John Perrott, Deception > bankrupcy, 21st October 1761.

Reference Number: t17611021-22
Offence: Deception > bankrupcy
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Death

306 (L) John Perrott , merchant , was indicted, for that he having become a bankrupt; after which he did conceal, embezzle , and remove his effects, to above the value of 20 l. *

Counsel. We will first prove the prisoner a trader, and that he owed a debt, upon which a commission could be taken out.

Anthony Bancroft . I have known the prisoner four years.

Q. Where did he live?

Bancroft. He kept a linnen-draper's shop on Ludgate-hill , and dealt in other articles,

Q. Was that the method of getting his living?

Bancroft. I believe it was.

Q. Do you know Mr. William Hewet ?

Bancroft. I do.

Q. Was the prisoner indebted to him, and in what sum?

Bancroft. He was indebted to him above a thou- pounds; I think it was 1025 l.

Cross Examination.

Q. How do you know he was indebted to him?

Bancroft. I know it by the entry made in the book, that I can prove to be my writing.

Q. Do you know there were goods delivered to him?

Bancroft. I know there were.

Q. What are the entries for?

Bancroft. For goods sold and delivered.

John Allison . I know the prisoner.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hewet?

Allison. I do; I know I have carried a great deal of goods to Mr. Hewet, and delivered them to him myself.

Q. Do you remember the particular quantities?

Allison. I cannot say I do; here is a book which I always signed after I carried the goods out, when I came back. [Producing a large book; it is read.] Two parcels, November 16, 1759, signed by John Allison .

Q. to Bancroft. Look in this book, and tell the court what that parcel came to. [He looks into it.]

Bancroft. This is 238 l. that is the parcel.

Christopher Harrison . I know the prisoner at the bar; I went to his house on the 17th of January, 1760; and on the 18th Mr. Perrott spoke to his apprentice, Richard Bagley , and desired him, if Mr. Hewet called, to say he was not at home. He likewise spoke to me, and desired I would let nobody go up stairs; he was afraid of being arrested. Mr. Hewet called, and asked if Mr. Perrott was at home; Richard Bagley said he was out, and he was then up-stairs.

Cross Examination.

Q. When was this?

Harrison. This was on the 18th of January, 1760.

Q. What time of the day?

Harrison. Perhaps about ten in the morning; I think it was near about that time.

Q. Upon what account did you go?

Harrison. I was sent by Mr. Maynard, and Mr. Hewet.

The clerk of arraigns produced the commission of bankruptcy against John Perrott , late of London merchant, taken out the 19th of January, 1760.

Mr. Vaughan. I am a clerk belonging to Mr. Webb's office in the Bank; I have here the bond and affidavit, upon which the commission was issued; [producing it] dated the 19th of January, 1760.

Q. to Harrison. Was the denial in order to a commission?

Harrison. That I cannot possibly take upon me to say.

Q. Was Mr. Hewet present when the prisoner was ordered to be denied?

Harrison. No, he came afterwards; there was only Richard Bagley, and me; Mr. Hewet called soon after; I had seen Mr. Hewet and Mr. Perrott talking together. Mr. Hewet went away, and Mr. Perrott came to Richard Bagley , and told him, if any body called, to deny him.

Q. Where was it that Mr. Hewett and Mr. Perrott were together?

Harrison. They were then in the farther warehouse; I did not hear what they said.

Q. Do you remember any body else that you denied him to?

Harrison. Yes, I denied him to one Mr. Buck.

Q. Was he a creditor?

Harrison. He was a large creditor.

Mr. Cobb produced the proceedings on the commission.

Counsel. Read folio first.

It is read by the clerk of arraigns.

Proceedings, examinations, and depositions, had, and taken under a commission of bankrupt, awarded and issued against John Perrott , of Ludgate hill, London, merchant, bearing date the 19th of January, 1760.

Memorandum.

That we Francis Filmer , Esq; Arthur Trollope , and William Crawley , Gents, the major part of the commissioners, named, and authorized in it, by a commission of bankrupt, awarded and issued against John Perrott , of Ludgate-hill, London, merchant, did administer to each other, and severally take the oath appointed to be taken by commissioners of bankrupts, by the late act of parliament, for that purpose, before we proceeded to act in the said commission, and in pursuance of the said act.

F. Filmer, A. Trollope, W. Crawley.

Witness. Thomas Cobb .

Q. to Mr. Cobb. Did you see the commissioners here named take the oath?

Mr. Cobb. I did.

Counsel. Read folio the fourth.

It is read, to this purport.

At Guildhall, London, 19th of January, 1760.

Memorandum,

That we the major part of the commissioners, named and authorized in it, by a commission of bankrupt awarded and issued against John Perrott , of Ludgate-hill, merchant, having met on the day, and at the place above-mentioned; and having proceeded to act in the said commission, have, upon good proof upon oath, found that the said John Perrott did, before the date and issuing forth of the said commission, become a bankrupt, within the true intent and meaning of the several statutes made, and now in force, concerning bankrupts, some or one of them; and we adjudge, and declare him a bankrupt accordingly.

F. Filmer, A. Trollope, W. Crawley.

The Second Part of these Proceedings will be published in a few Days.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 21st October 1761.

