Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th October 1720.
Reference Number: 17201012
Reference Number: f17201012-1

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terniner, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old Bayly,

ON

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, being the 12th, 13th, and 14th of this Instant October, 1720. In the Seventh Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

21. Octob. 1720.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir GEORGE THOROLD , Kt. and Baronet, Lord Mayor of the City of London; Mr. Justice Tracy; Mr. Baron Price; John Raby , Esq; Deputy Recorder; and several of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London, and County of Middlesex.

The Jurors Names were as followeth:

London Jury

Abraham Lassoone ,

John Barry ,

Jonathan Hickes ,

James Marriner ,

Robert White ,

James Nelson ,

John Halloway ,

John Sharp ,

John Chambers ,

Richard Coultson ,

James Bedall ,

Edward Cox .

Middlesex Jury

Thomas Cliff ,

William Hargrave ,

Abraham Harrison ,

John Pashley ,

Richard Jackson ,

Thomas Bates ,

Joseph Parsons ,

Daniel Andrews ,

Edward Percival ,

Richard Ambler ,

John Stibbs ,

Alexander Kilgower .

Reference Number: t17201012-1

Elizabeth Fowlis , alias Thewlis , of St. Peters Cornhill , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cloth Coat and Wastcoat, and other Goods to the value of 4 l. in the Dwelling House of Thomas Prime , on the 1st of this Instant October . The Prosecutor deposed that the Prisoner was his Servant , and while he was at his Country Lodgins at Hackney, she took the Goods, and carrying them to pawn without Temple Bar was stopt by the Pawnbroker. Abraham Bibbin deposed, that the Prisoner brought the Goods to him to pawn, but, he suspecting her, examined her how she came by them. and she confest they were her Master's, and where she lived; whereupon he secured her. The Prisoner in her Defence said that she did not take them with a felonious Intent, but designed to have fetcht them again. The Jury considering the matter, found her Guilty to the value of 10 d . To be Whipt .

Reference Number: t17201012-2

Thomas Bostock , of St. Mildred in the Poultry , was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Handkerchief value 2 s. from the Person of Thomas Bedford , on the 15th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that as he was going by the Poultry Church a Gentleman ask'd of him if he had not lost his Handkerchief, whereupon he felt in his Pocket and mist it. Thomas Husbands deposed that he saw the Prisoner follow the Prosecutor through Cornhill to the Poultry, and against the Church saw him take the Prosecutor's Handkerchief out of his Pocket, whereupon he seized him so quick that he had not an Opportunity to drop it, and acquainted the Prosecutor of it; that he had attempted to take it before, but could not. The Prisoner in his Defence said that he had been at Southwark Fair, and was Drunk. The Jury considering the matter found him Guilty to the value 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-3

Joseph Johnson of St. Mary Woolnoth , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cloth Cloak Bag, a Cloth Gown and Cassock, a Stuff Gown, a Perriwig, 2 pair of Silk Stockings, 1 pair of Shoes, &c. the Goods of William Savage , on the 28th of September last. Richard Lukes deposed, that as he was going along he heard a Small Coal Boy cry out to a Man (who laid the Goods mentioned in the Indictment on a Bulk at the Corner of Lombard-Street ,) that's none of your Sack; that the Prisoner came up said it was his, took it up, and carried it from the Corner of Lombard-Street to Threadneedle-Street, where (the Boy crying out Thieves) he dropt it; that the Small Coal Boy followed and took the Prisoner, and he staid to look after the Goods; that there were three of them in all, but the other two got away; that there was a light in a Brandy Shop next the Bulk, by which he saw them all very plain, and was sure the Prisoner was the Person who took the Goods up at the Corner of Lombard-Street, saying they were his, and carried them to Threadneedle-Street; that the Small Coal Boy (who took him, but could not be found to give Evidence now) told him he saw one take it off a Horse on London-Bridge, and carry it to Lombard-Street end. The Goods were produced in Court, and swore to by the Prosecutor and his Man. who being then come out of the Country, the Prosecutor took Coach in Southwark, and left his Man to take care of the Goods and Horses. The Prisoner denied the Fact, and said that he had been at the Angel and Crown in White Chappel, and going by the Change they laid hold of him; he also called several to his Reputation. But the Evidence being very positive that he was the Person who said the Goods were his, and that he carried them from the Bulk in Lombard-Street to Threadneedle-Street the Jury found him Guilty . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-4

William Fletcher , alias Fellowes , of St. Brides , was indicted for Assaulting Richard Schingle on the High Way, putting him in Fear. and taking from him a Hat value 5 s. and a Perriwig value 5 l. on the 12th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that as he was going along Fleetstreet , the Prisoner set his Foot before him and threw him down, took his Hat and Wig and run cross the way with them; that he jostled him several times before, and though he was much hurt and bruised by the Fall yet he got up and ran after him. John Griffin deposed, that as he was lighting a Gentleman and two Gentlewomen along he heard the cry of stop Thief, and the Prisoner running between them he laid hold of him, who dropt the Hat and Wig at his Feet. Another deposed, that he saw the Prisoner jostle the Prosecutor. Three others deposed, that they saw the Prisoner with the Hat and Wig in his Hand, and that when he was seized he dropt them. The Hat and Wig were also produced in Court and swore to by the Prosecutor. The Prisoner in his Defence said that the Prosecutor was drunk, and fell down, and that he went to help him up; but called none to prove it, nor any to his Reputation. The Jury found him Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-5

Thomas Tompion and Ann Tompion his Wife , of Alhallows the Great , were indicted for privately stealing a Silk Purse value 6 d. 11 Guineas, from the Person of Elizabeth Cole , on the 20th of September last. Elizabeth Cole deposed, that she went to the Temple-Stairs to take Water and called out, Two Pence to Pepper-Alley; that the Prisoners were in a Boat there, said they were going thither, and invited her into the Boat; that they made room for her to set in the middle, and Ann Tompion sat on that side of her where her Pocket with the Purse of Guineas were; that she made some rusling about her Petticoats, which she (the Prosecutor) thought might be occasion'd by their Hoops incommoding one another; that when they were got to Dowgate, Ann Tompion said to her Husband, my Dear. we have forgot the Writings; he replied, we can do nothing without them, we must go back again for them, but won't hinder the Gentlewoman but call a pair of Oars; which they did, and went out of the Boat; that when she was landed at Pepper Alley, and got to the top of the stairs, she feeling for Money to pay the Waterman mist her Purse of Guineas; whereupon she went into Tuly-Street to Mr. Hart, whom she was going to pay them to, and acquainted him with her Misfortune; that it was then Half an Hour after 12 a Clock. That Mr. Hart went back with her immediately to Pepper-Alley Stairs, where they took Boat, and telling the Waterman how she had been served; and asking if be knew any Thief Taker, he said yes; carried them to Black-Fryers, and then went with them to (an Acquaintance of his) Mr Murrel's at the Coach and Horses in Black and White Court in the Old Bailey; where telling her case, and describing the Persons who were in the Boat with her, as that he was a Fat Man with a Smiling Countenance, a Sword by his Side, and a Two Tail'd wig on; she had a Red Damask Silk Gown and Petticoat on, a Gold Chain and Locket about her Neck, and Bobs in her Ears, Mrs. Murrel said it must be the Prisoners; and went to their House, but they were not within; that Mrs. Murrel went again and the Prosecutor along with her in a Riding-Hood Mrs. Murrel lent her to conceal her self in; that then they were both within, and she was positive they were the same Persons who were in the Boat with her. That she had received 9 Moidores of Mr. Hart to dispose of for him, and was to have 6 d. a piece Profit, that she left them at Mr. Brandon's in Lombard-Street, and took Guineas, which she paid away for a piece of Holland, and received the 11 Guineas mentioned in the Indictment of Mr. Bladen in Hatton Garden, and was sure she had them in her Pocket when she went into the Boat.

