 d. and five pounds in money, numbered , the property of Edward Williams , July 2d . ~

Edward Williams . I am a vintner : I live in Warwick-lane ; the prisoner was apprentice to one Mr. Fletcher, a merchant taylor. About seven weeks ago I missed a sum amounting to more than forty shillings in silver out of the till in the bar; the prisoner saw me put it into the purse first, and then afterwards into the till; this was at eleven o'clock at night; in a few minutes after the prisoner went out, I missed the purse and the silver. Last Saturday the prisoner's master, Mr. Fletcher, came to me, and said he thought his boy had defrauded him of half a guinea, for he had more money than he could have honestly come by; his master and I sent over for him to my house; upon being charged with taking the money, he said he had taken the purse and the money; that he had reached his hand over the bar and unlocked the till, the key being left in the lock, and took out the bag and money, and left the key to do the like again.

Q. Were any promises made him?

Williams. There were none; his confession was made free and voluntarily; the prisoner's master returned me a guinea and half a guinea.

- Fletcher. I suspected the prisoner by his spending more money than he ought to do; I spoke to him about it; his account was that it was given to him; he told me he had the half guinea which I found upon him of Mr. Williams; that he went to change a guinea at Mr. Williams's, and that Mrs. Williams by mistake gave him change to the amount of a guinea and half; I found the key of the till upon him; when I shewed the key to Mr. Williams, he said it was the key of his till; the prisoner confessed taking the canvas bag, and said he had never counted the contents when he was charged with it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-61

630. (2d M.) JANE CASLAKE was indicted for stealing four yards and the half of one quarter of a yard of shalloon, value 7 s. the property of Robert Cornish , July 16th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-62

631. (2d M.) AMOS MERRITT was indicted for that he in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon John Dobbs , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. and three shillings in money, numbered , the property of the said John, April 9th . *

John Dobbs . I was robbed in the fields going from London to Islington , about a quarter after ten at night of the 9th of April.

Q. What sort of a night was it?

Dobbs. A dark night.

Q. Can you tell by whom you was attacked?

Dobbs. The first man that attacked me seemed to be the nearest man of the two; my partner, William Beckenham , was about fifteen or twenty yards before me; the moment they crossed my friend I heard this man say, d - n my eyes, what do you use the gentleman ill? then I got up to them; I suspected they were going to fight; I did not know in what manner the man was coming upon him; I said don't fight, don't fight; as soon as I had mentioned that word, the first man said to me, d - n your eyes, I will shoot him and you too; that was just as the other man came up; he presented a pistol to me, and said give me your stick (I had an oaken stick in my hand) or you are a dead man, and presented a pistol to me; I said what do you want; he said your money; I said again, if that is all you want you shall have my purse and money, and all together, don't use us ill; so I took my purse out of my pocket and gave it him; there were three shillings in it; I delivered it to the man.

Q. To which?

Dobbs. I take it to be the prisoner; it was the man that presented the pistol to me; I had a

bundle in my other hand; he said give me your bundle; I said it will be of no use to you, don't take it from me; he said if there is any valuable things in it I will return it, and with that he returned it again.

Q. I should rather have thought if there was nothing valuable in it he would have returned it?

Dobbs. I cannot tell what thoughts he had about it; he did return it me; then he asked me if I had any valuable pieces in the purse; I told him he had got my all and was welcome to it.

Q. Did he say any thing about returning them if there were?

Dobbs. He said he would return them; I told him he had got my all; he said he was in distress; I told him what I had he was welcome to; then said he this is not all, and I think shook the purse; I said, then search my pockets and welcome; he turned back again and put his hands across my breeches pocket; I had about three-pence halfpenny in my pocket, which he felt; he put his hand across my waistcoat to feel for my watch; he did not put his hand into my pocket, nor ask me for my watch. William Beckenham cried out to the other man that was robbing him, don't murder me. This man that was robbing me, said to his partner, d - n your eyes, if you use the young man ill, I will shoot you dead; I begged him not to let my partner be hurt; he said he should not; he said go on, if you turn again I will shoot you, if you don't you shall not be hurt; I walked gently on; that was all that passed between the man and me.

Q. You say it was about a quarter after ten, and it was a dark night?

Dobbs. It was.

Q. Look at the prisoner and see whether you can say that is the man?

Dobbs. The man was about that man's size, but I cannot swear positively; from the appearance and from the voice that appears to be the very man.

Q. Do you believe him to be so?

Dobbs. Yes.

Q. Where did you first hear his voice after this?

Dobbs. At Sir John Fielding's office.

Q. How long after the time you was robbed?

Dobbs. That was about a fortnight ago, I believe; I was called when Brannon and Madan were brought before Sir John Fielding the first day; that was in May; Merritt was not there.

Q. When did you see Merritt?

Dobbs. About a fortnight or three weeks ago, I cannot speak exactly to the time.

Q. You heard him speak at Sir John Fielding's?

Dobbs. Yes; that was the most that I could be a judge of.

Q. Have you seen your purse again since?

Dobbs. No; the prisoner said he threw it away; I heard him say so the last day he was at Sir John Fielding's office.

Q. How was that introduced?

Dobbs. I believe I asked him if he remembred what sort of a purse it was, and so did Justice Addington; he said it was either a purse or a linen bag, and that he threw it away; I took out the purse I had in my pocket, and asked him if he knew any thing of the purse, and whether it was like the purse I had in my pocket; he said he had done it away.

Q. What sort of a purse was it you was robbed of?

Dobbs. A linen bag purse.

John Leigh . I am clerk to Sir John Fielding ; I have here the voluntary confession the prisoner made before the Justice: on the 19th of August the prisoner was brought from Tyburn to the office by two constables.

Q. Did he make it freely and voluntarily?

Leigh. Yes.

Q. Were there any promises of favour?

Leigh. The Justice had said that he would endeavour to save his life.

Court. Then I will not suffer the confession to be read.

John Reynolds , Esq; I was attending the last execution of the convicts at Tyburn on the 19th of August; when the ordinary of Newgate had been some time in prayer with the unhappy convicts, a person came up to me and informed me that Madan, one of the convicts, was innocent, for that a person had been in the press yard, and declared that Madan was innocent, and that he was the person who had committed that robbery; I immediately asked the ordinary whether he had heard any thing of it; the ordinary informed me he had; in less than a minute another person came up, and said the man who had made that confession was among the crowd, and that he wished to take leave of Madan, and to ask his forgiveness; these words were hardly spoke before the prisoner at the bar appeared; he was instantly conducted into the cart, and

took leave of Madan; I immediately asked him if Madan was innocent; he answered he was; I then said is it true that you are the person that committed that robbery; he answered, yes; while this conversation passed, his back was to the convict Madan; I then desired him to turn about and make that declaration publickly looking at Madan; he refused to turn about, but again said that Madan was innocent, and then he said that he himself was not the person that committed the robbery; I told him that having once confessed it, it was my duty to order him into custody, which I immediately did.

Court. Was Madan convicted for the robbery of Dobbs?

Mr. Reynolds. No, of Beckenham

Court. Then that does not apply.

Mr. Reynolds. It was one and the same robbery.

Court. See how it is in the record.

Clerk of the Arraigns. It appears by the record that Madan was convicted for the robbery of Beckenham.

William Beckenham . John Dobbs and I were robbed at about a quarter after ten at night, or a little more, on the 9th of April coming across the fields; I met a tall lusty man; Dobbs was about eighteen yards behind me when I was robbed.