Reference Number: t17611021-22

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Wednesday the 21st, Thursday the 22d, Friday the 23d, Saturday the 24th, and Monday the 26th of OCTOBER.

In the first and second Years of His MAJESTY's Reign. Being the Eighth SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honble Sir Matthew Blakiston , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

NUMBER VIII. PART II. for the YEAR 1761.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by J. SCOTT, at the Black-Swan, in Pater-noster Row.

M. DCC. LXI.

[Price SIX-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.

Memorandum,

THAT the said John Perrott did, on the day, and at the place abovementioned, surrender himself to us, the major part of the commissioners, and submitted himself to be examined by us from time to time, touching a disclosure and discovery of his estate and effects, and to conform to the several statutes made concerning bankrupts: and particularly to the act passed in the fifth year of his present majesty's reign, intitled, An Act to prevent the committing of frauds by bankrupts.

John Perrott .

F. Filmer, A. Trollope, W. Crawley.

Mr. Robert Brown . I acted as messenger from the commissioners to Mr. Perrott. (He produced a Paper.) This is the copy of the notice which I gave into his own hand at Guildhall.

It is read, to this purpose.

19th Jan. 1760.

Whereas a commission of bankruptcy was issued against John Perrott , of Ludgate-hill, merchant, this is to summon and require him to appear on the 26th of January, the 4th of February, and the 4th of March, at four o'clock in the afternoon, to make a full disclosure and discovery of his estate and effects, &c.

Q. Was this notice printed in the Gazette.

Mr. Brown. It was.

( The Gazette read, for Tuesday, Jan. 22; the purport of which was, requiring the bankrupt to attend on the 26th of January, the 4th of February, and the 4th of March.)

Counsel. Now read folio the 6th, to shew that the commissioners met.

(It is read, to this purport.)

At Guild-hall, London, 26th of Jan. 1760.

Memorandum,

THAT we, the major part of the commissioners named and authorized in it, by a commission of bankrupt awarded and issued against John Perrot , met on the day, and at the place above mentioned, pursuant to notice in the London Gazette for that purpose; but the said John Perrott did not appear, to make any discovery of his estate or effects, or sent any excuse why he did not.

F. Filmer, A. Trollope, W. Crawley.

Counsel. Read folio 39, there is a new commissioner, but turn first to the page before it, there it will be seen he is qualified.

Clerk of Arraigns. Here it is, name Christopher Loffts .

( Folio 39 read, to this purport.)

At Guildhall, 4th of March, 1760.

BE it remembred, that this being the day appointed, pursuant to notice in the London

Gazette, for John Perrott , the person against whom the commission of bankrupt now in prosecution is awarded and issued, to surrender himself, and to make a full disclosure and discovery of his estate and effects, and to finish his examination under the said commission named, authorised, met at the time and place above-mentioned, pursuant to such notice; at which time a petition from the said bankrupt, preferred to the hon. the lord keeper of the great seal of Great Britain, paying that his time for making full disclosure and discovery of his effects, and to finish his examination, may be enlarged for the space of 46 days, to be computed from this 4th day of March instant, with his lordship's order thereon for that purpose, bearing date the 28th day of February last, was produced to, and served upon, the said commissioners. The said commissioners do therefore adjourn taking such examination till the 19th day of April next, at this place, at four of the clock in the afternoon of the same day.

Counsel. We shall now prove the notice given to Mr. Perrott to attend the 19th of April.

Robert Brown . I have here the warrant for the inlarged time, and the notice which I served on Mr. Perrott

Q. Was the notice mentioned in the Gazette?

Brown It was, it is dated the 8th of March.

C. for Prisoner. We admit that; there is no occasion to read it.

Counsel. Read folio 58.

(It is read, to this purport.)

At Guildhall, London, Saturday, the 19th of April, 1760.

BE it remembred, that this 19th day of April, 1760, being the day appointed in pursuance of an order from the rt. hon. the lord keeper of the great seal of Great Britain, and the notice given in the London Gazette, of Tuesday, the 4th day of March last, in consequence thereof, for John Perrott , of Ludgate-hill, merchant, the person against whom the commission of bankruptcy now in prosecution, is awarded and issued, to make a full disclosure and discovery of his estate and effects, and finish his examination under the said commission; the said John Perrott accordingly appeared before the major part of the commissioners named in the commission; and being sworn and examined by them the said commissioners, upon his oath faith, that the plate, china, linnen, and other household furniture, of him, the said examiners, seized by the messenger to the commissioners acting under the said commission, in and about the dwelling-house of him, this examinant, appraised and valued at the sum of 9 l. 3 s. 9 d. and also the stock in trade of him, this examinant, seized likewise by the said messenger, in and about the warehouse and premisses, of him, this examinant, appraised and valued at the sum of 5055 l and upwards; but which stock in trade cost him, this examinant, at prime cost, the sum of 6000 l. and upwards; the which plate, china, linnen, and other household furniture, as also the said stock in trade, proper inventories have been taken and made, as this examinant believes; and to which inventories, as to the particulars or contents of the specifick plate, china, linnen, or other household furniture; as also of the said stock in trade therein mentioned, be, this examinant, craves leave to refer himself in the hands, custody, or power of his (this examinant's) assignees, or one of them, except such plate, china, linnen, and other household furniture, and also such stock in trade, as by accident or oversight may have been omitted in the said inventories, or either of them, but yet were in and about the said dwelling-house, warehouse, and premisses of him, this examinant, at the time of the said messenger's entry into, and taking possession thereof; also cambricks in the Royal Exchange warehouse, of the value of 2000 l. or thereabouts, where no inventory, or other appraisement, hath been taken or made, as this examinant believes; also debts, to the amount of 280 l. and upwards, due to his (this examinant's) estate, entered in the books of account of him, this examinant, in the hands, custody, or power, of his (this examinant's) said assignees, or one of them; wherof, for greater certainty, he, this examinant, hath made an abstract in writing, of sundry debtors and marks; of some with the letter A; the several particular and specifick effects of him, this examinant, mentioned and set forth in the paper-writing marked by the letter B, subjoined to his examination; which paper-writing, marked with the said letter B, he, this examinant, prays may be taken as part of this his last examination, the several examinations of him, this examinant, taken the 26th day of February last, and subsequent