John Roberts deposed, that he was at Pepper Alley Stairs when Mrs. Cole landed, and confirmed what she had swore as to her coming back from Tuly-Street with Mr. Hart, and his carrying them to Black-Fryers and going with them to Mr. Murrels, and what pass'd there; and further deposed, that he went with Mrs. Cole to the Temple Stairs to enquire after the Waterman who took her into his Boat there to the seeming Gentleman and his Wife, and left a Note there promising a Reward if he would appear, or to any who could produce him.

Roger Cole deposed, that he came with his Wife from Rotherhith (where they Live) into the City, and parted with her at the Still-Yard; that she was going to Mr. Bladen's in Hatton Garden to receive some Money, but that he did not know Mr. Bladen himself, he being a Mariner and not acquainted with his Wife's Dealings.

Mr. Hart confirmed what Mrs. Cole had before deposed, as to the Moidores and her coming to him, and his going with her and the Waterman (Roberts) to Mr. Murrel's, and what past there.

Mr. Murrel deposed, that he knew Roberts, and that he came with Mrs. Cole and Mr. Hart to his House to enquire for a Thief taker, confirmed what Mrs. Cole swore before relating to what pass'd in his House, and farther deposed, that when Mrs. Cole came from the Prisoner's House with his Wife, and had seen them, and declared that she was positive they were the same Persons who invited her into the Boat to them, that he then said there was no Occasion for a Thief-Taker, he would be Thief-Taker himself; for he would send for them to his House, whither he was sure they would come, and then have a Constable and secure them; he also gave a bad Character of Mr. Tompion and his House.

Mrs. Murrel confirmed Roberts, Hart, and Mrs. Cole's coming to her House, and the Prosecutor's telling her Story as before, and that when she heard her Description of the Persons, she (this Evidence) said it might be the Prisoner's for she (Ann Tompion) was reputed to be the most ingenious Pick-Pocket in London. That she went to the Prisoner's House under pretence of Borrowing a Sword for her Husband; that they were not then at Home; but she went in and up Stairs, where she found one Woman washing of Clothes, another washing her Feet. That sometime after she went again with Mrs. Cole (to whom she had lent her Riding-Hood) and found them both at Home; that she told Mr. Tompion her Husband desired him to lend him a Sword, and that he would let it be a good one, to which he readily consented, and brought her one with a Silver Hilt, saying there's a Sword will see the Devil out. That when Mrs. Tompion saw Mrs. Cole (though conceal'd as much as could be in her Riding-Hood) she ask'd who she was; to which this Evidence reply'd, a Friend of hers she met on Ludgate-Hill, whereupon Mrs. Tompion turn'd away her Face, that she then had on a Suit of Callicoe, but when she was taken she had a Gown of her Husbands on. That when they came out Mrs Cole declared that she was sure they were the same Persons who were in the Boat with her.

Henry Yates deposed, that he keeps a Cooks Shop in the same Court, and that Mrs. Tompion told him that she had been out to get in some Money, and after several Disappointments had met with one who owed her 11 Guineas and had paid her, that she told him so the Day before Croydon Fair, but he could not be positive whether she said 11 Guineas or 13; nor whether she said she received it that Day or the Day before.

Samuel Chester deposed, that Mr. Tompion had kept a Bawdy House in Black and White Court for several Years.

The Prisoners denied the Fact, and said that they were not out of their House all that Day, and called the following Evidence to prove it.

Elizabeth Lambert deposed, that she went to the Prisoners House between 12 and 1 to carry them some Money, and that they were both at home then; and being askt how she came to take notice of the Day, said, she could not tell the Day of the Month; but it was the Day before Croydon Fair.

Sarah Linnet deposed that she was as the Prisoners House the Day before craydans Fair from 11 till 3, and that they were at home all the time; and being ask'd what she was, and how she came to go and stay there

so long, said she was a Servant, had been arrested and put into the Compter, but clear'd by the late Act, and went there for some Writings for her safety.

Susannah Chickley deposed, that she had been servant there, and that the Prisoners were not out of Doors all that Day till 8 or 9 at Night.

Richard Lloyd deposed, that he carried a Pot of Beer there and saw them both at home.

Will. Tompkins deposed, that he is Mr. Tompion's Journeyman ( a Watchmaker ) and that the Prisoners were at home all Day till about 7 or 8 a Clock at Night, and that one Mr. Facey paid him 13 Guineas on the Monday. That though be workt above Stairs he was obliged to go down often into the Kitchen to Light a Candle, where he constantly found them.

Elizabeth Gooseman deposed, that she had been a Servant to the Prisoner 5 Weeks, and that they were not out of the House till 7 or 8 a Clock that Night, when her Master went out to hire a Coach to go to Croydon Fair the next Day: and that her Mistress wore that Day a Damask Gown of her Master's.

Henry King deposed, that he went to Mr. Murrels on the 26th of September, and raised a Discourse concerning the Prisoners; and that Mrs. Murrel used some Invectives against them, clapt her Hands, and seemed to have a Grudge against them.

Benchior Higgins deposed, that he went with the former Evidence to Mrs. Murrels, and said that Mrs. Murrel seemed to have some Spleen against the Prisoners.

The Evidence for the King gave the Prisoners House a very ill Character, and said that some of the Women who gave Evidence for them used to go out to pick up Men and carry them in there.

The Jury considering the whole Matter, Acquitted Thomas, Tompion, and found Ann his Wife Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-6

Elizabeth Eves and William Reynolds , of St. Andrews Holbourn , were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing a Silver Tankard value 5 l. a Silver Tumbler, a Silver Mug, two Pieces of Old fashion Silver, 6 Silver Button's &c. the Goods of George Owen , in the Dwelling House of Mary Magick , on the 14th of September last; and William Reynolds as Accessory in receiving the same, knowing them to be stole .