Q. Do you know whether Dobbs was robbed?

Beckenham. The man that came up to me first struck me; I had a stick in my hand; I struck him two or three times; he drew a cutlass, which he held to my neck, and swore he would cut me down if I made any resistance; he took a bundle, containing a new coat and waistcoat, from under my arm.

Q. Do you know any thing that was done to Dobbs?

Beckenham All that I heard pass was the man said give me your money, during the time I was robbed.

Q. Do you remember afterwards Dobbs going on?

Beckenham. Yes; he passed me.

Q. Did you see more than two people there?

Beckenham. No.

Q. Did the man that robbed Dobbs come up to you afterwards?

Beckenham. This lusty man that came up to me first took my watch out of my pocket; he said d - n your eyes, give me your money directly; I put my hand in my pocket, and pulled out foy shillings; there came up another man immediately; he clapped a pistol into my mouth, and said d - n your eyes, have you done with the dog? he said no, I have not got the watch; said I yes, you have taken it out of my pocket yourself.

Q. Did you take any notice of that man?

Beckenham. The man that came and put the pistol into my mouth appeared considerably shorter than the first man.

Q Do you take the prisoner to be the man?

Beckenham. I cannot say he is at all like him in appearance; the man that came to me appeared shorter; the prisoner is about as tall as the man that came to me first; the other said he had not got the watch; the man that put the pistol in my mouth said he would blow my brains out if I did not give it him; I said the other had it; they doubted it; they felt about my clothes; the lusty man that attacked me first swore if I did not give him the watch he would murder me; the other said don't; said he d - n your eyes I will; then said the other I will shoot you if you do.

Q. Do you know the name of that tall man that robbed you?

Beckenham. Michael Brannon .

Q. The other man seemed shorter than him and the prisoner?

Beckenham. Yes, he was shorter than him I am sure, and seemed to be shorter than the prisoner.

Q. Do you take upon you to say positively he was shorter, or that he appeared to you to be shorter?

Beckenham. I am sure he is shorter.

Q Are you sure he was shorter than the prisoner?

Beckenham. He appeared to me to be so.

Q. Did you see his face?

Beckenham. Yes, he stood before me sometime.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the man or not?

Beckenham. I do not think he is.

Q. Do you think you took sufficient notice of the shorter man to know him again if you was to see him?

Beckenham. I knew him so far as to prosecute him and he was convicted.

Q Was you here at the trial of Madan?

Beckenham. Yes, he was cast upon my indictment.

Q. Do you take upon you to say that you swore to the other man positively that you knew his face?

Beckenham. He appeared very much like the man; the coat that I lost was upon Madan's back at the time of his being taken.

Q. Did you see only two men?

Beckenham. No; they pushed me about the length of this table before they left me.

Q. They were a good while with you?

Beckenham. Yes, about ten minutes.

Q. Did you take particular notice of Madan's face?

Beckenham. I took particular notice of the men, their appearance, their size, and make, but could not see a great deal of their face.

Q. What do you think upon looking at that man?

Beckenham. He might be there for what I know, but he does not look like the man that came before me.

Q The question is, whether you believe that to be one of the two men or not?

Beckenham. I do not believe he is one of the two men, because the man that came to me first was a very lusty man, and the other was considerably shorter; Brannon is taller than this.

Beckenham. I believe Brannon is something taller, but there is but very little difference.

Q. You do believe this is not the man?

Beckenham. I believe so.

Q. to John Dobbs . Have you seen Brannon in Newgate?

Dobbs. Yes, after the last time I was before the Justice I came to look at him.

Q. What say you as to the difference in height between this prisoner and Brannon?

Dobbs. There is not a great deal of difference in the height; Brannon is a lustier man; there is a causeway at the place where we were robbed; the man might have some advantage in that.

Prisoner's Defence.

I have nothing at all to say for myself I am taken at such a nonplus; I had not time to send for any body.

Acquitted .

(2d M.) AMOS MERRITT was a second time indicted for that he in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon William Beckenham , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his site, and stealing from his person a cloth coat, value 40 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 20 s. a silver watch, value 3 l. and forty shillings in money, numbered , the property of the said William, April 9th .

No evidence was given.

Acquitted .

See the trial of Michael Brannon and Patrick Madan , for commiting this robbery, last sessions.

Reference Number: t17740907-63

632. (2d M) EDWARD CROTHER was indicted for committing a rape on the body of Ann Fletcher , a child under the age of ten years, to wit, of the age of four years , July 23d .

The girl being too young to give her testimony upon oath, the prisoner, who is but twelve years of age, was

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-64

633. (2d M.) OLIVER DAVIS was indicted on the coroner's inquisition, for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Brown (a black) by beating him with both his hands, in and upon the head, temples, and ears; thereby giving him several mortal bruises, of which he sustantly died , July 15th . *

Thomas Miller . The prisoner and the deceased came to my house on the morning of the 15th of June; they called for some rum and milk; I shewed them into a shuffle board room; they did not like it, but went into another room; when I brought the rum up they were stripped and got fighting; I thought the black had the advantage at first; he knocked the prisoner down and offered to strike him when he was down; the prisoner got up, and they went to it again, and the prisoner knocked the black down; the black got up again and said he would have another round; the prisoner then knocked the deceased down again, and he never rose any more.

Guilty of manslaughter . Branded and discharged.

Reference Number: t17740907-65

634. (2d M.) JOHN POPPLEWELL was indicted for stealing three silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of her Royal Highness the princess Amelia , July 9th . *

Keteneller Skinner. I am a silversmith: on the 11th of July in the morning, the prisoner

brought a spoon to me broke in two in the middle, and asked me to buy it; I weighed it, it came to eleven shillings and three pence; I suspected he stole it, and asked how he came by it; he said it was his own, and he had several more of them; that he had an uncle in the Hay-market, who would give him a good character, and knew the spoon to be his; I went with him to his uncle's; his uncle said it was his own, he had seen it at his table; upon that I gave him eleven shillings and three pence for it; his uncle said he would not swear to the identical spoon, but he had seen such at his table, and it must be his, for there was his name upon it; upon the same day one Mr. Pullen came with the prisoner to fetch the spoon, and gave me the eleven and three pence for it again; the prisoner said Mr. Pullen was his father-in-law, and wanted the spoon, that it should not go out of the family; Pullen bought another at the same time.

James Pullen . I know the prisoner very well: he has an own uncle, that is servant to the Princess Amelia; he used often to go and see his uncle; on the 9th of July I was at the Princess Amelia's; the prisoner was there then; his uncle told me he had lost two silver spoons; a fortnight before we were up in the steward's room, and two or three more servants; we all came down stairs, but the prisoner staid behind on the landing place; this was on Saturday; on Monday I went to carry my bill; Doctor Bell 's servant, who is chaplain to the Princess, met me and told me there was a spoon lost while I was there on Saturday; as soon as I had done my business I went and told the prisoner's uncle I had some reason to suspect his nephew had got the spoon that was lost, and told him my reason; I come to town and went to the uncle at the Hay-market, and he fetched the prisoner; we took him to the Turk's Head, and I charged him with stealing the spoon; he denied it a long while; I told him his uncle would get turned out of his place, and he would be the ruin of himself and his family; he then took me into the yard and said he was in great distress which occasioned him to take the spoon; I asked him what he had done with it, that we might get it again and replace it, and then perhaps all would be well.

Q. Did you promise him any favour?

Pullen. No, he took me to Mr. Skinner's and we got the spoon again; I paid eleven shillings and threepence for it, (produces it); I bought another spoon as much like it as I could, in order to replace it because it was broke.

Edward Powell , a page to the Princess Amelia, deposed, that the spoon was the property of the Princess Amelia.