thereto, by and before the commissioners acting under the said commission. Several settlements of papers and accounts which he, this examinant, hath made with Mr Maynard, one of his assignees, in the hands, custody, or power, of the said Mr. Maynard, and indorsed by this examinant, a parcel of goods at Chester, in dispute with this examinant's estate, of the value of 13 l. 19 s. 4 d. are, and do contain, a full and true account, disclosure and discovery of all his (this examinant's) effects and estate, real and personal; and how, and in what manner, to whom, and upon what consideration, and at what time, or times, he, this examinant, hath disposed of, assigned, or transferred, any of his goods, wares, merchandizes, monies, and other estate and effects; and all books, papers, and writing, relating there-upto, of which he, this examinant, was possessed, or in, or to which, he, this examinant, was any way interested or intitled; or which any person or persons had, or hath, or have had, any interest for him, or for his use, at any time before or after the issuing of the said commission, or whereby he, this examinant, or whereby such person or persons, he, his, or their family or families bath, or can, or may have, or expect, any profit, or possibility of profit, benefit, or advantage, whatsoever, except only such part of his (this examinant's) estate and effects, as have been really, and bona fide, before sold or disposed of, in the way of his trade and dealings, and except such sums of money as have been laid out by him, this examinant, in the ordinary expences of himself and his family; and that he, this deponent, at the time of this his examination, hath delivered up to the commissioners, by the said commission authorized, or the major part of them all such parts of his ( this examinant's) goods, wares, merchandizes, money, estate, and effects, and all books, papers, and writings, relating thereunto, and at the time of such examination, are in his possesion, custody, or power, as necessary wearing apparel only excepted; and that he, this examinant hath not removed, concealed, or embezzled, any part of his estate, real or personal, or any books of account, papers, or writings, relating thereupto, with intent to defraud his creditors.

John Perrott .

Counsel. Turn to the 5th of June.

It is read, to this purport

At the Half-moon Tavern, Cheapside, London.

John Perrott . the bankrupt being present at the time and place above mentioned, and being sworn and examined, and the following questions being propounded, (to wit) As you do admit that you have spent the last week, previous to your examination before us on the 19th of April last past, with Mr. Maynard, one of our gnees, to settle and adjust your account and to draw up a true state thereof; to enable you to close such your examination; and do likewise admit, that upon such state thereof it appears, that, after giving you credit for all sums of money paid by you, and making you debtor for all goods sold and delivered to you, from your are entering into trade, to those on your bankruptcy, it appears that there is a deficiency of the sum of 13, 13 l. Give a true and particular account what is become of the same; and happend in what manner, you have applied and disposed thereof

Counsel. Now his answer.

The manner in which I have disposed of and applied the said sum of 13 513 l. is as follows.

Fitting up my warehouse in Blowbladder-street, and furnishing the same, -

100

Rent, and boy's wages, during my stay there, -

100

Travelling expences during the same, - 100

My own diet for that time, - 125

Cloaths, hats, wigs, and other wear ing necessaries, -

200

Fitting up my house on Ludgate-hill, - 100

Furnishing the same, - 200

Housekeeping during m stay there, with rent, taxes, and servants wages, -

2700

Cloaths, hats, wigs, and shoes, and other wearing apparel during my stay there,

700

Travelling expences during my stay on Ludgate hill, -

360

Horses, and keeping them, saddles, bridles, and farrier's bill, during my residence on Ludgate hill and Blow bladder-street, -

575

Tavern expences, coffee-house expences, and places of diversion during the above time, -

920

Carried over, 6200

Brought over, 6200

Expences attending the connection I had with the fair sex, -

5500

Paid Mr. Thompson, for selling goods by commission, -

300

Forgave him a debt, in consideration of his trouble and time, in relation to getting bills accepted, and such like business, about -

30

Lost by goods and mourning, -

3000

15,030

The aforesaid account is the most particular and exact account I can possibly give, how so great a deficiency appears upon the state of my account, as I never made any entry of my expences in any book, or otherwise in writing, excepting some few household and warehouse expences, entered by my servants; and the said account, according to the best of my knowledge, remembrance, and belief, is true in every particular; and I am the better able to be positive herein, that such deficiency in my accompts arose from my expences, and extravagant way of living, because I have not concealed any part of my estate or effects whatsoever, but have made a full and true disclosure and discovery thereof in my last examination.