Frances Owen deposed, that she had the Plate in her possession in Trust for her Nephew by Order of my Lord Chancellor; and that the Prisoner Eves was her Servant , and ask'd her on the Friday to give her leave for an Hour and half to go to her Mothers; that she went but did not return; that on the Sunday she mist the Plate, and sent to the Prisoner Eaves's Mother, who produced her, and the confest that she took the Goods at several times, and sold them to Mr. Reynolds. That they got the Recorder's Warrant to search Mr. Reynolds's House, and found the Tankard behind a Shutter in his Shop; that he then said he had not bought a Tankard in 6 Weeks afterwards said he bought it that Day was Sevennight, and said before the Justice that he bought it at a Market Price. Mr. Weaver deposed that he met Eves and askt her how her Mistress did; that he met her again betimes on on Saturday Morning, who seemed to be in Confusion, as if she had been up all Night; that he went to his Sister's(Mrs. Owen) told her how he had met Betty, and bid her see if she had not lost any thing; that he went along with them to search Mr. Reynolds's House, and found two Pieces of Old Fashion Silver belonging to a Socket produced in Court; that Mr. Reynolds said he had not bought a Tankard for 6 Weeks; but he (this Evidence bid the Constable move a Shutter, and found it there without the Lid; that it weighed 18 Ounces without the Lid, and that Eves said he gave her 4 Guineas and 15 s. in Silver for it with the Lid; and that being askt what was become of the Lid, he answered, he believed he might have sold it. Mrs. Weaver deposed that she went with the Constable to search Mr. Reynold's House for the Goods, who pulled our a small Drawer from under his Glass Case, and shewed them Rings and Trifles; that when they had found the two pieces of Old Fashion Silver in an open Drawer in his Shop, they then ask'd for the Tankard, Tumbler, Mugg, and Buttons, whereupon he opened his Press all but one Shutter (which she caused to be opened,) and found the Tankard there without the Lid; and that the Constable said the Lid had been taken off lately, the Pin looking as if it had been filed within 3 Days; that Mr. Reynolds said he had it above 6 Weeks; the Tankard which was mark'd G M M, was produced in Court and Swore to.

The Confession of the Prisoner Eves was read in Court, and she also owned the Fact on her Tryal.

Mr. Reynolds in his Defence said that he bought the Mug, Tumbler, and Tankard of Eves at the Market price, that he gave 4 Guineas, 7 Shillings in Silver, and a Ring of 18 s. value for the Tankard; that the told him it was some Old Plate of Mrs. Owen's, who had sent her to sell it for her. Mrs. Reynolds deposed, that she was in her Father's Shop when Eves brought in the Tankard to sell; that there were others in the Shop, and Eves put the Tankard on the Compter; that it was the 5th of September last; that her Father weighed it, and gave her a Ring, 4 Guineas, and some Silver for it, but she did not know the weight of it, not how much Silver he gave her, she going then to look after the Glasses in the Windows; that she was drest very clean and tight, without a Hood or Riding-Hood, with a White Apron and Handkerchief; that when she was gone she askt her Father if he knew her; who told her that he had bought something of her before. Mr. Marlow deposed, that he had know Mr. Reynolds many Years, that he had a general fair Character in all his Dealings; that the Tankard was not worth 5 s. per Ounce some time ago, there was so much Solder in it, neither was it worth more now. Mr. Marlow, Brother of the former, confirmed the same both as to Character, and value of the Plate. Mr. Eggleton deposed, that Mr. Reynolds is one of the Court of Assistants of the Goldsmiths Company, and has been pitcht on for particular Matters in Assays and valuing of Plate, in respect to his Judgment and Honesty. Mr. Green deposed, that he had known Mr. Reynolds 20 Years, had workt for him, and found him always just and honest; that the Tankard is not worth more than 5 l. per Ounce, and that Mr. Reynolds could not get above half a Crown by buying of it. The Jury consdering the matter, acquitted William Reynold, and found Elizabeth Eves Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-7

Thomas Flory , of St. Michael at Quern , was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Hankerchief value 2 s. from the Person of Isaac Tilliard on the 26th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that as he was going along Cheapside, just by the Conduit, the Prisoner and another jostled him, and he lost his Handkerchief. Mr. Holland deposed, that as he was going through Cheapside between 3 and 4 in the Afternoon aforesaid, he stopt to buy some Fruit, and the Woman told him there were two Pickpockets followed the Prosecutor, whereupon he made haste after them, and saw the Prisoner take the Prosecutor's Handkerchief out of his Pocket and drop it on the Ground; upon which he took him by the Collar, and acquainted the Prosecutor therewith. The Prisoner in his Defence said, that the Prosecutor's Handkerchief was half out of his Pocket, and he rushing by, it fell on the Ground. The Jury considering the Matter, found him Guilty to the value of 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-8

David Wilford of St. Peters Cornhill , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Vellom Pocket-Book, value 1 s. the Goods of Charles Townsend , on the 25th of July last. The Prosecutor deposed, that he being in Change Alley , Mr, Levit turn'd him round, and told him that the Prisoner had pickt his Pocket; that he saw his Pocket-Book in the Prisoner's Hand, and saw him drop it, but there being a Crowd he got away; that he being inform'd that he ran into the Compter, he went after him, and after much Searching and Stir, found him in the Kitchen in a Black Coat, though he was Genteely Drest in Brown when he did the Fact. Mr. Levit deposed, that he saw the Prisoner in the Alley, and was told that he was a Pickpocket; that be observed him to follow the Prosecutor a good while, and by Jonathan's Coffee-House saw him take the Book out of his Coat Pocket; whereupon he turn'd the Prosecutor round and told him; but the Crowd gathering

he got away and ran into the Compter, which this Evidence being inform'd of, went to Sir William Withers , who ordered them to search, and to bid the Keepers refuse them at their Peril; that they searched a long while, but could not find him; till at last they were told that he was in the Kitchen, where they found him in Black Clothes; but they using some Words, the Clothes he did the Fact in were produced. The Prisoner denied the Fact, and said that he sold Old Clothes in the Mint for a Livelihood; but had no Evidence to prove it, not any to his Reputation. The Jury found him Guilty to the value of 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-9

Abraham Poore , of St. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Handkerchief value 2 s. 6 d from the Person of Charles Winckworth on the 5th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that he lost his Handkerchief out of his Pocket against St Dunstan's Church in Fleet-Street . Mr. Adams deposed, that he was going along at the same time, and that there was a great Burying; and that as the Prosecutor was going to cross the Way, he saw the Prisner jostle him. and take his Hankerchief out of his Pocket, and that there was another with the Prisner; that he immediately acquainted the Prosecutor with it, and the Prisoner confest it and said that he should have it again. The Prisoner on his Tryal denied the Fact, but called none to his Reputation. The Jury considering the matter, found him Guilty to the value of 10 d Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-10

Elizabeth Williams , of St.Andrews Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Perriwing, value 50 s. the Goods of John Ravenal , on the 5th of September last. But the Evidence not being sufficient the Jury Acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-11