Ellis Pugh , silversmith to her Royal Highness the Princess Amelia, proved the spoon to be her Royal Highness's property, and said it had been marked as all the rest were with A. P. that the A. was erased.

Prisoner's Defence.

A young man in a public house gave me the spoon and desired me to sell it for him.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-66

635, 636. (L.) CHARLES NANGLE and MARK LOVE otherwise MAGRAH were indicted; the first for having in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange called a bank post bill, bearing date the 28th of June, subscribed by Jeremiah Thompson , for the governor and company of the bank of England for 50 l. payable to Mess. Coiston and company ; the other prisoner for forging and counterfeiting an indorsement with the name Robert Swyer , with intention to defraud William Barrett .

Second Count, both charged with uttering and publishing as true the same, knowing it to be forged with the same intention.

Third Count, with the like forgery as in the first, only instead of saying upon a bill of exchange called a bank post bill, it is called a promissory note for the payment of money.

Fourth Count, with the like uttering as in the second, only with the same distinction as in the third count, June 28th. ||

William Harriman . I am clerk to Mess. Colston; I went to the bank on the 28th of June last and desired four bank post bills three fifties, and a thirty-six pound eighteen shillings and fourpence, to be made payable to Robert Swyer of Shaftsbury or his order; I put them in my pocket and went home; this was about two o'clock on Tuesday; the 28th of June in going home, somebody in an alley pushed against me; I thought it an accident and did not lay any stress upon it; when I got a little further I put my hand in my pocket and missed my pocket book; I went home directly and acquainted the head clerk with it; after that I went to the bank and got the numbers of the bills, which were 7800, 1, 2, 3; was advertised them next

day; I went to the bank for the numbers, within about half an hour after I was robbed.

Matthew Vernon . I am an officer in the bank: (produces a bank post bill for fifty pounds, which is read and corresponds with the indictment); the name Thompson is Mr. Thompson's hand writing; the bill was duly signed, and brought for acceptance next morning about ten o'clock; there were no other bills of that day that correspond in number and sum with this.

Harriman. The bill produced is one of those I received from the bank; I know it by a blotch in the name.

William Barrett . I live in the Minories; both the prisoners came to my shop on the 28th of June and bought goods to the amount of four pounds seventeen shillings and ten pence; they offered a bank post bill, payable to Robert Swyer or order; that is the bill that is now produced; I looked at it and told them that as it was payable to Swyer or order, it required an indorsement; upon this Nangle took a pen and indorsed it, and the other man, before he indorsed it, whispered to him; and he was present when it was indorsed.

Court. Look at the indorsement?

Barrett. That indorsement was wrote by Nangle; Nangle was the man who offered it in payment; I paid the difference in cash, and each of them took a parcel of the goods I had sold them; they were done up in two parcels; Mr. Pierrepoint called upon me that night, and I paid him that bill in part of an account we settled between us; it was Nangle who immediately bargained for the goods; but the other interfered so far as to say whether they were bad or good, or he liked the quality of them; I afterwards apprehended them both; I met Nangle on the 26th of July, and another man with him; I sent for my apprentice; the person I sent had fixed them, and when the apprentice came he agreed in opinion with me, that these were the two men; I apprehended them; at the time they were taken they were loitering about near the Bank; I sent for my apprentice before I took them that I might be sure of the men; Mark Love had altered his dress a little; these things were sold openly by me, and the bill paid openly in my shop

Anthony Twiddle . I am apprentice to the last witness; I remember the prisoners coming to the shop; it was in the afternoon; they cheapened some goods; they would not have them cut off til l they had first shewn the note to Mr. Barrett; Love said shew the gentleman the bill to see whether he likes it or not, before we have any thing cut off; Mr. Barrett took the bill and said it required an indorsement; Nangle took a pen and ink and wrote Robert Swyer upon the back; some words passed in a whisper, I could not hear what they were, but Mr. Barrett had before that told them it required an indorsement; then Mr. Barrett made a bill of the goods and put them up in separate parcels; each of them took a parcel; Love went out half a minute before Nangle; my master sent for me about the 15th of July to the lottery office.

Q. Is that the post bill that was produced by the two prisoners, and tendered to your master?

Twiddle. (Inspects it) I am sure it is, because there is a particular blotch in the name I can speak to it by; my master sent for me in order to see if I knew the two prisoners at the bar after he had met them in the street; I went to Richardson and Goodluck's office; a man that I had put upon watch asked me if he was to stand there; I said yes; there I asked where my master was; I beckoned to him at a little distance off, then the man came and said the men were just at the other end of the lottery office; I saw them there, and a third person with them; I was then certain of Nangle's person, and I am sure of it now; they were apprehended and taken to the Manston-house; I never saw the men till they came to my master's shop to buy the goods there; they came some time between five and nine in the afternoon, I cannot be positive to the hour; the men were near a quarter of an hour in the shop; I was behind a compter on the other side of the shop; Mr. Barrett stood behind the opposite compter; Mr. Barrett gave change for the bill; they just weighed the money, but I believe they took some guineas that were light, because they were in a hurry.

James Hudson . I am servant to Mr. Biggs; the two prisoners came to our shop; they looked at some goods and bought some, and they presented a bank post bill for fifty pounds; having some suspicion of it I desired my master to let me go out to get it changed; I did not mean to change it; I went out and returned, and said I could not get it changed; they said it did not much signify, they were going into the city and would call for them as they came back; I went after them, I did not keep them in my eyes all the way; coming by Mr. Barrett's shop I saw them in the shop; I watched till they came out

again, and then I asked Mr. Barrett if he had given them change for a bill; he said he had; I told him my suspicions about it; he said they had indorsed it to him, he thought there was no danger of losing the money; I watched them to Whitechapel Bars, from thence to Leman-street; I saw them go into a house called the English Hotel; I told Mr. Barrett of it; I am sure they are the same men; they are not in the same dress now they were then; each then had a bundle under his arm.

Q to Vernon. When these bank bills are issued payable to order, do the Bank pay them without an order?

Vernon. No, not without a proper indorsement from the party to whom it is made payable; if a bill comes, and the person to whom it is payable cannot be found, which is sometimes the case, they then require a particular receipt.

William Chase I am a linendraper in the Minories; Nangle came to my shop, on the 28th of June, about six in the afternoon, and bought a piece of Irish cloth, and four neckcloths; he said I must give him change for a bill of 36 l. 18 s. 4 d. (it is produced); that is the bill; I paid the difference in cash; the amount of the goods was 3 l. 12 s. 6 d.

Mr. Harriman. That is one of the four bills I got that day at the bank.

Evelyn Pierrepoint . I know Mr. Barrett; I settled an account with him on the 28th of June; he said he had received that day a bank post bill an hour or two before; that he doubted the goodness of it; that two people had bought some goods; one had indorsed it, and he believed it was forged; I took it; then it was indorsed as it is now; I will swear positively to the number.

Richard Jeston Case . I received this bill on the 29th of June, of Mr. Pierrepoint; I had no other bill in my pocket; I went from Mr. Pierrepoint's to the Bank; it was there immediately stopped.

Benjamin Bates . I know Mr. Swyer; he lives at Shaftsbury in Dorsetshire; I know his hand writing; the name indorsed of Swyer upon this bill is not Mr. Swyer's hand writing.

Prisoner's Defence.

I leave it to my counsel.

For the prisoner.

