Thomas Applegarth, Michael Soss, Alexander Manassah, Violent Theft > highway robbery, 16th January 1751.

Reference Number: t17510116-43
Offence: Violent Theft > highway robbery
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty; Not Guilty
Punishment: Death; Death

145. 146. 147. Thomas Applegarth and Michael Soss , were indicted, for that they in a certain alley, near the king's highway, on James Spurling , Esq ; did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, one gold watch, value 20 l. two gold seals value 30 s. one gold chain, value 40 s. the goods of the said James. And Alexander Manassah , for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen, Nov. 17 +

James Spurling . I cannot say I know the prisoners at the bar. On the night betwixt the 16th and 17th of Nov. I was going out of Mark-lane into Mincing-lane, to my own house; going into Star-alley , I met two men, and they proved to be what I feared (by their appearance) one of them I think was the evidence, there came two gentlemen out of the alley. I forgot my own safety, and when I was got about a yard into the alley; I turned back to see if they stop'd these two gentlemen, intending if they had so done, to call the watch; the two fellows met me body to body, one of them threatened me saying, if I spoke a word I was a dead man, he would blow my brains out if I moved an inch; I found my self in bad hands, so I turned back and set myself against the wall in the alley; the evidence placed himself on one side me, and the other person on the other, the evidence had a pistol and held it to my head, threatening as before mentioned. They took from me a gold watch, with a gold chain and seal to it, and I believe they took some silver, but I am not quite certain what I had in my pocket; the man on my right hand had his hand in my pocket about two minutes, he seem'd much concern'd and behav'd in so remarkable a manner, that the evidence took his pistol from my head, and levell'd it at his, and swore if he did not rifle me, he'd

blow his brains out; he left half a crown and a shilling in my pocket; the evidence put his hand in my other pocket, and his finger in my sob; but he was in some concern, for he left half a guinea there ; then they order'd me down the alley, and they ran down Mark-lane : by the behaviour of the other fellow, I did think he had some knowledge of me, from his reluctance to hurt me; for my part I do recollect his face very well, but I cannot tell where I have seen him, nor who he is. As to Applegarth, I saw nothing of him, I saw but two persons; Soss seems to be about the size of the other man, (that was present) but I will not swear to him; but he took great pains to hide his face from me, but the evidence did not. There was a lamp about a yard from my face, it shone in my face, I had not an opportunity of seeing them as they might me. I make no doubt of the evidence being one, by answering every question I ask'd him. Soss denied knowing any thing of the evidence, but afterwards confessed before the justice, he was in bed with him that same night.

Mr. Spurling. I am brother to the Prosecutor, I know nothing of it, but what came out at justice Fielding's. I attended at the examination of the two prisoners. Mr. Fielding ask'd the prisosoner Soss, whether he had any acquaintance with Brown the evidence; he absolutely denied having any before he was imprisoned with him, and mentioned this particular word, (before he turned buck or stag) which was interpreted an evidence. Mr. Fielding said, he had got this cant word very readily; there happened to be a person in company, who said he remembered him formerly being an evidence. Afterwards Soss confessed, that he lay that very night the robbery was committed, in bed with the evidence, and parted with him the next day at 8 o'clock; and also there was a woman lay in the same bed with them, but he confessed nothing of the robbery.

David Brown . The two prisoners and I went out with an intent to rob; coming along Fenchurch-street we stopped at the end of Mark-lane; we saw this gentleman coming up it; there is a little alley. We ran round and stopped him; we left Applegarth at the head of the alley. He said he would look out to see if any body came. Soss and I robbed the gentleman of a gold watch, two shillings and some halfpence; I attacked him, and Soss searched his pocket; he gave me the watch as soon as he had taken it: after we had robbed him, Thomas Applegarth came running down the lane after us; we went over Tower-hill ; then we went to their lodging on the other side the water. I lay on the fore side of the bed; he and his wife were in bed, and the watch too; then Michael Soss and I came over the water the next day, and sold the watch to Minous the Jew for 5 l. 15 s. 6 d. in Duke's-place, he gave me the money at the sign of the Angel there, there was one Scampy by at the same time, he deals in the same way.

Q. to the prosecutor. What do you value the watch at?

Prosecutor. The watch, seals, and chain all together stood me in 27 l.

Witness continues. After we sold the watch, we went on the other side the water to them again; they laid in a lodging house; we laid all together; I took the money of the Jew; Soss did not desire his share of the money, but as much as would buy him some cloat hs, which he had. Applegarth had a guinea and some silver.

Applegarth. I never had a farthing of the money.

Evidence continues. He went and fetched his wife's gown out of pawn.

William Marriot . I took Michael Soss by Shoreditch church, upon the evidence of this David Lloyd , otherwise David Brown, and he seemed to take on very much. I asked him, why he did not take on so before he committed this heinous crime? I took him to a public house on the other side the bridge, there he begged and said, he would not own any thing before he came to the justice; at last he owned he received some money for a watch of esquire Spurling's, which he had a hand in taking; and he said Applegarth stood to watch, when this watch was taken, and that his wife had it all night, and said it was sold to a Jew for 5 guineas and a half, and that David Brown had a pistol of him for half a crown a night to go a robbing. Thomas Applegarth was taken the same night, that is, the 27th of December; he said with a great oath, that he did not care for never a Stag, (in his way of talking.) saying he was never in any robbery, only these things which were lost in Fenchurch-street in November, and then he had none of the money. Soss wanted to be admitted an evidence before a magistrate.

N. B. The second part will be published on Friday next the 1st of February.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 16th January 1751.

Reference Number: t17510116-43

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commissions of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX,

HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY,

On Wednesday the 16th, Thursday the 17th, Friday the 18th, Saturday the 19th, and Monday the 21st of January.

In the 24th Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

BEING THE Second SESSIONS in the MAYORALTY of the

Right Honble Francis Cokayne , Esq; LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

PART II. of NUMBER II.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by M. COOPER, at the Globe in Pater-noster Row. 1751.

[Price Four-pence.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commissions of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.

Q. to David Brown .

DID this Minous lend you a pistol?

Brown. He ask'd me five shillings for it, and I left half a crown in his hands, and I brought it back again the next morning and delivered it to him, and told him it was good for nothing: he told me he would go and buy me shot and powder, because I was afraid to buy such things.

Hen. Peal. I was in a public house when Applegarth was brought in; the evidence Brown sat in a box; he said, he was not afraid of what could be done to him, for he was never concerned in but one robbery, and then he had none of the money.

Applegarth's defence, I know no more of the thing than the child unborn; the evidence thought me an unfortunate man, therefore he had me put into the information.

Soss's defence. The gentleman have sworn falsely against me, and that only for the sake of the reward.

Manassah's defence. I have nothing to say; but let him bring a person to prove I paid him the money for the watch.

Applegarth guilty Death , Soss guilty Death , Manassah, acq .

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 16th January 1751.

Reference Number: t17510116-43

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commissions of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX,

HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY,

On Wednesday the 16th, Thursday the 17th, Friday the 18th, Saturday the 19th, and Monday the 21st of January.

In the 24th Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

BEING THE Second SESSIONS in the MAYORALTY of the

Right Honble Francis Cokayne , Esq; LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

PART II. of NUMBER II.

LONDON:

Printed, and sold by M. COOPER, at the Globe in Pater-noster Row. 1751.

[Price Four-pence.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commissions of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery held for the City of London, &c.


View as XML