Martha Purdew , of St. Giles without Cripplegate , was indicted for privately stealing a Canvas Bag. 25 Guineas, 2 Carolus's and a Quarter piece of Gold from the Person of Richard Gaudin , on the 26th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed that as he was going through Cripplegate between 8 and 9 at Night the Prisoner saluted him with a How do you do Countryman? Won't you give me a Dram? that he went into a Brandy Shop with her at Cripplegate, and gave her a Dram; that she asked him how far he was going, and he told her towards Islington; she said that was her way, and she would go with him: that when they came to the Bell in Golden Lane she said that as he had been so kind as to treat her before, she would give him a Quartern of Brandy there: That they had not been there a quarter of an Hour before she made an Excuse to go to the Backside, and staying longer than Ordinary he mist his Bag of Money, and was going after her, but was stopt by the Man of the House, who told him that there was a Shilling to pay, and he must not go till he had paid it; that he reply'd he had no Money left, for the Woman that came in with him had Pickt his Pocket of all he had; that he pull'd out his Watch, (worth 7 l.) to leave for the Shilling till he redeemed it, but the Man of the House said he could not tell whether it was worth it, and kept him there while he opened and lookt upon it. That the next Day he went to the Brandy Shop where they drank at Cripplegate, to enquire if they knew her, and told them how she had served him; they said that she came there sometimes, and when she came again they'd send for him; which they did the next Day after; that when he took her she owned she had his Money, and had bought her 3 Gold Rings, Bobs for her Ears and Riding Hood, and had good Clothes on then though in a mean Grab when he drank the Brandy with her, and lost his Money; that there was no body in the Room with him but the Prisoner; and that he had none of his Money back again. John Drake deposed, that the Prosecutor came to him on the 28th of September, and desired him to go along with him in search of the Prisoner, and that a Woman came and acquainted him that she was then at the Brandy Shop; that they went immediately, but she was gone before they got there; that the People of the House told them which way the went and directed them to another Brandy Shop, from whence she was also just gone; but by their directions they followed and found her in a poor Garret wherein were a few Flocks and Rags, but no Bed; that they lookt under the Door and saw her lying on her Back, got the Door open, and he (this Evidence) went to her and told her she was his Prisoner: that she owed she took the Prosecutor's Money; but said she had those Clothes before she took it; and that she also said she had Gold, if the Prosecutor would make it up. The Jury found her Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-12

James Allen and Jane Baine , of St. Peters in Middlesex were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing a Wooden Box, a King Edward's Shilling,a Queen Elizabeth's 6 d. and a blue Silk Apron, from the person of Elizabeth Coffering on the 7th of September last: And Jane Baine for receiving the Silk Apron Knowing it to be stole . The Prosecutor deposed that she being alone at her own Door between 10 to 11 the Night aforesaid, fell asleep, and the Prisoner Allen came and pickt her Pocket of her Box and Money, and took her short Apron; that he owned the Fact and said he had sold the Pieces of Money at a Gold-Smith in the Minories for 15d. where they were found accordingly; and gave the Apron to Baine; that she lost several other things, as two Notes which were in the Box with the Money, but had nothing else again but the Money. The Constable deposed, that when he took Allen he gave him the Box again, and told him he had thrown the Notes down the Grates on Tower Hill, and Confes'd where he had sold the Money for 15d. His Confession before the Justice was read in Court; and the Box and Money produc'd and swore to by the Prosecutor. The Evidence not being sufficient against Jane Baine, the Jury Acquitted her, and found James Allen Guilty to the value of 10d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-13

William Withall , alias Harris , of St. Andrews Holbourn , was indicted for breaking open the Dwelling House of William Gore , Esq ; in the Night time, and taking thence 24 Pewter Plates value 24 s. 2 Brass Sauce Pans value 2 s. 6d. the Goods of the said William Gore; and a Gown, 8 Yards of Edging, some Muslin, &c. the Goods of Ann Dilley , on the 19th of August last. Ann Dilley deposed, that the Doors and Windows were fast in the Evening. that they set up till between 12 and 1 when they heard a Noise in the Scullery and another Room, but thinking it to the Cat, they went to Bed; and between 4 and 5 in the Morning a Man came and knockt them up; that when she came down Stairs she found the Iron Bar broke out of the Window, and the Goods gone. That about a Fortnight or 3 Weeks after her Gown was found on the Back of Rebecca Airy . Rebecca Airy deposed, that the Prisoner lodged in her House 5 Days, and went out the 19th of August at Night, but did not come home again till between 5 and 6 the next Morning, when he gave her the Gown, saying there was an Old Gown which she might make things for her Children with; but she wore it her self, and it was owned on her Back in Grays-Inn; that he also brought in some Plates and two Sauce-Pans at the same time. Anthony Knapp deposed, that the Prisoner lay with him, staid out all Friday Night, came home the 20th in the Morning, and gave the Gown to their Landlady. Jonathan James deposed, that he being out to see all safe the Back-side the Buildings, found the Windows of the Green-house open, whereupon he went round to raise the Family; that 2 quarrels of Glass were taken out, and the Iron Bar wrencht. Mr. Dacres deposed, that Airy was found in Grays-Inn with the Gown on her, and he being the nearest Constable, was sent for, that Airy then said she had it of the Prisoner, who threw it on her Bed, and said she might make things of it for her Children, but she chose to wear it her self. The Gown was produced in Court and swore to by Dilley. The Prisoner denied the Fact, but called none to his Reputation. The Jury found him Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-14

Elizabath White , of St. Mary in Whitechappel , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Holland Smock value 12 s. the Goods of Samuel Perrey , Esq ; and a Mobb value 1 s. the Goods of Ann Nicholas on the

29th of September last. It appeared that the Prisoner used to wash at the Prosecutor's House, and took the Goods, which were found upon her; and her Confession was read in Court. The Prisoner called several to her Reputation, who gave her a good Character, and deposed that they heard no ill of her before. The Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d . To be Whipt .

Reference Number: t17201012-15

Benjamin Speed , John Brewinton , and Charles Moore of St. Paul's Covent Garden , were indicted for Feloniously stealing 2 Cloth Seats of a Coach, value 30 s. the Goods of Joseph Barnard , on the 6th of Octob last. And Eleanor Griffiths for entertaining them and receiving the same knowing them to be stole . Joseph Barnard deposed, that he lent out his Coach to John Andrews the Day aforesaid, with 4 Seats in it, and when he brought it home there was but two: that when he went before the Justice next Day he saw his two Seats that were missing, but the Feathers taken out. John Andrews deposed, that as he was driving the Coach by King-street, a Gentleman call'd to him and told him he believed he was robb'd, whereupon he got down and mist the Seats; that he saw the Prisoners go into the Pizza in Covent Garden, and the Gentleman and himself followed them; that he took William Lewellin (who was with them) by the Collar and secured him, who told the next Morning where they might find the other 3, which they did accordingly. William Lewellin deposed, that his Father caught him and Speed breaking open his Stall, and sent them to Bridewell, but having got out and meeting the Prisoners he went along with them; that Speed took the Seats out of the Coach and gave them to Brewinton, but that he knew nothing of the Woman (Griffiths). Mr. Blackham deposed, that as he was walking under the Piazzas in Covent Garden, (it being a wet Night) he saw Lewellin and three others go out after a Coach, and he suspecting that they had a mind to rob somebody that might be in it, watcht them, which they observing, Speed came up to him, swore, and struck at him; that there were 4 about the Coach, and 4 went under the Piazzas. James Wigg deposed, that the Constable sent for him to carry Lewellin to Prison; who said, if he would let him he would make a Confession where he might take the other Three; that they found them at Griffith's House in Newtoners Lane, two of them in Bed and the Seats between the Bed and Matt, but the Feathers taken out of them, the other Prisoner was just leapt out of Bed in another Room. Henry Becket deposed, that he was the Constable that carried Lewellin to the Round House that Night, and before the Justice the next Day, where he denied every thing; but as he was carrying him to Newgate he said if he would go back again he would make an ingenious Confession; that upon his Confession they had a Search Warrant and went to Griffiths House in Newtoners Lane where they found the Prisoners, and the two Seats, which were produced in Court and swore to by the Prosecutor. The Jury considering the matter Acquitted Griffiths; and found the Three Men Guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-16