Thomas William Robinson . I am a surgeon: I know Nangle; I saw him on Wednesday or Thursday some time about the 27th or 28th of June; I am not certain of the day; I have known him in Liverpool; I met him in Bishopsgate street; I went with him to the Red Lion and London Hospital, Whitechapel; there was one Donnelly with us; a man accosted Nangle as soon as we got into the house; Nangle had some parcels made up in paper when I met him, and the man that met Nangle asked him if he had bought the goods he spoke to him about; Nangle said he had, and produced them; Nangle gave the man the goods, and he asked how much they came to; Nangle said ten pounds; the landlord was present in the room at the same time. The man who was waiting at the publick house produced that fifty pound note, and Nangle gave him a twenty pound bank note, and the rest in cash; it was between three and four o'clock when I met Nangle; the man then went away. I do not know to whom it was payable, but I believe one Swyer or Sawyer, or such name; (it is shewn him). I believe that bill is the same; the master and Donnelly were in the room at the same time. I have known Nangle two or three years ago at Liverpoole. I have not seen him till this particular time; I am sure it was on Thursday; I think it was the 28th. The parcel was opened; there were some muslin and some handkerchiefs in it.

Henry Barrett . I have known Nangle about five years; he worked with me as a stone carver; he always behaved well. I have not known him much these four years.

James Sands. I am a carver: I have known Nangle these four years; he worked with me till last September; he bears a good character.

Michael Lurriman . I have known Nangle six years; he worked with me till four years ago; he bore a good character.

Q. to Barrett. Whether you don't frequently receive bank post bills without any indorsement upon them?

Barrett. I never did receive a bank post bill without it; I looked upon it to be so necessary that I refused to take this bill till it was indorsed.

NANGLE guilty . Death .

LOVE acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-67

637, 638. (L.) JOHN DEXTER and JEREMIAH ALLEN were indicted; the first for stealing two canvas bags, value 2 s. and 17 lb. wt. of tobacco, and twenty shillings , the

property of Thomas Sansbery and John Read , and the other for receiving the above goods well knowing them to have been stolen , July 11th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-68

639. (M) THOMAS WALLIS was indicted for stealing a guinea , the property of Alexander Showan , Dec. 18th . ||

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-69

640. (2d M) LEWIS WILLIAMS was indicted for assaulting Thomas Green with a certain offensive weapon and instrument called a pistol, with intent to rob him , June 1st . *

Thomas Green I am guard to the New Leeds coach ; I saw the prisoner on Finchley Common in April last, in the night; he ordered the coach to stop, and then rode up to the door, and told the gentleman in the coach that he must have a little money; I immediately fired at him, and he rode off; whether I wounded him I cannot tell; I will not positively swear that the prisoner is the man; whoever he was, he was quite alone, and rid off; it was two or three months after before he was taken up; I saw no pistol at the time he stopped the coach or demanded the money.

Q. What was your piece loaded with?

Green. With shot; there was no ball. He stood on the near side of the coach.

John Clarke . The prisoner owned to me that he did this fact, and wished the guard had killed him. On examining his lodgings I found a pair of pistols and some slugs, and a coat and waistcoat, which were both shot through. On examining him, I found likewise his back was shot; he said one Robinson had been concerned with him in several robberies, but that he was alone at this time.

Prisoner's Defence.

I don't know any thing of the affair; when I came to lodge in the room there was a box in it; the clothes nor pistols are neither of them mine. I live servant with Sir George Hay ; I could have had many gentlemen of Doctor's Commons to my character if I had sent for them.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-70

641. (L.) EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Josiah Collier , Aug. 14 . ~

Josiah Collier . On the 14th of August, going up Holborn-hill , I felt something at my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I immediately seized him and he dropped it; the watch being set I took him to the watch-house. (The handkerchief produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner, in his defence, said, he never saw the prosecutor, nor the handkerchief, till he laid hold of him.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-71

642. (L.) JOSEPH HARRISON was indicted for stealing two smoothing planes, value 18 d. the property of John Eaton , Sept. 3 . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-72

643. (L.) WILLIAM WESTBROOK was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Kersley , Aug. 21 . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-73

644. (L.) JOSHUA COTTON was indicted for stealing a pair of leather shoes, value 10 d. the property of Michael Warren , Aug. 23d . ~

Michael Warren . I am a shoe-maker . On the 23d of August I lost a pair of leather shoes; I saw them about two o'clock; I went up stairs and came down between three and four; then I missed them.

Another witness. I am servant to Mr. Warren: coming out of the yard, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner with one foot within side the shop, the other upon the cell of the door; he leaned over, and took a pair of shoes off of the board; I ran after him and in about twenty yards stopped him; he had the shoes beneath his coat under his arm; they were taken from him.

Prisoner's Defence.

I saw a brown paper on the ground; I thought it an empty piece of paper; I took it up and found in it a pair of shoes.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-74

645. (L.) BENJAMIN GIBBS was indicted for ripping, cutting, and stealing 80 lb. of lead, value 6 s. the property of Philip Keys , Esq ; the said lead being affixed to a certain dwelling house , the property of the said Philip Keys , Esq; Sept. 2d . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-75

646. (L) JAMES DUFFEY was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Pearce , July 25th . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-76

647. (L.) SAMUEL BOWMAN was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Thorold , July 21st . ~

Thomas Thorold . On the 21st of July, about twelve at noon, as I was passing under Newgate , I felt something at my pocket; I turned round and seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; he dropped the handkerchief, and as I was stooping to take it up, he got from me; I pursued and took him at the corner of the Old Bailey.

- Woodfield, the constable, who was charged with the prisoner, produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

There were five or six lads by; one of them threw a handkerchief, and it came against my breast. The prosecutor laid hold of me and said I had picked his pocket, and went to strike me with a stick, so I got from him.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-77

648. (L.) WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Richard Davage , July 31st . ~

Richard Davage . On the 31st of July, about a quarter after nine in the evening, coming up Fenchurch-street , I missed my handkerchief; the prisoner was taken for another offence of the same kind, and my handkerchief found upon him.

William Bowyer . I saw the prisoner pick another gentleman's pocket; I secured him; the gentleman came up, and searching him, found the prosecutor's handkerchief upon him.

Alexander Penn . I was going along Fenchurch-street; the last witness called after me, and said I was robbed; he had secured the prisoner; I returned, searched him, and found the prosecutor's hand in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the handkerchief.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-78

649. (L.) WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing seventy-two pair of iron tongues and chases for buckles, in the rough, value 5 s. the property of William Gibbs , Aug. 30th . ~

William Gibbs . I am an ironmonger in Smithfield : on the 30th of August, the prisoner came to our shop for a pair of buckle chases; I served him with a pair, and he asked for another; while I was looking for them, I heard him fumbling among some tongues and chafes in the rough at the end of the compter; I suspected he had taken some, and informed Henry Bonnum , who was in the compting house, of it, and desired him to step out and justle against his pocket; he did, and when he had paid for those he bought, and was going away, he stopped him, and we charged him with it; he denied it; but when I threatened to send for a constable, he pulled them out of his pocket; there were six dozen pair.

Henry Bonnum confirmed his evidence.

The prisoner, in his defence, denied the charge, and said he only took up the paper to see if there were any there to suit him

He called two witnesses who had known him a dozen years, and gave him a good character.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-79

650. (2d M.) WILLIAM GRIFFITHS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Palmer , on the 26th of July , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. a silver cream pot, value 7 s. two silver salts, value 10 s. a silver pepper box, value 5 s. a stone stock buckle set in silver, value 20 s. a silver table spoon. value 10 s. a silver pap spoon, value 5 s. five silver tea spoons, value 5 s. and a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3 s. the property of the said Joseph, in his dwelling house . ||

Joseph Palmer . My house was broke open in the night of the 26th of July; I was up the last person over night; I was bad a bed the next morning with the rheumatism; my brother came up to me, and told me several things were missing; I came down and made a general search, when I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them.)

