George Barber, Deception > forgery, 16th January 1761.

Reference Number: t17610116-9
Offence: Deception > forgery
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Death

46. (L) George Barber , was indicted, for that he having in his custody a bill of exchange, with the name John Sharp thereunto subscribed, purporting to bear date the 2d of November, 1760, at Manchester, directed to Mr. Rigby, merchant, in Gracechurch-street, for the payment of 50 l. and that he, on the 5th of December , did make, forge, and counterfeit; and cause to be made, forged, and counterfeited; and readily acted therein a certain order by the name of John Rigby thereunto subscribed, to Mess. Honeywood, Fuller, and Co. for the payment of the said 50 l. contained in the said bill; and for publishing the said order, well knowing it to have been forged. ++

George Fawell . I am a clerk to Mess. Honeywood, and Co. bankers. The prisoner at the bar brought a bill to our house on Friday the 5th of December, about four in the afternoon, for 50 l.

Q. Where do they live?

Fawell. In Birchin-lane: he brought it for payment. This is the bill. [Producing it. It is read in court.]

Q. Was the acceptance on it when he brought it.

Fawell. It was. That is, accepted Dec. 1, pay at Honeywood, Fuller, and Co. for John Rigby .

Thomas Clifton . I am very well acquainted with Mr. John Rigby 's hand-writing.

Q. Look upon the name John Rigby , to the acceptance.

Clifton. [He takes it in his hand.] This is not like his hand-writing.

Q. Have you seen him write?

Clifton. I have several times.

Q. Are you sure that is not his hand-writing?

Clifton. I am very confident it is not.

Cross Examination.

Q. What are you?

Clifton. I am servant to Mr. Rigby.

Q. Are you not in partnership with him?

Clifton. No, I am not.

Q. Does he not vary in his writing sometimes?

Clifton. He varies very little in his writing; but this has not the least likeness to his writing.

Q. to Fawell. Did the prisoner demand payment of that bill?

Fawell. He did. I asked him if he came for the money for it: he told me he did. I saw there was no similitude in the hand at all. I shewed it to one of the other clerks: he desired me to go to Mr. Cope. I did: he desired me to go to Mr. Rigby, to know whether any of his clerks might have wrote his name to it. I went, but did not see Mr. Rigby; I saw Mr. Clifton, that is here. I went a second time; then I saw Mr. Rigby.

Q. Are you well acquainted with Mr. Rigby's hand-writing.

Fawell. I am extremely well acquainted with it. I asked the prisoner who he received it for, if it was for himself. He said, For one Mr. Davis, a milliner, in King-street, Westminster. I asked him how he came to receive it for him. He said, He was a neighbour of Mr. Davis's, and coming into the city, he desired him to call, and receive it. I asked him if Mr. Davis had given value for it. He said he could not tell. During the time I was gone to Mr. Rigby's, the prisoner endeavoured to make his escape. When I returned, I found our people, with other assistance, had pursued and brought him back, just as I came to the door. He was then taken to the Mansion-House. His lordship was then at the Old-Bailey, being sessions time. We brought him to his Lordship. I was present at his examination. Then he told my Lord, he had found the bill [with other two bills that were found. in his pocket, when he was searched in the Poultry Counter ] on London-bridge.

Cross Examination.

Q. Is it customary in the course of business, for the clerk to accept bills for the master?

Fawell. Yes; but they never write the masters name, except payable for their master. If I was clerk, I should say, payable for John Rigby , and sign my name.

Q. Did you never know a clerk to sign his master's name to a bill for his master?

Fawell. No, never in my life; to do it as this.

Q. Then how came you to go to Mr. Rigby's, to inquire whether it was his clerk's writing?

Fawell. As he trades to Manchester, we did not know but that some of his clerks might have inadvertently wrote it so.

Charles Holmes . There was an out-cry of stop him; the prisoner was coming through Change-alley; I had my knot upon my shoulder, and having but one hand, I laid hold of the skirt of his coat; he slipped away from me, I followed him cross Lombard-street, and laid hold of him again. He then himself cried out, stop him, and made his way into Abchurch-lane. A young man came out of Mr. Pope's shop, a laceman, and he and I together stopped him. We took him to Mr. Fuller's, in Birchin-lane. I being a constable, was ordered by one of the clerks so to do. Then I had charge given me of him by Mr. Fuller. I took the prisoner to the Mansion-house. Going along, I said what is the meaning of this out cry I have got you in charge for. He made slight of it, and said, only forging a note. There was never a magistrate at the Mansion-house. and I took him to the Compter. He held his hands up to Mr. Fuller, and begged he would not hang him, but get him for transportation, and would have gone on his knees.