Thomas Paine of St. Dunstan at Stepney , was indicted for privately stealing 12 yards of Shag value 48 s. and 6 Pound of Feathers value 6 s. the Goods of Samuel Shepherd ; and a Cloth Coat the Goods of and 1 Sack the Goods of , on the 15th of September last. Mrs. Shepherd deposed, that in the Evening she went into the Coach-House and lockt the Doors, but in the Morning about 5 found the Door broke and the Goods gone, which were afterwards found at the Prisoner's. Samuel Shepherd deposed, that his Wife telling him the Door was open and the Lining and Seats of his Coach gone, he got a Search Warrant. searcht several Houses, and at last the Prisoner's, where he found his Goods: That the Prisoner said two Men, Robert Whitlock and William Sibley , brought them to his House, but owned that he was with them [several words unclear] was committed; that Whitlock and Sibley [several words unclear] he went to look after them. The [several words unclear] said, that two Men came into his [several words unclear] drink Geneva, and brought the Goods with them: but could not prove it, nor cald any to his Reputation. The Jury considering the matter found him Guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-17

Mary Granger and Sarah Lawson of St. Mildred in the Poultry , were indicted for privately stealing two Gold Rings, two Diamond Rings, Garnets. &c. to the value of 18 l. on the 15th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that as he was going Home between 11 and 12 the Prisoners ask him to give them a Glass of Wine; that they went to Three Crains in the Poultry , where they pick his Pocket of the Goods mentioned in the Indictment; that his Box was found in Granger's Bosom, but the Rings, &c. were taken out of it, and upon searching her some were found that Night, others next Morning, that he had been at the other end of the Town, was a little merry but not drunk. Richard Evans deposed, that he was sent for, and when he came the Prosecutor said the Prisoners had robb'd him, that he took a Candle and look upon the Ground round Granger before she was search'd and there was nothing there then; that he found the Steal Box in her Bosom empty, and a Ring and some small Stones were found on the Ground after searching her, which were not there before; that the next Morning the rest of the Goods were brought (except 5 Diamonds and a Ring) wrapt up in her Handkerchief, and that the Prosecutor then owned the Goods but not the Handkerchief they were brought in. The Drawer at the Tavern deposed, that the Prosecutor came with the Prisoners to their House the Night aforesaid and that when they were going away, he knowing Granger to be an ill Woman, ask him if he had not lost any thing, and that he feeling in his Pockets said, yes, he had lost his Box with the Rings and Jewels in it, whereupon he shut the Door, brought them back and sent for a Constable; that the Constable took a Candle and lookt round them, and he saw him (the Constable) take the Box out of Granger's Bosom, and he found a Ring and same small Stones on the Ground. Another deposed, that the Prosecutor sent for him the next Morning, told him the Prisners had pickt his Pocket, and askt him to go before the Justice with him; that they went to the Star-Tavern in Coleman-Street, were part of the Goods were brought and deliver'd to him, particularly one Ring which he could swear to. That an old Woman, said to be Granger's Mother, brought them. The Jury considering the matter, acquitted Lawson, and found Granger Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-18

Joseph Jackson of Finchley , (together with Richard Dickinson not yet taken) was indicted for a Misdemeanour in Assaulting John Cheltenham and Thomas Carter on the High Way on the 7th of September last, with an Intent to rob them . He was a second time indicted for the like Offence, in Assaulting James Innocent on the High Way with an Intent to rob him . John Cheltenham deposed, that they having taken a Ride out on the 7th of September, as they were coming over Finchley-Common about Half an Hour after 6 a Clock, the Prisoner and Dickinson rode very hard up to them; that the Prisoner rode against him with such Fury that though he caught hold of him (this Evidence) he fell off his Horse into the Ditch, tore his Face and Eyes very much, and pull'd him (this Evidence) into the Ditch upon him; that Dickinson clapt a Pistol to Mr. Carter's Breast, and said, D --- n you Stand and Deliver your Money; that he heard him say the same to Capt. Innocent who was coming on with a Gentlewoman in a Shaise; that Mr. Carter rid after Dickinson toward the Shaise, who riding off, he came back to him (this Evidence) in the Ditch and bid him rise and mount, which as soon as he could disintangle himself from the Prisoner he did. That be found a Pistol in the Prisoner's Pocket charged and prim'd, and they carry'd him to Browns-Well-House; where he swore we should not keep him without a proper Officer: That there were 3 High Way Men more on the Common that Night. Mr. Carter confirmed the same, and farther deposed, that Dickinson clapt his Pistol to his Breast twice, and the last time it flash'd in the Pan but did not go off; that then he rode

up to Capt. Innocent, bid him stand and deliver, and flash'd a Pistol at him, which did not go off neither; that Dickinson rode off, the Capt. drove away and he rode back to his Friend in the Ditch (who in this for surprise he had forgot) that they went to Brown's-Well-House, where they found Capt. Innocent and the Gentlewoman who were in the Shaise; that Mr. Cheltenham and himself went out to seek after the Prisoner, and found him coming softly down the Road; that Mr. Cheltenham seized him and took a Pistol out of his Pocket, and he (this Evidence ) took another out of his other Pocket, both of them loaded and prim'd, and produced in Court. The Prisoner denied that he had any such Intent, and said that he was under some Misfortunes, and carried the Pistols for his Defence. The Jury found him Guilty of both Indictments. Fined 20 l for each Offence to suffer 3 years Imprisonment, and stand committed till he pays his Fines .