Benjamin Palmer . I am brother to the last witness; I fastened all the doors and windows over night; I went to bed at near eleven o'clock; I got up in the morning at about seven o'clock; I was first up in the family; I found all the places in the shop and parlour fast as I left them over night; soon after I missed several things, of which I informed my brother; it was some time before I discovered which way the thief had got into the house. I went into the cellar about eleven o'clock; I observed a greater light than usual came through the door, and upon examination I saw the bar of the cellar door lie upon the stairs; the porter and I examined it; there were three marks of a chissel, which corresponded with a chissel Mr. Brown has in his custody.

Joseph Palmer . I applied at Justice Welch's office to advertise the things I had lost, but I saw my things advertised by Sir John Fielding ; I saw the chissel applied to the cellar door; it fitted the marks exactly; I saw the plate in the house the night before it was stole.

Francis Jarvis . I went down into the cellar with my master's brother, between ten and eleven o'clock, to fetch some hard soap; my master desired me to go up and see if the door was fast, because the light was more than ordinary; I went up and found the bar broke down and set upon one side; it is a wooden bar that goes across the inside; there are two half doors go down from the street; I pushed my hand against the door, and it went open; the two bolts were forced off.

Mr. Robert Brown . Returning from the city about one o'clock in the morning, on the 27th of July, as I passed Charing-cross the prisoner passed me, and looked very hard at me; he was to close to me, that I thought he had picked my pocket; he afterwards crossed upon me three several times between Charing-cross and Palace-yard; I was on the right hand side of Palace-yard by the Horn Tavern, when I saw him crossing from the opposite side, and he stopped in the midway; there was no person at all near there that I saw, I thought, by a motion he made with his right hand, using his left at the same time, that he was cocking a pistol which alarmed me very much; I looked about for a watchman; there was a watchman in the passage of the Horn Tavern; I bid him follow me home; I was going to Ahingdon-street; he did get up to follow me, but when I had got about forty or fifty yards, I looked about and found he was not following me; the prisoner was going along by the stone-building at the Office of Ordnance; I kept my eye on him; I saw him cross over by the dark part by Henry the VIIth's Chapel, a dangerous place; I was on the right hand side, and the prisoner on the left, till he began to cross towards me; a watchman turned the corner by me; I called to him to stop that man, for I was persuaded he had some ill design; we both ran at him; at the same time; I seized him by the collar with my left hand, and with my right hand seized his right arm; I felt this chissel (producing a large one) under his coat in his right arm; he held it in this position like a pistol; when we had seized him I told the watchman to conduct him to the Round-house; going along, I observed him to be very uneasy; I then took from him under his coat this hanger (producing it); when we had got him to the Round-house, as I had a strong suspicion he had fire arms about him, I desired he might be searched; I felt his pockets and round his arm, but found nothing; not being satisfied, I ordered his coat to be taken off; taking it off this pepper box (producing it) fell from under his right arm to the best of my recollection; and the constable of the night, or one of the watchmen, took out of his pocket a flint a steel and some matches (producing them); I afterwards ordered his shirt to be stripped off, and from his shirt, while stripping off; came out this salt cellar; and from his breeches this other salt cellar (producing them); these I have had in my custody ever since; he was taken next morning to Sir John Fielding 's, who advertised the things that I foun d upon him, and committed him for further examination, and the next day they were sworn to by Mr. Palmer.

Q. Was you present at Mr. Palmer's afterwards when the chissel was tried on the door of his house?

Brown. Yes, I was; there were two impressions made by this chissel; one at the top of the door, the other at the bottom; the impressions correspond precisely with the point of the chissel; there was one mark on the centre of the

door, where the wrench was made when it was opened, for they drew bolts as thick as my finger; there is a mark corresponds with the face of the chissel for five inches; there is likewise a notch in the chissel, and there is the mark of it in something hard in the door. (The plate was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-80

651, 652. (2d M.) ROBERT EDWARDS and FRANCIS MORRIS were indicted; the first, for that he in the king's highway in and upon Thomas Morgan did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear, and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a watch with the inside case made of metal, and the outside case covered with tortoiseshell, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 2 s. and a steel bed hook, value 2 d. the property of the said Thomas, and the other for receiving the above goods well knowing them to have been stolen , June 3d ||.

Thomas Morgan . On the 3d of June about a quarter after nine at night, I was stopped near the first mile stone in the Tottenham-court-road as I was going to Hampstead, and was robbed of my watch by the prisoner Edwards; it was about dusk, but it was light enough to see his face; I am satisfied he is the man; I advertised the watch, and received a summons to look at it, among many others, at Sir John Fielding 's; there I saw it and swore to it.

John Heley . I took Morris by an information from his wife; I searched his house, and found this watch (producing it); it has no chain to it; I believe Mr. Clarke found the chain; he took Edwards and brought him into Morris's house while I was there.

Morgan inspects the watch. This outside case I am sure is mine; the inside case I believe to be mine, but the name and number have been altered.

Q. from Edwards to Morgan. Whether he is sure I am the person? I think he must be mistaken.

Morgan. I am satisfied you are the man; I am convinced from your face and your voice.

Christopher Moon , a watchmaker, deposed, that he cleaned the watch for Mr. Morgan some years before, and that notwithstanding the alteration of the name and number he could swear it was Mr. Morgan's watch.

John Clarke . Heley and I went to apprehend Morris; while we were there a young fellow came to borrow a shilling of one Davis in Morris's house; I asked him who he came from; he said the man was waiting without; I went out with him and took Edwards; I had an information from Morris's wife, that Edwards stood charged; I took him into the house, and took them both to prison; eight or nine days after Morris was in custody, I took this chain upon him (producing it).

Morgan. I believe that chain to be mine; there is a bed hook to it; I cannot swear to it.

Edwards's Defence.

I did not know till the night before I came to Newgate, the night on which the robbery was committed, therefore it is impossible to recollect where I was.

Morris's Defence.

This watch was in a case of mine, with eleven more.

Edwards called a witness, who had known him twelve years, and gave him a good character.

Morris called a witness, who said he was bred up to a watch engraver, and now kept a public-house.

EDWARDS Guilty. Death .

MORRIS Guilty . T. 14 .

Edwards was recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Reference Number: t17740907-81

653. (2d M.) EDWARD FOX was indicted for stealing a pair of leather gloves, value 6 d. a walking stick, with a hook horn head, mounted with silver, value 2 s. and two guineas, the property of William Bishop , privately from his person , August 8th ||.

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-82

654. (2d M.) HENRY DRAKE WATSON was indicted for stealing twenty remnants of Irish cloth, value 15 s, a quilted petticoat, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 6 d. two muslin aprons, value 2 s. two linen aprons, value 2 s. a remnant of India dimity, value 6 d. six linen handkerchiefs, value 18 d. two sprigged cloaks, value 3 s. six remnants of muslin, value 2 s. a pair of

lawn ruffles, value 18 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. five muslin caps, value 1 s. four remnants of lawn, value 1 s. a table cloth, value 1 s. five remnants of Russia cloth, value 1 s. and two pair of linen sleeves, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Jones , August 15th +.

