Margaret Martell, Killing > murder, Theft > grand larceny, 7th July 1697.

Reference Number: t16970707-46
Offences: Killing > murder; Theft > grand larceny
Verdicts: Guilty
Punishments: Death

Margaret Martell , a French Woman, of the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted upon two Indictments; the first for Murthering Elizabeth Pullen , Wife of Paul Pullen , Esq ;, at the Pine Apple in Suffolk Street , on the 29th of June last, by giving her one Mortal Wound in the Throat with a Knife value 2 d. of the breadth of six Inches, and of the depth of four Inches, of which she instantly died . The Second was for Robbing Esquire Pullen of a Silver Tankard, 2 Silver Candlesticks, 4 Gold Rings, a Silver Porringer, 3 Spoons, 2 Gold Watches, 6 pair of Silver Buckles, with divers other Goods . The first Evidence was the Maid-servant, who said that her Mistress being at Dinner, and near dined, the Prisoner came and knockt at the Door, she being her Mistress's Acquaintance, let her in, and her Mistress askt her why she did not come sooner, whereupon she excused her self; then she brought the Meat and set it down, and she did eat, and gave her Two pence to buy a Pint of Ale, and a Pint of Beer and Ale, and after Dinner was over, she took away, and the Prisoner set down upon a Squab, and she observed that she had Slippers on, and she inquired the occasion of it, and she replied that she had skalded her Foot, and could not wear her Shooes; and as she sat, she saw a Paper lye upon the ground, with a Direction on it to Madam Webbs in Red Lyon Square on Holborn side, and that the Prisoner askt to let her Maid carry it, which she granted; then she went with the Letter, and was directed from thence to one Madam Tempests in Cooks-Court in Lincolns-Inn-Fields, in the mean time the Maid was gone, she compleated her Bloody Act; she being returned, the Prisoner told her that her Mistress was gone out, and had taken the Key with her, and would not be at home till Seven a Clock, and then they were to take a walk in the Park; then she took her Work and went up Stairs, and the Prisoner with her, and the Prisoner drew the Window-Curtains, and said she did not love so much Light; then she had her lay down her Work, and she would shew her a pleasant Trick; and said if she would sit down in the Chair, and take the Key in her hand, and shut her Eyes whilst she could tell Threescore, she should perceive the Person whom she loved; she tried, but could perceive nothing; then they went down into the Parlour, and the Prisoner gave her Half a Crown to fetch a Pot of Drink, which she did; then she sent her for some Brandy, pretending that she was not well; after that she said she would go into Leicester Fields and bespeak some Shooes; sometime after she was gone her Master came home and she told him that she could not let him into that Room, for her Mistress was gone out, and had taken the Key with her; with that he went to bed about 10 at Night; the Prisoner came again, and askt if her Mistress was come in, and gave her a Halfpenny to fetch a Candle, and bad her light it, and she staid till near Eleven, and told her she wanted a pair of Buckles of her Mistress's to trim her Stays; then the Maid desired her to lie down upon the Bed till her Mistress came, and as the lay down, she spied some Drops of Blood upon her Petticoat, and the askt her how that happened, she gave her no answer, but smiled upon her; she carried a little while, and said, Your Mistress wo'nt come home to Night, I will call in the Morning; and went her ways. About Twelve the Maid went up to her Master, and told him that her Mistress was not come in, and was afraid some People might hurt her; and she said she would go and see for her, which she did, but could not find her, but one of the Neighbours coming home with her, askt her if she had ever a Key that would open that Door, and she told her yes, the Key of the Larder, and went and fetcht it, and opened the Door. and when they came in, the Window-Shutters were shut, and it was all in darkness; and opening the Shutters, found a great deal of Blood, and the print of a Slipper in the Blood; and they sent for a Constable, and broke open the Closet door, where they found the Gentlewoman with her Throat cut, lying in that Condition, and the Goods taken away: The Maid declared that no body was there but the French Woman, who some time after was apprehended in Rupert Street; and in her Lodging, in a Trunk, they found most of the Goods, and one of the Slippers that was bloody; she said, when taken, that the Gentlewoman gave them her; but upon her Trial she said that two Men came in, and one went into the Inner Parlour to the Gentlewoman, and the other held a Pistol to her Breast, and bad her that she should not say any thing till the next day, and gave her the things. Then she altered her Story, and said that the Lady gave them to her to pay her Debts, for she was minded to leave the House over to her, and she and her Maid would become Boarders there; as for her Slippers, she said she went to Market, and might step in some Blood; and as for her Petticoat, it might be bloody with Meat; and she said that she was innocent of the Murther. The Trial lasted near Four hours, and she had a party-Jury of half English, and half Frenchmen, who having considered the matter, found her guilty of wilful Murther; and likewise of the Robbery.

[Death. See summary.]


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