Charles Golding, Theft > burglary, 6th September 1738.

Reference Number: t17380906-8
Offence: Theft > burglary
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Death

9. Charles Golding , of Hampstead , was indicted for breaking and entering the Dwelling-House of Jane Maria Ward , about Twelve at Night, and stealing two Velvet Hoods, value 5 s. two Velvet Manteels, value 5 s. six silver Spoons, value 12 s. five Silver Tea Spoons, value 12 d. a Silver Tea-strainer, value 6 d. and two silver Salts, value 4 s . April 23 .

George Townshend . Mrs. Ward is my Sister; she lives at Hampstead , and I have an Apartment in her House. On the 23d of April, in the Night, I heard the Latch of the Door go up, so I got up about one o'Clock, and saw the Parlour Windows open. Upon which I cry'd out Thieves! And when the Neighbours came out, I went into the Hall with them, and we look'd over the House. All the Things mentioned in the Indictment were missing, and a Pane of Glass was taken out of a Casement in the Hall-Window, (I suppose) to lift up the Latch and get it open. I have nothing to say against the Prisoner: I only speak to the Robbery, with these Circumstances; and say the Goods lost were the Property of my Sister. I can't be sure as to the Condition of the House over Night, for we are in no great Fear of Thieves, because we keep Things of as little Value there as possible.

Job Trip . I think it was on the 24th of April the Prisoner's Brother's Wife came to my House, to offer these 3 Spoons in Pawn. I thought they were not honestly come by, so I examin'd her about them, she seem'd angry, and went and fetch'd her Husband, the Prisoner's Brother, who told me they were his own. I was not satisfied with this, but got from him - that he liv'd at Hampstead, and that his Name was George Ward , which prov'd to be a wrong Name. I went upon this to Hampstead, and enquir'd for him by that Name; telling the People he appeared to me to be a Painter By the Description I gave of him, I heard his Name was John Golding , and that he liv'd in such a Place. According to the Directions I had got, I went to his Uncle, and enquired if he had lost any Spoons? He told me he had not, but a Gentlewoman who liv'd higher upon the Hill had, and perhaps they might be her's. He went with me to Mrs. Ward's, I shew'd her the Spoons, and she own'd them, and asked me what sort of a Person brought them to me? I described the Man, and she said it was the Man that painted her House a little before The Uncle upon hearing this, begg'd she would be favourable, and he would endeavour to get the Things. Accordingly he brought the Prisoner and his Brother to her House, and the Prisoner took all the Blame upon himself, and said he broke open the House by himself. These 3 Spoons he gave me out of his own Pocket, and when I asked him for the Salts, he said he had carry'd them to his Brother's House, and the Brother run directly and fetch'd them by the Prisoner's Directions. There was a Velvet Hood likewise found in his Pocket, but as I could not be positive to that, I have not brought it.

Mr. Townshend. These Spoons and Salts I know to be my Sister's.

Prisoner. I met my Brother and Sister in London, he was fuddled, and my Sister desired me to take these Things for fear he should lose them. Guilty , Death .


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