Thomas Jones . I am a linen draper and live in Oxford-street; the prisoner was a shopman to me; he was employed under another man in a shop I have in Swallow-street ; a servant who has the care of that shop, told me he had been looking over the stock book, and found several erasements had been made in it; I immediately compared that stock book with the check I kept upon it, and found that such erasements had been made, and the things were missing; I got a warrant against the prisoner, and then I sent for him; I told him I had missed such things; he immediately confessed he had taken them, and begged of me not to prosecute him; he said he had kept company with a prostitute for twelve months, and had been very uneasy in his mind; that he had intended to acquaint me with it, and that he would leave off those ways, but did not know what to do; he did intend to tell me, but was afraid of the woman discovering it; he had persuaded her to go to service next day, and then intended to leave off these ways.

On his cross examination he was asked if he did not promise him favour; to which he replied in the negative.

The prisoner called David Bynan , who said he had a warrant to apprehend the prisoner; that the things were found by the prisoner's direction; and that Mr. Jones said he would not hurt him.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-83

655. (2d M.) MARY JACKSON was indicted for stealing a stuff petticoat, value 4 s. two linen aprons, value 2 s. a yard and a quarter of linen cloth, value 1 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two linen caps, value 6 d. the property of Mary Sedgwick , widow , Sept. 13th .

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-84

656. (L.) JOHN COTTON was indicted for the wilful murder of William Saddler , June 22d .

Ann Sadler . I am the widow of the deceased; I keep the Red Lion, on Musswell-hill; Cotton, the prisoner, worked opposite our house; he owed us fifteen pence; my husband went over and asked him for it, but did not get it; about five o'clock the prisoner set out for London, and my husband followed him; a little before six my husband returned, and a great many people with him; he was then wounded; they went with him to a surgeon at Highgate; he died on the 9th of July.

Henry Wilmot . I live at Tottenham; I saw the deceased the day he received his wound at Crouch-end ; I was almost opposite the Queen's-head, on horseback, standing at the blacksmith's; I saw the deceased and the prisoner coming up the road just by the King's-head; the deceased laid hold of the prisoner by the collar, or coat; they were then about a hundred yards from me; he let him go again; they came about fifty or sixty yards further, and then laid hold of one another by the collar; I was about thirty yards from them; I stood still all the time; there were no blows on either side; I saw they were shoving one another about, and the deceased being the strongest, when they came close to me, shoved the bricklayer across a little bit of a drain, or ditch, about twelve inches deep, and two feet wide; then I saw the prisoner strike the deceased on the left side of the head; they were both on their legs at that time; on the prisoner striking him, he let him go, and then they got out of the ditch; they got into the road, and had a little kind of a fight; there were blows struck on both sides, and a fall, and the bricklayer seemed to strike at the place of the head where it was bloody, with his fist; there was but one blow with the hammer; they got up, and the publican cryed out, will n body lay hold of him! will nobody lay hold of him! or something of that kind, bleeding very bad.

William King , a blacksmith at Crouch end, who was standing with the last witness, confirmed his evidence.

Mr. Young. I am surgeon; I saw the deceased while he was sick in the hospital; I saw the wound on the left side of his head; I found the skull fractured.

Q. Did that wound occasion the death?

Young. Most certainly.

Prisoner's Defence.

As I was returning to London from my work the deceased followed me, and overtook me

when I had got a quarter of a mile; he asked me if I would sight; I told him I was not able; he then left me; he overtook me again by Crouch-end; he charged me with owing him fifteen pence I did not owe him; he asked me for it; and because I would not pay it he said he would lick me out of it; he knocked me down in a ditch; I got up, and he knocked me down again; he was going to strike me a third time, and not being able to stand against him I struck him in my own defence.

For the Prisoner.

John Cheek . The prisoner is a bricklayer and worked for my father; when the men had finished their job, I ordered them half a gallon of beer to treat the men; when it was brought over the deceased said Cotton owed him thirteen-pence; I had paid sixteen pence for him that day, which was all that he then charged him with; the deceased laid hold of his collar and shoved him about very much, and said he should not go till he paid it; it was at Crouch-end.

George Gillet . I saw all that happened at Crouch end; when we had done our job the deceased came over and charged the prisoner with owing him thirteen pence, and said he should not go till he paid it; he went home and got a stick five feet long, and followed the prisoner; he overtook him at Crouch-end and knocked up his heels, and threw him into a ditch, and struck him twice; while he was in the ditch he was going to strike him the third time, and the prisoner struck him with the hammer; then they came out of the ditch together, and had an engagement by the turnpike, in the road, and gave each other a fall; the prisoner seeing the blood come said, if he would kill him he might, he would fight no longer.

Not guilty of the murder but guilty of manslaughter . B . and Imp. six months .

Reference Number: t17740907-85

657. (L.) THOMAS PETT was indicted for stealing 48 lb. of moist sugar, value 12 s. the property of James Dyer , Aug. 15 . ~

John Rutherford . I am clerk to Mr. Dver, who is a sugar-baker ; on the 15th of August I was at Ralph's-Key ; we had fifteen hogsheads of sugar there for shipping, and they were weighed; the coopers came down to hoop them; the prisoner is a cooper ; I was informed the prisoner had taken some sugar out of the hogsheads; I weighed them over again, and found four of them plundered.

John Dixon . I saw the prisoner as he was at work at the hogsheads, put some sugar in a bag three times; the bag was afterwards found.

John Bricher . I was up in the compting-house; the last witness called me down, and told me some of the coopers had been filling a bag with sugar; my partner and I went down and found the bag of sugar under the scaleboards, with loose hoops over it, it weighed fifty-four pounds; the prisoner was present when we found it; Dixon told me he saw the prisoner put the sugar in the bag, on which I took him.

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing at all of it.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-86

658. (L.) SAMUEL TRANTAM was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of William Bolton , August 25th . ~

William Bolton . On the 25th of August, about eight o'clock I was going up Ludgate-hill ; I put my hand in my pocket and missed my handkerchief; Mr. Rose soon after brought the prisoner to me, and Mr. Rose had my handkerchief in his hand.

- Rose. I was coming down Ludgate-hill; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's right hand coat pocket; I secured him and carried him to the prosecutor; I took the handkerchief out of his bosom.

John Doncastle , the constable, produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I took the handkerchief off the ground.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-87

659. (M.) DANIEL GRIFFITHS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Oram , on the 6th of August ,

about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing three delph bowls, value 1 s. a china bowl, value 1 s. two looking glasses, value 8 s. a delph dish, value 4 d. a linen tablecloth, value 2 s. and a pair of leather shoes, value 4 s. the property of the said Thomas in his dwelling house . ~

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-88

660, 661. (2d M.) JOHN SMETHURST and LUKE MARGERUM were indicted for stealing a bank note, value 10 l. the property of Robert Tatham , in the dwelling house of Andrew Wallis , the same note being due and unsatisfied , July 4th . ~

Both acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-89

662, 663. (L.) HANNAH MACARTY and HANNAH BELL were indicted for stealing two linen gowns, value 20 s. a linen tablecloth, value 2 s. two silk and cotton handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a sattin cloak, value 7 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. three linen aprons, value 2 s. a linen napkin, value 6 d. a linen sheet, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. seven yards of printed cotton cloth, value 7 s. and eight yards of silk lace, value 8 s. the property of Ann Stevenson , widow , Aug. 14 . ~

Ann Stevenson . I keep a public house ; the prisoner was employed by me as a nurse during a long illness; came the latter end of July, and staid four weeks; I paid her for her attendance 5 s. 3 d. a week; I missed some things; being ill and not having an opportunity of looking over my things, my suspicion was raised from the prisoner (Macarty) having a linen handkerchief of mine about her neck; on being challenged with that handkerchief, she owned it was mine. I missed on the 15th of August, a gown, and a great many other things, and went to Mr. Bruin's, a pawnbroker's on Snow-hill; there I found many things that are mentioned in the indictment; Bell had the silk handkerchief; Bell had slept one night in the house.