Q. Where was this?

Holmes. This was not at the Mansion-house.

Q. What did Mr. Fuller say to him?

Holmes. He said, how came you to do so rash an action. The prisoner answered, it was merely for want of money. The next morning the prisoner was brought to the Old-Baily. I went to the Compter for him. Mr. Fuller was there, and asked the prisoner for his pocket book; the prisoner's brother was with him; and said, if you have a pocket-book, give it him. I said, I saw you have one. He delivered it to Mr. Fuller; and in it were found two other notes, and a letter. Then Mr. Fuller delivered the pocket-book to his brother.

*** The Second Part of these Proceedings will be published in a few Days.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 16th January 1761.

Reference Number: t17610116-9

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE C ITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Friday the 16th, Saturday the 17th, and Monday the 19th of January.

In the first Year of His MAJESTY'S Reign. Being the Second SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honble Sir Matthew Blakiston , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

NUMBER II. PART II. for the Year 1761.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by J. SCOTT, at the Black-Swan, in Pater-noster Row.

M. DCC. LXI.

[Price FOUR-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.

Q. DID you look at those notes?

Holmes. No, I did not.

Mr. Fuller. I went to the compter in the morning after the prisoner was committed. I imagined this was not the first offence he had committed of this kind, and asked him for his pocket-book; at last he delivered, it up: I opened it, and took out two bills, signed Rigby.

Q. Did he deny having any pocket-book when you asked him for it?

Mr. Fuller. At first he did.

Q. How many partners are there of you.

Mr. Fuller. There is Mr. Honeywood, I, and Mr. Cope.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the bills on the bridge, folded in one another loose. There were a great many people by, but I did not know any of them. I did not demand the money, neither did I think of receiving it. The clerk looked at one of the bills, and went out, as I thought, to go to Mr. Rigby. I went out, and they overtook me. The man asked me what I was charged with. I said, it was on suspicion of forging a note. As for Mr. Davis, I never knew no such man.

To his Character.

Jonathan Skofield . I have known the prisoner at the bar 13 or 14 years.

Q. What has been his behaviour and character during that time?

Skofield. Very good; he served his apprenticeship with his uncle in the country.

Q. What country?

Skofield. In Yorkshire, near Wakefield, a dry-salter, a very honest man as any in the world. I could not believe the prisoner guilty of forging a note, till I went to see.

Thomas Shaw . I have known the prisoner about 10 years in the country.

Q. Have you known him down to the present time?

Shaw. I have.

Q. What is his character?

Shaw. A very good character, but I have not known much of him since he came out of the country.

Mr. Parker. I have known him about 15 years, down to the present time.

Q. What is his general character?

Parker. It is a very good one, that of an honest man; I never heard any complaints of him in my life; I should not have scrupled to have trusted him; I have trusted him, and found him very honest.

Thomas Craven . I have known the prisoner 15 or 16 years, we were school-boys together.

Q. Have you known him down to the present time?

Craven. I have.

Q. What is his general character?

Craven. I never heard or saw any thing by him, but what was very well; he bore the character always of an honest man; he has been trusted by persons where I was in service.

Francis Maxon . I have known him about 14 years; I lived two years at his uncle's.

Q. What is his character?

Maxon. He is a very civil, honest young man.

Q. Have you known him down to this time?

Maxon. I have, almost; I knew him till within this two or three years.

Jonas Carr . I have known the prisoner above 18 years; I lived with his uncle, a dry salter in the country.

Q. What is his general character?

Carr. He always bore a good character in the country, and in town too, of that of a very honest man.

John Hincliff . I have known him 18 or 19 years, ever since he was a boy.

Q. Have you known him lately.

Hincliff. I cannot say I had any acquaintance with him here in town; in the country he had the sole care of his uncle's business, who must return many thousands a year; there he always bore a good character, as a very honest worthy young man.

Guilty Death .

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 16th January 1761.

Reference Number: t17610116-9

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE C ITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Friday the 16th, Saturday the 17th, and Monday the 19th of January.

In the first Year of His MAJESTY'S Reign. Being the Second SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honble Sir Matthew Blakiston , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

NUMBER II. PART II. for the Year 1761.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by J. SCOTT, at the Black-Swan, in Pater-noster Row.

M. DCC. LXI.

[Price FOUR-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.


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