Reference Number: t17201012-19

Richard Cecil , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for breaking and entring the Dwelling House of Charles Windell on the 16th June last, in the Night time, with an Intent to Steal . The Prosecutor deposed, that he keeps the Globe in Hungerford-Market and that his House was broke open between 1 and 2 a Clock; that he lost no Goods; but had a great many Thousand Pounds worth of Plate and Linnen, belonging to some of the Nobility, and others, under his Care. Richard Webb deposed,that about 11 a Clock he brought down a Cart load at Goods of the Duke of Newcastle's to the Prosecutor's House, that he lockt and barr'd the Door and Windows, and saw every thing safe; that about one a Clock he found a Window of a Back Room next the Waterside open, which he had barr'd; whereopon he left his Brother to guard that Window, while he went round to the Door, where he took the Prisoner coming out of the House. - Webb deposed, that he staid at the Window while the former Evidence went round to the Door, that while he waited there he heard a Bolt shoot in the House, and that when the Prisoner was taken, he went up to the former Evidence's Assistance. Ann Windell deposed,that the Prisoner came to their House about 8 or 9 a Clock, and he not liking the Room he was in, she shewed him another; that when he had drank his Drink he went away, and afterwards came again, and call'd for Brandy; that about 12 a Clock they turn'd him out, and the House was made safe. The Prisoner denied that he broke the House or that he went into it with an intent to steal, and in his Defence said, that having been in the House that Night before, went into the same Room again, the Door being open, and knock'd and call'd but no Body answering he came to the Door and was seized. But the Jury not taking his Word for it, found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-20

Jane Ross of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 7 Pewter Pots, 2 Damask Napkins, and a Lac'd Mobb , the Goods of Thomas Maddox on the 12th September last: but the Evidence not-being sufficient the Jury Acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-21

Charles Saunders of St.Andrews Holbourn , was indicted for Assaulting Hannah Watson on the High-Way. on the 8th of this Instant October , putting her in Fear taking from her, a Pocket, 5 Keys, and 4 s. 6 d. in Money . It appeared that the Prosecutor going along Kingsgate-Street about 9 at Night with her Petticoat over head to keep off the Rain, the Prisoner came by and pull'd off her Pocket with the Keys and Money in it, and she seeing of him run, mist her Pocket and cry'd out Stop Thief; thus he finding himself pursued, made a Stop, then ran a little further and was taken, and the Pocket was found thrown over some Rails just where he stopt, that there was no Body near her but the Prisoner; that he made his Escape from them as they were carrying him to the Watch-House, but he was soon re-taken. It did not appear that she was put in Fear, but that her Pocket was rather privately taken from her; the jury found him Guilty of Felony only . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-22

Ann Powell of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 pair of Jumps value 50 s.and 3 Stomachers value 6 s. in the Dwelling House of James Sykes on the 21st of September last. It appeared that Mrs. Sykes met the Prisoner coming out of her House with 2 pair of Jumps under her Petticoats, which she took from her; that the Prisoner ran away but Mrs. Sykes followed her crying Stop Thief, that the Prisoner ran into a Shop, but dropt the 3 Stomachers in her Flight; that the Prosecutor having lost Goods several times before, went into Fee-Lane to enquire for Jumps to fit her, and in one Shop had two pair of her own brought to her, and in another one pair; all which were sworn to be bought of the Prisoner, and to be the Prosecutor's, and that those she had on her Back were his also. Her Confession, wherein she owned the taking 2 pair of Jumps and 3 Stomchers was read in Court. The Jury considering the Matter, found her Guilty to the value of 39s . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-23

John Harris of St. Giles without Cripplegate , was indicted for breaking the Dwelling House of Isaac Purser in the Night-time, and taking thence 2 Gowns, a Callimancoe Petticoat, a Quilted Petticoat, a Riding hood, a Drugget Coat and a Cloth Wastcoat , on the 17th of February last. Elizabeth Purser deposed that when she went out (about 7 or 8 a Clock) her Inner Door was lockt, and the outer Door on the Latch for the Convenience of her Lodgers; that she came Home about 9 and found her Door broke and the Goods gone; that William Field gave her Notice that the Prisoner and himself commited the Fact. William Field deposed, that the Prisoner and himself went to the Prosecutor's House on the 17th of February last between 9 and 10 at night; that they lifted up the Latch of outer Door, and broke the inner Door open with a Chissel; that the Prisoner took the Goods, and gave them to him in a Bag, which they afterwards sold to Eliz Glanister . Jonathan Wild deposed, that he knows the Prisoner; that he has been condemned before, has been an Evidence against several, convicted some, and has kept Company with Field. The Jury found him Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-24

Richard Glassford , of St. Andrews Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Gold Ring, a Drugget Coat and Wastcoat, a pair of Shoes and Stockings , the Goods of John Smith , on the 25th of September last. It appeared that the Prosecutor and the Prisoner were Fellow-Prentices together; and that the Prisoner ran away from his Master, but was brought Home again on the Saturday and kept up on the Sunday; that on Sunday Night he got out of the House and took the Goods mentioned in the Indictment with him; that the Hat, Shoes and Stockings were found upon him. The Jury considering the matter, found him Guilty to the value of 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-25

Elizabeth Firth , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Poplin Gown and Petticoat value 8 s. a Camblet Gown and Petticoat value 6 s. A pair of Stayes 2 s. a Silk Hood 1 s. and 5 s. in Money , the Goods and Money of George Leadbeater , on the 12th of September last. It appeared that the Prisoner was the Prosecutor's Lodger , took the Goods and went away with them; that she was taken 4 Days afterwards, and the Goods found upon her, which were produced in Court, and owned by the Prosecutor. The Jury found her Guilty . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-26

Martha Thomas , of St. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Linnen Shift value 3 s. The Goods of Thomas Palmer , on the 1 st of January last. But the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury Acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-27

Jane Duff , of St. Clement Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing 144 Glass Bottles value 20 s. the Goods of John Warner , on the 12th September last. But the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury Acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-28

Ann Raven , of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Cloth Seats of a Coach Value 5 s. the Goods of a Person unknown, on the 13th of September last. Roberts Diggs Deposed, that he pull'd the Coach out of the Yard to make Room to carry in some Timber; that the Seats were in the Coach when

he pull'd it out, but gone when he put it in again; that he followed the Prisoner, and found her with 1 Seat under her, the other in her Hand; and that the confest it before the Justice. Another Evidence confirmed the finding the Seats as before. The Jury found her Guilty . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-29

Dorothy Hellom , of St. Peters in Middlesex , was indicted for breaking open the House of William Mills in the Day Time, no Person being therein, and taking thence a Silk Gown and Petticoat value 6 l. a Quilted Petticoat value 10 s. 8 Damask Napkins 16 s. a Damask Table Cloth 30 s. a Lawn Sheet 40 s. and one Hoiland Shirt 15 s. on the 14th of August last. She was a second time indicted for breaking the House of Samuel Caldicut in the Day Time, no Person being therein, and taking thence a Blue Apron value 1 s. and a Muslin Neckcloth value 6 d. on the 20th of July last. It appeared plainly that the Prisoner took the Goods and told where she had disposed of them, and that they were found accordingly; which she owned before the Justice, and her Confession was read in Court. But the Evidence not being sufficient to fix the Burglaries on her, the Jury Acquitted her of them; and found her Guilty of Felony only on each Indictment . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-30