JOHN PERROTT .

Counsel. Read Folio 112.

( It is read, to this Purport.)

At Guildhall Coffee-house, near Guildhall, London, the 21st day of March, 1761

John Perrott , against whom the commission of bankrupt now in execution hath been awarded and issued, being here present, at his own request being sworn and examined before the major part of the commissioners in and by the said commission named and authorised; and the following questions, ( to wit) As you do admit that you have spent the last week, previous to your examination before us on the 19th day of April last past, with Mr. Maynard, one of your assignees, and to settle and adjust your accounts, and to draw up a true state thereof, to enable you to close such your examination; and do likewise admit, that on such state thereof it appears, that after giving you credit for all sums of money paid by you, and making you debtor for all goods sold and delivered to you, from your first entering into trade, to the time of your bankruptcy, it appears that there is a deficiency of the sum of 13,513 l. Give a true and particular account what is become of the same; and how, and in what manner, you have applied and disposed thereof.

Being again propounded to him, he gave upon oath the following answer; ( to wit)

THAT about six years ago he, this deponent, became acquainted with one Sarah Powell , otherwise Sarah Taylor, who lately lived at Weybridge, in the county of Surry; but at the time when he first became acquainted with her, she lodged at Mr. Serjeant's, an Excise-officer, in Cold-bath-fields, in the county of Middlesex; which Mr. Serjeant now keeps a bookseller's shop near Temple-bar, known by the sign of the Star, as this deponent believes. Says, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, at the time he first became acquainted with her, was of the age of 25, or thereabouts, and, as she informed this deponent, was the daughter of a clergyman somewhere in the West of England, but where more particularly this deponent cannot recollect. Says, that about ten months ago, and since this deponent's confinement in Newgate, he was informed by Mr. Straw, an apothecary in Leadenhall-street, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, was then dead; and told this deponent he had received such information from her sister, Mrs. Penny, now living in Coney-court, Gray's-inn, as this deponent believes. Says, that from the time he became acquainted with the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, to the time of his being committed under this commission, which was on the 19th of April last, there continued a familiar intercourse between them; during which time he, this deponent, expended considerable sums of money; and this deponent faith, that from Christmas, 1758, to Christmas, 1759, he expended upon, or paid, or remitted, to the said S. Powell, otherwise Taylor, the sum of 5000 l. at the times, and in the manner following; that is to say, that at Christmas 1758, he, this deponent, sent her by the post, to Weybridge aforesaid, the sum of 100 l. in Bank-bills; that such bills were common Bank-notes, (not post-bills) not taken in this deponent's own name, nor received by him from his banker; and in the month of

