Ordinary's Account, 12th September 1707.
Reference Number: OA17070912A

The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, Confession, and Last Speech of Charles Moor, who was Executed at Tyburn, on Fryday the12th day of September 1707.

I Shall not here give the Reader so full an Account of this Man as I hereafter intend, when the other Malefactor, condemn'd with him, shall be out of my Hand. But so much I will now say for the present satisfaction of the Publick, That I found him all along to be a very harden'd Sinner. His Condemnation was for having broke out of Prison, wherein he was confin'd to Work for former Crimes, and for having now robb'd the House of Sir John Buckworth, Bart . all which he could not deny, but he would not discover his Accomplices, nor any thing that might tend to the clearing of his Consecience, and the satisfaction of honest Men. So obstinate he was, That when both my self and other Divines shew'd him the necestity of making a free Confession, he did more and more harden himself against all Admonitions that could be given him. True it is, that in general he acknowledg'd, that he had been a very ill Liver, having broken the Laws of Cod and Man, by doing that which he ought rot to have done, and omitting to do that which he should have done. Further, he came to acknowledge, that he had been guilty of Swearing, Drunkenness, Lewdness, and the Profanation of the Lord's Day, That he had several times wrong'd his Neighbours, and had not thought to amend his Life by former Judgments upon him; and that if he had had Grace, he might have lived very well by his Callings, which were that of a Husbandman, and of a Sailor. He told me, that he had gone several Voyages, tho but Thirty four years of Age, and understood Sea-faring Business as well as most. He likewise told me, That if he had known when he was Tryed, that he should have dyed, he would have had one or two with him for Fancy, for then. he would have made some Discovery of Persons concern'd with him, but now he was resolv'd to make none.

Thus he express'd himself, and shew;d how little sensible he was of his approaching Death, seeming rather to be given to jesting, than to entertain those serious Thoughts, which were becoming a Man under his Circumstances. I would advise others by any means not to imitate him in this wicked and desperate Temper, which for ought we know, may now have ended in his Eternal Misery.

What end he made, and what he further said, with the Particulars of his Behaviour in Newgate; I shall, God Willing, give a fuller Account thereof, on Monday next, when I Shall fet out the last Speech of William Elby, alias Dun, who is to be hang'd in Chains to Morrow at Fulham, for the Murther of Nicholas Hatfield, by him committed there, Etc.

Friday, 12 Sept. 1707.

This is all the present Account that (in this hurry) can be given of this Dying Malefactor, by

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

ADVERTISEMENTS.

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A Sermon Preach'd in the Morning at St Dunstan's in the West; and in the Afternoon (with some Variations at Newgate, on the 2d day of September 1707. being the Fast-day for the Fire of London. By PauLorrain, Ordinary of Newgate, Sold by B. Bragge, at the black Raven in Pater-nofeer-row, 1707.

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THE Monthly Miscellany, or Memoirs for the Curious. Occasionaly containing. Divinity and Law. Philosophy Moral, Natural and Experimentals Mathematicks in its several Branches, Physick, Chymistry, Surgery, Anotomy and Botany. Epitome of Books and News impartially done. Lives and Charcters of Famous Persons as well Living as Dead, being the Life of Doctor Sherloch. Letters on several Subjects; with a Diary of material Occurences. History Poetry and Travels. For the Month of July. Sold by J. Morphew near Stationers-Hall Price 6d. where may be had the 7 foregoing, Lives of Prince Lewis of Baden and my Lord Cutts, Mr. Jeremiah White, late Chaplain to Oliver Cromwell and D. Drake. Containing several other curious Miscellaneous Works in sundry Faculties.

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THE Diverting Muse, or the Universal Medley, Written by a Society of Merry Gentlemen, for the Entertainment of the Town. The Third Part. Consisting of, A wither'd Whore's Peep into a Looking-glass at Forty. The Riddle. A Morning Observations upon a topping Tavern over a Pint of Canary. A Poem upon Mr Wood, a Derbyshire Gentleman's marrying three of his Children on the same Morning. Wine beyond Love, or a Bottle before Beauty. The London-Bawd. The Maiden-Dream. The ungrateful Mistreis. London: Printed and Sold by B. Bragg at the Raven in Pater-noster-row, 1707.

Robert Whitledge living at the Sign of the Bible in Creed-Lane within Ludgate, sells all manner of Bibles and Common Prayer-Books, and other Books well Bound, at a reasonablerate.


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