Nathaniel Hawes , of St. Clement Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing 7 Yards and half of Sattin value 18 s. 5 Yards of Mohair 28 s. 47 Yards of Camblet 6 l. 13 s. 6 d. 8 Yards of Burdet, and four Yards of Tiking in the Dwelling House of James Gronas and Gladwell Peyton . on the 9th of September last. Gladwell Peyton deposed, that the Prisoner had been with him 3 Months upon Liking in order to be Apprentice to him; that he missing Goods several times, made enquiry after them; that on Saturday Morning the Prisoner went away, and left word that he was going to another Master; that he was seen to be flush of Money and had got himself lac'd Ruffles, &c. that he having notice that the Prisoner used to go often to Mr. Phillip's, a Piece Broker, he got a Warrant to search his House, where he found several of his Goods, as Mohair, Damask, Camblet, &c. and that he sold him that for 24 s. and 6 d. which was worth 10 l. 24 s. Mr. Green deposed, that when he served the Warrant on the Prisoner, he owned that he stole the Goods from his Master, and sold them to the Piece Broker. Mr. Browne deposed, that he went to the Prisoner in the Round House. who owned to him that he had stole Goods from his Master and sold them to John Phillips , who bid him bring what he would and he would buy it, that he told him several Particulars and the Prices he had sold them for, which he set down from his own Month, and the Prisoner afterwards signed it. Mr. Fortune confirmed the former Evidence. The Prisoner owned his Signing the Paper in Court, which was read, by which the Goods appeared to be sold greatly under the value. The Jury considering the matter, found him Guilty to the value of 39 s . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-31

Mary Bowen of St. Andrews Holbourn , was indicted for that she together with Sarah Matthews (not yet taken) did privately steal from the Person of Thomas Patrick , a Silver Watch value 7 l. 10 s. and 13 s. in Money , on the 16th of September last. The Prosecutor deposed, that as he was going home about 11 at Night. he met the Prisoner and Sarah Matthews against Grays-Inn-Lane, who askt him to drink a Glass, that he went with them to a Brandy Shop in Grays-Inn-Lane , and they pickt his Pocket of his Watch and Money. Ann Masters deposed, that the Prisoner and Sarah Matthews came into her Shop the Night before, and the Prisoner then said they were to go Halves in what they got for a Fortnight; that on the 16th at Night they came in with the Prosecutor; that the Prosecutor said his Pocket was pickt, whereupon the Prisoner pawned her Coat for a Crown, and gave another Crown out of her Pocket to pacify him; that Sarah Matthews and the Prosecutor went out together, and the Prisoner remained in her Shop Half an Hour after they were gone. Another Evidence deposed that when the Prisoner was taken by the Constable she owned that she knew where the Watch was pawned for 20 s. and said he should have it again if he would let her go. The Jury considering the matter found her Guilty to the value of 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-32

Elizabeth Lambert of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Grasett Gown value 20 s. the Goods of William Westall , on the 19th of June last: But the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury Acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-33

Susanah Martin of Finchley , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Holland Shifts value 2 s. 2 Suits of Headclothes 3 s. a Callicoe Gown and Petticoat 1 s. 6 d. the Goods of Jacob Rust , on the 30th of August last. It appeared that the Prisoner was the Prosecutor's hired Servant , that she came on Thursday noon, and went away the Monday Morning following, and the Goods were mist: that about a Fortnight, or three Weeks after, she was found at Enfield with the Gown upon her Back. The Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d . Transportation .

Reference Number: t17201012-34

Stephen Delforce , of St. Dunstan at Stepney , was indicted on the New Act of Parliament for the more Effectual Transporting of Felons, &c. for that he having been formerly Convicted of Felony, and Transported among other Convicts from Newgate for the same, had returned into the Kingdom of Great Britain before his Time, without any Lawful Cause ; which being fully proved upon him, the Jury found him Guilty . Death .

Reference Number: t17201012-35

Elizabeth Brittain , of St. Paul's Shadwell , was indicted for a Misdemeanour in inticing Robert Austen a Black Smith to go beyond Sea to exercise his Trade contrary to the Statute in that case made and provided . But no Evidence appearing against her, she was Acquitted .

Reference Number: t17201012-36

Hester Filewood , of St. Botolph withoutAldgate was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Purse 2 d. and 11 Guineas , on the 10th of October last the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury acquitted her.

Reference Number: t17201012-37

Henry Membry ,of St. Dunstan in the East , Gent . was indicted for the Murder of Ann Pooley , by throwing her down to the Ground, and Striking, Beating, and Kicking her on the Head and Back on the 7th of September last, of which Striking, Beating and Kicking she languished till the 9th of the said Month and then died . Josiah Wright deposed, that he being at Tower Hill the 7th of September about 9 at Night, and hearing the Cry as of a Person in Distress, he went up to them and saw the Prisoner kick the Deceased near the small of her Back as she was on the Ground; and that he said to her, Get up, you Bitch, you shall have a Run for it; that he followed and struck her on the Back; that he was sure the Deceased was the Person kickt, and the Prisoner the Man who did it, he knowing them both, and the Moon shining very bright; this Evidence being askt if he knew where the Prisoner lived, answered, Yes, he's a Dyer in Tower street. Elizabeth Tilsley , Elizabeth Walker and Hannah Day , confirmed the former Evidence as to the Prisoner's kicking and striking of the Deceased, and bidding her get up and run; they were sure the Deceased was the same Person he served so, for they knew her by her Yellow Stomacher, Black Stockings and Rag about her. Williams Day and Matthew Ballard Corroborated the former Evidences. Lawrence Farril deposed, that the Prisoner came into the Nags-Head-Alehose that Night while he was there, blamed the Officers for suffering such loose Cattle to lye about the Hill, and said that he had just knockt one down on one side. another on the other, and one Bitch he kickt down and up again. Mary Gideon deposed, that the Overseers brought the Deceased to her to look after at 8 a Clock on Thursday Morning, and that she died at one a Clock the same Night; that she did not speak all the time she was with her; that she did not observe any Bruises on her while she was alive, but when she was dead she was as black as a Shoe from Ear to Hip every where.

The Prisoner in his Defence said that he went that Night to smoak a Pipe with a Friend, and on Tower Hill heard Murder cry'd out, and a Voice cry Capt. Membry. that when he came up he found a parcel of Black Guards, and bid them disperse themselves; that he did set his Foot in the Breech of one of them, not the Deceased, and said, run you Dog, it is good for your Health. John Ruart , deposed, that as he was on his Duty, he heard the People say that there was a Women Drunk or Dead in Thames Street, near the Custom-House, he went to see her, and found a poor ragged Girl, that could not speak lying on the Stones, that it was Wednesday Night between 8 and 9 a Clock; that Watchmen took her away, and he saw her next Morning