January, 1759, he took to the said Powell, otherwise Taylor, at Weybridge aforesaid, the sum of 500 l. which sum was paid to her at different times, in Bank-notes and cash. Then, in the month of February following, he gave her at Weybridge, where she then was, as this deponent believes (as to the place) in Bank-notes and cash, but the greatest part in cash, the sum of 400 l. Then, in the month of March following, he carried to her, at Weybridge aforesaid, in cash and Bank notes, the greatest part in notes the sum of 300 l. Then, in the month of April following ( to wit) in the beginning of the said month. and just before she went to Bath, he gave her, in Bank notes and cash, but chiefly in cash, the sum of 700 l. Then, in the Month of May following, he sent to her at Bath, by the post, in Bank bills, the sum of 500 l. Then, in the month of June following, he sent to her at Bath aforesaid, by the post, in Bank-notes the sum of 500 l. Then, in the month of July following, he carried to her, at Weybridge aforesaid, to which place she was then return'd from Bath, in Bank notes and cash, the sum of 400 l. Then, in the month of August following, he sent to Bath aforesaid, to which place she was then returned, by the post, in Bank-notes, the sum of 600 l. Then, in the month of September following, he sent to her at Bath aforesaid, by the post, in Bank-notes, the sum of 300 l. Then, in the month of October following, he sent to her at Bath aforesaid, by the post, in Banknotes, the sum of 300 l. Then, in the month of November following, he sent to her, at Bath aforesaid, by the post, in Banknotes, the sum of 200 l. Then, in the month of December following, he sent to her at Bath aforesaid, by the post, in Banknotes, the sum of 200 l. in all 5000 l. And this deponent further faith, that he never draw'd upon his banker for any of these sums above-mentioned, but received them from one Henry Thompson , since deceased, who was employed by this deponent to sell goods for him. This deponent says, that no person whatever was present at any time when he delivered any of the said notes or cash to the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor. During her residence at Bath she lodg'd at one Miss Parker's in the Grove, and went by the name of Powell; and that, during the time of her residence there, she lodg'd at a toyman's in the Grove aforesaid, but the name of the toyman I cannot recollect. Saith, that he, the deponent, hath not been at Bath for this seven years last past. Says, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, kept house at Bath, during her stay there, as this deponent believes. Says, he don't know whether she kept any carriage during her stay there, or not. She was attended there by a man servant, named John; and by a maid servant, named Nancy; but what were their respective sirnames, or where they now respectively live, or may be heard of, this deponent knows not. Says, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, returned from Bath, to Weybridge, about the latter end of January, or beginning of February, 1760, where she died some time in the month of April following, as this deponent hath been informed and believes. Says, that from the time she so returned to Weybridge, to the time of this deponent's commitment to Newgate, he never went to see her but once, at which time, she was extremely ill, and dying of a consumption. Says, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, then knew that this deponent was a bankrupt, but never offered to return to this deponent any part of the money he had to given, and remitted to her, as aforesaid; neither did this deponent ask her what she had done with the same, or how she intended to dispose of her effects after her death. Says, he never desired any person to attend her in her last illness; nor does he know who did then attend her. Says, he kept no particular account, or memorandum whatsoever, of the payments and remittances, so remitted to her, as aforesaid, but is enabled to speak so particularly from his memory. Says, the reason of making such remittances to her, was her complaints to him by letters, that the places where she resided were very expensive; and though this deponent thought her demands very extravagant, yet he, this deponent, made her the remittances aforesaid, in order to enable her to defray such expences, and not with a view to establish a fund for her future support, or wherefrom he could draw any advantage. Says, that he continued to correspond with the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, for the space of six weeks after her second return from Bath, as aforesaid; but says, that all the letters, except one or two, which he received from her, during this deponent's acquaintance with her, were contained in a paper parcel, mentioned in a former examination of this deponent, to be delivered by him to the said Henry Thompson , and afterwards re-delivered by the said Henry Thompson , to this deponent; and that all such letters had been since burnt or destroyed by this deponent. Says, that the reason for not disclosing the transactions between him, this deponent, and the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, before, was because it was her dying request, that he, this deponent, would not expose her to the world. And this deponent faith, that during the said year 1759, when he made such remittances to the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, he knew he was not worth any thing, and that he was remitting to her his creditors money; and that such remittances were not made in hopes of receiving any reward back therefrom. Says, he does not know any person who can now give any account of the reality of the above transactions, or of any of the above remittances, or payments; but believes that the said Mrs. Penny, and the said Mr. Straw, had heard this deponent declare, that the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, was very expensive to him, this deponent, and cost him large sums of money. And this deponent faith, that the said Henry Thompson informed this deponent, that he sold the goods of this deponent, from which the money, so paid, and remitted to the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, arose; to the several persons following, among others; namely, to Sir Samuel Fludyer , Mr. Mabbs, in Smithfield, Mr. Whiting, in Cheapside, and Mr. Pierpont, of the same; says, that the said Henry Thompson kept no particular account of the monies raised by him, by the sale of such goods, for the use of this deponent, as aforesaid. Says, that during the first year of his acquaintance with the said Sarah Powell , otherwise Taylor, she might cost him the sum of 100 l. but cannot recollect any of the particulars thereof. Says, that she removed from her lodgings in Cold-bath-fields, to a little street, in Westminster, but cannot recollect the name of the street, or the person with whom she lodged; though he, this deponent, having frequently so visited her in such her lodging, and corresponding with her there by letters for about three months. Says, that between that time, and her removing to Weybridge, she resided at several different places, but cannot tell where, or with whom in particular; neither can gave any particular account what he expended upon her, the second, third, and fourth years of their acquaintance, though the same familiarity and intercourse subsisted during all that time, as in the year 1759.

John Perrott .

Counsel. We are going to charge him with the 13 notes mentioned in the indictment, and shall call witnesses first to prove the notes found in his custody.

Robert Brown . (Again,) I am messenger to the commissioners of bankruptcy.

Q. Was you to this?

Brown. I was.

Q. Was you imploy'd to make any search in Newgate, for any concealed effects upon the prisoner?

Brown. Yes. It was on the 25th of June, 1761; I went pursuant to the order of Mr. Cobb, and Mr. Maynard, from the Assignees, to examine his room; and Mr. Hewitt, and Mr. Salkall, went with me. Upon examining an old trunk in his room, I found a bit of cloth, tied up with some white tape; I cut it, and felt something pretty thick; in it was a bit of silk tied up; I opened that, and there I found five half bank notes. I seeing some old print upon one of them, I looked at it, and said, I am sure this is not for less than a thousand pounds, because I could see the end of the word thousand, it can be no other word. I delivered these five half bank notes to Mr. Hewitt.

Q. Look at these; [He receives five half bank notes.]

Brown. I cannot swear these are the identical half notes, they having been out of my possession; but I believe them to be the same.

Cross Examination.

Q. What particular reason have you for believing them to be the same?

Brown. By that which I mentioned, of the thousand pounds.

Q. Is there any other sum that you can form any idea from?

Brown. No, there is not; but I do verily believe those notes to be the same which I found there, and delivered to Mr. Hewitt, one of the assignees.

Q. What are the letters you ground your belief upon?

Brown. Here is the letter, half of the word thousand upon it: [They are delivered in.]

Q. Did you search any other place than Newgate?

Brown. I went up to Mrs. Ferne's, with a search-warrant, I had searched there before; but I made a second search, and found a note of hand for 12 hundred pounds; the gentlemen with me, told me, they found some half bank-notes there; but I did not see them found.

William Hewit . I was with Mr. Brown, when he searched the prisoner's room in Newgate. I saw him take out these half notes, [Here produced,] from an old rag, which he found in a trunk. He delivered them into my hands, I took them home, and put the initial letters of my name upon them, and know them to be the same; here is part of the word Martin on one of them.

Q. What letters?

Hewit. Here is Martin Mathias , or bearer, 30 June, 60.