James Gattey . I am servant to Mr. Bruin, the pawnbroker; both the prisoners pawned goods at different times with me; the prosecutor came to enquire concerning some things; Bell was the person that pawned these things (particularizing some of them); they were all pawned as was usual with them in the name of Macarty; I don't know that any of the things produced were pawned by Macarty herself.

George Black produced two gowns, two handkerchiefs, and a table cloth, which were delivered to him. (The things deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner, Bell, in her defence, denied the charge.

There being no evidence to affect Macarty, she was not put upon her defence.

Bell called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

MACARTY acquitted .

BELL guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-90

664, 665. (2d M.) WILLIAM SPEDDING and ANN, his wife , were indicted for making, forging, and counterfeiting a piece of false and counterfeit money, to the likeness and similitude of a sixpence , June 17 .

Both acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-91

666. (2d M.) MATTHEW PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing twenty-four iron streaks, value 5 l. 3 lb. of nails, value 1 s. and twenty-four rivets, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Clarke and Co. +

Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-92

667, 668. (L.) CHARLES PULLEN and MARY, his wife , were indicted for stealing a muslin apron, value 2 s. a cloth apron, value 3 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a callico handkerchief, value 3 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Stubbs , Aug. 2d . ~

John Stubbs . I live in Finsbury, Moorfields : I am a leather breeches maker . My wife and I went into Smithfield on the 31st of July, about three in the afternoon, and returned home at half after ten at night. When I went out I double locked the door; on my return I found it on the spring; I borrowed a candle of my next door neighbour, and went up stairs; I found my first room door broke open; I had the key in my pocket; I came down; the watch was going by; I brought him in, and we all went up stairs together; I found my book-desk and

the drawers broke open, and the books and drawers left about the room; we went up two pair of stairs; there I found my chest of drawers broke open; the locks of the drawers were broke open, and the drawers broke almost to pieces, and my clothes taken out. On the Monday following, I was told by a young man, that the Kentish Drover, in Long-lane, Smithfield, was a likely place to find my things as, and advised me to search there; I went to my Lord Mayor next morning, and got a warrant to search the prisoner's house; in the one pair of stairs room I found two silk handkerchiefs, an India callico handkerchief, a white linen handkerchief, a worked muslin apron, and a callico apron; I asked them how they came by them; Mr. Pullen said he did not know any thing about them further than that the callico handkerchief was given to him; we found them in two different drawers, and some among the soul linen; we took the woman before my Lord Mayor; she denied some time knowing any thing about them; afterwards she said they were left there by one Jack, she did not know his other name, for two shillings. The prisoner keeps the Kentish Drover. (The goods were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Ann Tadwell . I know the callico handkerkerchief and muslin apron to be Mrs. Stubb's property; I have seen her wear them several times.

Saints Phillips. I know the callico handchief and muslin apron to be the property of Mrs. Stubbs.

John Squire . I am a constable: on the 2d of August I had a search warrant brought me, signed by my Lord Mayor, to search the prisoner's house, the Kentish Drover, in Long-lane; I found the things that are produced there.

Charles Pullen 's Defence.

I was in bed when the things were brought into my house; my wife told me one Jack left them, and said he would call again; he had been there several times before, but has never been since.

Mary Pullen's Defence.

A lad whose name is Jack brought the things to me, and desired to leave them, and said he would call again for them; I took them up stairs; never saw him from that time to this; I knew him by his coming in and having a glass of brandy and so on.

Q. from the Jury to the Prosecutor. Who was the person that gave you the intelli gence?

Stubbs. His name is Wright; he lives at Walworth; he advised me to search the Red Lion, in Whitecross-street, and the prisoner's house, as suspicious houses; I searched both, but found nothing of mine at the Red Lion.

The prisoner called Elizabeth Norton , who deposed that the prisoner was at home on the 3st of July, from eight in the morning till eight at night.

Elizabeth Cleave , who lives at a Mr. Naylor's opposite the prisoner's, deposed that she saw him at home all that day, and that she had heard that the wife was all day at Hackney.

James Howell deposed that he was at the prisoner's house on the 31st of August, from two o'clock in the afternoon till between four and five, and that the prisoner was at home at that time.

Mary Williams , Elizabeth Russell , and Jane Williams deposed that they went to Hackney with Mary Pullen , and that they were in company with her till ten o'clock at night.

And they called ten other witnesses, who gave them a good character.

CHARLES PULLEN guilty . T .

MARY PULLEN acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-93

669. (L.) WILLIAM HUGHES was indicted for being found at in the city of London, on the 5th of September last, before the expiration of the time for which he had been transported .

It appeared from the Record that the prisoner was tried in Mr. Alderman Nash's mayoralty, for stealing a silk handkerchief, of which he was convicted, and received sentence of transportation for seven years; that in Mr. Alderman's Townsend's mayoralty, he was capitally convicted for being found at large, before the expiration of the said term of seven years, but afterwards received his Majesty's mercy upon condition of transportation for fourteen years; he was now indicted for being found at large in the parish of St. James's, in the County of Middlesex, before the expiration of the said fourteen years, to which

He pleaded Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-94

670. (L.) PETER BURGENO was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Righton , August 2d . ~

Mr. John Righton deposed, that his carriage broke down with him on the 2d of August at the end of the Fleet-market , which occasioned a croud, at which time his pocket was picked of a silk handkerchief.

- Haddersley deposed, that he saw the prisoner pick Mr. Righton's pocket of his handkerchief, which he put in at the bosom of his shirt, from whence the witness took it. (The handkerchief was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner in his defence said, he found the handkerchief in the Fleet-market; he called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-95

671. (L.) WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Freeman , July 29th . ~

John Freeman . On the 29th of July, about half after six in the afternoon, coming down Devonshire-street from the square, I was told I had lost my handkerchief; I put my hand in my pocket and missed it directly; I had passed the prisoner just before. (The handkerchief produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

James Arnold . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and run away; I pursued him and cryed stop thief, and Cumberland stopped him.

Peter Cumberland . I stopped the prisoner and pulled the handkerchief from under the flap of his waistcoat; it hung down as he ran along.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-96

672. (L.) JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Henry Burder , July 30th . ~

Henry Burder . Coming down Chick-lane between four and five o'clock in the afternoon on the 30th of July, I saw the prisoner flurt my handkerchief out of my pocket; I saw it in his hand; I turned round and said you rascal what do you mean by that? he ran down Black-boy-alley; I pursued him, with the cry of stop thief; he was stopped by the constable; I had lost sight of him as he turned the corner, but am sure he is the man; I do not know what became of the handkerchief, it was not upon him when he was taken.

- Land, the constable, deposed, that upon hearing the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner run, he stopped him, but found nothing upon him.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never saw the handkerchief.

Guilty . T .

Reference Number: t17740907-97

673, 674. (L.) WILLIAM NORBURY and BENJAMIN DENNISON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Cobb , on the 1st of August , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 2 s. the property of the said James, in his dwelling house . ~

Both acquitted .

Reference Number: t17740907-98

675. (L.) JOHN ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing a linen quilt, value 30 s. two linen sheets, value 25 s. a stuff petticoat, value 3 s. a silk and stuff gown, value 20 s. four cotton gowns, value 40 s. three cotton handkerchiefs, value 2 s. six muslin handkerchiefs, value 3 s, a muslin apron, value 3 s. four linen aprons, value 4 s. a linen shift and four silver tea spoons, value 12 s. the property of John Jones , in the dwelling house of the said John Jones , August 21st . +

John Jones . I am an iron-porter , and live on Dowgate-hill ; I lost the several articles mentioned in the indictment on the 21st of August, I know nothing of my own knowledge.