lying among the Stones on Tower Hill, but could not tell whether it was the Deceased or not. Williams White and John Bliss deposed, that they carried such a Girl from Thames Street to Tower Hill about 11 a Clock that Night by Order of the Constable, that she might not be chargeable to their Parish: that she had on a Black Gown, Black Stockings, and Leather Bodice John King deposed, that he was sent for to Sam's Coffee-House, upon the same Occasion, and order'd the last Evidences to carry her to Tower Hill for the reasons aforesaid, and that she had on a dark Gown, a pretty clean Shift, Black Stockings, and (he believes) a Yellow Stomacher. Mr. Urquehart deposed, that he saw the Girl lying on Tower-Hill on Thursday Morning with some Straw on each Side, and a Stone under her Head; that he sent her to the Nurse, and went and told Captain Membry that the People said he had kickt her to Death, and advised him to send a Surgeon to her to clear himself; that he went along with the Surgeon; that the Girl was put to Bed, washt, a clean Smock put on, and they examined her Body and found no Hurt at all, but only a small Scratch (like one done by a Pin) on her Arm; that when he heard she was dead, be went again with the Surgeon and searcht, that then he found no Bruises, but only the settling of the Blood as usual. Mr. Glenn deposed, that he went with the former Evidence (the Overseer of the Poor) to see the Girl, that he told them the was dying, that the was starved, and he believed in Convulsions, that he had her stript and turn'd, to search her, that he found no Marks of Bruise or Tumour, nor any thing else but what is usual after Death by the setling of the Blood. Three other Evidences confirm'd what had been deposed by the Watchmen, Overseer and Surgeon. Ruth Downes , a Giril, deposed, that she was upon Tower-Hill with Ann Trundley on Wednesday about 9 a Clock at Night, and Ann Trundley hitting her self against an Iron fell a beating this Evidence, and bit her on the Shoulder, whereupon she cry'd out Murder, and a Gentlemen came by (who taking them for Boys) kickt her, and said run you Dog run; that she knew Ann Pooley , and saw her at the Keys at 12 at Noon that Day very bad. Ann Trundley confirmed the former Evidence; and being askt whether she knew Ann Pooley , and what was become of her, said, Yes, she went into the Country, got in Ague, and Fever, and came up and died with a Parish Nurse on Tower-Hill; that she used to be with them, but was not there that Night. The 4 first Evidences being call'd again, deposed, that they did not see either of those two Girls there; but that it was the Deceased that they saw the Prisoner kick. The Prisoner called several Gentlemen of great Reputation and Worth to his Credit, who gave him a very good Character, and that he was a Man of Compassion and not of Cruelty. The Jury considering the whole matter, acquitted him.

Reference Number: t17201012-38

Thomas Belsenger , of St. Dunstan at Stepney was indicted for committing a Rape on the Body of Martha Gilbert , of about 16 Years of Age , on the 30th of September last. Martha Gilbert deposed, that the being much troubled with the Headache the Day aforesaid, laid herself down on the Bed, about three of four in the afternoon the Prisoner came up Stairs to see for a Pot, and finding her on the Bed, put his Hand up her Coats, stopt her Mouth with his Hand, and had Carnal Knowledge of her by Force and against her Consent, that she made what Resistance she could, and cry'd out as soon as she got his Hand from her Mouth; whereupon Mrs. Winny came down to her Assistance, caught him in the Fact, and pull'd him off from her; that he said if she prosecuted him for a Rape, he would swear she pickt his Pocket; that he had attempted to put his Hands up her Coats several times before, for which she had left fetching of Drink at his House, that she was up one pair of Stairs and Mrs. Winny up two pair, looking out of Clothes. Mrs. Winny deposed, that she hearing a Noise and a Bussle went down Stairs, found the Prosecutor's Coats up, and the Prisoner between her Legs with his Breeches down; that she pull'd him off, and he flew at her and scratcht her: that the Prosecutor was black in the Face with strugling, and could hardly speak: that he said if the Prosecutor sued him he would swear she pickt his Pocket. Jane King deposed, that she lodged in the Ground Floor, and heard the Prisoner coming down Stairs say, you Bitches if you Prosecute me I will swear you pickt my Pocket; that he had attempted her formerly, when she heard her leap out of Bed to avoid him. Mrs. Woolley and Mrs. Britton deposed, that they were sent for to the Prosecutor, found that she had received damage, that her Body had been enter'd, that her Shift at their Request was brought; and had all the shew of Virginity, and they believed she had no Conversation with Man till then, and that by Force.

The Prisoner denied the Fact, and said Winny was not in the House, but came in after: that they pickt his Pocket of 5 s. bid him hush, and all should be made easy. A Girl of 14 Years of Age deposed, that she went up to play with Mrs. Winny's Child, and the Prisoner came up and askt for Pots; that the Prosecutor said to him, Ye old Surfeit here are none; that she prickt him with a Pin, and he went to the Bed with her, and while they were on the Bed together Winny took a heap of Farthing out of the Prisoner's pocket and put them into the Prosecutor's Lap, and when she got up they fell on the Ground; that the Prosecutor said to the Prisoner, here's Three Halfpence, One Penny more will make it up a Pot, and then you shall do it; and that Winny's Child was asleep on the same Bed. Ann Smith deposed, that the Prosecutor was a naughty Girl, that about 9 Weeks ago she askt the Prisoner for a pint of Wine, and he gave her a Shilling, then put his Hands under her petticoats, and this Evidence went out of the Room; that she was there another time when the prosecutor huncht and gam'd the prisoner, and he told her it was not the first time he had lain with her. Edward Meadowes (a Surgeon) deposed, that he was sent for to go with 2 Midwives to search the prosecutor, that she said she never knew Man before, and had the same Shift on then; that he saw no Symptoms of her Virginity, and believed she was a common Woman before. The Midwives were of the same Opinion. The prisoner called several to give a Character of the Prosecutor and Mrs. Winny, who gave them a very bad one: and also called several to his own Reputation, who had known him long, and said he was an Honest Man and a good Neighbour.

Then the Prosecutor called 7 or 8 to clear her Reputation and Mrs. Winny's, who gave them a very good Character, as Civil, Honest and Industrious.

The Jury considering the whole matter, acquitted him.

Reference Number: s17201012-1

The Tryals being over, the Court proceeded to give Judgement as followeth:

Receiv'd Sentence of Death, 9.

William Fletcher alias Fellowes , Ann Tompion , Elizabeth Eves , Mary Granger , Martin Purdue , William Withall , Richard Cecil , John Harris , and Stephen Delforce .

Burnt in the Hand. 2

Richard Trantrum , and Lucius Owen , both formerly Convicted. To be Transported. 19.

Thomas Bostock , Joseph Johnson , Thomas Flory , David Wilford , Abraham Poor , James Allen , Benjamin Speed , John Brewinton , Charles Moore , Thomas Paine , Charles Saunders , Ann Powel , Richard Glassford , Elizabeth Firth , Ann Raven , Dorothy Hellom , Nathaniel Huwes , Mary Bowen , and Sussanah Martin.

To be Whipt. 5.

Elizabeth White , Elizabeth Fowlis, Alias Thewlis, Jane Worsley , Alice Hewton , and Mary Green , the three last formerly Convicted.

Joseph Jackson Fined. 20 l. for each Offence, to suffer 3 Years Imprisonment, and to stand committed till he pays his Fines.

Ann Tompion pleaded her Belly, and a Jury of Matrons being impannelled, found her with Quick Child.

Reference Number: a17201012-1

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