Gideon Maynard . I took these half notes out of a little box in Mrs. Ferne's apartment; she was a little riotous, and did not care I should take possession of them; I put them into the constable's hand.

Q. What are they?

Maynard. Here are five half Bank-notes, Mrs. Ferne signs her name Mary Ferne , and in others she signs it, Mary Ann Ferne, [They are delivered in.]

Q. How many of these half notes tally with those found in Newgate?

Maynard. Here is C 272 for 40 l.

C 174 for 50 l.

K 316 for 50 l.

No. 9 for 20 l.

four of them tally. There was another note found at the same time, for 25 l. does not tally with any of the other.

Q. Did you find the other half of the thousand pound note?

Maynard. No, I did not; we carried Mrs. Ferne to justice Fielding, and I believe these half notes are entered in his book.

William Stears . I am a clerk at the Bank, there were three notes made out in the name of Martin Mathias , and given in lieu of 13 notes, brought into the Bank, by Martin Mathias ; I have them here, [Producing 13 notes.] And for those 13 notes, there were three notes taken out for the same value.

Q. What do they amount to?

Stears. They amounted to two thousand one hundred pounds; the three notes made out, were two for a thousand each, and one for one hundred pounds. Two of them were paid; one of a thousand, and one of a hundred, I paid since; they were H 214, 215, and 216. Here is James Coors on the face of the thousand pounds, but nothing on the face of the hundred pound note.

Q. Look on this half note found in Newgate?

Stears. Unless I had the other part of the note, I cannot tell what that was for. Here is at the bottom of the thousand pound note, John Butt , 30 June, 60. Mr. Butt is one of the cashiers.

Q. Whether on the 30th of June, there were any other notes made out to Martin Mathias, besides those three?

Stears. No, there were not as I know of.

Q. Have you examined the books at the Bank?

Stears. I have, and find no such names.

Charles Smith . I sent my servant to the Bank, with a thousand pound Bank-note to change.

Q. Who did you receive it of?

Smith. I received it of Mrs. Ferne.

Q. to Stears. Are any of those three notes you mentioned unpaid?

Stears. There remains one note of a thousand pounds unpaid in the book.

Charles Taylor . I am clerk to Mr. Cotes.

Counsel. Look at this note for 1000 l. [He takes it in his hand]

Taylor. This note corresponds with our book H. 215, 1000 l. On the 8th of October, that money was received at the Bank by one of Mr. Cotes's clerks.

Q. How did Mr. Cotes come by that note?

Taylor. A person that said he came from Mr. Charles Smith , brought it to our house, and I gave four of Mr. Cotes's notes of 200 l. each payable to Charles Smith , or bearer; and 100 l.

Bank-note, and 100 l. in money, was given by the teller for it.

Q. What was the number of the Bank-note?

Taylor. The Bank-note was number C. 245, payable to Mr. James Cotes .

Q. When were these notes you gave him of Mr. Cotes's paid?

Taylor. The first was paid the 27th of October, 1760; the second the 29th of October, 1760; the third the 9th of April, 1761; and the fourth the 14th of April, 1761.

Q. The note of 200 l. dated the 9th of April, 1761, what did you give for that?

Taylor. A 100 l. Bank-note, a 50 l. ditto, a 30 l. ditto, and 20 l. in money.

Q. What did you give for each of them? be particular with each.

Taylor. That of the 27th of October, a 100 l. Bank-note, a 50 l. ditto, and 50 l. in money. The next was paid with a 100 l. note, a 50 l. note, and 50 l. in money.

Q. Describe them?

Taylor. The first, numb. K. 316, payable to Drummond and Co. the 26th of March, 1761. The second, numb. C. 174, payable to S. and W. Smith, the 27th of February, 1761. The third, numb. C 134.

Counsel. That is not material.

Taylor. The fourth, numb. C. 272, payable to J. Lascomb, the 2d of March, 1761.

Counsel. There are three of these that tally.

Q. Look at these half-notes, and see if they correspond? [He takes them in his hand.]

Taylor. Here is numb. 316, payable to Drummond and Co. the 26th of March. Here is another, numb. 272, payable the 2d of March, 1761. Here is another, 174, payable to Samuel and William Smith , the 27th of February, 1761. These three I find correspond.

Counsel. Here is a note of 400 l. which was paid for two bales of silk, by Thompson; and we shall prove Perrott had in his custody two bales of silk, agreeing with the mark. This note is payable to Asgill and Co. this is one of the 13 paid into the Bank.

Peter Turquand . I am now partner with Mr. Chavet; I was clerk to him; we bought two bales of silk of Perrott, on the 15th of December. Here is the bill of parcels, wrote by Thompson; it was wrote in my compting-house. We gave him 434 l. 14 s. for them; and I gave him a note of hand, payable five days after date, which note was paid at the expiration of the time, by this draught upon our banker, Sir Charles Asgill and Co. payable to William Thompson , or bearer.

William Donaldson . I am clerk to Mr. Asgill, here are the draught and the note. [ Producing them.] The note is C. 282, dated the 15th of December, for 400 l.

Cross Examination.

Q. Was you the person that gave the note?

Donaldson. No, but it appears so in our books.

Counsel. I am going now to prove by Perrott's book, that he had silk of the quality of this.