Sarah Jones . I am wife of the last witness; when I went out on Sunday the 21st of August I left my house and every thing safe; when I returned home at night I missed the several things mentioned in the indictment. (They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

John Heley . On Sunday the 21st of August I was informed that a suspected person had been seen to carry some bundles into Star-court Shoemaker row; Mr. Clarke and I went there; after waiting there some time I saw the prisoner go into the house with something under his arm; we went into the house and asked for Mr. Robertson (who I knew before); the woman of the house called out Robertson two or three times; Robertson not coming down, Mr. Clarke took a candle and went up stairs; I heard a bustle

soon after; I went up and found Mr. Clarke had got hold of the prisoner; we found this bunch of picklocks (producing them) in his pocket; the room the prisoner lived in there, with a girl, was locked; I opened the door with one of these picklocks.

Q. How do you know that he lived there?

Heley. The landlord of the house, whose name is Nash, told me so; in the closet in that room I found these things; (produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix); he said he knew nothing, of them; there was a box in the room under the bed; I asked him whose box that was, he said it was his; we broke it open and found in it a dark lanthorn, a tinder box and matches, a brace of pistols loaded; we put him in the round house for that night; the next morning the prosecutor came to Sir John Fielding's office to advertise the things.

Prisoner. It was not my lodgings; I went to see the girl that lodged there, as I might go to see any other girl of the town.

John Clarke deposed, that when he went up stairs and attempted to secure the prisoner, the prisoner made a blow at him, and then kicked the candle out; upon which he called up John Heley . The rest of his evidence was the same as that of the last witness.

William Nash . I keep a house in Butcher-row.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house?

Nash. I believe he used to come backwards and forwards; I seldom saw him come out or in; I let the room ready furnished to a young woman.

Q. Was he at your house the night he was taken up?

Nash. He was there the day before; I trusted the key to the young woman; what passed I cannot say; he came backwards and forwards to this woman a month or five weeks.

Q. from the prisoner. Was I in your house from three o'clock that afternoon till the time I came home at night?

Nash. No, he was out; I saw a person in green clothes bring in a bundle about as big as if it contained two suits of clothes; the girl said he had brought his clothes from his father's; took no further notice of it; I had no suspicions of this.

Q. What is the name of this young woman?

Nash. I really forgot; her christian name is Susannah; I forget her other name; she went away the day after; she used to go by the name of Robertson.

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17740907-99

676. (2d M) MARY DOLLARD was indicted for stealing two china bowls, value 2 s. a china pint mug, value 6 d. a copper coffee pot, value 2 s. and a copper tea kettle, value 2 s. the property of William Roberts , August 27th . ++

William Roberts . I keep the Yorkshire Stingo near Paddington ; I missed several things; I searched the lodgings of one Mrs. Neale, where the prisoner was about to lodge, there I found some of my things (repeating them); she told me if I would search Cowell's house, I should find some more; and if I went to Walham Green I should find more, at the house of one Vincent; in Cowell's house I found two china bowls and the pint mug; I went to Walham Green to Vincent's, there I found the copper coffee-pot; the woman is a labourer in the brick fields; she used my house; the tea-kettle I found at the house of one Mary Edmunds ; she said before the justice she found the tea-kettle at the corner of the Bowling Green.

John Vincent . I have known the prisoner a great many years; she lodged at my house: I don't remember her bringing any thing there; Mr. Roberts came and searched; I told him he was welcome to search any part of my house; there was an old box; I told him he might break it open; he challenged the coffee pot; the woman told me she bought it. I have had four children by her, and she is now big with a fifth; she is within three weeks of her time.

Prosecutor. I know the coffee pot by a nail I drove in the handle.

Mary Neale . I live at Paddington: the prisoner brought the china mug and one bason to my house; I thought them her own property, for she said she was turned out and she should come there and bring all the things she had.

Richard Cowell . The prisoner lodged with

me all this summer; I remember her bringing one of the basons.

Prisoner's Defence.

I bought the coffee pot in Rag-fair; the kettle I found in a field, not the Bowling Green; I did not go on his premises to get it; the bason I had of him to carry some milk home; they sell milk.

She called three witnesses who had known her some years, and gave her a very good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Reference Number: o17740907-1

Levi Barnett otherwise Lype Coser , and William Waine , capitally convicted last session, were executed at Tyburn, on Friday the 19th of August.
Reference Number: s17740907-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 17.

Charles Nangle , William Hughes , John Robinson , Richard Clarke , Charles Mills , John Pugh , Joseph Doggett , John Vixer Dacritt , Amos Lewis , Lewis Lequint , William Griffith , Robert Edwards , Charles Shaw , Elizabeth Wigley , John Olding . And Charles Lockett otherwise Lockington, and Abraham Abrahams , who were formerly capitally convicted for forgery, but judgement was respited till a point of law had received the determination of the Judges.

Transportation for fourteen years, 3.

Edward Nicholls , John Smith and Francis Morris .

Transportation for seven years.

Mark Oldbury , William Pollett , William Kenedy , John Gunn , Henry Fenley , Arabella Hart , John Ayres , William Alsom , Thomas Atkinson , William Bean , Peter Kennedy , John Harris , Ralph Magrath , Peter Burgeno , Samuel Trantum , Hannah Bell , Elizabeth Price , John Edwards , Eleanor Dixon , Ann Ambrose , Susannah Bailey , Sarah King otherwise Williams, William Jones , Mary Ann Sayers , William Warrington , Edward Buckley , Edward Fawcet , William Higgins , Richard Gilson , Jane Leishman , John Popplewell , Lewis Williams , William White otherwise Wrigglesworth, Henry Drake Watson , Thomas Petto , William Ruffhead , James Wright , William Lee , Edward Wright , Joshua Cotton , Samuel Bowman , William White , William Norbury , and Charles Pulien .

Branded and imprisoned six months, I.

John Cotton .

Branded, 3.

Ann Hinchley , Oliver Davis , Joseph Bailey .

Reference Number: s17740907-1

Levi Barnett otherwise Lype Coser , and William Waine , capitally convicted last session, were executed at Tyburn, on Friday the 19th of August. The rest of the capital convicts were respited during his Majesty's pleasure.

Reference Number: a17740907-1

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates, &c.

Accurately taken down in SHORT HAND, Also the Art of SHORT WRITING completely and expeditiously taught, By JOSEPH GURNEY , SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, near STAPLES-INN:

Of whom may be had the eighth Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound, 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his Sister MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34. Bell-yard, near Temple-Bar.

Of whom may be had, The Trials of the Prisoners at the Assize at Chelmsford, Before the Right Honourable Lord MANSFIELD,

Containing among others The remarkable Trial of JOHN DIXON , the Chimney Sweeper, Who was executed for the Murder of his Apprentice.

Taken down in SHORT HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY .

Reference Number: a17740907-2

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates, &c.

Accurately taken down in SHORT HAND, Also the Art of SHORT WRITING completely and expeditiously taught, By JOSEPH GURNEY , SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, near STAPLES-INN:

Of whom may be bad, the eighth Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound, 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his Sister MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34. Bell-yard, near Temple-Bar.

WHO SELLS The Trials of the Prisoners at the Assize at Chelmsford, Before the Right Honourable Lord MANSFIELD,

Containing among others The remarkable Trial of JOHN DIXON , the Chimney Sweeper, Who was executed for the Murder of his Apprentice.

Taken down in SHORT HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY .


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