Mr. Maynard produced a book. This is one of Perrott's books. [He reads folio 78, and 79.] A bale of silk, containg 161 pounds of silk, neat, bought the 3d of October, 1759. The other is the 3d of October, 161 pounds of silk, bought of Zackery and Filmer.

Cross Examination.

Q. Look over this book, and see if there are no other bales of silk about the same size?

Maynard. I have examined this book very exactly; I find but one bale besides these. [The bill of parcels and draught are delivered in, &c.]

Walter Powel . I am clerk to Castells and Wheatley; I remember to have received this note in part of a sum of 2,750 l. I paid it in the name of Thompson, the 11th of January, 1760, in the part of a draught of Mr. Frederick Gibson 's, Cheapside. It was payable to Mr. James Mabbs , or bearer; K. 79, to W. Forbes, 2d of January. The date I did not take down. This tallies with our waste-book. I paid it to a person named Thompson.

James Mabbs . I know Mr. Thompson, I had dealings with him in the year 1760; I bought some long-lawns of him; I believe 280, or 90 pieces.

Q. In what manner did you pay him?

Mabbs. I paid him in a draught of Mr. Frederick Gibson , Castell, and sons, 550 l.

Q. to Powell. Had you any other draught of that day of Mr. Frederick Gibson 's?

Powell. No, our books have only this draught of that day.

Mr. Gines. I am a banker.

Q. Look at this note H 39, for 100 l. the 13th of December, 1758. [He takes it in his hand]

Q. Look at H. 257, for 100 l. payable to Glyn and Co. the 5th of December, 1759. [He takes it in his hand]

Q. Look at C 186, for 100 l. payable to Pewteres, the 10th of December, 1759. [ He takes that it in his hand.]

Q Look at numb. 7, for 100 l. payable to William Sonal , the 11th of November, 1759. [He takes it in his hand also.]

Q. Did you pay these away to any person, and at what time?

Gines. H. 39 was paid the 13th of December, 1759. to Henry Thompson ; C. 185, and H. 257, were paid to Henry Thompson , by a clerk of mine.

Q. Upon what account were they paid?

Gines. In discharge of a promissery note for 366 l. for Sir Samuel Fludyer , which I discounted for this Henry Thompson .

Q. What do you know of number 7?

Gines. Numb. 7, for 100 l. was paid in discharge of three of my own notes given to Thompson; which notes were given in part of payment to Sir Samuel Fludyer . That was given to Henry Thompson .

Counsel. These are four of the 13 notes.

Samuel Cope , I am clerk to Sir Samuel Fludyer . [He produced a bill of parcels.] Sir Samuel has bought shalloons several times of Mr. Thompson. On the 12th of December he bought to the amount of 366 l. and here is another note for 370 l. for shalloons bought of Mr. Thompson; and 13 s. was paid in cash, which made up to the amount of 736 l. 13 s.

Thomas Lee . Numb. H. 382, for 100 l. and numb. C. 262, for 200 l. were paid by my clerk on a draught of the prisoner Perrott. Also B. 253, for 100 l. and H 69, for 100 l. were paid to a person named Bentley, who came for it payable to Molinox.

Cross Examination.

Q. You say these two notes were paid to a draught upon the prisoner.

Lee. The draught was payable to Cunningham, or bearer.

Counsel. There now appear to be eight of the 13 notes.

Roger Thompson . Henry Thompson was my father.

Q. Is he living or dead?

Thompson. He is dead; he died the 28th of last October.

Mary Harris . I know Mary Anne Ferne .

Q. How long have you known her?

M. Harris. I have known her this four years.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar?

M. Harris. I do.

Q. Do you know of any connections between them?

M. Harris. I do, so far as she told me; I frequently heard her speak of such a person, and she has taken me to Newgate to him, and told me he was my master.

Q. What was you?

M. Harris. I was her servant.

Q. Did she tell you this in his hearing?

M. Harris. Yes, she did

Q. What did he say?

M. Harris. He consented to it, that it was so.

Q. What country woman is she?

M. Harris. She comes from Derbyshire; her father is dead; I know her two brothers

Q. In what circumstances was her father?

M. Harris. I have heard they were poor people, and kept a little farm of about 20 or 30 l. a year.

Q. What was she when you knew her first?

M. Harris. Then she was just come from a service in Watling-street, at the sign of the tea-chest.

Q. Did she receive wages there?

M. Harris. I believe she did.

Q. What was her master's name?

M. Harris. I think the name was Hanison; she lodged at Mr. Jefferson's, a grocer, by Temple bar, in Shire-lane.

Q. How did she use to appear?

M. Harrison. She had scarce any cloaths at all, nor no money at all.

Q. Did you see her when she went from that lodging?

M. Harris. I did not for about two years after.

Q. When did you see her since?

M. Harris. I saw her on the last fast-day; she called upon me, and gave me an invitation to go and see her, and I went to see her on the fast-day.

Q. How did she appear then?

M. Harris. She appeared very much in an exalted state; I was so surprized to see it, I took the liberty to ask how she came to be possessed of so large a fortune.

Q. When was this?

M. Harris. This was the 5th of last March, when I went to live with her, and also before, when I went to see her.

Q. What account did she give you?

M. Harris. She told me her fortune came by a person belonging to a picture that hung in her dining room.

Q. Where was the prisoner then?

M. Harris. He was then in Newgate.

Q. Did you ever go with her there to him?

M. Harris. I did, almost every day, and sometimes twice a day; I heard her tell him she had shewed me his picture, and what discourse had passed between she and I; that is, what she had told me. Mr. Perrott asked me if I thought the picture was like him.

Q. In what situation did she then live?

M. Harris. She lived in a plentiful manner; Mr. Perrott used to make her great promises how they should live when he came out of New-gate; and she told him about a house of Mr. Smith's to be disposed of. He made an objection, and said there was not room sufficient to keep a pair of horses. He said he would make her a present of a pair of diamond buckles, and a pair of diamond ear-rings, and lay out upon her 300 l. When she went to buy this house of Mr. Smith's, she took half a Bank-note for 1000 l. and said the other half was in the hands of Mr. Perrott in Newgate. They had a great deal of conversation relating to notes, and other things. When she told him that house was to be sold, he said, My dear, have you a mind for it? She said, Yes, if she could have it for eight or 900 l. Mr. Perrott said, My life for it, you shall have it, for I like the place above all things.

Q. from Prisoner. When did I promise her these diamond buckles and ear-rings?

M. Harris. I cannot exactly tell the time, but it was all within the time I lived with her; it was when we were with him in Newgate. I went to live with her on the 5th of March.

Q. to Hewitt. Was there any agreement between you, that Perrott should be denied to you, in order that he should be a bankrupt?

Hewitt. There was a meeting of a great number of the creditors at the Half-moon tavern, the night before he was denied; I believe it was the night that I went to his house. It was the night before the act of bankruptcy was committed. It was agreed between him and the creditors, that he should be denied to any one of them, that he might be a bankrupt; and he was denied to me, in consequence of that agreement; he was denied to another also.

Q. Who was that person?

Hewitt. I do not know now; I cannot recollect that; it was one of the creditors that was at the Half moon tavern.

Q. from Prisoner. Was you at my house in the morning, and in my company?

Hewitt. I was; that was previous to that day.

Prisoner. That was the very same morning.

Q. from Prisoner. Did not you go out at the back-door?

Hewitt. I believe I did.

Q. from Prisoner. Do you remember a circumstance of your asking my apprentice whether I was at home? What was the answer?

Hewitt. I cannot tell the answer.

Q. from Prisoner. Do not you remember a circumstance of your coming to ask my apprentice, Bagley, concerning his master, and he said to you he was at home, and you answered he must say he was not at home; you knew he was at home.

Hewitt. That I do not remember.

Q. from Prisoner. Do you remember my going out at the back-door?

Hewitt. No.

Q. from Prisoner. Did you call upon any business to ask for money, or if I had any bills?

Hewitt. I had a note of the prisoner's, payable at a banker's.

Q. Did the prisoner owe you any money?

Hewitt. He owed me a large sum of money.

Prisoner. I had bought goods of Mr. Hewitt, upon nine months credit; none was become due then.

Hewitt. I called upon him then on account of hearing some of his bills had been returned, to know if it was true, being willing to know what situation he was in.

Q. Whether any money was due to you on the 19th of January?

Hewitt. I cannot tell; unless I look into my books; I had a draught of his upon a banker, and that was returned me; then it became necessary for me to apply to Perrott for the money.

Q. When was that?

Hewitt. Not that day, but the day after.

Q. Was it before, or after the issuing the commission?

Hewitt. It was paid after he was denied.

Q. When did he pay you that money?

Hewitt. I believe that very same day.

Q. Was not that before the issuing of the commission?

Hewitt. I did not receive the money of him after the commission was entered; the commission was issued on the 19th, which was the day after.

Prisoner's Defence.

My lord, all I have to say is this, that Thompson sold goods is very true; but what debts he took, how he negotiated them, I cannot say. All the debts I received of him, I sent to Mrs. Powell to Bath, and Weybridge. It is a very great unhappiness to me, that Mr. Thompson is dead; what he knew he would testify. As to those notes, half with me, and half with Mrs. Ferne, they were Mrs. Ferne's own. I have laid in Newgate so long, I have none but she to support me; she has sent me a bit of meat, tea, and sugar, and those little things; and she requested of me to take them half Bank-bills into my portmanteau. I thought I should be very ungrateful, if I did not; and the reason she gave me was, her house had been attempted to have been broke open twice; and for the favours she was pleased to compliment me with, she said she thought she had some little right so to do. They asked me for the key; I gave them it. When they found these half Bank-bills sewed up by Mrs. Ferne, Mr. Brown has positively sworn they were covered with a piece of white cloth in a bit of silk. They were covered with a bit of white dimity. When I asked him to take an account of them (for I did not know what notes they were, neither did I ever see them) he would not let me, but carried them away.

Guilty Death .

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 21st October 1761.

Reference Number: t17611021-22

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Wednesday the 21st, Thursday the 22d, Friday the 23d, Saturday the 24th, and Monday the 26th of OCTOBER.

In the first and second Years of His MAJESTY's Reign. Being the Eighth SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honble Sir Matthew Blakiston , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

NUMBER VIII. PART II. for the YEAR 1761.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by J. SCOTT, at the Black-Swan, in Pater-noster Row.

M. DCC. LXI.

[Price SIX-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.


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